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52nd Ann Arbor Film Festival Program

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Publisher
Ann Arbor Film Festival
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Rights Held By
Ann Arbor Film Festival
OCR Text

52
nd
Ann Arbor Film Festival
Proud to partner
with the A AFF —
connecting our
students with
ground breaking
experimental film.

THE

BESTFILMS

The Stamps School—

FROM
THE WORLD’S BEST FESTIVALS

shaping a new generation
of multi-disciplinary
collaborators, global citizens,
and creative innovators.

JUNE 4-8, 2014
DETROIT • ANN ARBOR

Stay tuned to cinetopiafestival.org for details.

Mich_theater_AAFF 2014_full color_w bleed_Cinetopia_FINAL.indd 1

1/24/2014 12:56:33 PM

Overview

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

ANN ARBOR
F I L M F E S T I VA L
MARCH 25–30
2014

OVERVIEW

PROGRAMS

2 Calendar of Events

21 Tuesday

4 Letter from the Executive Director

24 Wednesday

5 Award Jurors

37 Thursday

6 Filmmaker Awards

47 Friday

8 Award Donors & Members

60 Saturday

9 Staff, Volunteers & Acknowledgements

77 Sunday

11 Beyond the Fest

85 Awarded Film Programs

12 DVD Collections
13 Silent Auction
14 Partners & Sponsors

RESOURCES

15 Gallery Exhibition

86 From our Sponsors

16 Theater Installations

116 Print Sources

18 Workshops & Presentations

119 Filmmaker Index
120 Map

FRONT COVER PHOTOGRAPH AND BACK COVER DETAIL Arthur Siegel, 1942.

“Hanna Furnaces of the Great Lake Steel Corporation, Detroit, Mich.” Courtesy
of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security
Administration – Office of War Information Collection.
1

Overview

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
T U E S D AY
MARCH 25

W E D N E S D AY
MARCH 26

T H U R S D AY
MARCH 27

2pm | FREE
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

10am | FREE
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

10am | FREE
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

6–8pm
Opening Night Reception
Mich Theater Grand Foyer

12:30pm | FREE
Steve Anker: Big As Life
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

12:30pm | FREE
Hope Tucker:The Obituary Project
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room

3pm
Music Videos in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

3pm
Thom Andersen:
Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room

8:15pm
Opening Night Screening
Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
Sava’s
10pm–2am | FREE

4:30pm
Gradual Speed
screening with White Ash
Films in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
7pm
Joseph Bernard: Super 8 Films
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
7:15pm
Films in Competition 1
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:15pm
Thom Andersen: Films 1964–2014
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Out Night
Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
SH\aut\ & \aut\BAR
11pm–2am | FREE

2

5:10pm | FREE
Penny W. Stamps
Presents Penelope Spheeris
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
6:45pm
Manakamana
Filmmakers in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
7:15pm
Films in Competition 2
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:30pm
Penelope Spheeris: Films 1968–1998
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Films in Competition 3
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
The Ravens Club
11pm–2am | FREE

F R I D AY
MARCH 28

S AT U R D AY
MARCH 29

S U N D AY
MARCH 30

10am | FREE
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

10am | FREE
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

10am
Expanding Frames:
Workshops & Presentations
Space 2435, North Quad

12:30pm | FREE
Jeremy Rigsby: Archaic Beasts,
God’s Asshole and Other Ideas
of the Previous Century
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room

11am | $5 Tickets
Films in Competition 5 (Ages 6+)
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

11am
It for Others
screening with
Statues Also Die
Film in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room

3pm | FREE
From Gulf to Gulf to Gulf
Artists in Attendance
Feature in Competition
UMMA Helmut Stern Auditorium
4pm
Thom Andersen: Red Hollywood
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
5pm
Penelope Spheeris:
The Decline of Western Civilization
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
7pm
A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
7:15pm
Films in Competition 4
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:15pm
Penelope Spheeris:
The Decline of Western
Civilization Part III
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Animated Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
11pm | $5 (FREE with 52 AAFF pass)
Lichens
Live Performance
Performance Network Theatre

11am
Films in Competition 6
Mich Theater Screening Room
12:30pm
Thom Andersen:
Los Angeles Plays Itself
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
1pm
Films in Competition 7
Mich Theater Screening Room
3pm
Films in Competition 8
Mich Theater Screening Room

12pm
Thom Andersen:
Reconversão
Filmmaker in Attendance
Mich Theater Screening Room
1pm
Films in Competition 11
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
2pm | FREE
The Forgotten Space
UMMA Helmut Stern Auditorium

5pm
From Deep
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

3pm
Purgatorio
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

5pm
The Absent Stone (La Piedra Ausente)
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room

3pm
Films in Competition 12
Mich Theater Screening Room

7pm
Touch 觸摸
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
7:15pm
Films in Competition 9
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:15pm
Costa da Morte
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Films in Competition 10
Main Auditorium

12am | $7 Tickets
Midnight Movie: Suburbia
State Theatre

12am | $7 Tickets
Midnight Movie: Suburbia
State Theatre

Afterparty
The Bar at 327 Braun Court
11pm–2am | FREE

Afterparty
LIVE Nightclub
11pm–2am | FREE with
52 AAFF pass or ticket
3

6pm
Award Program 1
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
8:15pm
Award Program 2
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
Alley Bar
10pm–2am | FREE

Overview

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
It is a great honor to welcome you to the 52nd Ann Arbor Film Festival. From intern to
advisory board, screening committee to special projects coordinator, having shown work
and won awards, brought my students, performed on the main stage and programmed
screenings, I have worn many hats for the Festival over the past two decades. I am now
positively elated to be leading the Festival as the new Executive Director.

And while we may carry the means by which to
view moving pictures in our pockets, we are here
reminded of the value of this communal setting and
this monumental scale. We are grateful to the Michigan Theater for assisting us in delivering the Festival
to you because it is here that the work can realize its
fullest impact. Thank you for lending your amazing
facility, crew, expertise and care.
Huge thanks to the artists, whose work motivates
and inspires us to sustain a space in which to share
it. I extend a special thank you to David Dinnell for
going above and beyond in upholding the integrity
of the Festival and to Ellie White, who joined us in
September, for her hard work and dedication. Endless
gratitude to the volunteers, members, donors, sponsors and partners whose tremendous support makes
this all possible.
It is our honor to assemble our local community
of fi lm lovers alongside the many who travel far and
wide to join us here in Ann Arbor. Together let us ride
the wave of new cinematic visions as the energy of
spring commences.

For over a half-century, people have gathered as winter wanes in Ann Arbor for the best in extraordinary
cinematic expression. We are thrilled to carry forward
this enduring tradition. The Festival serves the deep
human need for aesthetic experience unbound by
commercial interests. It reminds us of our humanity
in a setting that connects us to each other.
Being human unites us, but variations and nuances
of the human condition make life compelling. The
Festival is a champion of personal expression. It
exists because the visions of diverse individuals offer
new and unique observations of the world. We hope
the work will transport you to unfamiliar places and
expand your notions about life or about yourself.
The artistic process requires giving of oneself
without certainty of the outcome. Trust in the process
brings results. We eagerly embark on a new collaborative process to bring the Festival in closer connection
with its art school origin. There is a poetry in the
Return, just as the seasons cycle. And so this season
marks a new return to the Stamps School of Art &
Design at the University of Michigan. Thank for your
enthusiasm in embracing us as your partner.

—Leslie Raymond, Executive Director

TO OUR SPECIAL PARTNERS, THANK YOU FOR EVERYTHING YOU DO FOR AND WITH US:

4

Overview

AWA R D J U R O R S

STEVE ANKER

HOPE TUCKER

JEREMY RIGSBY

Steve Anker, dean of the CalArts
School of Film/Video (2002–2014),
formerly began the exhibition
series and served as program
director for the Boston Film/Video
Foundation (1977–1980), artistic
director of the San Francisco
Cinematheque (1982-2002), and
since 2003 has been co-curator
of FILM AT REDCAT (LA). Anker
has curated series or programs for
The Museum of Modern Art (NYC),
Pacific Film Archive (Berkeley),
London International Film Festival,
Los Angeles Country Museum
of Art, Sharjah Art Biennial, and
several other major festivals and
museums. Anker curated or co-curated three major series, Austrian
Avant-Garde, 1955–1993, Big As Life,
and Radical Light, each of which
had an accompanying catalogue.
Anker’s writings appeared in the
above catalogues, and for several
periodicals, including Incite, Film
Comment, Film Quarterly, and the
Soho Weekly News, plus he helped
begin and co-edited Idiolects.
Anker has taught in several major
film and video programs, including
Massachusetts College of Art, San
Francisco Art Institute, Bard College,
and San Francisco State University,
in addition to CalArts.

Hope Tucker transforms what we
know as a daily form of narrative
through The Obituary Project, a
compendium of contemporary salvage ethnography that documents
the passing of cultural markers and
ways of being. She has animated
cyanotypes of American downwinders; recorded mobile phone footage
of the last public phone booths
in Finland; retraced the path of
protest that closed the only nuclear
power plant in Austria; and written
the text of a video out of paper clips,
a Norwegian symbol of nonviolent
resistance. Screenings and exhibitions include the 21er Haus, Vienna;
ar/ge kunst Galeria Museo, Bolzano;
Gene Siskel Film Center, Chicago;
International Film Festival Rotterdam; New York Film Festival’s
Views from the Avant-Garde; Punto
de Vista, Festival Internacional de
Cine Documental de Navarra; Vox
Populi Gallery, Philadelphia; Zagreb
Dox; and the 40th, 41st, 50th, and
51st Ann Arbor Film Festivals.

Jeremy Rigsby was Program Director of the Media City Film Festival in
Windsor, Canada from 1997–2004,
and again (with Oona Mosna) from
2007 to present. In 2005–06 he
was Artistic Director of the Images
Festival in Toronto. He has curated
programs for numerous venues
worldwide including the International Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen,
the Hong Kong Cinematheque, the
Espacio Fundación Telefónica
(Buenos Aires) and the Independent Film and Videomakers Forum
(Seoul). He has previously served
on the Competition Jury for festivals
including the Jeonju International
Film Festival, VideoEx (Zürich) and
the International Film Festival Rotterdam. His writing and interviews
on artists' film have appeared in
CinemaScope, Take One, Film 2.0
and other publications.

Free Presentation
Wednesday 12:30pm
See page 26 for details

Free Presentation
Thursday 12:30pm
See page 38 for details

Free Presentation
Friday 12:30pm
See page 48 for details

5

Overview

F I L M M A K E R AWA R D S
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is committed to providing direct support to filmmakers.
Our 2014 awards competition presents over $19,000 to filmmakers through cash
and film stock/processing. Winning an award at the AAFF means not only prestige
and financial support, but can also qualify filmmakers for Oscar®-nomination by the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in the short film category (qualifying
awards: Best of Festival, Best Experimental Film, Best Animation, Best Narrative).

Ken Burns Award for Best of the Festival $3,000

Gil Omenn Art & Science Award $1000

Presented to the film of any genre or length that best
represents the artistic standards of excellence for the
Festival. This award is generously provided by influential
documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, a graduate of Ann
Arbor’s Pioneer High School.

This award honors the filmmaker whose work best
uses the art form of film and video to explore scientific
concepts, research natural phenomena or embrace real
world experimentation. Provided by Gil Omenn who
seeks to encourage a positive exchange between the
arts and sciences.

Lawrence Kasdan Award
for Best Narrative Film $1,000

Peter Wilde Award for Most
Technically Innovative Film $500

The narrative film that best makes use of film’s unique
ability to convey striking and original stories will receive
this award distinction. A notable Hollywood filmmaker, Lawrence Kasdan got his start in Ann Arbor at the
University of Michigan and continues his connection
through support of this Festival award.

The film which displays the most pioneering, cutting-edge technical innovations will receive this award.
Peter Wilde was a long-time projectionist for the Festival
and master of special effects. This award honors his
creativity and pursuit of new techniques.

Chris Frayne Award for Best Animated Film $1,000

\aut\FILM Award for Best LGBTQ Film $500

Recognizing the animated film that delivers the best
style, creativity, and content. This award is given in
honor of the spirit of Chris Frayne, a key participant
in the Festival’s early years, whose approach to life was
reminiscent of his colorful cartoon characters. Special
thanks to Ann Arbor’s colorful Quack!Media for lead
support of this award.

This award honors the film that best addresses and gives
voice to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender or Queer
(LGBTQ) issues. The \aut\BAR of Ann Arbor contributes
this award to promote a diversity of voices that achieve
excellence in filmmaking.

Leon Speakers Award for Best Sound Design $500
Given for excellence and originality in sound design;
this award is provided by Leon Speakers, custom building high-fidelity home theater speakers in Ann Arbor
since 1995.

The Barbara Aronofsky Latham Award for Emerging
Experimental Video Artist $1,000
This award provides support to the most promising video artist at the inception of her/his career. Distributed
by the Video Data Bank, the award was conceived by the
Aronofsky family to honor the late Barbara Aronofsky
Latham, a Chicago-based experimental video artist who
passed away in 1984.

Audience Award $500
Awarded to the highest-rated audience selected film
in competition at this year’s Festival.

Gus Van Sant Award for
Best Experimental Film $1,000

Prix DeVarti for Funniest Film $1,000
Awarded to the film likely to create the most laughs in
the Festival. This prize honors the 52-year friendship between Dominick’s pub and the Ann Arbor Film Festival,
and honors the memory of Dominick and Alice DeVarti.
Supported by the D. Devarti Family Trust.

Honoring the film that most successfully showcases
the use of experimental processes, forms, and topics.
Acclaimed director Gus Van Sant supports this award,
as his early short experimental films won awards at the
Ann Arbor Film Festival in the 1980s.

6

A W A R D S A N N O U N C E M E N T Sunday, March 30 at 6pm
A W A R D S S C R E E N I N G S Sunday, March 30 at 6pm and 8:15pm
Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Michael Moore Award
for Best Documentary Film $1,000

The Eileen Maitland Award $500

The best non-fiction film of the Festival will receive this
award from documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, who
received inspiration from hundreds of films he viewed
over the years at the Ann Arbor Film Festival. Proceeds
from his film, Roger and Me, fund this annual award.

This award is given to the film that best addresses
women’s issues and gives voice to female voices. It was
created to honor of the spirit and memory of Eileen
Maitland who was a dear friend and long-time supporter of the Festival, as well as a patron and practitioner
of the arts.

Stan Brakhage Film at Wit’s End Award $1,000

Award for Best International Film $500

For a film artist whose work exemplifies the ideals
of the individual creating, through deep personal
necessity, a revealing and thought-provoking visual
expression of formal innovation and integrity.

Granted to the film produced outside of the United
States which most strongly wins over our Award Jury.
This award is provided by Tios Mexican Cafe, serving
Ann Arbor since 1986.

Award for Best Cinematography
$1350 processing, $500 B/W film stock

The No Violence Award $512
Provided to reward the film that best exemplifies themes
and images of peace, whether addressing the topic directly or simply turning the mind toward gentleness. No
depictions of weaponry or fighting, human or animal
suffering, or destructive activities. Provided by Ann
Arbor residents Matthew Graff and Leslie Lawther.

For the film that demonstrates the highest excellence
and creativity in cinematography. The recipient of
this award will receive film processing from Colorlab
($750), a full-service motion picture film laboratory
and telecine house; and Niagara Custom Lab ($600) the
only full-service lab in Canada running the new super 8
negative stocks; as well as film stock from ORWO North
America ($500).

Award for Best Music Video $300
Provided to recognize excellence in the art form of music
video, which serves as a unique collaborative relationship between musician and film/video maker. This award
is supported by Ann Arbor’s beloved and independently
owned Wazoo Records and Overture Audio.

Tom Berman Award for Most
Promising Filmmaker $1,000
This award is intended to support an emerging filmmaker that the Award Jury expects will make a significant
contribution to the art of film in the course of his/her
filmmaking career. This award is supported by the
Berman family in honor of the memory of Tom Berman,
who was a University of Michigan film student, an early
Festival supporter and close friend to many within the
Festival community.

Jury Awards $1,500
Remaining prize monies that are distributed at the
awards jurors’ discretion as special recognition for
films of distinction and artistic accomplishment.

George Manupelli Founder’s Spirit Award $500
Provided to the filmmaker that best captures the bold
and iconoclastic spirt of the founder of the Ann Arbor
Film Festival, George Manupelli, whose vision for the
Festival continues to this day. Supported by the D.
DeVarti Family Trust.

7

Overview

AWA R D D O N O R S
$3000

$500–$999

$250–$499

Ken Burns

\aut\ Bar
George Fisher & Kari Magill
The LaBour Foundation
for Non-Institutional Living
Leon Speakers
Matthew Graff & Leslie Lawther
Quack! Media
Susan Warner
Tios Mexican Café

Dan Gunning & Vicky Engel
Dennis Hayes
Lars Bjorn & Susan Wineberg
Myrna Jean Rugg & Rick Cronn
Piotr Michalowski & Deanna Relyea

$1,000–$1,500
Anonymous
D. DeVarti Family Trust
Gus Van Sant
Lawrence & Meg Kasdan
Martha Darling & Gil Omenn
Michael Moore
Video Data Bank
& The Aronofsky Family

$100–$249
John Caldwell & Susan Kalinowski
Overture Audio
Wazoo Records

MEMBERS AND DONORS
$15,000–$20,000
Anonymous
Peter & Rita Heydon

$10,000–$14,999
Bruce Baker & Genie Wolfson

$5,000–$9,999
Cynthia Nicely
Ken Burns
Michael & Lesa Huget
Tom Bray & Jeri Hollister
Wendy Lawson

$2,500–$4,999
630 Club
Josh Pokempner

$1,000–$2,499
D. DeVarti Family Trust
Deborah Greer
Heidi Kumao & Michael Flynn
Martha Darling & Gil Omenn
Matthew Graff & Leslie Lawther
Ruth Bardenstein & Jim Roll
Russell Collins & Deb Polich
Susan Landauer
Vic Stretcher & Jeri Rosenberg

$500–$999
Alec & Judy Allen
Jill McDonough & Greg Merriman
Dr. John W. & Jackie Farah

The LaBour Foundation
for Non-Institutional Living
Lawrence and Meg Kasdan
Robert & Debbie Merion
Ron and Robin Sober

$250–$499
Barry Miller
Barbara Brown & Howard White
Dennis Carter
The Dwyer Family
Janet Kreger
John & Jennifer Baird
John & Patricia Carver
John Dryden & Diana Raimi
Jonathan Tyman
Nan Godwin
Nancy LaTendresse
Susan Dise
Vivek Palavali

$150–$249
Clark Charnetski
Cory Snavely
David Gilbertson
Deanna Morse
Deborah Koons-Garcia
Ellen & Hubert Cohen
Frank & Gail Beaver
Jack & Sharon Kalbfleisch
Joan Lowenstein
Joanna Courteau
Kostas Pappas
Leonard Pulinski
Marie Woo & Harvey Levine

Nancy Brucken
Dr. Peter R. Drescher Trust
Philip Hughes
Sacha Feirstein
Sean J. Kenny
Sheldon & Rita Stark
Thomas Chivens

$149 and below
Amanda Schott
Clifford Sheldon
David Sullivan
Ellen Rabinowitz
Ellen Spiller
Gary Bruder
Gregory Spaly
Jeffrey Reece
Jeffrey Scher
John Nelson
John & Susanne Stephenson
Judith Calhoun
Judith Schwartz
Kathy Bergman
Katrina Hagedorn
Kerry Laitala
Lars Bjorn & Susan Weinberg
Lyn Elliot
Relah Echstein
Robert LaJeunesse
Robert & Sharon Ongaro
Steve Anker
Ted Lyman
Tom Bartlett

MEMBERSHIP / SUPPORT
Experience all the Ann Arbor Film Festival has to offer by becoming an AAFF member!
For more information, visit our website aafilmfest.org
8

Overview

S TA F F, V O L U N T E E R S & A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S
Executive Director
Leslie Raymond

Lobby Decorations
Jeremy Harvey

Program Director
David Dinnell

Opening Night
Entertainment
Jeremy Wheeler

Operations Manager
Ellie White
Technical Director
R. Thomas Bray
Festival Coordinator
Maria Feldman
Filmmaker Liaison
Terrence Campagna
Festival Assistant
Hilary Young
Housing Coordinator
Myrna Jean Rugg
Juror Liaison
Elizabeth Hagen
Opening Night Reception
Food Coordinator
Paquetta A. Palmer
Graphic Design
Letterform
Silent Auction
Coordinator
Katie Westgate
Installation Coordinator
Jason Jay Stevens
Festival Photographer
Mark Gjukich Photography
Festival Videographer
Jonathan Tyman
52nd AAFF Trailers
David Dinnell
Gerald McKay
Jason Jay Stevens
Lori Felker
Mark Toscano
Potter-Belmar Labs
Ted Kennedy

Events Committee
Connie Crump
Courtney Hardebeck
Maria Feldman
Sacha Fierstein
Susan Landauer
Membership Committee
Barbara Brown
David DeVarti
David Olson
David Wolber

Afterparty Entertainment
Charles Trees
Dave Olson
Dustin Krcatovich
Justin Dykehouse
Martin Thoburn
Rolando Calip

Film Programming
Assistance
Julie Murray

Board of Directors
Bruce Baker (President)
Michael Huget
(Vice President)
Cynthia Nicely (Treasurer)
Matthew Graff (Secretary)
Constance Crump
Russ Collins
Susan Landauer
Ted Kennedy
Wendy Lawson

Festival Screening
Assistance
Maria Feldman
Screening Committee
Cory Snavely
David Gilbertson
Donald Harrison
Jen Proctor
Jim Dwyer
Kat Hagedorn
Patrick Wodzinski
Vanessa Sly Thoburn

Advisory Board
Barbara Hammer
Becca Keating
Carl Bogner
Deanna Morse
George Manupelli
Ken Burns
Lawrence Kasdan
Leighton Pierce
Michael Moore
Suzan Pitt

Screeners
Barbara Twist
Cory Snavely
David Gilbertson
Dawn Stronski
Donald Harrison
Esther Kirshenbaum
Fred Beldin
Hilary Young
Jim Dwyer
Jon Moodie
Kat Hagedorn
Katie Westgate
Kaylan Mitchell
Leslie Armell
Lisa Nichols
Lloyd Goldsmith
Maria Feldman
Mark Gjukich
Robin Sober
Ron Sober
Vanessa Sly Thoburn

Education Advisory Board
Bryan Konefsky
Chris McNamara
James Snazell
Jen Proctor
Scott Northrup
Terri Sarris
Education Program
Coordinators
Akiva Gottlieb
James Snazell

9

Interns
Lauren Iverson
Dave Mullen-Muhr
Josh Sperling
Michigan Theater
Projection & Stage Staff
Dan Bruell
Dan Morey
Frank Uhle
J Scott Clarke
Jim Pyke
Rick Berthelot
Scott McWhinney
Walter Bishop
Technical Assistants
Patrick Wodzinski
Mark Murrell
Projection Assistants
Isaac Sherman
Jacob Barreras
Nazli Dincel
Super 8mm Projection
Daïchi Saïto
Screening Room 16mm
Projection System
James Bond,
Full Aperture Systems
Catalog Printing
The Prolific Group under the
supervision of Chris Young
Granting Agencies
and Organizations
The Academy of Motion
Picture Arts & Sciences
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts
The Michigan Council for
Arts and Cultural Affairs
The National Endowment
for the Arts
After Party Venues
\aut\BAR
Alley Bar
The Bar at 327
Braun Court
LIVE Nightclub
The Ravens Club
Sava’s

Overview

S TA F F, V O L U N T E E R S & A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S
Opening Night Catering
\aut\BAR
The Brinery
Café Zola
Cherry Republic
eat catering & chef services
Flat Out Bread Co.
Jerusalem Garden
The Lunch Room
Morgan & York
Old Town
Paquetta A. Palmer
People’s Food Co-Op
The Ravens Club
Sava’s
Silvio’s Organic Pizza
Tantre Farm
Tracklements Smokery
Opening Night Drinks
Arbor Brewing Company
Mighty Good Coffee
The Ravens Club
Sazerac Company
Terra Blanca Wine,
courtesy of Eagle Eye Distributers
TeaHaus

Sneak Preview Caterers
Frita Batidos
TeaHaus
Filmmakers’ Dinner
Casa Dominick’s
In-Kind Partners
Adams Street Publishing/Current
Arbor Brewing Co.
Barry Bagels
Castles in the Air
The Crofoot
Detroit Public TV
Digital Media Commons
Dunning Toyota
Eagle Eye Distributors
Flutter and Wow Museum Projects
Jerusalem Garden
Katherine's Catering
Letterform
Mark Gjukich Photography
Marriott Residence Inn
Media Lingua
Metro Times
Michigan Radio WUOM 91.7
Michigan Theater

Mighty Good Coffee
Performance Network Theatre
The Ravens Club
Roos Roast
RingSide Creative
Sava’s
Sazerac Company
TeaHaus
U of M Stamps Speaker Series
U of M Witt Residency
VGKids
Weber’s Inn
WQKL Ann Arbor’s 107one
Yelp
Zingerman’s

Extra Thank Yous: Maria Feldman, Myrna Jean Rugg & Rick Cronn, Ruth Bardenstein, Julie Murray, Jason Jay Stevens,
Lalena Stevens, Marie Woo & Harvey Levine, Barbara Brown & Howard White, Annie White, Heidi Kumao, Deborah
Greer, David DeVarti, Donald Harrison, Christy LeMaster, Terri Sarris, Chris McNamara, David Wolber, Ron and Robin
Sober, Jill McDonough, Jen Proctor, Trenton Corp.; Tom Bartlett, Jonathan Tyman, Jennifer Tysse & Ian Levine, Lars
Bjorn & Susan Wineberg, Markus Nornes (UM Screen Arts & Cultures); Gunalan Nadarajan (Penny W. Stamps School
of Art & Design); Chrisstina Hamilton (Penny Stamps Speaker Series and Witt Visiting Artist Program); Mark Nielsen
(UM Work Gallery); Rich DeVarti (Casa Dominick’s); Len Coombs (Bentley Historical Library at UM); Amanda Krugliak,
Professor Sidonie Smith (UM Institute for the Humanities); Gregory Tom (Eastern Michigan University); Russ Collins,
the staff and management at the Michigan Theater; IATSE Local 395; Ruth Slavin, Lisa Borgsdorf, (UMMA); Eric Farrell (The Bar at 327 Braun Court); Keith Orr, Martin Contreras (\aut\BAR); Amy Cantú, Andrew Sullivan, Eli Neurberger
(Ann Arbor District Library).
Mark Toscano (Academy Film Archive); Greg Baise (Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit); Ralph McKay (Sixpack Film
Americas); Mark McElhatten (Views from the Avant Garde, NYFF); Andréa Picard (Wavelengths, TIFF); Agnieszka Koperniak, Anna D˛abrowska (New Horizons International Film Festival); Mary Scherer, Abina Manning (Video Data Bank);
Jeremy Rigsby, Oona Mosna (Media City); Srimoyee Mitra (Art Gallery of Windsor); Ralf Sausmikat (European Media Art
Festival); Mads Mikkelsen (CPH:DOX); Aimée Mitchell (Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Center); Tessa Janssen, Marta
Jurkiewicz (EYE Film Netherlands); Colin Beckett, Vassily Bourikas, Rachael Rakes, Brett Story, and Genevieve Yue.

10

Overview

BEYOND THE FEST

The 52nd Ann Arbor Film Festival Traveling Tour visited more than a dozen cities in
the United States and abroad with award-winning and select short films from the 2013
Festival. All filmmakers participating in the tour receive income for each screening of
their work, providing direct support to independent artists. To learn more about the
AAFF Traveling Tour please visit: aafilmfest.org/tour

Northfield, MN

Philadelphia, PA

Claremont, CA

Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Oct 4, 2013

Pittsburgh, PA

St. Olaf College
Jan 21 & 22, 2014

University of the Arts
Feb 11, 2014

Pitzer College
Mar 10 & 11, 2014

Grosse Pointe, MI

Hamilton, NY

Detroit, MI

Chicago, IL

Colgate University
Jan 28, 2014

Mothlight Microcinema
Trinosophes
Feb 21, 2014

Columbia College
Chicago
Mar 12, 2014

Durham, NC

Amherst, MA

Duke University
Feb 26, 2014

Hampshire College
Apr 7, 2014

Grosse Pointe
Public Library
Oct 24, 2013

Providence, RI
Rhode Island
School of Design
Nov 9, 2013

Los Angeles, CA
Los Angeles Film Forum
Dec 15, 2013
& Jan 5, 2014

Milwaukee, WI
Union Theater
Jan 28 & Feb 18, 2014

Lancashire,
United Kingdom

Ann Arbor, MI

Bloomington, IN

Edge Hill University
Feb 5, 2014

University of Michigan
Screen Arts & Culture
Mar 11, 2014

Indiana University
May 2, 2014

Houston, TX
Rice University
Feb 7 & 8, 2014

11

Overview

DVD COLLECTIONS
Volumes 1–6 are on sale at the merchandise table in the Michigan Theater
lobby during the festival and available on our website: store.aafilmfest.org

Volume 5
50th Ann Arbor Film Festival – 2012

Volume 6
51st Ann Arbor Film Festival – 2013

Includes films by Hope Tucker, Ben Russell, Jillian Mayer & Lucas Leyva, Stephen Irwin, Hayoun Kwon, Sylvia
Schedelbauer, Minna Parkinnen, Jonathan Schwartz,
Suzan Pitt, James Sansing, Laura Heit and Jennifer
Reeves. (NTSC DVD Region 0, 97 min)

Includes films by Mark Toscano, Matt Wolf, Karen Yasinsky, Alexandra Cuesta, Anna Marziano, Shambhavi Kaul,
Joshua Gen Solondz, James Lowne and Naoko Tasaka.
(NTSC DVD Region 0, 99 min)
Volumes 5 & 6 are brand new, featuring screen-printed cases
from our friends at VGKids.

Volumes 1–4

12

Overview

SILENT AUCTION
The Ann Arbor Film Festival Silent Auction is back again by popular demand and takes
place upstairs at the Michigan Theater March 25th through March 30th. Our auction
offers a tremendous range of items from artists and local businesses. All winning bids
support the AAFF, a mission-driven non-profit organization. We would like to thank
our generous donors for this year’s auction.

THE 52ND AAFF SILENT AUCTION DONORS INCLUDE:
almapottery

Helen Gotlib

Panache Home

Arsenal Handicraft

Gregory Holm

Pete Deevakul

boundedition

Itibere Silveira

Radius Garden

Ben Saginaw

Janelle Songer Ceramics

Robin Sober

Cara Rosaen

Jim Schulz

Ruth Bradstreet

Chain Chain Chained

John Sauve

Sarah Lapinski

Colin Dodge 

Juicy Kitchen

SEE Eyewear

Core Therapeutic Massage
and Bodywork

Katie Westgate

Selo Shevel Gallery

Cristin Richard
Dang Argyle
Darcy Bowden
Elevated Press
Everyday Wines
FOUND Gallery
Heavenly Metal

Leila Neves

Seva Restaurant

The Library Lab

Shannon LeMasters

Mary Callum

Sloe Gin Fizz

Megan Trudeau

Susan Westgate

The Michigan Theater

Sweet Heather Anne

Monica Hofstadter

Victoria Granzow

The Moontower

Yana Benjamin Photography

Pacific Rim

Zack Horwitz 

Please visit the auction and bid on items to help support the AAFF.

13

PA R T NERS & F O UN DATI O N A L SU P P O R T

S P O NS O RS
KEY SPONSORS

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

CORE SPONSORS

R

14

Overview

GALLERY EXHIBITION
March 19–April 5 | Work Gallery | 306 South State Street

The Movement of People Working
Phill Niblock
The Movement of People Working features over 20 hours
of 16mm films Phill Niblock shot from 1973–1991 in the
Arctic, Hong Kong, Japan, China, Indonesia, Hungary,
Peru, Portugal, Lesotho, Romania, and Mexico. These
films focus on the rhythm and bodily movements of
manual laborers within the frame, outside of sociological and anthropological concerns. Multiple video projections of these films are set to many hours of Niblock’s
minimal, microtonal compositions he composed and
recorded from the early 1970s through 2012.

Phill Niblock (b.1933) a New York-based composer and
multi-media musician internationally recognized for his
minimalist compositions. He is the director of Experimental
Intermedia, a foundation for avant-garde music based in
New York with a parallel branch in Ghent, Belgium.
Niblock has been based in New York since 1958, initially
working as a photographer and filmmaker. His first musical compositions date from 1968.

OPENING RECEPTION at the Work Gallery from 6–8pm,

PRESENTED WITH Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit and

Wednesday, March 19th with Phill Niblock in attendance.

the Roman J. Witt Residency Program, Penny W. Stamps School
of Art & Design

LIVE CONCERT PERFORMANCE with Niblock on Thursday,
WITH SUPPORT FROM The Andy Warhol Foundation

March 20th at Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

for the Visual Arts

15

Overview

T H E AT E R I N S TA L L AT I O N S
For the duration of the festival these works will be on display in the Michigan Theater.

1

2

The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti (circa 1990)
By George Manupelli
12” x 12” x 12”
3 dimensional mixed media assemblage
On loan from the Matrix Collection

4

What We Saw (2014)
By Everybody
Dimensions variable
Paper, pencils, digital media player, projector

George Manupelli, a pioneer in experimental film since
1955, has exhibited and won awards internationally
including the 1964 Venice and 1965 Sao Paulo Biennials.
Manupelli founded the Ann Arbor Film Festival in 1963
and directed it for 17 years. George was born in Boston’s
North End in 1931 into a struggling and oppressed Italian
immigrant community. George must have experienced
the visceral anger of the arrest and state frame up of two
members of that community for murder and robbery,
Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Vocal and active
anarchists Sacco and Vanzetti were sent to the electric
chair in 1927 for their political beliefs and nothing else.
Several early AAFF posters included images of Sacco
and Vanzetti. 1

An experimental remix documentary by everyone who
wants to participate, to be created and projected in the
theater lobby during Festival week. Cards are provided
for you to write what you saw. Leave them in a box
in the lobby to be photographed and uploaded into
a rotating slide presentation called What We Saw, an
experimental remix documentary by Everyone, with
daily updates to the slideshow.

Butterfield 9: Ann Arbor CineMemories (2014)
By Mike Mosher
8.5’ x 4.5’
Acrylic on naugahyde

This artwork subjectively assembles nine remembered
film experiences, with imagery derived from movies
viewed at different moments in the artist’s boyhood and
adolescence in Ann Arbor 1960-1973. These include “101
Monologue (2013)
Dalmatians”, “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World”, “What
By Hanna M. Owens
Did You Do in the War, Daddy?” and “Dear Brigitte” (in
5 minute loop
the Michigan Theater), along with others “Thunderball”
Digital video
Deliver a monologue on stage as a woman, a radical fem- and “Help” (State Theater), “Mask of Fu Manchu” (in the
Fifth Forum), “Gimme Shelter” (the Campus Theater)
inist act. Perform an endurance monologue (a dialogue
with the self), the same thing as exercise. In endurance, and “Earthquake” (Maple Village).
Mike Mosher, Ann Arbor Pioneer ‘73, is Professor, Art/
the inner exchange echoes the vessel. The vessel exhausts itself yet the dialogue continues. Body goes mind Communication Digital Media at Saginaw Valley State University, about ninety minutes north of here. He exhibited
goes, body stops mind goes. What can the body really
“Beyond Ken Burns” and “The Gaze” installations in the
do? What does it really do? This is how many jumping
Michigan Theater restrooms at the 46th Ann Arbor Film
jacks I can do before breaking.
Festival, 2008.
Hanna M. Owens is a feminist artist and writer from
Baltimore working primarily in video and performance.
She currently lives in Chicago. 2

16

5

3

5

6

Vario Vortex Vinyl View (variable)
By Gary Schwartz
16” x 14” x 8”
Vinyl LP’s, recycled turntable, paper, wood,
ephemera, light stand, strobe.
Going nowhere fast. The Zoetrope, or “Wheel of Life”,
a 19th century philosophical/optical toy re-introduces
21st century viewers to concepts of cycles, rhythms &
metamorphic transformation inherent in our psyche.
Gary Schwartz is an Academy Award nominated
filmmaker, award winning animator, director, artist
and educator conducting intensive hands on animation
workshops internationally through his company Single
Frame Films. 3

Space Is The Place (2014)
By Jeremy Harvey
20’
Mixed media
A massive monochromatic mobile of starkly contrasting
amorphic shapes that dangle from the ceiling from long
thin lines.
Jeremy Harvey is a 42 year old artist from Oak Park.
He’s mainly known for his mural work with his two companies inFUSE Murals and Castles In Air. 4

/don’t_let_us_get_s.ick (2014)
By Evan Meaney
Dimensions variable
Mixed media architectures, live reprojection
A passive installation asking users to sing to it. Sound
activates the image, forming a bump-mapped, spectral
reflection; waning in and out, propagated by the secrets
and shanties offered to its inputs. Named for one of
Warren Zevon’s last songs, this program anticipates
the moments of silence we carry in our voice.
Evan Meaney is an American-born filmmaker and new
media artist. Currently, Evan is a member of the Media
Arts faculty at the University of South Carolina. 5

Congratulations (One Step at a Time) (2014)
By Roger Beebe
60 minute loop
Digital video
Notes on gender in the 21st Century. A sad sequel
to “You’ve come a long way, baby!”
Roger Beebe’s films and videos have screened on 6
continents at such places as the CBS Jumbotron in Times
Square and McMurdo Station in Antarctica. In addition to
his work as a filmmaker, he is also a curator: he ran Flicker, a festival of small-gauge film in Chapel Hill, NC, from
1998-2000 and FLEX: the Florida Experimental Film/
Video Festival from 2004–2014. He currently teaches in
the Department of Art at Ohio State. 6

17

Overview

E X PA N D I N G F R A M E S :
A A F F W O R K S H O P S & P R E S E N TAT I O N S
Space 2435 | North Quad | 105 South State Street, Ann Arbor

Tuesday
2–4pm

Wednesday
10am–12pm

Thursday
10am–12pm

Expanding Frames Introduction
and Orientation
Leslie Raymond and James Snazell

Identity, Creativity and Wellbeing:
The Role of the Arts Festival in
Engaging Communities
Owen Evans and Tristi Brownett
Drawing on research and interviews
with festival organizers and participants, this presentation will explore
the potential role arts festivals such
as the AAFF can play in engaging
different types of communities in a
variety of ways. We will concentrate
in particular on how festivals might
develop cultural and social capital
and wellbeing, evidence of which
is increasingly demanded by arts
funders in the United Kingdom.
Tristi Brownett works in Occupational and Public Health and as
sessional lecturer at Canterbury
Christ Church University (UK).
Owen Evans is Professor of Film
at Edge Hill University (UK).

Making is a Form of Thinking
Sasha Waters Freyer
This talk posits Art as a methodology to acquire and expand human
knowledge. We invite film lovers,
students, and curious members
of the public to view three short
films framed by research inquiries
– questions posed but not necessarily answered. Eschewing anecdotal
information about the artists and
their training, our goal is to stimulate
the intelligence of the audience and
invite their feedback. With works
by Jennifer Chan, Tova Mozard and
Bahar Behbahani.
Sasha Waters Freyer makes films,
videos, photographs, pillows, dresses
and curtains. She is the Chair of the
Department of Photography and Film
at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Conversations
James Snazell
A number of three-to-five person
collectives will be created. Each
collective will function as a mini
discussion group to engage the
work being screened at the Festival.
Topics, themes and other content
discussed by each collective, as well
as discussion duration, will be determined by each group.
James Snazell is an experimental
filmmaker and lecturer based in Manchester and teaches animation and
visual effects at Edge Hill University
in the UK.

Show & Tell : Shooting Gear
Chris McNamara, moderator;
AAFF visiting guests TBA
Film and video artist Chris McNamara
teaches courses in New Media production in the Department of Screen Arts &
Cultures at the University of Michigan.

Convergent Media Activism
through Projection
Joseph Lopez
When teaching is merged with
community service and activism,
transformational experiences for
all participants can take place.
The Convergent Media Collective
engages in reciprocal learning and
mentoring experiences where the
collective learns from each other as
well as from their clients. This talk
includes real world examples of how
to engage your community through
projection and other “new media”
technologies.
Joseph Lopez is a professor at the
University of the Incarnate Word. He
is also founder and member of the
Convergent Media Collective.

PRESENTING PARTNER
OF EXPANDING FRAMES
THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN

18

Ask the Programmer
David Dinnell
An open discussion and Q&A about
the Festival and programming with
Ann Arbor Film Festival Program
Director David Dinnell.

The AAFF has been host to many educational activities, both formal and
informal, over the years. Expanding Frames provides a framework for
containing and formalizing these initiatives. The program aims to foster a
deeper understanding of the work being exhibited at the festival, and to open
a space for dialogue that nurtures both community and critical thinking.

Friday
10am–11am

Friday
11am–12pm

Saturday
10am–12pm

Politics: Aesthetics: Action
Caitlin Horsmon
What is the revolutionary potential
of the cinema? This session focuses
on the ways in which non-fiction
and experimental film and video use
form to produce political messages.
It will explore aesthetic theory to
better understand the complex ways
that avant-garde works produce social outcomes. A conversation about
art, audience, and the possibilities
of experimental aesthetics to produce change.
Caitlin Horsmon is an artist,
teacher and curator based in Kansas
City Missouri. She is an Associate
Professor at UMKC and Co-Director
of Plug Projects.

Avant-Garde as Kitsch: Experimental
Film and Internet Video
Colin Beckett
The vernacular video forms that
have emerged on YouTube, Vine
and other online services over the
last eight years frequently bear
striking resemblance to the non-narrative strategies that have constituted the history of avant-garde film
and video, as critics and scholars
have noted.
As these internet video services
eclipse traditional narrative cinema
in viewership and cultural influence, it appears that the cinematic
avant-garde has triumphed. But
if this is a triumph, it initiates a
profound crisis in the avant-garde,
liquidating the structuring relationships that have defined it, and
proving false many claims about its
ideological force.
This lecture, illustrated with internet videos, examines the implications of the rise of fragmentary,
non-narrative forms, asking how it
recasts the history of avant-garde
film and video and what sort of
space it leaves for contemporary
avant-garde moving image practice.
Colin Beckett is a writer based in
Brooklyn, New York. His work has
appeared in BOMBblog, The Brooklyn
Rail, Cineaste, Moving Image Source,
Idiom Magazine, The L Magazine,
and wuxia.

What The Hell Was That?
Daniel Herbert w/ visiting guests
Within the realm of cinema, experimental film is often misunderstood.
Join us for an educational screening
and discussion hosted by Daniel
Herbert, Assistant Professor in the
UM Department of Screen Arts and
Cultures. Several challenging, short
experimental films from this year’s
AAFF will be presented and screened
by participating panelists, followed by
open discussion with the audience.
Daniel Herbert is author of the
book Videoland: Movie Culture at
the American Video Store (UC Press,
2014). His essays appear in Canadian
Journal of Film Studies, Film Quarterly, Millennium Film Journal, and
Quarterly Review of Film and Video.

19

Sunday
10am–12pm

Stop Motion Magic
Squeaky Wheel Staff
With some imagination and innovation, many household and common
items can be turned into an experimental video! Participants in this
hands-on workshop will collectively
explore the elements of moving image through multiple forms of stop
motion animation. By the end, you
will have co-produced a short experimental video with some new friends!
All materials are provided, but feel
free to bring photos, magazines, art
supplies…or anything else you can
get your hands on!
Visiting artists for this workshop
are staff members from Squeaky
Wheel, a long-running film & digital
art center in Buffalo, NY

20

T U E S D AY

A M I L L I O N M I L E S AWAY
PA G E 2 3

21

Tuesday

8:15pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

OPENING NIGHT SCREENING
Films in Competition

1

2

3

4

The 52nd Festival opens with a reception
featuring an open bar with Terra Blanca wine
courtesy of Eagle Eye, signature Sazerac cocktails
mixed by Ravens Club and Arbor Brewing Company beer, appetizers from local favorites Ravens
Club, Sava’s, Jerusalem Garden, Café Zola and
more. Music by DJ Jeremy Wheeler.
This screening is dedicated to the memory of
Dominick and Alice DeVarti whose longstanding
devotion to the festival is gratefully carried forward
by their sons Richard and David.
bbrraattss
Ian Cheng
New York, NY | 2013 | 3 min | Video
Motion capture choreography simulated against
motion capture choreography. —IC 1
Interactive
Bryan Boyce
San Francisco, CA | 2013 | 2 min | Video
Interactive is a very versatile system. 2

The Dark, Krystle
Michael Robinson
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 9.5 min | Video
The cabin is on fire! Krystle can’t stop crying, Alexis
won’t stop drinking, and the fabric of existence hangs in
the balance, again and again and again. —MR
“The Dark, Krystle brilliantly re-purposes the artificiality of stock gesture, allowing viewers to see its
hollowness and to feel it recharging with new emotional
power. Equal parts archival fashion show and feminist
morality play, Robinson’s montage rekindles the unfinished business of identity, consumption, and excess in
1980s pop culture.” —Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago 3
Division
Johan Rijpma
Netherlands | 2012 | 1 min | Video
A piece of paper is divided by hand into an even number
of pieces and then reassembled. A photograph of this finished composition is then printed and divided again. This
makes the impossible possible, tearing the now included
empty spaces that make up the tears in the paper. The
feedback division process is repeated while the number
of imprecise manual divisions gradually increased. 4

22

5

6

7

8

Cut
Matthias Müller and Christoph Girardet
Hannover & Bielefeld, Germany | 2013 | 13 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE The body as a wound that
never heals. 5
A Million Miles Away
Jennifer Reeder
Chicago, IL | 2014 | 27 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE Melancholy as a survival
strategy in the American Mid-West: An adult woman (the
conductor) on the edge of failing and a pack of teenage
girls (the choir) simultaneously experience a supernatural
version of coming-of-age. The transformation is equal
parts tense and tender. It unravels patiently to the infectious beat of an 80s era heavy metal anthem rearranged
as a lamentation. —JR 6
Metamorfoza
Martha Colburn
Netherlands | 2013 | 6.5 min | Video
With a stop frame animation featuring dolls, sets
and found footage, a theme of ‘hidden truth’ emerges; accompanied by Juan Felipe Waller’s composition
“Metamorfoza.” 7
Tacoma
Courtney Krantz
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 6.5 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE A reflection on home and memory.
Old love letters. A card game. Music gone by. An

indoor-outdoor encounter of domestic space. Filmed
in the verdant environment of the Pacific Northwest
at my grandmother-in-law’s residence where she has
lived for over 40 years. —CK 8
Little Girl
Bruce Baillie
1966/2014 | 10 min | 16mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION This film by Bruce Baillie,
completed in 1966 but unreleased until 2014, is contemporaneous with Castro Street, but is much more formally
connected to All My Life or Still Life, also from the same
year. In three sections with three different formal strategies, Baillie shares distilled moments of found natural
beauty as he encountered them in the North Bay outside
San Francisco. The first section features a study of plum
blossoms, rendered in rich, multiple superimpositions
that allow the white flowers to explode into a blizzard of
visual complexity, framed by a panning shot of purple
mountains. In the second section, Baillie allows us a
furtive glimpse of the titular little girl, waving to cars with
her dog on the side of the road, lost in her world and
thoughts. Bruce’s framing remains unadorned, feeling
no need to add to or take away from a beautiful piece of
simple portraiture. The third section, of waterbugs on the
surface of a pond, remind us how remarkable and sensitive Baillie’s camerawork can be, as he observes their
graceful dances, and the subtle light and water effects
they produce by their movements. —Mark Toscano
Preservation print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive

AFTERPARTY

Continue the Opening Night celebration with drink specials and music at Sava’s!

SAVA’S | 10PM–2AM | FREE

23

24

W E D N E S D AY

GRADUAL SPEED
PA G E 2 9

25

Wednesday

12:30pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FREE

STEVE ANKER: BIG AS LIFE,
8MM EXPERIMENTAL FILM IN THE U.S.:
THE BOSTON UNDERGROUND, 1976–1992
Juror Presentation
Big As Life was a 76 program series held at The
Museum of Modern Art from 1998 to 2000. Co-curated by MoMA curator Jytte Jensen and myself,
the series included Regular and Super 8mm
works by over a hundred filmmakers, and all of
the films were shown in their original gauge.
The series was a testament to a great and defiant body of groundbreaking art that ranged from
the deeply personal and poetic to radical forms
of documentary and dramatic narrative. Most
prints hadn’t been shown in many years, and
dozens of these films have doubtless perished or
deteriorated since the series was presented. Tonight’s program of rare Super 8mm prints focuses
on Boston as one of the capitals of small-gauge
filmmaking, a metropolitan area that produced
several important artists who were drawn to
8mm largely through the art and teaching of Saul
Levine. An active 8mm filmmaker who has been
Mysterious Barricades
Peter Herwitz
1987 | 8 min
Super 8mm | Silent
A highly concentrated, ravishingly
hand-manipulated film that evokes
states of the sublime as well as loneliness and emotional turmoil. Made
by Herwitz while he was a graduate
student at the San Francisco Art
Institute, this wholly original work is
imbued with Saul Levine’s influence.
Notes of An Early Fall, Part One
Saul Levine
1976 | 33 min | Super 8mm
A major work that portrays the
beauty and sadness of isolation in a
desolate landscape. Triumphing over
this physical reality and his own
emotional landscape, Levine uses
the formal properties of the medium
to weave extended sound takes and
highly charged montage into a poignant and witty self-portrait. 1

working in 8mm for more than forty-five years,
Levine inspired Marjorie Keller, Phil Solomon,
Mark LaPore, Luther Price, Anne Charlotte Robertson, Pelle Lowe, Peter Herwitz, Caroline Avery
and Nina Fonoroff, among others, to produced
great work in this modest, home movie medium.
Experimental filmmaking has always been an
especially fugitive pursuit in Boston, given the stifling control of powerhouse academic institutions
as Harvard, M.I.T., and Boston University, and
the conservative Boston Brahmin culture. Few
major filmmakers, such as Daniel Barnett, have
emerged during the past five decades.
In retrospect, it makes sense that 8mm films
made by renegade personalities would thrive in
the underworld of Boston culture, and they have
an urgency and intensity that matches the greatest avant-garde and experimental films.
—Steve Anker

Apologies
Anne Charlotte Robertson
1990 | 17 min | Super 8mm
Apologies is possibly this late, great
film-diarist’s only film that survives
in its original unadulterated form.
With savage irony and wit, and with
shockingly brutal honesty, Robertson lists all of the things she feels
guilty about. Using Super 8 sound’s
distinctive form of immediacy, the
filmmaker creates a self-portrait
unlike any other in cinema. 2
Earthly Possessions
(The Looking Glass Trilogy, Part III)
Pelle Lowe
1992 | 23 min | Super 8mm
A haunting, trance-like evocation of
trans-gender longing. Amidst gothic
backgrounds and expressionistic
gestures, Lowe’s characters enact a
ritualistic, internalized drama.

Sodom
Luther Price
1989 | 17 min | Super 8mm
Sodom uses found footage gay porn
and physical carvings into the small
8mm material itself, to create a
horrifying glimpse into a particular
imaginary hell. Price’s sensational
imagery is both confrontational
meditative, and Sodom recalls such
earlier films as Jack Smith’s Flaming
Creatures or Barbara Rubin’s Christmas on Earth. 3

PROGRAM NOTES AND PRINTS
COURTESY OF STEVE ANKER
SUPER 8 PROJECTION BY
DAÏCHI SAÏTO
WITH THANKS TO SAUL LEVINE FOR
ASSISTANCE WITH PROVIDING THE
PRINT OF APOLOGIES.
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY
WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE
VISUAL ARTS

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Wednesday

3pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

$5 Tickets

MUSIC VIDEOS IN COMPETITION

3

6

2

8

1

4

5

7

Shikaakwa by CAVE
Nick Ciontea
Chicago, IL | 2013
5 min | Video 1
Can’t Say No to Annie
by Jamaican Queens
Katie Barkel
Detroit, MI | 2013
5 min | Video
Varðeldur by Sigur Rós
Melika Bass
Chicago, IL | 2012
7 min | Video 2
Omaha by Bonnie ‘Prince’
Billy & Dawn McCarthy
Ben Russell
Malta/France | 2013
4 min | Video
Long Island Ice Tea, Neat
by the Coup
Kelly Gallagher
Iowa City, IA | 2013
2 min | Video 3

Tiniest Seed
by Angel Olsen
Randy Sterling Hunter
Vienna, Austria | 2012
3.5 min | Video

No Answer by Wolf Eyes
Joel Rakowski
Ann Arbor, MI | 2013
1 min | Video

Embodied by Jib Kidder
Jib Kidder
New York, NY | 2013
2.5 min | Video

Temple Walking by Clay
Rendering
Joel Rakowski
Ann Arbor, MI | 2014
4 min | Video

Scattered in the Wind
by Implodes
Lori Felker
Chicago, IL | 2013
6 min | Video 4

Auroratone (featuring “So
Lillies” by Julia Holter)
Emily Pelstring
Montreal, Canada | 2013
4 min | Video 6

Brats by Liars
Ian Cheng
New York, NY | 2012
3 min | Video

Transmission
by Demdike Stare
Andy Rushton
Manchester, UK | 2013
3.5 min | Video

Grip by Sun Araw
Daniel Brantley
Los Angeles, CA | 2013
6 min | Video 5

Black Refraction
by Tim Hecker
Sabrina Ratté
Montreal, Canada | 2013
3.5 min | Video 7

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Problem Areas
by Oneohtrix Point Never
Takeshi Murata
Saugerties, NY | 2013
3 min | Video 8
Please, Please, Please,
Let Me Get What I Want
by The Smiths
Ian Roberts
England | 2013
2 min | Video

INTRODUCED BY WQKL
HOST MARTIN BANDYKE
SPONSORED BY WQKL
107.1 FM ANN ARBOR
COMMUNITY PARTNER
THE NEUTRAL ZONE

Wednesday

4:30pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

GRADUAL SPEED
SCREENING WITH WHITE ASH
Films in Competition

1

Gradual Speed
Els van Riel
Brussels, Belgium | 2013 | 52 min | 16mm
“Gradual Speed is a work on and for black and white
16mm film seen as matter and at the same time as a metaphor for everything we can not grasp.” —Els van Riel
For a film whose title describes the relatively simple
mechanism used to create it, Els van Riel’s 16mm film
ushers a series of startling transfigurations which brilliantly engage the form in the extended time spent with
people, animals, events and objects in whose company
the filmmaker sketches larger philosophical concerns to
do with love, fixity, representation and loss.
Carefully positioned, the camera begins on a single
frame, the shutter held open, and then is imperceptibly
increased in speed, quickening the frame rate and thus
changing the exposure time for each successive frame,
which eventually produces a visible moving image
whose Keystone-Cops styled speed in turn changes,
falling into step with real time.
Inspired in large part by the account of Vladimir
Shevchenko who was one of the first photographers to
see the appalling consequences of the nuclear disaster
at Chernobyl and record them on sensitive plate. The
actual degree of that sensitivity was evident in the
processed film which showed the characteristic effects
of heavy radiation. He himself later succumbed to
radiation poisoning. van Riel notes, “It is this inextricable relationship that casts its long shadow across this
musing film-sculpture, like an afterthought that reminds
us that film is primarily a body that carries within it the
light traces of other bodies, always balancing between
appearing and disappearing.”

These observations are manifested in the precision of
her subject’s endlessly renewed temporal adjustment,
so that the imminent haste, for example, of her dozing
mother, whose fidgeting over the long duration signifies
much in its change of speed alone, becomes all we have
ever needed to know about exposure tables and time’s
abstract passage. It is this inward epiphany, rather than
any dazzle on the screen, that holds the greatest power
to sway. —Julie Murray
PRECEDED BY

White Ash
Leighton Pierce
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 30 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE White Ash is an inexorable dive into
edges of consciousness. Grounded in recognizable images
and sounds captured from reality, White Ash is designed
to scrape through the patina of normal perception, leading to an embodied associational state—something “to the
side” of narratives and perceptions.
Pierce meticulously weaves the warp and weft of image
and sound leading the viewer into a conscious meditative
state. Shooting and then animating thousands of moving
camera, handheld, long exposure, digital photographs
into articulations of real spaces and events, Pierce then
re-articulates the video by applying the lever of a judiciously composed musique-concrète soundtrack. 1

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FILMMAKERS IN ATTENDANCE

Wednesday

7pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

JOSEPH BERNARD: SUPER 8 FILMS
Filmmaker in Attendance
Joseph Bernard, raised on the East Coast, received degrees in painting from the University of Hartford Art School and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. For almost ten
years, from the mid–70s through the mid-80s Bernard made over 100 Super 8mm silent
films, “subjective, often highly manipulated, non-narrative observations frequently on
filmmaking itself.” In 1986 he transitioned from filmmaking to collage painting.
Based in Detroit for four decades, Bernard currently resides in Troy, MI where he has been
working toward a release of selected films on DVDs and archiving his complete collection.
This program features a selection from his extensive body of film work,
“film-as-film abstractions, … more closely akin to absolute music.”
ALL FILMS SUPER 8MM AND SILENT

Chamber
1977 | 18 min
Significantly pivotal, this early
experiment shot with a flawed
camera, made editing manipulation
indispensable, even desirable. The
first & last images are of a portion/
detail of Chamber — a 1970, 40” x 30”
decal-on-glass and mirror painting
of mine that, like the film, reflects its
surroundings. The film’s title takes
into account other meanings and
implications of the word ‘chamber’,
i.e., of the heart, core, intimate
music, prison, camera, room, gun
part (both empty & loaded). 1

Semblance: Frampton
Brakhage Relation
1981 | 6 min
A simplistic analogy of obvious
disparities between these two
masters that I concocted on the
beach in Provincetown. As a
disclaimer: my filmed comparisons
relating H.F. & S.B. should in no
way be construed with the quality
or intentions of these high priests of
filmmaking. Just koaning around.

Night Mix
1982 | 13 min
This particular one carries a
broad filmmaking vocabulary
and was a response to a “still vs
Icon
motion” picture debate between a
1978 | 6 min
Beyond much single frame shooting, photographer friend and myself. It
was highly altered with opaque tape
Icon allowed the use of cropped
stencil letters as abstractions and the over frames, bleach, ink, abrasions
idea of bringing other painting tools and quantities of cement splices.
Shot in Detroit and Provincetown,
and sensibilities to film.
this is dedicated to Bill Gubbins.
Ritual
Drawings On Africa
1979 | 3 min
1981 | 2 min
A 50’ roll of film edited in camera;
Totally under-exposed 35mm slides
a small gem with timing & lap
of African maps were provided to
dissolves that were truly a gift.
be drawn on by a 10 and a 12 year
old. The slides, with their emulsionscratched images, were then macro
rephotographed. A wondrous
collaboration.

Film For Untitled Viewer
1983 | 3 min
A traveling-text soliloquy
acknowledging an unknown,
perceptive audience member
with whom I’m sharing this film.
Variant Chants
1983 | 16 min
This is an often rapid montage of
stills and short clips referencing
aspects of “set-up” or tabletop
filmmaking, as well as my own
paintings on glass and 35mm
slide photographs. In part, the
film provides a view of its little
laboratory, disclosure of its own
making. For me, this remains an
in-total dervish dance... a celebration
of light, color, movement and all the
charged beauty I was capable
of, then or since. 2

FILM DESCRIPTIONS
& SUPER 8 PRINTS COURTESY
OF JOSEPH BERNARD
SUPER 8 PROJECTION BY
DAÏCHI SAÏTO
WITH SUPPORT FROM
THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION
FOR THE VISUAL ARTS
COMMUNITY PARTNER MUSEUM
OF CONTEMPORARY ART DETROIT

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Wednesday

7:15pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 1

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5

Sun Song
Joel Wanek
Oakland, CA | 2013 | 14.5 min | Video | Silent
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE “I would tell the people on this
planet that there are forces: their job is to slow you up.
You’re supposed to keep moving.” —Sun Ra
A poetic journey from the darkness of dawn into the
brightness of the midday sun in the American South.
Filmed entirely on the number 16 bus route in Durham,
North Carolina over the course of six months. —JW 1
Square Dance, Los Angeles County, California, 2013
Silvia das Fadas
Los Angeles, CA | 2013 | 9 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE “The people are what is not there
yet, never in the right place, never ascribable to the
place and time where anxieties and dreams await.”
—Jacques Rancière 2
Burn Out the Day
Sasha Waters Freyer
Richmond, VA | 2014 | 4 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE The passing of a decrepit totality;
wounds and traces left by fire and light as an abandoned
home burns to the ground. Mute observers and memory
fragments remain. The pleasures and terrors of rural
domestic comfort. —SWF 3

SPONSORED BY ZINGERMAN’S

Letter to a Refusing Pilot
Akram Zaatari
Lebanon | 2013 | 34 min | Video
Taking a cue from Albert Camus’ epistolary essay
“Letters to a German Friend,” in Letter to a Refusing Pilot
celebrated Lebanese artist-filmmaker Zaatari conducts
both an investigation of and a stirring tribute to an act
of resistance (or forbearance) that marked his childhood
memories: the refusal of an Israeli pilot to bomb a boys’
high school on June 6, 1982 in south Lebanon. Oscillating between documentary, essay and fiction, this elegant
and multi-layered film combines personal and archival
documents as it seeks to recuperate historical truth from
the annals of personal reminiscence, laced with both enchantment and fear. Framed like a coming-of-age filled
with wonderment and insuperable curiosity, Letter to a
Refusing Pilot humanizes a personal gesture in the face
of a greater conflict. 4
Sea Series #9 & #13
John Price
Toronto, Canada | 2013 | 6 min | 35mm | Silent
The fragility of diary entries, combined with the tireless
observation of the shore’s many different moods and
slow transformations. In this series, Price combines two
close things: family and the sea. He films one motif and
re-exposes the film a second time, sometimes several
years later. These multiple expositions emphasize the
situations’ placement within a never-ending flow.
—Andrea Slovakova 5

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Wednesday

9:15pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

THOM ANDERSEN: FILMS 1964–2014
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences
When a film is called “didactic”, it is most often
intended either as an insult or as a way of bolstering a work’s particular theoretical ambitions.
Thom Andersen’s resolutely nonfictional films are
didactic in a richer, more specific sense. In the
eight films and videos he has made since 1965, he
has worked cinema to its limits, not in the service
of formal exercise or psychological realism, but
in order to uncover precisely what kind of reality
film is capable of disclosing of its subjects, and in
doing so, has crafted new, particularly cinematic
methods of practical, political, and, ultimately,
moral instruction.
Highlighting the instructive qualities of Andersen’s films perhaps buries the idiosyncrasy
and sense of humor that characterizes them. His
four feature-length works have most frequently
been designated as essay films for their discursive

Nevertheless, Andersen considers teaching his
primary vocation. While his writing and filmmaking have come in intermittent bursts over the last
four decades, he has taught university film courses more or less consistently since the mid-1970s.
Born in Chicago in 1943, Andersen moved to
Los Angeles, the city with which his work has
become inextricably associated, when he was
four years old. In the early 1960s, he became
active in the Los Angeles underground film scene,
making a handful of short films, attending quite a
few more, and forming a lasting friendship with
Morgan Fisher, whose own films are revealing
of some of Andersen’s own preoccupations. He
attended film school, first at USC, and then UCLA,
where he completed Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer (1975) as his master’s thesis.
In 1976, he joined the faculty of the University
of Buffalo’s legendary Center for Media Studies,
brought in by documentarian James Blue, with
whom Andersen had studied at UCLA. In 1978,
HE HAS WORKED CINEMA
he took a position in Ohio State’s department
TO ITS LIMITS, NOT
of photography and cinema, where he joined
fellow Southern California radical Allan Sekula.
IN THE SERVICE OF
In 1984, Andersen and Sekula became early victims of the culture war, purged from the faculty
FORMAL EXERCISE OR
along with photographer James Friedman, in
PSYCHOLOGICAL REALISM,
the administration’s effort to rid the department
of Jews and leftists—ironically enough, while
BUT IN ORDER TO
Andersen was already deep into the research
on the Hollywood blacklist that would form the
UNCOVER PRECISELY WHAT
basis for Red Hollywood (1995).
KIND OF REALITY FILM IS
Since 1987, Andersen has taught at CalArts,
whose School of Film and Video has since graduCAPABLE OF DISCLOSING
ated many of the most interesting experimental
film and videomakers working today, some of
OF ITS SUBJECTS
whom have collaborated with Andersen on his
more recent projects.
style of argumentation, the deep and somewhat
Andersen made his earliest films during the
eccentric learning that underlies it, and the sharp avant-garde cinema’s extended high modernist
prose in which they are narrated. While the vivid phase, when the formalist charge of “minimalist”
sense of history and deep political commitment
or, later, “structural” film predominated. His
that Andersen brings to his subjects creates an
first film, Melting (1965), appears today almost
undeniable sense of authority, it is leavened by
like something of a parody of the concerns that
the playfulness and the self-conscious subjectivity animated that moment, but there is more at stake
of the essay form.
than the issue of film form. In a single, head-on
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Thom Andersen: Films 1964–2014

Wednesday

shot, it pictures nothing but the dissolution of
an ice cream sundae. The gerund form of its title
“suggests,” as Andersen would later note of the titles Eadweard Muybridge gave to his photographs,
“a motion uniform and timeless.” As timeless as
time itself, anyway: the film makes a material
record of entropy, that is, of time’s passing.
In — —– (1967), made with Malcolm Brodwick,
Andersen addressed his investigation of cinematic time to the question of montage. Applying a
predetermined structure to small-gauge footage
of Los Angeles’ rock-and-roll industry and to
recordings of its music on its soundtrack, the
film stages a series of arbitrary sound-image
relations, demonstrating the cinema’s ceaseless
production of meaning.
In so far as they picture actual events, and as
they enact certain principles of cinema, these
films can be considered documentaries, but
with Olivia’s Place, shot in 1966 and completed
in 1974, Andersen’s filmmaking takes a decisive
turn toward the descriptive. In
just a few long, static takes, the
film records the dying days of a
working class Santa Monica coffee shop as the forlorn sounds
of Big Jay McNeely’s “There is
Something on Your Mind” play
from the jukebox.
In 2010’s Get Out of the Car,
Andersen would once again
render his city in fragmentary
16mm glances brought together by the pulse of local music.
3
Andersen calls Los Angeles
Plays Itself “a city symphony in
reverse,” but it still pictures the city as something
of a self-sufficient system from a God-like vantage.
Get Out of the Car is instead a city symphony from
below, showing the city as it is seen crossed on
foot by its poorest residents.
Between it and the early shorts, Andersen made
the three essayistic features on cinematic subjects
that have attracted the most attention in his body
of work. Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer
examines the philosophical force of Muybridge’s
proto-cinematic innovations and precisely locates
the social and technological underpinnings that
distinguish his zoopraxography from the cinema

9:15pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

proper. Red Hollywood, made with Noël Burch,
looks at the neglected works of blacklisted Hollywood leftists and insists we take seriously the
sociopolitical content of their work.
Both films are interventions in film historiography that are remarkably articulate in form and
argument, but it is with Los Angeles Plays Itself
(2003) that Andersen synthesized a style fully
adequate to his ambitions. His wide-ranging investigation into cinema’s uses of the city unfolds
in a seamless montage and makes its claims in
an unabashedly personal, somewhat unreliable
register without diminishing their urgency.
Andersen turns our attention to the people and
events that the best-known visions of the city
have overlooked, and to the overlooked visions
that have captured such people’s lives.
Reconversão (2012) picks up the architectural
preoccupations of Los Angeles Plays Itself and
matches them to the questions about the nature
of stillness and motion at the center of Eadweard

Muybridge, Zoopraxographer, finding them
newly relevant to the digital era. Depicting the
buildings of Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto
de Moura through a set of animated DSLR stills,
Andersen affirms that architecture, no less than
cinema, is a time-based art that gives shape to its
era’s social relations.
In his observations on other filmmakers and
their work, Andersen frequently emphasizes
qualities that illuminate his own approach. In
Muybridge’s Animal Locomotion, Andersen discovers a “dialectic of subject and method.”
At the conclusion of Los Angeles Plays Itself,

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Thom Andersen: Films 1964–2014

Wednesday

9:15pm

1

2

2

3

he draws a modified, Deleuzian conception of
neorealism from in the 1970s work of black,
working-class filmmakers like Haile Gerima,
Charles Burnett, and Billy Woodbury: a neorealism that “describes another reality and creates a
new kind of protagonist...a seer, not an actor,”
and that “posits a new kind of time. A spatialized, non-chronological time of meditation,
and of memory [in which] everything is filtered
through [the protagonist’s] consciousness, and
the film follows it, as it slides freely from perception to memory.”
In conversation with William E. Jones, Andersen
elaborates a “theory of description” from Krzysztof Kieślowski’s remarks on his own early documentaries: “Only when you describe something
ESSAY TEXT BY
COLIN BECKETT
ACT WITHOUT WORDS
PRESERVATION PRINT

can you start thinking about it. Only then can you
deal with it. Only then can you try to change it.”
The echoes of Marx are no accident. At the
root of all of Andersen’s allegories of his own
practice is an unwavering commitment to two
kinds of materialism: a historical materialism that
interprets culture as an expression of a society’s
social and economics arrangements, and a filmic
materialism that interprets cinematic meaning
through its technological underpinnings. The history of avant-garde cinema is riddled with efforts
to collapse these distinct materialisms. Only in
Andersen’s work do we find a fully formed version of each kind in a mutual interdependence.
His films demand that we pay attention to better
things and that we pay it better.

Act Without Words
1964 | 6 min | 16mm
Melting
1965 | 6 min | 16mm

COURTESY OF HIGH M. HEFNER
MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE,
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN

Michigan Theater Screening Room

Olivia’s Place
1966 | 6 min | 16mm 1

CALIFORNIA

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-- ----Thom Andersen & Malcom Brodwick
1967 | 11 min | 16mm 2
Get Out Of The Car
2010 | 35 min | 16mm 3
Hey, Asshole!
2014 | 5 min | Video

Wednesday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

OUT NIGHT
Films in Competition

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The Thing
Rhys Ernst
Los Angeles, CA | 2013 | 15 min | Video
A woman, a transgender man, and their cat travel
towards a mysterious roadside attraction known as
“The Thing.” 1

Ghost Syndrome
Rita Piffer
Florianópolis, Brazil | 2013 | 7 min | Video
A portrait of a Moroccan lesbian who immigrated to the
United States, and the emotional resonances of living in
between cultures. 4

100 Butches #9: Ruby
Off-White Tulips
Elisha Lim
Aykan Safo ğlu
Toronto, Canada | 2012 | 1 min | Video
Berlin, Germany | 2013 | 24 min | Video
A catholic convent schoolgirl remembers her first gay crush. NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE Concentrating on James
Baldwin’s extended stays in Istanbul in the 60s and
70s, the film explores the limits of an autobiography
Falling In Love... with Chris and Greg:
mostly relying on found materials such as Sedat Pakay’s
“Work of Art! Reality TV Special”
photography. Racism, transnational discourses, queer
Chris E. Vargas and Greg Youmans
politics and appropriation art are also being investigated
Hamilton, NY | 2012 | 14 min | Video
Work of Art! was the last full-length episode in the online throughout the video-essay. 5
series Falling in Love...with Chris and Greg, made by
Chris Vargas and Greg Youmans between 2008 and 2013. Akin
Through the magic of DIY video effects and voice redub- Chase Joynt
bing, Chris and Greg become contestants in a reality-TV
Toronto, Canada | 2012 | 8 min | Video
competition to be The Next Great Artist. The challenge:
Akin powerfully engages in a relationship between an
“Make a successful piece of queer art about failure.”
Orthodox Jewish mother and her transgender son as
Can they make it through a double elimination? 2
they navigate silent secrets of a shared past. 6
Cakes Da Killa: NO HOMO
Ja’Tovia M. Gary
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 13 min | Video
An electrifying portrait of a young artist determined
to create and live life on his own terms. Born Rashard
Bradshaw, Cakes Da Killa is a 22 year-old hip hop artist
and openly gay man whose provocative lyrics explore
sexuality and gender politics. 3

SPONSORED BY GOOGLE
COMMUNITY PARTNERS JIM TOY COMMUNITY CENTER
& UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SPECTRUM CENTER

AFTERPARTY

Out Night continues at \aut\BAR with complimentary
appetizers and firepits in the courtyard!

\aut\BAR | 11pm–2am | FREE
36

T H U R S D AY

LUNAR ALMANAC
PA G E 4 3

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Thursday

12:30pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FREE

HOPE TUCKER: THE OBITUARY PROJECT
Juror Presentation
As director of The Obituary Project, a compendium of experimental salvage ethnography that
transforms a quotidian form of narrative, Hope
Tucker reframes the passing of sites, people,
communities, rituals, cultural markers, and
ways of being.
She has documented shuttered bread factories, fallen witness trees, and disappearing civil
rights era landmarks; animated cyanotypes of
downwinders and old instructions for making
fishing nets by hand; recorded mobile phone
footage of the last public phone booths in Fin-

William Stokoe Jr., Sign
Language Advocate, Dies at 80
USA | 2000 | 3 min | 16mm
Decibel Range Reduced To Reflect
Moderate Hearing Loss 1
Bessie Cohen, Survivor of the
1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Fire
USA | 2000 | 3 min
The last ninety years of a complex
life become eclipsed by an escape
from a burning building. 2
Lolo Ferrari
USA | 2001 | 2 min
Corrupted Sound File
An obituary whittles one’s social contribution down to its barest form. 3

land; written the entire text of a video out of
paper clips, a Norwegian symbol of nonviolent
resistance; and retraced the path of protest that
closed the only nuclear power plant in Austria.
Like all obituaries, these are selective interpretations of rich and complex lives. The Obituary
Project rearranges the contours of biography
by acknowledging the attributes by which we
learn to recognize and which become markers
of authentic life. Tucker will present a program
of videos along with excerpts from her installation work and a recent work in progress.

Vi holder sammen / We hold together
Norway | 2011 | 4 min
Norwegian w/ English Titles
A typeface formed by hand from paper
clips spells out an imperfect construction of a national history as it visualizes
a period of nonviolent resistance. 7
Puhelinkoppi (1882–2007)
Finland | 2010
8 min | Mobile Video
Finnish w/ English Titles
Marking a shift in the functioning of
private and public space, after existing as a sidewalk staple for over a
century, the phone booth in Finland
is now extinct. The artist uses her
camera phone to document the
passing. —Images Festival 8

worldwide. Shifting focus away from
episodic plot structure allows for a
sustained gaze on Wilson’s role in
the series level narrative and success
of The Cosby Show.
The Sea [is still] Around Us
USA | 2012 | 4 min
Rachel Carson is dead, but the sea
is still around us…this small lake is a
sad reminder of what is taking place
all over the land, from carelessness,
shortsightedness, and arrogance.
It is our pool of shame in this, ‘our
particular instant of time.’ —E.B.
White, 1964

Handful of Dust
USA | 2013 | 9 min
Big Star
Mono Recording from 1953
USA | 2003 | 3 min
Vermont says goodbye to Solzhenitsyn Prussian blue can be used to render
The map-maker grew up down the
images and counteract radiation
USA | 2012 | 4 min
street from where the car hit the tree Surveillance Video
poisoning. 10
and rode many a Big Star cart. 4
Russian w/ English titles
The Russian writer spent twenty
Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market
Missing in the Severe Clear
years in exile in a remote American
USA | 2008–Ongoing
USA | 2001 | 4 min
village. This pixilation, part one of a 1 min Excerpt from Sunday
‘Severe Clear’ is aviation slang for
diptych, was shot on the anniversary April 14, 2013 | Silent
clear, crisp, blue skies with boundof his death. 9
After buying candy at this grocery
less visibility. 5
store in Money, Mississippi in 1955,
14 year old Emmett Till was brutally
Ellis Wilson’s Funeral Procession
Noel
murdered. His killers were acquitted,
USA | 2012 | 8 min Excerpt of
UK | 2005 | 5 min
fueling the civil rights movement.
a 74 minute Work | Silent
A songwriter’s identity remains
Historical markers have repeatedly
When painter Ellis Wilson died in
as obscure as his motives for pendisappeared from this site. 11
1977, his documentation of the lives
ning a popular American holiday
of people of African descent was not
standard. 6
well known. Ten years later, his
WITH SUPPORT FROM
work Funeral Procession became
THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION
part of a show that still plays
FOR THE VISUAL ARTS
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Thursday

3pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

THOM ANDERSEN:
EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, ZOOPRAXOGRAPHER
Filmmaker in Attendance

Eadweard Muybridge,
Zoopraxographer
Thom Andersen
1975 | 60 min | 35mm

few materials: Muybridge’s stills and
zoopraxographs (often animated),
a narration read by Dean Stockwell,
Michael Cohen’s score, and less than
a minute of originally photographed
In the late 1960s and early 1970s,
footage. It is tempting to say that
the reconsideration of Eadweard
Andersen removed everything
Muybridge took on a new urgency
except the essentials, but, as always,
in relation to the formalist concerns Andersen’s highly specific idea of
then powering the central current
the essential—the film begins with a
of avant-garde film. Thom Andersen quote from Mao—reminds us of the
began researching Muybridge in the absurdity of such a conceit.
mid-1960s. In 1966, he published
The fastidiousness of the film’s
an essay about him for Film Culture analysis follows Muybridge’s own
that advanced some of the claims he work. In the reanimated zoopraxwould make in his first feature film,
ograph stills, the film reveals what
Eadweard Muybridge, ZoopraxograMuybridge accomplished scientifipher, completed in 1974 in collabocally, aesthetically, and philosophration with Morgan Fisher and Fay
ically, and how his motion studies
Andersen.
cleared the path for the invention
As in his early shorts, Andersen’s
of cinema, but remained distinct
approach to recounting Muybridge’s from it. Onscreen, it traces the exact
life and analyzing his work could be temporal distance between the procalled “minimalist”, though Anders- filmic events of his images and our
en would likely prefer it to be called experience of them—constructing a
“reductionist”, following the term he dizzying mise-en-abyme.
later applied to Warhol’s first films.
Andersen is fond of quoting Roland
The film is made with remarkably
Barthes’ riff on Francis Bacon, which
40

asserts “that a little formalism turns
one away from History, but that a lot
brings one back to it.” No other film
makes that point as well as Eadweard
Muybridge, Zoopraxographer.
The film takes for granted that
even in a moving image collection as
rigorously scientific as Muybridge’s
Animal Locomotion, sociological and
historical revelation is inevitable.
From there it precisely demonstrates
how different kinds of knowledge
are produced by moving images.
—Colin Beckett

PRINT RESTORED BY THE UCLA
FILM & TELEVISION ARCHIVE
PROGRAM INTRODUCED BY
COLIN BECKETT, A WRITER
BASED IN BROOKLYN, NY
SPONSORED BY UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN SCREEN ARTS & CULTURES
COMMUNITY PARTNER RACKHAM
VISUAL CULTURE WORKSHOP

Thursday

5:10pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FREE

PENELOPE SPHEERIS
Presented by The Penny W. Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series

Often referred to as a “Rock ‘n Roll anthropologist”,
Penelope Spheeris is an American director, producer
and screenwriter. Her groundbreaking exploration
of the formative Los Angeles punk scene, The Decline of
Western Civilization (1981) (screening Friday see pg. 52),
is still the crucial reference point for the history and
culture of that era. She will be joined in conversation with Mark Toscano, film preservationist for the

Thursday

6:45pm

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Film
Archive, for a discussion that will cover Spheeris’s vital
independent filmmaking career, including her early
radical shorts and pioneering music films, as well as
her documentary and narrative features.
Penelope Spheeris’s films will be featured in four
programs Thursday, Friday and Saturday during the
52nd Ann Arbor Film Festival.

The Penny W. Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series is
focused on creativity and innovation, presenting visionary leaders who use their creative practice effectively.
It celebrates those who transcend tradition and set a
progressive and influential tone with their work.” The
series has become a revered weekly event at the Michigan
Theater drawing people from across the University, Ann
Arbor, and the greater Detroit region. The core audience
is comprised of Stamps School of Art & Design students
in the midst of discovering their own creative path, but is
open to the public at large.

Michigan Theater Screening Room

MANAKAMANA
Filmmakers in Attendance

Manakamana
Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez
Nepal/USA | 2013 | 118 min | S16mm on Video
Manakamana is composed of 11 shots from the inside
of a cable car as it transports pilgrims making an ancient
journey to a Nepali mountaintop. The shots unfold
in real-time, corresponding to the duration of a roll
of 16mm film. Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez have
created a film “thrillingly mysterious in its effects: a
staged documentary, a cross between science fiction
and ethnography, an airborne version of an Andy
Warhol screen test. As with the richest structural films,
Manakamana is a kind of head movie that viewers
are invited to complete as they watch, an endlessly
suggestive film that both describes and transcends
the bounds of time and space.” —NYFF
EDUCATIONAL PARTNER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CENTER FOR EAST ASIAN STUDIES
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL
FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

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Thursday

7:15pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 2

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4

A Return to the Return to Reason
Sabine Gruffat
Chapel Hill, NC | 2014 | 3 min | 35mm
WORLD PREMIERE A Return to The Return to Reason is a
tribute to Man Ray’s 1923 film “Le Retour à La Raison”
(A Return to Reason), the first film to use his ‘Rayograph’
technique in which Man Ray exposed found objects onto
film negative.
In this film the found object is Man Ray’s digitized film,
the first Dada film. The“original” film was digitized with
all its aged emulsions, scratches, and splices, then compiled into digital filmstrips. These filmstrips are used
to output a dithered and inverted image that the laser
engraver may etch onto black 35mm film leader. The
film images are created as the laser engraver scratches
away the emulsion on the black leader. In this way, Man
Ray’s spontaneous process becomes systematic. —SG 1
Chicago Loop
James Benning
1976 | 9 min | 35mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION In three virtuosic sequences created entirely in-camera, Benning alternates
contrary camera movements in a trio of Chicago locations with increasing rapidity to a point where they first
fracture and then merge in the viewer’s eye. Restored
print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive 2

Rode Molen
Esther Urlus
Rotterdam, Netherlands | 2013 | 4 min | 35mm
Rode Molen (Red Mill) is a research into motion picture
printing techniques. The starting point and inspiration for
the film are the mill paintings of Piet Mondriaan, especially “Rode Molen.” In the film, color is created by multiple
exposures through different masks during printing.
Depending what developing process is used the colors
mix in two ways: additive or subtractive. —EU 3
Black Drop
Simon Starling
UK | 2012 | 28 min | 35mm on Video
Produced in association with Modern Art, Oxford
and the Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford, the film Black
Drop unfolds in a 35mm editing suite as an editor tries
to bring structure and understanding to a varied
array of material including: footage made on location
in Hawaii and Tahiti on the occasion of the June 2012
transit of Venus, archive material, and ultimately
footage of himself editing. As the editor cuts and splices
the complex narrative unfolds. The film tells the story of
the relationship between astronomy, photography and
the beginnings of moving image technology. Predicated
on the idea that the 2012 transit may be the last to be
recorded on celluloid (the next transit will occur in

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6

8

7

2117), Black Drop tracks the development of the French
astronomer, Jules Janssen’s innovative photographic
revolver – a device that was designed to counter human
error in timing the crucial moments of Venus’ contact
with the edge of the sun, and was influential in the
development of Etienne Jules Marey’s photographic rifle
and the Lumiére Brother’s cinematograph. 4
Main Hall
Philipp Fleischmann
Vienna, Austria | 2013 | 5 min | 35mm
US PREMIERE Designed by Josef Maria Olbrich in 1898, the
main exhibition hall of the Vienna Secession is generally
regarded as one of the first White Cube Spaces of art
history. The myth of the neutral space has a long tradition of being critically examined by the institution itself.
Using 19 specially designed cameras, Main Hall adds a
purely cinematographic gesture to the space’s history
by having it look at its own architecture. 5
Lagos Island
Karimah Ashadu
Nigeria/UK | 2012 | 4 min | Video
Ashadu has constructed a “Camera Wheel Mechanism”
from scrap materials found on the Lagos Island coast,
inspired by the region’s hawkers and laborers and their
ubiquitous, overburdened, handmade carts. A camera
encased inside the mechanism depicts a constantly shifting perspective of the coastline, creating an atmosphere

both playful and tense. Homes built by migrants on the
coast will soon be destroyed by the Lagos government
in a bid to clean up the city. 6
Lunar Almanac
Malena Szlam
Montreal, Canada | 2013 | 4 min | 16mm
Moons in a journey through magnetic spheres,
influencing subtle energies on Earth. —MS 7
Dot Matrix
Richard Tuohy
Victoria, Australia | 2013 | 16 min | 16mm x 2
Dot Matrix is a dual 16mm film involving two almost
completely overlapping projected images. The ‘dots’
were produced by photogramming sheets of dotty paper
(used for manga illustrations) directly onto raw 16mm
film stock. These dots were then contacted printed with
‘flicker’ (alternating black frames) creating strobing
‘interruptions’ to the dots. The drama of the film emerges
in the overlap of the two projected images of dots. The
product they make is greater than the parts. The sounds
heard are those that the dots themselves produce as they
pass the optical sound head of the 16mm projector. 8

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SPONSORED BY UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DIGITAL MEDIA COMMONS

Thursday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

Filmmaker in Attendance

PENELOPE SPHEERIS: FILMS 1968–1998
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences
For a lot of people, Penelope Spheeris
seems to have sprung raucously onto
the independent filmmaking scene
with the unsurpassable The Decline
of Western Civilization in 1981. Never
mind that she had a thriving and
prolific career all through the 70s,
2
1
producing TV and film work for people like Albert Brooks, and creating
a large number of pioneering music shorts for acts like Funkadelic and Ry Cooder. But even these accomplishments of the mid-70s were preceded by her early UCLA film school shorts—an eclectic, revelatory batch of work
that prove her a confident, creative, and sure-footed filmmaker right from the beginning. These six shorts from
1968–1972 are extremely rarely seen, and reveal many of Spheeris’s characteristic interests, modes, and innovations as an independent filmmaker. Earliest expressions of punk sarcasm, sly mockumentary, and disarming intimacy culminate in the breathtaking companion films I Don’t Know (1970) and Hats Off to Hollywood (1972), a pair of
miraculous works that brilliantly and movingly blend documentary and recreation in an utterly unique expression.
Also showing will be Spheeris’s lovely and adoring short portrait of her one-of-a-kind mom, No Use Walkin’ When
You Can Stroll (1998). —Mark Toscano
Synthesis
1968 | 7.5 min | 8mm
Penelope Spheeris’s first film, made
in 8mm Kodachrome at UCLA. In a
seemingly near-future control room
devoid of people, various readouts
and calculations suggest that humankind is not altogether compatible with
the grand scheme of the universe.
Bath
1969 | 5.5 min | 16mm
Made in an environment and at a
time when frequent and gratuitous
images of nude women permeated
the work of her male counterparts,
Spheeris produced this intimate and
sensual observation of a woman
bathing. The appearance of Spheeris’s credit at the beginning of the film
seems to ask the question: how does
voyeurism change when we know
the voyeur is actually a voyeuse?
Shit
1969 | 3.5 min | 16mm
Never completely finished during its
original production, this snarky comic piece was rediscovered in Spheeris’s vaults in 2010 and preserved as-is.
The titular substance plays a key role
in determining an outmoded man’s
role in a changing society. 1

The National Rehabilitation Center
1969 | 12 min | 16mm
Two years before Peter Watkins’
Punishment Park, Spheeris takes
the McCarran Act to its inevitable
next step and shows us - via an
early use of mockumentary - what
the U.S. might be like if potential
subversives were simply locked up
en masse before they had a chance
to subvert anything.

in the lives of Jimmy/Jennifer and
Dana, a loving, bickering couple who
challenge the notion of homonormativity. Drugs, poverty, disease,
bigotry, and prostitution all figure
into this disarmingly candid and often hilarious film, a remarkable work
that is the apotheosis of Spheeris’s
early filmmaking, and a luminous
signpost leading directly to The
Decline of Western Civilization. 2

I Don’t Know
1970 | 20 min | 16mm
A truly major work, I Don’t Know
observes the relationship between
a lesbian and her friend/lover who
prefers to identify somewhere in
between male and female, in an
expression of personal ambiguity
suggested by the film’s title. This
nonfiction film - an unusual, partly
staged work of semi-vérité - is the
first of Spheeris’s films to fully
embrace what would become her
characteristic documentary style:
probing, intimate, uncompromising,
and deeply meaningful.

No Use Walkin’ When You Can Stroll
1998 | 11 min | 35mm
One-time carny, bartender, and married ten times, Penelope Spheeris’s
mother was an uncommon woman.
In this sweet, funny, and moving
video portrait, Spheeris gives us a
vivid glimpse into the richness of
her mother’s life and character.
NEW HD TRANSFERS COURTESY
OF THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE
PROGRAM INTRODUCED BY
MARK TOSCANO, FILM ARCHIVIST
FOR THE ACADEMY OF MOTION
PICTURE ARTS & SCIENCES

Hats Off To Hollywood
1972 | 22 min | 16mm
Picking up the story first presented
in I Don’t Know, Hats Off to Hollywood
brazenly and brilliantly mixes documentary reality with fully staged
recreations/reimaginings of episodes
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SPONSORED BY
BURNS PARK CONSULTING
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM
THE PENNY W. STAMPS
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES

Thursday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 3

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Wildnis (The Wild)
Helena Wittmann
Hamburg, Germany | 2013 | 12 min | Video
Potatoes have to be peeled, withered orchid blossoms
must be plucked. Then everything is in order. —HW 1

A Study in Natural Magic
Charlotte Pryce
Los Angeles, CA | 2013 | 3 min | 16mm
Witness an alchemist’s spell; the transmutation of light
into substance; a glimpse of gold. —CP 4

murmurations
Rebecca Meyers
Lewisburg, PA | 2013 | 6 min | 16mm
A charm; siege; dissimulation. Descent and watch.
Avian voices link gesture and snowfall, macro views
of whiskered branches and furry firs. —RM 2

After Hours
Karen Yasinsky
Baltimore, MD | 2013 | 10.5 min | Video
After Hours originated with thoughts on senseless
violence, cultural observation and hypnotism. My
meditations on these involve anxiety and a sense of expectation which helped form the structure. Many of the
images are repurposed, related but unhinged from their
original context. The work includes puppet animation,
film, video and hand-drawn animation. —KY 5

Light Year
Paul Clipson
San Francisco, CA | 2013 | 10 min | 16mm
An abstract 16mm film study of the San Francisco waterfront, showcasing the complex natural and architectural
systems within this urban landscape, from the ephemeral rhythms of light and water to the rigid order of bridges and skyscrapers. Music by Tashi Wada, performed by
Charles Curtis and Judith Hamann. 3

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Films in Competition 3

Thursday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

5

6

7

8

Prisoner’s Cinema
Joshua Gen Solondz
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 10 min | Video
“It has been widely reported that prisoners confined to
dark cells often see brilliant light displays, which is sometimes called the ‘prisoner’s cinema.’” —Salvatore Cullari
I hand spliced this project until my computer crashed. It
should induce alpha and delta states, the brain states of the
hyper aware and the comatose. For my mother. —JGS 6
sfaíra 1985–1895
Ivan Ladislav Galeta (1947–2014)
Croatia | 1985 | 10 min | 35mm
sfaíra 1985–1895 is dedicated to Pythagoras and Plato
and is an homage to two of Galeta’s favorite spheroids:
the Earth and the Sun. The protagonist, as we are
informed by the title sequence, is a sculpture named
Earthbound Sun and the film’s photography, a stunning
example of optical printing techniques, shows his affection for both. With sfaíra, Galeta delivers a pictorial and
literary Maximalism, in a way that only cinema can do
but had not been done before. —Vassily Bourikas
Print courtesy of Zagreb Film. 7

Let Us Persevere In What
We Have Resolved Before We Forget
Ben Russell
USA/France/Vanuatu | 2013 | 20 min | 16mm on Video
“We are happy. (Silence.) What do we do now, now that
we are happy?” —Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot
“John Frum prophesied the occurrence of a cataclysm
in which Tanna would become flat, the volcanic mountains would fall and fill the river-beds to form fertile
plains, and Tanna would be joined to the neighbouring islands of Eromanga and Aneityum to form a new
island. Then John Frum would reveal himself, bringing
in a reign of bliss, the natives would get back their youth
and there would be no sickness; there would be no need
to care for gardens, trees or pigs. The Whites would
go; John Frum would set up schools to replace mission
schools, and would pay chiefs and teachers.” —Peter
Worsley, The Trumpet Shall Sound: a study of cargo
cults in Melanesia 8

SPONSORED BY TEAHAUS

A F T E R PA R T Y

Enjoy independent and experimental mixology
in a 1920s speakeasy setting, with live video and DJs.

The Ravens Club | 11pm–2am | FREE
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F R I D AY

A S P E L L T O WA R D O F F T H E D A R K N E S S
PA G E 5 3

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Friday

12:30pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FREE

JEREMY RIGSBY: ARCHAIC BEASTS,
GOD’S ASSHOLE AND OTHER IDEAS
OF THE PREVIOUS CENTURY
Juror Presentation
Presented and curated by Jeremy Rigsby and
Oona Mosna, Program Directors of the Media City
Film Festival. Media City is an annual international
festival of film and video art presented over five
days in Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan.
In July 2014, Media City will hold its 20th edition.
This program features nine films by artists whose
work has been featured in retrospectives presented during the first two decades of Media City.

15/67 TV
Kurt Kren | Austria | 1967 | 4 min | 16mm
“... [T]his film involves the audience in a conceptual and
reflexive process. Five short sequences are all shot from
the same viewpoint in a quay-side café... Each shot,
containing some small movement, is repeated in the
film twenty-one times, in mathematically determined
order... The significance does not lie in the mathematical sequences as such, but in how the viewer attempts
to decipher the structure... The nature of the similarities between the images and motion is such that the
reflexive mode of the viewer is taken through a number
of distinguishable phases, as first the images themselves
are recognized and defined, then remembered, then
their sequence noted and compared via memory.”
—Malcolm LeGrice, Abstract Film and Beyond 1

WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL
FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

Boston Fire
Peter Hutton | USA | 1979 | 8 min | 16mm
“Boston Fire finds grandeur in smoke rising eloquently
from a city blaze... The beautiful texture of the smoke
coupled with the isolation from the source of the fire
erases the destructive impact of the event. The camera,
lost in the immense dark clouds, produces images for
meditation removed from the causes or consequences of
the scene. The tiny firemen, seen as distant silhouettes,
gaze in awe, helpless before nature’s power.” —Leger
Grindon, Millennium Film Journal
Shot-Countershot
Peter Tscherkassky | Austria | 1986 | 1 min | 16mm
“Shot-countershot. The idea of the century.”
—Hans Fraeulin 5
Boston Steamer
Friedl vom Gröller | Austria | 2009 | 3 min | 16mm
“Boston Steamer is based on the unusual idea that God’s
asshole is visible during a full moon, being the round
ball itself.” —Dietmar Schwärzler

Rhinoceroses
Karl Kels | Germany | 1987 | 9 min | 16mm
“Kels organizes sequences of images with an accelerated
activity unnatural for his subjects but coherent for the
process of cinematographic creation. At the end of the
film the archaic beasts slowly and imperturbably leave
their cage. At that moment, with the camera recording
what takes place in front of it in real time, their gestures
regain an intrinsic timelessness, finding, in our company, the sort of peacefulness they need to exit the stage.”
—Miryam van Lier 2
Da Capo: Variations on a Train with Anna
Guy Sherwin | England | 2000 | 16mm | 9 min
“[A] set of variations, in picture and sound. Fourteen
interpretations of a keyboard prelude by J.S. Bach accompany images taken from a train leaving a station.”
—Guy Sherwin 3

Hong Kong (HKG)
Gerard Holthuis | Netherlands | 1999 | 14 min | 35mm
“Mysterious chrome creatures over the heart of Hong
Kong. A film about life and a city; an observation of the
end of the last century.” —Gerard Holthuis 4

Erwin, Toni, IIse
Friedl vom Gröller | Austria | 1969 | 9 min | 16mm
“Thematically, Friedl vom Gröller (Kubelka)’s films
are closely related to her photographic works, which
are portraits. In 1968 she began working with film,
producing her first sketch of three individuals. The three
protagonists appear in various aquatic environments in
Vienna, at the Danube Canal or the Danube River itself.
The final passages herald [her] later approach: the film
portrait, which dispenses with language and plot.”
—Hemma Schmutz 6
Portrait
Sergei Loznitsa | Russia | 2002 | 28 min | 35mm
“Portrait consists of what at first appear to be photographs of Russian farmers. But as we watch the carefully
composed scenes, small details in the background
begin to catch our eye... Occasionally someone shifts
their weight, or turns slightly, or blinks... [A] thoughtful
meditation on man and nature, city and country, old
Russia and new... Portrait is provocative exactly because
it plays with the artifices of traditional portraiture, of
iconic ‘peasants’.” —Slavic Review 7

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Friday

3pm

UMMA Helmet Stern Auditorium

FREE

FROM GULF TO GULF TO GULF
Film in Competition

From Gulf to Gulf to Gulf
CAMP (Shaina Anand and Ashok Sukumaran)
India | 2013 | 83 min | Video
Comprising over four years of footage, From Gulf to
Gulf to Gulf is the result of a collaboration between the
Indian art collective CAMP (Shaina Anand and Ashok
Sukumaran) and a group of sailors from the Kutch
district in western India. A modern adventure on the
high seas (captured with cell phone cameras and set
to a soundtrack of old and new Bollywood, Pakistani,
and local religious songs chosen by the sailors), the film
captures workaday life and lazy hours as the sailors
ferry everything from electronics to livestock from the
Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Aden to the Somali coast and
back again. —Nellie Killian

SHAINA ANAND AND ASHOK SUKUMARAN
IN ATTENDANCE
SHAINA ANAND AND ASHOK SUKUMARAN’S
VISIT MADE POSSIBLE BY THE ROMAN J. WITT ARTIST
RESIDENCY PROGRAM, PENNY W. STAMPS SCHOOL OF
ART & DESIGN, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, AND THE
ART GALLERY OF WINDSOR
SCREENING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MUSEUM OF ART
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL
FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

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Friday

4pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

THOM ANDERSEN: RED HOLLYWOOD
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

Red Hollywood
Thom Andersen and Noël Burch
USA | 1996 | 114 min | Video
Made in collaboration with Noël
Burch, the video Red Hollywood is
one product of Andersen’s years of
research into the Hollywood blacklist, a larger project that comprises
several essays and a book, Les communistes de Hollywood: Autre chose
que martyrs, also written with Burch,
that has never appeared in English.
At the heart of Andersen’s project
is the conviction that, contrary to the
claims of their milquetoast liberal
apologists, many of the writers,
directors and producers who refused
to testify before HUAC were not only
committed leftists of one sort or
another, but that many of them produced films of political significance.

As he wrote in his first essay on the
subject: “It would be an injustice to
those who were blacklisted to say
they did nothing to deserve it. A
history of the blacklist must first be
worthy of them all.”
In the video, this argument is
persuasively advanced through Billy
Woodbury’s narration. But it is much
more than a cinematic extension of
the arguments Andersen and Burch
have made elsewhere. Through extended excerpts from more than 50
films, and in interviews with blacklisted artists, including Abraham
Polonsky, Paul Jarrico, and Afred
Lewis Levitt, Andersen and Burch
give the films and filmmakers space
to speak for themselves, sometimes
to confirm, sometimes to contradict
the filmmakers’ own claims.
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The video’s dialectical structure
produces a three-dimensional monument to the polysemous powers
of cinema. Even more than any of
its particular claims, Red Hollywood
insists upon the political necessity
of popular art forms and the dignity
of the sometimes unpopular artists
who use them. —Colin Beckett
FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
RED HOLLYWOOD SCREENS IN A
VERSION DIGITALLY REMASTERED
IN 2013.
PROGRAM INTRODUCED BY
RACHAEL RAKES, INDEPENDENT
CURATOR, CRITIC AND FILM EDITOR
FOR THE BROOKLYN RAIL

Friday

5pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

PENELOPE SPHEERIS: THE DECLINE
OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION
Co-Presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

The Decline of Western Civilization
Penelope Spheeris
USA | 1981 | 100 min | 35mm
The Decline of Western Civilization
is a ragingly vital work, a blistering,
vividly insightful and energetic portrait of the Los Angeles punk scene
(and, by extension, the city’s—and
America’s—disenfranchised youth
culture) ca. 1979–80. It is THE punk
documentary, and a standard by
which all others—all other music documentaries, really—are measured.
Combining an informal, interactive
approach with expert, incisive
filmmaking, Spheeris reveals the
surprisingly eclectic, kaleidoscopic
nature of Los Angeles punk, using

incredible performances and interactions with seminal groups Black
Flag, The Germs, Catholic Discipline,
X, Circle Jerks, Alice Bag Band, and
Fear as the film’s foundation. The
tapestry is woven to a striking complexity with additional commentary
from writers, club owners, security
guards, and the punks themselves,
who open up in a series of iconic,
fragmentary interviews. Throughout
the entire movie, Spheeris’s intelligent, focused, and caring presence
is strongly felt, never intruding
yet never hiding, her curiosity and
fascination fueling this unforgettable film with a palpable, wide-eyed
excitement. —Mark Toscano
52

PRINT COURTESY OF
PENELOPE SPHEERIS AND
THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE
FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM
THE PENNY W. STAMPS
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES
SPONSORED BY THE CROFOOT
COMMUNITY PARTNER
WCBN-FM ANN ARBOR

Friday

7pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

A SPELL TO WARD OFF THE DARKNESS
Feature in Competition

A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness
Ben Rivers and Ben Russell
Estonia/France | 2013
98 min | 16mm on Video
The close collaboration between
internationally celebrated artistfilmmakers Ben Rivers (Two Years
at Sea) and Ben Russell (Let Each
One Go Where He May) has yielded
an intriguing ethno-trance aesthetic
that finds its stunning summa in
their much anticipated co-directed
feature A Spell to Ward Off the
Darkness. An immersive, at times
mesmerizing experience, Spell
follows a nameless protagonist—
played with Bressonian restraint
by musician Robert A.A. Lowe,
of Lichens and Om fame—as he
explores three markedly different
existential options: as a member
of a fifteen-person commune on
a small Estonian island; living
alone in the breathtaking wilds of
northern Finland; and as a singerguitarist for a neopagan black metal
band in Norway.

Shot on Super 16mm by Rivers,
Russell and Chris Fawcett (the
Steadicam operator for Let Each
One), Spell is awash in atmosphere,
bathed successively in natural,
incandescent sunshine, the blues
of a perpetual magic hour, and
the stroboscopic concert lighting
of a dingy bar. Liberated from
conventional narrative causality,
Robert’s trajectory charts a
continuous drift (superbly conveyed
by a floating camera) that signals
a radical investigation of the self,
an enigmatic effort to “ward off
the darkness” that is engulfing our
increasingly secularized world. Is
this a search for fulfillment, mutual
understanding, a gesture to quell
boredom and unremitting solitude,
an affront to utopianism, or simply a
natural progression through life?
Choreographing the movements of
their non-actors, Rivers and Russell
explore a participatory ethnography
with both their real-life characters
and us, the viewers, drawing deeply
from the elemental in order to shake
us from our viewing habits. Bound
53

by the structures that inevitably
dictate our lives, it’s easy to forget
that the world is vast and ripe with
possibilities, and that we should
probably attempt a few alternate
modes of existence before we leave
this Earth behind. —Andréa Picard

PRECEDED BY

Still Life
Bruce Baillie
USA | 1966 | 3 min | 16mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION

A single-take roll of film recording a
tableau of table top objects, flowers
and incidental conversation at the
Morningstar commune.
Preservation print courtesy of the
Academy Film Archive

BEN RUSSELL
& ROBERT A.A. LOWE
IN ATTENDANCE
SPONSORED BY
ENCORE RECORDS

Friday

7:15pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 4

1

Misterio (Mystery)
Chema García Ibarra
Elche, Spain | 2013 | 12 min | Video
They say that if you put your ear to the back
of his neck, you can hear the Virgin talk. —CGI 1

Nail Art
Martha Jurksaitis
Leeds, UK | 2013 | 3 min | 16mm
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE Nail Art is a 16mm film made
entirely using nail varnishes and nail stickers as my materials. It’s a visceral response to the craze for nail art,
and considers whether nail art is wholly at odds with
female freedom, as an activity that requires maintaining
a veneer at the cost of empowered physical action in the
world, or whether it’s a modern-day equivalent to patchwork and a piecing together of feminine community and
the emergence of a fresh and active aesthetics. —MJ 5

The Obvious Child
Stephen Irwin
Kingston, UK | 2013 | 12.5 min | Video
Somebody broke the girl’s parents. The rabbit was
there when it happened. It was an awful mess. —SI 2
CARS & KILLERS
Gretchen Skogerson
Boston, MA | 2013 | 2 min | Video
CARS & KILLERS hitches found text, image and
sound together for a ride. —GS 3
The Blazing World
Jessica Bardsley
Boston, MA | 2013 | 20 min | Video
A troubling relationship arises between the character
played by Winona Ryder in the film Girl, Interrupted, the
genuine depression experienced by the actress, and the
shoplifting of which she was accused. Consisting entirely
of clips stolen from existing films, this video essay,
which ultimately turns out to be profoundly personal,
explores possible links between depression and kleptomania. —JB 4

ELSA merdelamerdelamer
Abigail Child
New York, NY | 2013 | 4 min | Video
Abigail Child’s short, ELSA merdelamerdelamer, is a
smoky, punky and sexy chapter in the collectively made
Feminist bio-drama, The Baroness, about the Baroness
Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Inspired by an event that
was lost in development where Man Ray and Duchamp
make a film of the Baroness shaving her public hair. 6
Adeline For Leaves
Jessica Sarah Rinland
Surrey, UK | 2014 | 13.5 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE Adeline For Leaves explores nature,
science and mythology through the eyes of an elevenyear-old botanical prodigy, and her recently deceased,
elderly mentor. 7

54

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2

3

4

5

6

7

SPONSORED BY

COMMUNITY PARTNER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

COLLEGE FOR CREATIVE STUDIES

FILM AND VIDEO STUDENT ASSOCIATION

55

Friday

9:15pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

PENELOPE SPHEERIS: THE DECLINE
OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION PART III
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

The Decline of Western Civilization Part III
Penelope Spheeris
USA | 1997 | 86 min | 35mm
In the third entry in Spheeris’s vital trilogy, the very
title of the series takes on a dark literalism: while the
“decline” of the first film was largely a reclamation of
that word as an ironic and earnest challenge to the status quo, the third film finds Los Angeles punks and punk
culture in a deeply nihilistic emotional rubble.
The ragged idealism of 1979–80 has devolved as the
culture attracted even more desperately disenfranchised
youths who found their only family and community
in the mid-’90s gutter punk scene. Spheeris’s probing
camera, both tender and confrontational, digs deep into
what might otherwise remain an impenetrable subcul-

ture and reveals a defiant, damaged humanity, albeit
one that often feels rootless and apathetic. The degree
to which the kids trust and connect with her is truly
remarkable, and the end result is a sad, powerful work
of rare intensity and honesty. —Mark Toscano

56

PRINT COURTESY OF PENELOPE SPHEERIS
AND THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE
FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM
THE PENNY W. STAMPS DISTINGUISHED
SPEAKER SERIES

Friday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

ANIMATED FILMS IN COMPETITION

1

2

4

5

3

6

The Reality Factory
Bryan Boyce
San Francisco, CA | 2013 | 1 min | Video
Bill O’Reilly discusses the nature of truth and illusion. —BB 1
Unicorn Blood (Sangre de Unicornio)
Alberto Vazquez
A Coruña, Spain | 2013 | 9 min | Video
Two teddy bears go hunting unicorns, their favorite
prey. Unicorns have tender flesh and delicious blueberry-flavoured blood which the bears need to stay
cute-looking. —AV 2
Velocity
Karolina Glusiec
London, UK | 2012 | 6 min | Video
“I always thought I had a perfect memory. I wanted
to show these drawings to you.” A collection of memories, drawings and loss. —KG 3
Crux Film
Lilli Carré and Alexander Stewart
Chicago, IL | 2013 | 5 min | Video
Precarious and fluid arrangements constantly interrupt
one another in a montage of waiting, anticipating, and

transitioning forms. Arrangements of marks and geometric forms are faced with unresolved states. Objects
struggle to maintain their shape, stay upright, or avoid
disappearing.
Crux Film is an animation composed of segments of
work by Lilli Carré and Alexander Stewart. Created over
the course of several weeks in shared studio spaces,
these simple animated segments developed directly in
response to one another; ideas, images, challenges and
structures ping-ponging back and forth between the two
animator’s light boxes. 4
Blanket Statement #2: All or Nothing
Jodie Mack
Lebanon, NH | 2013 | 4 min | 16mm
A quilted call and response. A battle of
extreme extremes. 5
Tropical Depression
Kelly Sears
Glendale, CA | 2012 | 3 min | Video
Footage from recent hurricanes and the 1931 Miss Universe Contest are collaged into an animated séance that
channels Galveston’s haunted history. 6

57

Animated Films in Competition

Friday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

8

7

9

10

Toto
Zbigniew Czapla
Krakow, Poland | 2013 | 12 min | Video
A story of a sensitive boy, raised by a lonely and hard
working mother somewhere in a far province, where life
revolves around daily, inveterate habits. The young protagonist is being deceitfully seduced by a shady “master”
and cynical collector of keys. In consequence of the mystery and rather incomprehensible events, the world of his
unconcerned childhood falls apart. The boy gets lost on
his way back home while his concerned mother embarks
upon a desperate attempt to find her little son. 7
Unmistaken Hands: Ex Voto F.H.
Quay Brothers
London, UK | 2013 | 26 min | Video
Working in the stop-motion puppet animation technique for which they are best known, this new film by
the Quay Brothers is based on the work of Uruguayan
writer Felisberto Hernández, often referred to as the
father of “magic realism,” for whom the Quays share a
strong affinity. 8

To Thy Heart (Do Serca Twego)
Ewa Borysewicz
Krakow, Poland | 2013 | 10 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE “He was so handsome, with his
jet-black hair, standing by the swing. When he smiled,
eyes would stand on end. It was schizophrenic - he was
so messed up that she would do whatever he said. She
wanted to listen to his sweet-talking, wanted him to talk
until the moon was up. Then she stopped pinning her
hopes on him. She couldn’t let him off so easily for his
betrayal.” Ewa Borysewicz’s animation is a secular litany
and a story of affection ending in bitter disappointment,
echoing through a tower block estate. 9
The Great Rabbit
Atsushi Wada
Kobe, Japan | 2012 | 7.5 min | Video
Once we called the noble, profound and mysterious
existence The Great. We have moved with the time, our
thought and consciousness has changed. And yet what
makes us still keep calling it The Great? —AW 10

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COMMUNITY PARTNER

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WSG GALLERY

58

Friday

11pm–1am

Performance Network Theatre

$5 (Free w/ AAFF Pass)

LICHENS
Live Performance
Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe records and performs
under the name of Lichens. He has released several
recordings on the Kranky and Type music labels and
has performed in the bands Singer and Om. Lowe is a
multi instrumentalist, working with voice and modular
synthesizer performing a spontaneous music that is
singular and ecstatic.
CO-PRESENTED BY WCBN-FM ANN ARBOR
COMMUNITY PARTNER
PERFORMANCE NETWORK THEATRE
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL
FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

Friday

12am

State Theatre

$7 Tickets

SUBURBIA
Midnight Movie

Suburbia
Penelope Spheeris
USA | 1984 | 94 min | 35mm
Produced by Roger Corman, Penelope Spheeris’s cult film
features non-professional performances by street kids
and punk musicians (Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers
among others). Mostly refugees from broken, lower- middle-class families who call themselves ‘’The Rejected’’ or

A F T E R PA R T Y
The Bar at 327 Braun Court | 11pm–2am | FREE

the “TRs”, the film depicts the lives of suburban punks
who squat in an abandoned bungalow in a Los Angeles
area that’s been condemned to make way for a new
freeway. With live performances by Southern Californian
punk bands D.I., The Vandals, and T.S.O.L.
“Suburbia is at its best when it is simply observing the
randomness of the lives of its young people, watching
them at aggressive play in a punk- rock club, stealing
food from suburban freezers or just sitting around in the
garbage of their beloved pad. Spheeris’s film is probably the best teen-agers-in-revolt movie since Jonathan
Kaplan’s Over the Edge and far better than Francis Ford
Coppola’s Outsiders and Rumble Fish.” —Vincent Canby,
New York Times
PRINT COURTESY OF PENELOPE SPHEERIS
AND THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE

Celebrate the festival with a drink
at our neighborhood bar!
59

60

S AT U R D AY

L O S A N G E L E S P L AY S I T S E L F
PA G E 6 5

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Saturday

11am

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

$5 Tickets

FILMS IN COMPETITION 5
Ages 6+

1

3
2

4

5

Give Me a Pie
Gina Kamentsky
Somerville, MA | 2013 | 1.5 min | 35mm on Video
WORLD PREMIERE Peg leg man dreams of a burlesque
queen. There are crash tests, several dogs and a pie.
—GK 1
What A Day
Shannon Lee
Detroit, MI | 2013 | 3 min | 16mm on Video
WORLD PREMIERE The protagonist of this story is taken out
of his daily routine by a suspiciously delicious cupcake
that sends him on a bizarre journey, promoting illogical
moments in life. This film was made with decorative
tape, glitter, permanent marker, magazine clippings,
and a razor blade on 16mm clear leader film. 2
Strange Wonderful
Stephanie Swart
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 4.5 min | Video
Little monster goes to school that day. She thinks,
“They probably call me snail face when I’m not
around.” Sometimes she gets lonely but she can
be happy too. —SS 3

Whispers on the Prairie
Deanna Morse
Grand Rapids, MI | 2013 | 4 min | Video
The first American lawn: Prairie. Back to our roots, to
the medley of native flowers that thrive in our forests
and our sustainably landscaped lawns. From the manicured carpets of blades of grass to the cacaphony of
colors in the native landscape. Score by Edie Herrold. 4
Light Plate
Josh Gibson
Durham, NC | 2012 | 10 min | 35mm
This whimsical black-and-white film essay explores
the Tuscan landscape and the relationship between
tradition, modernity and food. Through shimmering,
hand-processed, window-framed ruminations, time
passes in licks of light, while a storm gathers and a
woman makes pasta by hand. —JG 5
Early 12 New York Song
Amanda Katz and Georg Anthony Svatek
Brooklyn, NY | 2012 | 3 min | Video
Objects and sounds collected on an early morning walk
through Brooklyn, NY billow against a sun-struck floor.
The smallest parts of the city are up for grabs. 6
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6

8

10

9

11

Little block of cement with
disheveled hair containing the sea
Jorge López Navarrete
Barcelona, Spain | 2013 | 15.5 min | Video
A dog and a mare embark upon a voyage together. 7
Forward Biased Condition
John Woods
Vancouver, Canada | 2013 | 3.5 min | 16mm
US PREMIERE Always in motion, never resting. This is a film
about the forward biased conditions of light and time. 8
F-Line
Silvia Turchin
Berkeley, CA | 2013 | 9 min | Video
F-Line is a poetic documentary that explores an ethereal
past and romance aboard San Francisco’s historic streetcars. The film was made with the underlying belief that
cinema, as Dziga Vertov said, “is capable of showing and
creating a world that the human eye alone cannot see.” 9
SPONSORED BY ANN ARBOR AREA COMMUNITY
CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU
COMMUNITY PARTNERS FESTIFOOLS
& ANN ARBOR DISTRICT LIBRARY

Musical Recordings from the Realm of the Dead
Troy Morgan
Los Angeles, CA | 2014 | 6 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE Four separate individuals at the dawn
of wireless technology become accidental collaborators
in a musical composition that is pieced together through
radio waves. This meditation on the creative process
reflects on the outcome of our individual endeavors and
suggests that it is impossible to be aware of what our
work ultimately will become once it is released from
our hands. Focusing on the sound design as the main
character, this fictionalized journey through early radio
explores the subtle changes that occur as a song travels
from person to person through new technologies. The
traveling sound moves through space, evolving, morphing, and letting go of its origin, in the same manner as
a modern Internet meme, giving a brief insight into the
unexpected uses and cultural manifestations that occur
within modern telecommunications. 10
FFF1
Marcin Giżycki
Warsaw, Poland | 2013 | 4 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE A free form film (without a
script) created with free tools found on the Internet.
A tribute to John and James Whitney. —MG 11
63

Saturday

11am

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FILMS IN COMPETITION 6

3

6
1

5

2

4

Sleeping District
Tinne Zenner
Brussels, Belgium | 2014 | 11 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE Combining outside and inside views
of residential areas built during the Soviet Era with
disjointed conversations translated from Russian into
a broken English, the film explores notions of home
shaped by memory, history, relations and objects.
While related to tangible experiences, it suggests
how these inform our imagination. 1

The Land Behind
Sabrina Ratté
Montreal, Canada | 2013 | 5 min | Video
Traveling on an undefined territory where the illusion
of a continuous tracking shot emphasizes an unreachable destination. Through the syncopated editing and
multiple transitions, images of the area themselves
become traveling entities, creating confusion on the
level of the depicted space as much as with the level
of its temporality. —SR 4

Cold Open
Seamus Harahan
Belfast, N. Ireland | 2013 | 12 min | Video
Six scenes recorded over one year in the vicinity of the
Waterworks (Queen Mary’s Park), in north Belfast; with
Harahan interested in a “making that ‘is’ about looking,
recording before thought, the visual consequence
of an absent minded gaze in response to the world;
locating yourself, locating others – mapping emotional
and intellectual spaces, being part of the moving mass;
the accumulation of meanings in the dislocation of the
familiar, where narratives recede in the minutae of
gesture and sound.” 2

Certain Things
Mark Toscano
Los Angeles, CA | 2014 | 4 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE Certain things you remember. These
are two of them, remembered by my father, as we drove
north on S. Las Vegas Blvd in November, 2011. —MT 5

South Bland Street
Lina Verchery
Somerville, MA | 2013 | 3 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE An experimental ethnography of a place,
tracing geographies of time, memory, and decay. 3

Mille Soleils
Mati Diop
Senegal/France | 2013 | 45 min | Video
Mati Diop creates a beautiful, haunting portrait of Magaye
Niang, the lead actor of the 1973 film Touki-Bouki. One of
the most important films of African cinema, Touki-Bouki
was directed by the filmmaker’s uncle Djibril Diop Mambéty. Set in Dakar and Alaska, A Thousand Suns portrays
Niang as a “sad-eyed cattle herder who embodied the
seminal role in Touki-Bouki forty years ago…[and]…is
now filled with longing for the vanished past and a future
that was never meant to be.” (Andréa Picard) 6

64

Saturday

12:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

THOM ANDERSEN:
LOS ANGELES PLAYS ITSELF
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

Los Angeles Plays Itself
Thom Andersen
USA | 2003/2013 | 170 min | Video
Newly remastered and re-edited, Thom Andersen’s
2003 opus, Los Angeles Plays Itself, traces the development and evolution of Los Angeles, “the most photographed city in the world.” Composed of hundreds of
film clips drawn from a century of cinema with a voiceover that is both lucid and humorous, the film garnered
broad critical acclaim and is considered one
of the essential documentaries of the 2000s.

Along the way, it recalls how movies have documented
vanished landmarks and neighborhoods.
The third section (The City as Subject) considers
movies that take the city itself as their subject, beginning
with Chinatown in 1974.
Movies about Los Angeles have been, for the most part,
period films, set in the past or in the future, and they
replace the public history of the city with a secret history,
opaque to its citizens. This urban legend is not innocent. It serves to dissuade naive viewers from political
engagement by telling them that they are condemned to
ignorance and powerlessness, no matter what they do.
In fact, the truth is the opposite: the public history is the
The first section (The City as Background) is about build- real history, as the treatments of Chinatown, Who Framed
ings and places, famous and obscure, and how they get Roger Rabbit, and L.A. Confidential demonstrate.
The notable exceptions to this pattern are some
typecast and transformed by movies.
low-budget independent films about ethnic minorities
The second section (The City as Character) considers
made in the tradition of neorealism, and it is with these
shifting attitudes toward the city expressed in the work
that Los Angeles Plays Itself concludes. —Thom Andersen
of film-makers who have self-consciously made the city
an important presence in their films.
It begins with Billy Wilder’s Double Indemnity, about
FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
which Richard Schickel wrote,”You could charge L.A.
as a co-conspirator in the crimes this movie relates,”
INTRODUCED BY GENEVIEVE YUE, CRITIC AND
and it ends with Jacques Demy’s Model Shop, in which
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AT THE NEW SCHOOL (NY)
the protagonist declares,”It’s a fabulous city. To think
some people claim it’s an ugly city when it’s really
SPONSORED BY MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
pure poetry, it just kills me.”
OF ARTS AND LETTERS FILM STUDIES PROGRAM
65

Saturday

1pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FILMS IN COMPETITION 7

5

We Had the Experience But Missed the Meaning
Laida Lertxundi
Los Angeles, CA | 2014 | 8 min | 16mm
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE Inspired, in part, by the short
story ‘Todos los hombres son iguales’ by Argentinian
writer Adolfo Bioy Casares; with the film’s title coming
from T.S. Eliot’s poem ‘The Dry Salvages.’ 1

Toros
Robert Fenz
Los Angeles, CA | 2014 | 6 min | 35mm
Toros is meditation on bullfighting, shot in Spain in 2013.
Intended to be shown as a looped multiscreen projection in HD and 35mm; here, as an exception, it will be
shown all together. 4

Life/Expectancy
Michele Fleming
USA | 1999 | 30 min | 16mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION Life/Expectancy is the
final 16mm film by Michele Fleming (1954–2013) before
she moved onto working in other media.
“In Life/Expectancy I would use the movies as the
repository for stories in fragmented form. After all,
there had been… we had been told… ‘the death of the
author.’ It was up to us now as ‘scripters’ to make
meaning. The contemporary story would lack completion. That lack could even be considered a ‘normalized’
state of our historic moment. Stories would have beginnings… would have ends… but no developed middle.
The piece is organized around ‘chapters’ or sequences
that try to represent different types of storytelling.
None of the approaches to storytelling explored here
are successful.” —Michele Fleming 2
Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive

The Disquiet
Ali Cherri
Lebanon/France | 2013 | 20 min | Video
US PREMIERE Lebanon has witnessed a number of violent earthquakes as a result of its geographical location
on several fault lines. Through an investigation of the
country’s seismic history, The Disquiet explores the
catastrophe in the making. 5
By the Lake
Chick Strand
USA | 1986 | 10 min | 16mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION “This is a sort of collage
film, using images shot for other films that somehow
never were finished. The sound comes from various
sound gathering adventures. Some were recorded at
Lake Tahoe, more during an operation on a horse, and
some is taken from a tape of an old radio program, ‘I
Love a Mystery.’ ” —Chick Strand
Preservation print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive

Winter Present
Robert Todd
Boston, MA | 2014 | 6 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE Jewels and entryways. Awaiting
the Thaw. —RT 3

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66

1

2

2

3

4

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Saturday

3pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FILMS IN COMPETITION 8

1

2

3

4

Eleven Forty Seven
Marika Borgeson
Los Angeles, CA | 2012 | 12 min | Video
Granite, metal, conifers, glass, and K-spar crystals. 1
Rivergarden
Jack Cronin
Ann Arbor, MI | 2013 | 10 min | Super 8mm on Video
Rivergarden explores the river as a place of spectacle
and reverie. 2
Lagos Sand Merchants
Karimah Ashadu
Nigeria/UK | 2013 | 9.5 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE Lagos Sand Merchants focuses on a
group of ‘Sand Merchants’ on the outskirts of Lagos, arduously trawling the Lagos State Lagoon and unearthing
sand deep from the river bed for the construction industry. Ashadu constructed a revolving device- the “Rotate
2 Mechanism (Drumroll).” As the mechanism moves, the
image lurches towards the ground and comes back up
again, as if surfacing for air. The mechanism becomes
a mirror of the task – producing a rhythmic quality that
reflects the monotonous yet poetic relationship between
the merchants and the lagoon. 3

DER SPAZIERGANG
Margaret Rorison
Baltimore, MD | 2013 | 3 min | Video
A document of my extensive walks taken throughout
the city of Berlin, during the cold days of April 1–7, 2013.
The film is edited in camera and composed of single
frame snapshots along with longer moments of glance,
captured on one 100’ roll of film. The soundtrack incorporates field recordings from these walks, as well as a
handmade beat sequencer and electromagnetic pickups
capturing the engine of a 16mm projector. The title
comes from a story by Robert Walser. 4
Fresno
Leandro Listorti
Buenos Aires, Argentina | 2014 | 3 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE In Norse mythology, the World Tree
Yggdrasil is commonly held to be an ash tree (Fraxinus).
The Norsemen had a very peculiar worldview, where
space was not unique nor continuous, and the universe
was made up of different worlds, where they could
destroy each world and create new ones. Amid the turmoil, Yggdrasil, always remains immovable, protecting
those who are saved from the cataclysms, to populate a
new world. Fresno shows one year in the life of one of
these trees. 5

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10

Brimstone Line
Chris Kennedy
Toronto, Canada | 2013 | 9 min | 16mm
Three grids are placed along the Credit River in rural
Ontario. They become devices through which the
stationary camera, pointing upstream, delineates
the landscape. They motivate the movement of the
zoom, which intensifies our sense of the field of view,
narrowing vision and flattening space. The river, framed
momentarily, flows past. 6
45 7 Broadway
Tomonari Nishikawa
Vestal, NY | 2013 | 5 min | 16mm
This is about Times Square, the noises and movements
at this most well-known intersection. It was shot on
B&W films through color filters, red, green, and blue,
then optically printed onto color films through these
filters. The layered images of shots by handheld camera
would agitate the scenes, and advertisements on the
digital billboards try to pull ahead of others. 7

Denkbilder
Pablo Marín
Buenos Aires, Argentina | 2013 | 5 min | 16mm
Fragments of a journey… Berlin, Buenos Aires and
the chaotic chances of building something close to
a cartography of remembrances. 8
sound that
Kevin Jerome Everson
Charlottesville, VA | 2014 | 12 min | 16mm on Video
WORLD PREMIERE sound that follows employees of the
Cleveland Water Department on the hunt for what lies
beneath, as they investigate for leaks in the infrastructure in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. 9
Fe26
Kevin Jerome Everson
Charlottesville, VA | 2014 | 7.5 min | 16mm on Video
Fe26 follows two gentlemen around the East Side of
Cleveland, Ohio and examines the tensions between
illegal work—in this case, the stealing of manhole covers
and copper piping—and the basic survival tactics that
exist in areas of high unemployment. 10

COMMUNITY PARTNER THINK LOCAL FIRST

69

Saturday

5pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FROM DEEP
Feature in Competition

From Deep
Brett Kashmere
Canada/USA | 2013 | 88 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE Basketball is everywhere in American
life. It can be found on driveways and playgrounds,
in gyms and alleyways and backyard courts, across all
avenues of popular media, and, recently, at the White
House. Its style has been absorbed into mainstream
fashion, language and music. Todd Boyd writes that
the merger of basketball and hip hop “stands at the
forefront of all that is hip, cutting edge, and controversial in contemporary American society.” The confluence
of new media, marketable stars, compelling social
narratives, and changes in the cultural landscape have
made basketball the sport that most defines our current
moment. Since its invention as a means for taming
aggression during the long New England winters of the
late-1800s, to rise of Dr. J, the slam dunk, and the integration of urban style into the pro game in the 1970s,
to its emergence as the 21st century American pastime,

basketball has become a shaping force in American life
and a global phenomenon.
From Deep documents the presence of basketball
within the sociocultural landscape of contemporary
America. Combining self-shot “moving snapshots” of the
game in its everyday form with a wide array of archival
footage, highlight reels, movie clips, commercials, music
videos, video game recordings, and found material, this
audiovisual essay offers a layered, non-linear perspective on the merger of basketball and hip hop culture, focused through the wide angle lens of the game’s history.

FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
SPONSORED BY HONIGMAN
EDUCATIONAL PARTNER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DEPRTMENT OF AFROAMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES

70

Saturday

5pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

THE ABSENT STONE (LA PIEDRA AUSENTE)
Feature in Competition

The Absent Stone
(La Piedra Ausente)
Jesse Lerner and Sandra Rozental
Mexico/USA | 2013
82 min | 35mm
In 1964, through an impressive feat
of engineering, the largest carved
stone in the Americas was moved
from San Miguel, Coatlinchan to the
National Anthropology Museum in
Mexico City. The extraction of the
enormous monolith, which represents a pre-Hispanic rain deity,
set off a rebellion in the town and

led to the intervention of the army.
Today, the enormous stone, now
upright, is an urban monument;
it has been transformed into one
of the principal icons of Mexican
national identity. The inhabitants of
Coatlinchan insist that the removal
of the stone has caused droughts.
Representations and replicas of the
absent stone appear everywhere
in Coatlinchan, where it resonates
in the memories of the inhabitants.
Using animations, archival materials
and contemporary encounters with
71

the protagonists of the transport
of the stone, this documentary
explores the relevance of the ruins
of the past in the present day.

FILMMAKERS IN ATTENDANCE
SPONSORED BY
DETROIT PUBLIC TV

Saturday

7pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

T O U C H 觸摸
Feature in Competition

1

1

2

Touch 觸摸
Shelly Silver
USA | 2013 | 68 min | Video
After 50 years away, a gay man returns to his old neighborhood—New York City’s Chinatown—to care for his dying mother. Like him, the city has changed and yet the
past still haunts his familiar streets. Touch is a poignant
and lyrical video diary, a tapestry of vérité camerawork,
stolen moments and probing observations, challenging
the manner in which we engage with the communities
that created us and how we embrace and chronicle
images of the everyday. —Bradford Nordeen, Outfest 1

PRECEDED BY

Farther Than The Eye Can See
Basma Alsharif
Jordan/United Arab Emirates | 2013 | 13 min | Video
A woman recounts her story of the mass exodus
of Palestinians from Jerusalem, beginning with the
arrival and ending with the departure. The tale moves
backwards in time and through various landscapes but
the events are not being undone and the story has not
been untold. Farther Than The Eye Can See is the tracing of a decaying experience told through words
of a place that no longer exists. 2

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Saturday

7:15pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 9

1

2

3

4

5

Encounters with Your Inner Trotsky Child
Jim Finn
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 21 min | Video
Another chapter in the parallel-leftist-universe of Jim
Finn, this video appears to be part of a communist
self-help videotape series made in the early 1990s. The
series author, Lois Severin, was responding to the move
from mass sociopolitical engagement of the 60s and 70s
to the personal fulfillment fantasies of the 80s – the Jane
Fonda-ization of the Left. 1

Brazilian “cinema novo,” traces of Amerindian sacrifices
and recordings of urban occupation evoking the spirit of
the “Theater of the Oppressed.” The color – all at once
skin, gesture, word, voice – structures as much as it
breaks, creating a sort of vanishing punctuation, a punctuation of the memory operating on itself. —EF & MT 3
Single Stream
Paweł Wojtasik, Toby Lee, Ernst Karel
Brooklyn, NY/Cambridge, MA | 2014 | 23 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE Single Stream explores a recycling facility in the Boston area, where hundreds of tons of refuse
are sorted daily. Blurring the line between observation
and abstraction, Single Stream plunges the viewer into
the steady flow of the plant and the waste it treats,
examining the material consequences of our society’s
culture of excess. 4

Mount Song
Shambhavi Kaul
Durham, NC/Mumbai, Maharashtra | 2013
9 min | Video
A current runs underneath. It creeps under the door,
makes its way into the cracks, revealing, obfuscating
or breaking as clouds in the sky. Mountain, cave, river,
forest and trap door; martial gestures, reiterated,
stripped and rendered. A storm blows through. A parrot
comments from a flowering branch. Here, the surfaces of
set-constructions are offered for our attachments. —SK 2
A Short Organon For the Hero
Elise Florenty and Marcel Türkowsky
Berlin, Germany | 2013 | 14.5 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE A story told through the eyes
of a parrot. He alone remembers the metamorphosis
of the modern figure of the Anti-Hero Anonymous. The
narrative is deconstructed into areas of color, from which
emerge “flashbacks” of fictional and documentary fragments filmed in Rio de Janeiro: scenes reenacting the

Suchy Pion (Dry Standpipe)
Wojciech B˛akowski
Poznań, Poland | 2013 | 13 min | Video
US PREMIERE A raw, personal, confessional narration undercuts the abstract images in Polish artist, musician and
poet Wojciech Ba˛kowski’s interlaced video collage Suchy
Pion. Condensing home videos into blocks of abstraction, Ba˛kowski creates a startling account of depression,
numbness and paradoxical lucidity. —Andréa Picard 5

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SPONSORED BY METRO TIMES
COMMUNITY PARTNER CHELSEA RIVER GALLERY

Saturday

9:15pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

COSTA DA MORTE
Feature in Competition

Costa da Morte
Lois Patiño
Spain | 2013 | 83 min | Video
The “Coast of Death”, a region in Galicia, Spain, was considered the end of the world during the Roman period.
Lois Patino’s documentary patiently observes the people
who inhabit it: the fishermen, loggers, and artisans who
maintain both an intimate relationship and an antagonistic battle with this beautiful and vast landscape.

image close in the sound). Eventually through the deep
contemplation of the image we will dissolve in the whole
and disappear into the landscape of Costa da Morte.
—Lois Patiño
PRECEDED BY

Canadian Pacific
David Rimmer
Canada | 1974 | 10 min | 16mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION Vancouver harbor with
The Coast of Death has always been to me a mythical
its railyards, mountains and passing ships is a vista in
place, it captivated me as such. It gradually started takfluid transformation as three winter months are recording shape as a real space through the tales of the people. ed and condensed to ten minutes. “What interested
What attracted me most of this place is its relation with
me about these shots were the horizontals: the train
the idea of end and death. Its history of shipwrecks gives tracks, the water, the mountains and the sky and the
it a mysterious and dangerous aura.
way in which these four elements would shift, change
Its inhabitants tell their stories and as a mythical echo
and fuse.” ­—David Rimmer
reverberating in the air history and legend merge. Their
New print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive
voices breach through new strata of the landscape to shape
the collective imaginary of that place and leave us in a
timeless space.
SPONSORED BY
I sought to relate the vastness of the natural space
MICHIGAN RADIO WUOM 91.7
to the intimate experience of people through a double
perceptual distance to the human figure (far in the
EDUCATIONAL PARTNER
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT
OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES & LITERATURES

74

Saturday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 10

1

2

3

4

Broken Tongue
Mónica Savirón
New York, NY | 2013 | 3 min | 16mm on Video
WORLD PREMIERE Broken Tongue is an ode to the freedom
of movement, association, and expression. It pays homage to the diaspora of the different waves of migration,
and challenges the way we represent our narratives. It is
a search for a renewed consciousness, for reinvention, a
“what if,” the formal equivalent of asking a question expressed with a broken tongue – or not so broken after all.
Mainly made with images from the January 1st issues
of The New York Times since its beginning in 1851 to
2013, Broken Tongue is a heartfelt tribute to avant-garde
sound performer Tracie Morris and to her poem
“Afrika.” —MS 1

Brief fragments of music and spoken commentary are
strung together in the form of a cut-up, accompanied by
the soft audio clicks of close to a thousand tape-spliced
edit points – a symphony of shattered sentences and
synthetic/exotic sound collages. —Stefan Grissemann 2

The Handeye (Bone Ghosts)
Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy
Berlin, Germany | 2012 | 7 min | 16mm
In early 20th century Vienna Robert Musil invited
Sigmund Freud to partake in, what he called, “a very
special séance.” Seated at the table Musil revealed that
they were going to summon the ghost of Franz Anton
Mesmer, discoverer of animal magnetism and forefather
of hypnosis. Musil told Freud about a series of dreams
he had which involved a talking flea. Musil, who had
secretly become a follower of the imaginationist school
Creme 21
of animal magnetism wanted to question Mesmer as to
Eve Heller
the meaning of these dreams, in which said flea foretold
Vienna, Austria | 2013 | 10 min | 16mm on Video
The stars are going haywire. A vision of heavenly bodies of impending catastrophes all over Europe. It is said that
in wild disarray. Assembled out of found moving images Mesmer obligingly appeared and spoke in a repetitive
and oblique manner. Mesmer’s words were transcribed
procured from old features and educational movies,
by Freud in several scraps of paper and hidden sepaHeller’s film begins and ends with a tunnel vision of
rately in a series of objects that, owing to the vicissitudes
outer space. From the suspended state of an astronaut
of history, would end up in the collections of three
we return to earth, fleeting shadows animate rooms, a
Viennese museums. Legend has it that he who could
slime-covered man is raised to his feet. Two eyes open
hesitantly; we see how they begin to see. After the silent piece together the text would find instructions for the
black and white prologue, sound and color are tuned in. assembly of a film. —AD & JM 3
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Films in Competition 10

Saturday

9:30pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

7
5

6

8

With Pluses and Minuses
Mike Stoltz
Los Angeles, CA | 2013 | 5 min | 16mm
“This morning the window blew its glass onto my face.
Real morning with pluses and minuses (my symbols for
truth).” A ground-less and boundless 16mm film in which
a wall becomes a window to a swirling landscape. —MS 4

Mountain In Shadow
Lois Patiño
Madrid, Spain | 2012 | 14 min | Video
Contemplative look toward the snowy mountain and
skiers activity on it. The vastness of space contrasts with
the insignificant that people looks like, almost invisible
by distance. 6

Photooxidation (Fotooxidación)
Pablo Mazzolo
Buenos Aires, Argentina | 2013 | 13 min | 16mm
De-electronation of a molecular entity as a result of
photoexcitation. Light increases its oxidation state, at
the same time it releases free radical electrons.
Light goes through human work as a natural photodegradation. It mutates within its own limits, from
a solar irradiation to its impossible perception in an
absent retina. —PM 5

Gowanus Canal
Sarah J. Christman
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 7 min | Video
Just below the surface of one of the most contaminated
urban waterways in the United States, microorganisms
thrive amidst the toxic waste. 7
Sea of Vapors (Meer der Dünste)
Sylvia Schedelbauer
Berlin, Germany | 2014 | 17 min | Video
WORLD PREMIERE A cascade of images cut frame by frame
flow into an allegory of the lunar cycle. —SS 8

MIDNIGHT MOVIE

A F T E R PA R T Y

Suburbia
12:00am | State Theatre | $7 Tickets

LIVE Nightclub | 11pm–2am
FREE w/ AAFF Pass or Ticket

See Friday Listing (pg. 59)

Come see a DJ/VJ set featuring an evolution
of musical genres!

76

77

S U N D AY

PICTURE PERFECT PYRAMID
PA G E 8 1

Sunday

11am

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

IT FOR OTHERS
SCREENING WITH STATUES ALSO DIE
Film in Competition

It for Others
Duncan Campbell
Scotland/Ireland | 2013 | 54 min | 16mm on Video
With It for Others, Glasgow-based Irish artist Duncan
Campbell has created an impressive study of the web
of ideas that we enshroud things, art, consumption, life
and death with - nothing less. An essayistic combination of gorgeous archive footage, animation and a new
performance by Michael Clark Company, his latest work
elaborates on Chris Marker and Alain Resnais’s essay
film Les statues meurent aussi (1953), where the Western
exoticization of African art is presented in an elegantly
questioning meditation about how we see objects and
movements, and endow them with meaning—be it a
wooden African sculpture, a packet of cigarettes, the
touch of a hand or the exchange of consumer goods.
It for Others refers both formally and discursively to
a great number of modernistic art movements and
theories, but brings them up to date with a twist, which
simultaneously undermines the coolly aloof analysis
that we are first presented with, and subsequently anchors it in real situations—namely the civil war in 1970s
Ireland and a contemporary Chinese sweatshop, where
Che Guevara t-shirts are produced on the assembly line.
—CPH:DOX

PRECEDED BY

Les statues meurent aussi (Statues Also Die)
Chris Marker and Alain Resnais
France | 1953 | 30 min | 35mm
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION After its first screening
at Cannes in 1954, where it won the Prix Jean Vigo, Les
statues meurent aussi was banned until 1963 owing to its
controversial anti-colonialist stance, and went unseen
in its unabridged form until 1968. “It is the notion of
négritude that the film engages with most deeply, and
perhaps most controversially, especially as it strives
to connect the death of the statue with the rise in the
commercialisation of African art for the pleasure of the
colonial classes. Indeed, it is against the backdrop of
a France that had so recently lost its colonial power,
but which still retained many of the quasi-Manichean
distinctions between white, Western culture and black,
African culture, that (and in spite of their claims to
the contrary) Resnais and Marker’s film projected its
passionately anti-colonial, anti-racist, even anti-capitalist
audio-visual collage. It is little wonder then that such a
film should have been censored until the late 1960s, by
which time it might have lost some of its topicality, but
none of its political vigour.” —Jenny Chamarette, Senses
of Cinema, Issue 52, September 2009
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL
FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

78

Sunday

12pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

THOM ANDERSEN: RECONVERSÃO
Co-presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

Reconversão
Thom Andersen
Portugal/USA | 2012 | 67 min | Video
Thom Andersen’s 2012 film Reconversão (Reconversion)
surveys the work of architect Eduardo Souto de Moura.
Although Andersen was invited specifically to make the
film in Portugal on the occasion of the Vila do Conde
festival’s 20th anniversary, his attentiveness to the
Pritzker prize winning architect’s buildings and unbuilt
projects is equal to the revered contemplation of his
hometown in 2003’s Los Angeles Plays Itself.
Travelling around sites in northern Portugal, from
the monumental sports stadium in Braga to Porto’s
understated modernist subway network, the viewer begins to grasp Souto de Moura’s loyalty to the
architectural history of the sites and buildings he
is commissioned to develop. What is striking is his

fascination with the afterlife of his work—the ruin—as a
measure of the society evolving around it. The narrator
reads a quotation by the architect’s frequent collaborator Álvaro Siza: “If the objects of the city are actual
or potential ruins, if they are subject to changes in use
and significance, if they succeed in time and space in
going beyond their own destiny, then we can say the
city is functional.”
Interestingly, during Reconversão, the camera
records at a reduced rate, adjusting the viewer to the
building’s sense of time, which inevitably outlasts our
own. —Shama Khanna

79

EDUCATIONAL PARTNER
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN TAUBMAN COLLEGE
OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN PLANNING

Sunday

1:00pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

FILMS IN COMPETITION 11

1

2

3

4

Thing
Anouk De Clercq
Brussels, Belgium | 2013 | 18 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE An architect talks about the
city he has built. Gradually we realize that the city is
imaginary. His account is an attempt to give his ideas
a fixed shape. 1
Aviary
Katherin McInnis
New York, NY | 2013 | 5 min | Video
Pigeons are filthy and useful, secret and ubiquitous,
passenger and carrier.
“A cine-poem about code.” —Craig Baldwin 2
Model Village
Hayoun KWON
Paris, France | 2014 | 10 min | Video
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE The village is loosely inspired
by a North Korean propaganda village, Kijong-dong.
KWON carries out her journey by proxy, testifying to this
ghost town in its true state as a mechanism of fiction. The
reality of a border confronted with its own staging, this
village can only be reached within our imagination. 3

Swamp
Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson
USA | 1971 | 6 min | 16mm on Video
THIS FILM IS NOT IN COMPETITION A collaboration between
Nancy Holt (1938–2014) and Robert Smithson (1938–1973)
made in 1969. Holt has said of Swamp that “...it deals
with limitations of perception through the camera eye
as Bob and I struggled through a muddy New Jersey
swamp. Verbal direction cannot easily be followed as
the reeds crash against the camera lens blocking vision
and forming continuously shifting patterns, confusion
ensues.” And Smithson said of the film “...it’s about
deliberate obstructions or calculated aimlessness.” This
was attained by having Holt walk through the swamp
while simultaneously filming, only seeing where she was
walking by looking through the lens of her Bolex camera
as Smithson gave her verbal instructions which he
recorded as he spoke them. (Description adapted from
robertsmithson.com) 4

80

5

6

7

8

Hacked Circuit
Deborah Stratman
Chicago, IL | 2014 | 15 min | Video
A single-shot, choreographed portrait of the Foley
process, revealing multiple layers of fabrication and
imposition. The circular camera path moves us inside
and back out of a Foley stage in Burbank, CA. While
portraying sound artists at work, typically invisible
support mechanisms of filmmaking are exposed, as are,
by extension and quotation, governmental violations of
individual privacy. 5
Psalm IV: Valley of the Shadow
Phil Solomon
Boulder, CO | 2013 | 7.5 min | Video
The fourth installment of my 7 part series, The Twilight
Psalms, Valley of the Shadow is a nocturnal lamentation
on love, loss, and the unknowable other... —PS 6
Picture Perfect Pyramid
Johann Lurf
Vienna, Austria | 2013 | 5 min | 16mm | Silent
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE Picture Perfect Pyramid is a
16mm film which in counter-clockwise spirals, circles a
large pyramid structure that was built on the outskirts
of Vienna in 1983. Using twenty-four positions the film
was shot over the course of an entire day, with one shot
per hour. The camera moves continuously and almost
imperceptibly, covering the surrounding area while the
landmark remains centered in the frame. Today the
building, a former indoor swimming pool, serves as a
venue for various events; from right wing party gather-

ings to an erotic fair that presents a live show with lights
visible even from the outside of the pyramid. In filming
the building, a structural approach focused on geometry
was used in order to achieve less subjectively motivated
images. (Translation: Seth Weiner) 7
Never a Foot Too Far, Even
Daïchi Saïto
Montreal, Canada | 2012 | 13 min | 16mm x 2
With original sound composition by Malcolm Goldstein.
Appropriating a brief fragment from a 35mm print of
an old Kung Fu movie, Never a Foot Too Far, Even is an
action movie without action. Presented in double-projection, with images from two separate rolls overlaid to
form a single image, this film focuses on an obscure figure
finding himself in a forest path, caught between perpetual
motion and stasis. The painterly images fluctuate in the
complex shifting of color and texture, phasing in and out
through a polymetric structure. It is a perceptual journey
without destination in the turning sphere of ever-changing image and sound, whose beginning and end move
in parallel towards a fleeting point of convergence. The
palindrome of the title alludes to the structure of the film
based on various combinations of a series of recurring
sequences that move forward and in reverse simultaneously, defying the usual sense of progression. —DS 8

SPONSORED BY STATE STREET AREA ASSOCIATION
COMMUNITY PARTNER MOTHLIGHT MICROCINEMA

81

Sunday

2pm

UMMA Helmet Stern Auditorium

FREE

THE FORGOTTEN SPACE

The Forgotten Space
Allan Sekula and Noël Burch
Netherlands/Austria | 2010 | 112 min | Video
Directed by filmmaker and author Noël Burch (b.1932)
and the late artist, photographer and filmmaker Allan
Sekula (1951–2013). The “forgotten space” of Sekula and
Burch’s essay film is the sea, the oceans through which
90% of the world’s cargo now passes. At the heart of this
space is the container box, which, since its invention in
the 1950s, has become one of the most important mechanisms for the global spread of capitalism.
The film follows the container box along the international supply chain, from ships to barges, trains, and
trucks, mapping the byzantine networks that connect
producers to consumers (and more and more frequently, producing nations to consuming ones). Visiting the

major ports of Rotterdam, Los Angeles, Hong Kong,
Guangdong province, and many places between, it
connects the economic puzzle pieces that corporations
and governments would prefer remain scattered.

82

INTRODUCED BY BRETT STORY, A NON-FICTION FILMMAKER, WRITER AND GEOGRAPHER BASED IN TORONTO 
PRESENTED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MUSEUM OF ART
WITH SUPPORT FROM THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION
FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

Sunday

3pm

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

PURGATORIO
Feature in Competition

Purgatorio
Rodrigo Reyes
Mexico/USA | 2013 | 80 min | Video
Reyes’ provocative essay film re-imagines the Mexico/
US border as a mythical place comparable to Dante’s
purgatory. Leaving politics aside, he takes a fresh look
at the brutal beauty of the border and the people caught
in its spell.
By capturing a stunning mosaic of compelling characters and broken landscapes that live on the US/Mexico
border, the filmmaker reflects on the flaws of human

nature and the powerful absurdities of the modern
world. An unusual border film, in the auteur tradition
of camera-stylo, Purgatorio ultimately becomes a fable
of humanity, an epic and visceral experience with powerful and lingering images.
SPONSORED BY UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
INSTITUTE FOR THE HUMANITIES
EDUCATIONAL PARTNER UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY

83

Sunday

3pm

Michigan Theater Screening Room

FILMS IN COMPETITION 12

1

2

3

5

4

Gente Perra (Dog People)
Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy
Berlin, Germany | 2014 | 25 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE A film based on fragments of the story
“La Gente Perra” by the Colombian writer Gomati D.
Wahn (1923–1993). The story, which takes place 3000
years in the future, tells of the character of The Admiral
as he searches for the land of the Dog People and the
riches that it hides. However, as is typical of Wahn’s style,
the story is assembled out of altered existing texts, in this
case, historic accounts of the discovery and conquest of
America or, as it was known then, The New World. 1
Tender Feet
Fern Silva
Chicago, IL | 2013 | 10 min | 16mm
Tender Feet was shot on the road in the southwest
leading up to the not quite so cataclysmic and transformative events anticipated to take place around Dec. 21st
2012. As digits flipped on the odometer, so did the days
in the Mayan calendar shedding light and darkness on
charred forests, arid landscapes, falling stars, destructive vortexes, fortune telling traffic signs, and ticking
time bombs...
“Do you know what the secret to life is... this... one
thing, just one thing...” —Curly Washburn 2

The Pieced Quilt
Scott Fitzpatrick
Winnipeg, Canada | 2012 | 4 min | 16mm on Video
WORLD PREMIERE Ink is lifted directly from the page in a
physical adaptation of the Bullfinch Press book of the
same title. Two folk/design traditions converge in this
cameraless animation on recycled 16mm film. 3
Will o’ the Wisp
Andrew Kim
Los Angeles, CA | 2013 | 23.5 min | 16mm
WORLD PREMIERE I can’t see ghosts, but film is indeed
a perfect medium. 4
Strawberries in Summertime
Jennifer Reeves
Brooklyn, NY | 2013 | 15 min | 16mm on Video
A two and a half year old boy revels in all things tiny
and huge on and around a farm. His father supports his
exuberant and insatiable curiosity of new experiences–
from wall climbing to discovering the natural world. As
a father-son bond grows, the mother with camera observes, hangs back, dives into a solitary landscape and
returns. The fleeting and glowing visual field evokes
the delicate tension between distance and intimacy a
mother can feel with her child. Richly toned black and
white positive, negative and solarized images, combined with snippets of voice, suggest the texture
of memory. —JR 5

84

Sunday

Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

AWARDED FILM PROGRAMS
The 52nd Ann Arbor Film Festival closing event provides two screenings with
selections of award-winning films as chosen by our Award Jury. Awarded Film
Program line-ups will be posted late afternoon on Sunday, March 30th at the
Michigan Theater and at aafilmfest.org.

8:15pm
Award Screening 2
A second select screening of awarded
short films from the 52nd Festival.

6pm
Award Screening 1
Onstage announcement of the 52nd jury awards,
followed by a select screening of awarded films. The
program will be preceded at 5:30pm by a screening of
work from the “clear leader” station, a new film created
by you—the audience—throughout the festival week.
This hands-on filmmaking activity was a popular part of
the AAFF for many years and we are excited to continue
the tradition on 35mm at the 52nd Festival. Soundtrack
created by Ed Special. This will be followed by the final
edit of a short collaborative remix project comprised
of user-generated images contributed throughout the
festival, organized and edited by multimedia artist and
filmmaker David Olson.

AFTERPARTY
Alley Bar | 10pm–2am | FREE
Wrap up the 52nd AAFF with DJs
and delicious handcrafted cocktails!

ACADEMY AWARD® QUALIFYING
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is recognized as a qualifying film festival for the
short film category of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. A short film
that wins one of the following awards at the AAFF is eligible: Best of Festival, Best
Experimental, Best Narrative, Best Animation.
There are currently two dozen qualifying festivals in
the U.S. For Academy Awards consideration, a short
film that is not more than 40 minutes in running time
(including all credits) and which falls into the animated
(cel animation, computer animation, stop-motion, clay
animation, puppets, pixilation, cutouts, pins, camera
multiple pass imagery, kaleidoscopic effects and drawing on the film frame itself for example) or live-action
film categories, can qualify in one of two ways:
1. The film must have been publicly exhibited for paid
admission in a commercial motion picture theater in
Los Angeles County for a run of at least three consecutive days with at least two screenings a day prior to
public exhibition or distribution by any nontheatrical
means or

2. The film must have won a qualifying award at a
competitive film festival, as specified in the Short Film
Qualifying Festival List, regardless of any prior public
exhibition or distribution by nontheatrical means.
 
All eligible motion pictures must be publicly exhibited
using 35mm or 70mm film, or in a 24- or 48- frame progressive scan Digital Cinema format in English or English
subtitles. Television or internet exhibition anywhere
does not disqualify a film, provided such exhibition
occurs after its Los Angeles theatrical release, or after
receiving its festival award. Documentaries, previews,
trailers or advertising films are excluded.
PLEASE SEE OSCARS.ORG FOR A COMPLETE
OUTLINE OF RULES AND ELIGIBILITY.

85

86

LETTERFORM

87

SCHOOL OF FILM/VIDEO
celebrates our long-standing relationship with the Ann Arbor Film Festival
and congratulates the Festival on its 52nd presentation.

recent calarts highlights at ann arbor
51st — 2013

50th — 2012

Suzan Pitt (faculty)
— career retrospective
Naoko Tasaka (mfa 12), Flower
— Founder’s Spirit Award
Alexandra Cuesta (mfa 09), Despidida (farewell)
— Best Cinematography
Akosua Adoma Owusu (mfa 08), Split Ends, I Feel
Wonderful
— Most Promising Filmmaker
Song E Kim (mfa 07), Bite of the Tail
— Best Narrative Film
Mariah Garnett (mfa 11), Encounters I May
or May Not Have Had with Peter Berlin
— Best lgbt Film
Maya Erdelyi (mfa 12), Pareidolia
— Emerging Experimental Video Artist Award
Rhys Ernst (mfa 11) and Zackary Drucker
(mfa 07), She Gone Rogue

Betzy Bromberg (faculty), Voluptuous Sleep
— Brakhage Film at Wit’s End Award
Charlotte Pryce (faculty), Curious Light
— Jury Award
Laida LertxundI (mfa 07), A Lax Riddle Unit
— Jury Award
Travis Wilkerson (mfa 01), Pluto Declaration
— Prix DeVarti for Funniest Film

49th — 2011
Natasha Mendonca (mfa 10), Jan Villa
— Best of the Festival
Brigid Mccaffrey (mfa 10), Castaic Lake
— Best Cinematography
Thom Andersen (faculty), Get Out Of The Car
— Best Sound Design
Deborah Stratman (mfa 95), Ray’s Birds
— Jury Award

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What happens
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The Michigan Film Office
is proud to support
the Ann Arbor Film Festival.

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store with a selection that reflects the tastes of
our local clientele. We are dedicated to
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Live Lobster • PriMe rib
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WEBER’S
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3050 Jackson Road, Ann Arbor MI
I-94 at exit 172
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APRIL

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DIGITAL MEDIA, NEW CINEMAS, &
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[dis]connect II
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Film Studies

CAL.MSU.EDU/GLOBALSOUTH
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109

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Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 222-9202
Open Monday-Saturday 7:00-6:00
Sunday 8:30-6:00

110

GANGER

111

112

AAFF52_savethedate_ad.pdf

1

3/9/14

10:05 AM

24

29

2015

Save the dates
for the 53rd
Ann Arbor
Film Festival

113

114

Resources

NOTES

115

Resources

PRINT SOURCES
100 Butches #9: Ruby 36
Elisha Lim
elisha.chwee.cheng@
gmail.com
elishalim.com
45 7 Broadway
69
Tomonari Nishikawa
tomonarinishikawa@
gmail.com
tomonarinishikawa.com
A Million Miles Away
Jennifer Reeder
thejenniferreeder@
gmail.com
thejenniferreeder.com
A Return to the
Return to Reason
Sabine Gruffat
sgruffat@hotmail.com
sabinegruffat.com

23

42

A Short Organon
For The Hero
73
Elise Florenty,
Marcel Türkowsky
florenty.turkowsky@
gmail.com
www.florenty-turkowsky.
blogspot.com
A Spell to Ward
Off the Darkness
53
Ben Rivers, Ben Russell
gil@lux.org.uk
br@dimeshow.com
benrivers.com
dimeshow.com
A Study in
Natural Magic
45
Charlotte Pryce
calipman@earthlink.net
charlottepryce.net
Adeline For Leaves
Jessica Sarah Rinland
jrinland2@aol.com
jessicarinland.com

54

After Hours
45
Karen Yasinsky
yasinsky@earthlink.net
karenyasinsky.com
Akin
36
Chase Joynt
chasejoynt@gmail.com
chasejoynt.com
Auroratone
Emily Pelstring
epelstring@gmail.com
emilypelstring.com

28

Aviary
80
Katherin McInnis
katherin.mcinnis@gmail.com
katherinmcinnis.net
Bbrraattss
Ian Cheng
mail@iancheng.com
iancheng.com

22

Black Refraction
28
by Tim Hecker
Sabrina Ratté
sabrinaratte@gmail.com
sabrinaratte.com
Blanket Statement
#2: All or Nothing
57
Jodie Mack
jodienmack@gmail.com
jodiemack.com
Brats
by Liars
Ian Cheng
mail@iancheng.com
iancheng.com

28

Brimstone Line
69
Chris Kennedy
chris@signaltoground.com
theworldviewed.com
Broken Tongue
75
Mónica Savirón
monicasaviron@gmail.com
Burn Out the Day
Sasha Waters Freyer
sasha.waters.freyer@
gmail.com
pieshake.com

32

Cakes Da Killa:
No Homo
36
Ja’Tovia M. Gary
jatovia.gary@gmail.com
Can’t Say No to Annie
by Jamaican Queens
Katie Barkel
kbarkel@gmail.com
katiebarkel.com

28

Canadian Pacific
74
David Rimmer
davidrimmer@gmail.com
davidrimmerfilm.ca
Cars & Killers
54
Gretchen Skogerson
skogerson@gmail.com
gretchenskogerson.com

Certain Things
Mark Toscano
fiddybop@gmail.com
preservationinsanity.
blogspot.com

64

Cold Open
Seamus Harahan
gimpelfils.com

64

Embodied
28
Jib Kidder
jibkidder.bandcamp.com
Encounters with Your
Inner Trotsky Child
Jim Finn
finn.jim@gmail.com
jimfinn.org

73

Costa da Morte
74
Lois Patiño
felipe.lage@zeitunfilms.com
zeitunfilms.com

F-Line
63
Silvia Turchin
silviaturchin@gmail.com
sleepingtreepictures.com

Creme 21
Eve Heller
sixpackfilm.com

75

Falling in Love... with Chris
and Greg: Work of Art!
Reality TV Special
36

Crux Film
Alexander Stewart,
Lilli Carré
alexander.b.stewart@
gmail.com
alexanderstewart.org
lillicarre.com

57

Cut
23
Matthias Müller,
Christoph Giradet
mueller.film@t-online.de
Denkbilder
69
Pablo Marín
pamarin82@yahoo.com
Der Spaziergang 68
Margaret Rorison
margaret.b.rorison@
gmail.com
margaretrorison.com
Division
22
Johan Rijpma
johan@johanrijpma.nl
johanrijpma.blogspot.com
Dot Matrix
43
Richard Tuohy
richard@nanolab.com.au
nanolab.com.au/
richard_tuohy
Early 12
New York Song
62
Amanada Katz
katz.alk@gmail.com
cargocollective.com/akatz
Eleven Forty Seven
68
Marika Borgeson
m.borgeson@gmail.com
marikaborgeson.com
ELSA merdelamerdelamer
54
Abigail Child
achild@mindspring.com
abigailchild.com
116

Chris E Vargas, Greg Youmans
chrisandgreginlove@gmail.com
fallinginlovewithchrisandgreg.com

Farther Than
The Eye Can See
72
Basma Alsharif
basmalsharif@gmail.com
basmalsharif.com
Fe26
Kevin Jerome Everson

69

picturepalacesale@yahoo.com

keverson.net
picturepalacepictures.com
FFF1
63
Marcin Giżycki
mgizycki@hotmail.com
Forward Biased
Condition
63
John Woods
heyjohnwoods@gmail.com
depictedtime.com
Fresno
68
Leandro Listorti
leandro.listorti@gmail.com
From Deep
Brett Kashmere

70

brett.d.kashmere@gmail.com

fromdeep.net
From Gulf to Gulf
to Gulf
Shaina Anand,
Ashok Sukumaran
camputer.org

50

Gente Perra
(Dog People)
84
Anja Dornieden, Juan David
Gonzalez Monroy
jdgonzalezmonroy@gmail.com

ojoboca.com

Ghost Syndrome
Rita Piffer
rita.piffer@gmail.com

36

Give Me a Pie
62
Gina Kamesntsky
ginak@ginakamentsky.com
ginakamentsky.com
Gowanus Canal
76
Sarah J. Christman
sarah@sarahchristman.com
sarahchristman.com
Gradual Speed
Els van Riel
mail@elsvanriel.be
elsvanriel.be

29

Grip
28
by Sun Araw
Daniel Brantley
danielbrantley1@gmail.com
Hacked Circuit
81
Deborah Stratman
delta@pythagorasfilm.com
pythagorasfilm.com/hacked-circuit

It for Others
Duncan Campbell
lux.org.uk

78

Interactive
22
Bryan Boyce
bb@dangeroussquid.com
dangeroussquid.com
Lagos Island
43
Lagos Sand Merchants 68
Karimah Ashadu
karimah@karimahashadu.com
karimahashadu.com
Let Us Persevere In
What We Have Resolved
Before We Forget
46
Ben Russell
br@dimeshow.com
dimeshow.com
Letter to a
Refusing Pilot
32
Akram Zaatari
vimeo.com/user4659478
Light Plate
Josh Gibson
joshigi@duke.edu

62

Light Year
45
Paul Clipson
paulclipson@yahoo.com
withinmirrors.org

Little Block of Cement
with Disheveled Hair
Containing the Sea
63
Jorge Lopez Navarrete
jolopezster@gmail.com
littleblockofcement.com
Long Island
Ice Tea, Neat
by the Coup
Kelly Gallagher
kelly@purpleriot.com
purpleriot.com

28

Lunar Almanac
43
Malena Szlam
szlammalena@gmail.com
Main Hall
Philipp Fleischmann
philippf@gmx.net

43

Manakamana
41
Stephanie Spray,
Pacho Velez
sspray@fas.harvard.edu
pachoworks@gmail.com
stephaniespray.com
pachoworks.com
Metamorfoza
23
Martha Colburn
info@marthacolburn.com
marthacolburn.com

Nail Art
54
Marth Jurksaitis
cherrykino@gmail.com
cherrykino.com
Never a Foot
Too Far, Even
Daïchi Saïto
dsaitofilm@gmail.com
No Answer 28
by Wolf Eyes
Joel Rakowski
vimeo.com/dinoclub
Off-White Tulips
Aykan Safoğlu
aykanella@gmail.com

Photooxidation
(Fotooxidación)
76
Pablo Mazzolo
pablomazzolo@hotmail.com

Mille Soleils
Mati Diop
annasandersfilms.com

64

Misterio (Mystery)
Chema Garcia Ibarra
chemagarciaibarra@
gmail.com
chemagarcia.com

54

Prisoner’s Cinema
Joshua Gen Solondz
roqeja@hotmail.com

Model Village
Hayoun KWON
prod@filmo.biz

80

Mount Song
Shambhavi Kaul
shambhavikaul@
me.com

73

murmurations
45
Rebecca Meyers
rammeyers@gmail.com
Musical Recordings From
the Realm of the Dead 63
Troy Morgan
troy@troymorgan.net
troymorgan.com

36

Omaha
28
by Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy
& Dawn McCarthy
Ben Russell
br@dimeshow.com
dimeshow.com

Picture Perfect
Pyramid
Johann Lurf
mail@johannlurf.net
johannlurf.net

Mountain in Shadow
76
Lois Patino
loispatinho@gmail.com
loispatino.com

81

81

46

Scattered in the Wind
by Implodes
Lori Felker
lorifelker@gmail.com
felkercommalori.com

28

Sea of Vapors
(Meer der Dünste)
76
Sylvia Schedelbauer
sylvia.schedelbauer@
gmail.com
sylviaschedelbauer.com
Sea Series #9 & #13
John Price
john@filmdiary.org
filmdiary.org

32

Shikaakwa
28
by CAVE
Nick Ciontea
nickciontea@gmail.com
brownshoesonly.com
Single Stream
73
Paweł Wojtasik,
Toby Lee, Ernst Karel
pawel.daishin@gmail.com
Sleeping District
64
Tinne Zenner
tinne.zenner@gmail.com
tinnezenner.com
Sound That
69
Kevin Jerome Everson
picturepalacesale@
yahoo.com
keverson.net
picturepalacepictures.com

Problem Areas
28
by Oneohtrix Point Never
Takeshi Murata
takeshimurata.com

South Bland Street
64
Lina Verchery
linaverchery@gmail.com
linaverchery.com

Psalm IV: Valley
of the Shadow
81
Phil Solomon
solomon@colorado.edu
philsolomon.com

Square Dance,
Los Angeles County,
California 2013
32
Silvia das Fadas
amorarondeninguemmora@
gmail.com

Purgatorio
Rodrigo Reyes
rrcinemaproductions@
gmail.com
rrcinema.com

83

Rivergarden
68
Jack Cronin
jackcronin@gmail.com
jackcronin.net
Rode Molen
42
Esther Urlus
vimeo.com/estherurlus

117

Stange Wonderful
62
Stephaine Swart
ses@stephanieswart.com
stephanieswart.com
Strawberries in
the Summertime
84
Jennifer Reeves
sparkypix@yahoo.com
jenniferreevesfilm.com
Sun Song
Joel Wanek
joel@joelwanek.com
joelwanek.com

32

Resources

PRINT SOURCES

Tacoma
Courtney Krantz
clk.krantz@gmail.com
courtneykrantz.com

23

The Handeye
(Bone Ghosts)
75
Anja Drnieden, Juan David
Gonzalez Monroy
jdgonzalezmonroy@
gmail.com
ojoboca.com

Temple Walking
by Clay Rendering
Joel Rakowski
vimeo.com/dinoclub

28

The Land Behind
64
Sabrina Ratté
sabrinaratte@gmail.com
sabrinaratte.com

Swamp
80
Nancy Holt,
Robert Smithson
Electronic Arts Intermix
http://eai.org/

Tender Feet
84
Fern Silva
fernsilva860@gmail.com
fernsilva.com
The Absent Stone
(La Piedra Ausente)
Jesse Lerner, Sandra
Rozental

71

The Obvious Child
54
Stephen Irwin
stephen@smalltimeinc.com
smalltimeinc.com
The Pieced Quilt
84
Scott Fitzpatrick
essfitzpatrick@gmail.com
The Reality Factory
57
Bryan Boyce
bb@dangeroussquid.com
dangeroussquid.com

alejandro.hormigo@imcine.gob.mx

lapiedraausente.com
The Blazing World
54
Jessica Bardsley
jessicabardsley@gmail.com
jessicabardsley.com
The Dark, Krystle
22
Michael Robinson
michaelblayneyrobinson@
hotmail.com
poisonberries.net
The Disquiet
Ali Cherri
ali.cherri@gmail.com
alicherri.com

66

The Forgotten Space
82
Noel Burch, Allan Sekula
doceye@xs4all.nl
theforgottenspace.net
The Great Rabbit
58
Atsushi Wada
entry@c-a-r-t-e-blanche.com
c-a-r-t-e-blanche.com

The Thing
Rhys Ernst
rhysernst.com

36

Thing
Anouk De Clercq
marie@augusteorts.be
portapak.be

80

Tiniest Seed
28
by Angel Olsen
Randy Sterling Hunter
randysterlinghunter@
gmail.com
vimeo.com/randysterlinghunter
To Thy Heart
(Do Serca Twego)
Ewa Borysewicz
zofia@kff.com.pl
kff.com.pl
Toros
Robert Fenz
robertfenz@gmail.com

58

66

Toto
58
Zbigniew Czapla
info@zbigniewczapla.pl
zbigniewczapla.pl

White Ash
29
Leighton Pierce
leightonpierce@gmail.com
leightonpierce.com

Touch 觸摸
Shelly Silver
info@shellysilver.com
shellysilver.com

Wildnis (The Wild)
45
Helena Wittmann
wittmann.helena@gmail.com
helenawittmann.de

72

Tropical Depression
57
Kelly Sears
kelly.sears@gmail.com
kellysears.com
Unicorn Blood
(Sangre de Unicornio)
Alberto Vazquez
inigo@uniko.com.es
uniko.com.es

57

Unmistaken Hands:
Ex Voto F.H.
58
Quay Brothers
probonofilm@gmail.com
probonofilm.com
Varðeldur
28
by Sigur Rós
Melika Bass
melikabass@gmail.com
tenderarchive.com
Velocity
57
Karolina Glusiec
karolina.glusiec@network.
rca.ac.uk
karolinaglusiec.com
We Had the
Experience But
Missed the Meaning
Laida Lertxundi
lertxundi@gmail.com
laidalertxundi.com
What A Day
Shannon Lee
slee62@saic.edu
shannonleeartist.com

66

62

Whispers of the Prairie 62
Deanna Morse
morsed@gvsu.edu
deannamorse.com

118

Will o’ the Wisp
84
Andrew Kim
kimandrewc@gmail.com
Winter Present
Robert Todd
roberttoddfilms.com

66

With Pluses
and Minuses
76
Mike Stoltz
stoltz.mike@gmail.com
mikestoltz.org
Joseph Bernard
joseph-bernard@
sbcglobal.net
josephbernard.com

30

Thom Andersen
33–35, 40, 51, 65, 79
tanderse@calarts.edu
Penelope Spheeris
41, 44, 52, 56, 59, 76
info@penelopespheeris.com
penelopespheeris.com
Hope Tucker
38
hope@theobituaryproject.org
theobituaryproject.org
Jeremy Rigsby
48
mediacity@houseoftoast.ca
mediacityfilmfestival.com

Resources

FILMMAKER INDEX
Alsharif, Basma

72

Gallagher, Kelly

28

Marker, Chris

78

Silva, Fern

84

Anand, Shaina

50

Gary, Ja’Tovia M.

36

Mazzolo, Pablo

76

Silver, Shelly

72

Andersen, Thom

33–35,
40, 51,
65, 79

Gibson, Josh

62

McInnis, Katherin

80

Skogerson, Gretchen 54

Girardet, Christoph

23

Meyers, Rebecca

45

Smithson, Robert

80

43, 68

Giżycki, Marcin

63

81

75, 84

Baillie, Bruce

23, 58

57

Monroy, Juan
David González

Solomon, Phil

Glusiec, Karolina

4+2

63

73

Gruffat, Sabine

Morgan, Troy

B˛akowski, Wojciech

54

64

62

Bardsley, Jessica

Harahan, Seamus

Morse, Deanna

23

28

75

Müller, Matthias

Barkel, Katie

Heller, Eve

28

26

28

Bass, Melika

Herwitz, Peter

Murata, Takeshi

Benning, James

42

Holt, Nancy

80

Navarrete,
Jorge López

63

30

Holthuis, Gerard

48

Nishikawa, Tomonari 69

Borgeson, Marika

68

Hunter,
Randy Sterling

28

Borysewicz, Ewa

58

Hutton, Peter

48

Boyce, Bryan

22, 57

Brantley, Daniel

28

Burch, Noël

51, 82

Campbell, Duncan

78

Carré, Lilli

57

Cheng, Ian

22, 28

Cherri, Ali

66

Child, Abigail

54

Christman, Sarah J.

76

Ciontea, Nick

28

Clipson, Paul

45

Ashadu, Karimah

Bernard, Joseph

Colburn, Martha

23

Cronin, Jack

68

Czapla, Zbigniew

58

das Fadas, Silvia

32

De Clercq, Anouk

80

Diop, Mati

64

Dornieden, Anja

75, 84

Ibarra, Chema García 54

29

Stratman, Deborah

81

Piffer, Rita

36

Sukumaran, Ashok

50

Price, John

32

Price, Luther

26

Svatek,
Georg Anthony

62

Pryce, Charlotte

45

Swart, Stephanie

62

Quay Brothers

58

Szlam, Malena

43

Rakowski, Joel

28

Todd, Robert

66

Ratté, Sabrina

28, 64

Toscano, Mark

Reeder, Jennifer

23

23, 41,
44, 52,
56, 64

Reeves, Jennifer

84

Tuohy, Richard

43

Resnais, Alain

78

Karel, Ernst

73

Kashmere, Brett

70

Katz, Amanda

62

Kaul, Shambhavi

73

Kels, Karl

48

Kennedy, Chris

69

Kidder, Jib

28

Kim, Andrew

84

Krantz, Courtney

23

Kren, Kurt

48

Rinland,
Jessica Sarah

KWON, Hayoun

80

Rivers, Ben

Lee, Shannon

62

Lee, Toby

73

Robertson,
Anne Charlotte

26

Lerner, Jesse

71

Robinson, Michael

22

Rorison, Margaret

68

Rozental, Sandra

71

Russell, Ben

28, 46,
53

Safoğlu, Aykan
Saïto, Daïchi
Savirón, Mónica

Levine, Saul

28

Fenz, Robert

66

Lim, Elisha

36

Finn, Jim

73

Listorti, Leandro

68

Fitzpatrick, Scott

84

Lowe, Pelle

26

Lowe, Robert A.A.

53, 59

Fleischmann, Philipp 43

66

Pierce, Leighton

62

28

Fleming, Michele

66

Loznitsa, Sergei

48

Florenty, Elise

73

Lurf, Johann

81

Freyer, Sasha Waters 32

Mack, Jodie

57

Galeta, Ivan Ladislav 46

Marín, Pablo

69

57
76

Kamentsky, Gina

Felker, Lori

42

Stewart, Alexander

Strand, Chick

54

66

28

Starling, Simon

Stoltz, Mike

Jurksaitis, Martha

Lertxundi, Laida

41

Stare, Demdike

28

36

69

Spray, Stephanie

74, 76

Joynt, Chase

Everson,
Kevin Jerome

41, 44,
52, 56,
59, 76

Pelstring, Emily

54

36

Spheeris, Penelope

Patiño, Lois

Irwin, Stephen

Ernst, Rhys

Solondz, Joshua Gen 46

Tscherkassky, Peter

48

Tucker, Hope

38

Turchin, Silvia

63

Türkowsky, Marcel

73

Urlus, Esther

42

54

van Riel, Els

29

53

Vargas, Chris E.

36

Vazquez, Alberto

57

Velez, Pacho

41

Verchery, Lina

64

vom Gröller, Friedl

48

Wada, Atsushi

58

Wanek, Joel

32

36

Wittmann, Helena

45

81

Wojtasik, Paweł

73

75

Woods, John

63

Schedelbauer, Sylvia 76

Yasinsky, Karen

45

Sears, Kelly

57

Youmans, Greg

36

Sekula, Allan

82

Zaatari, Akram

32

Sherwin, Guy

48

Zenner, Tinne

64

Reyes, Rodrigo

83

Rijpma, Johan

22

Rimmer, David

74

119

Resources

MAP

SCREENING VENUES

INSTALLATIONS

A Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty St.

D Work Gallery
306 S. Sate St.

B UMMA Helmut Stern
Auditorium
525 S. State St.

I

LIVE Nightclub
102 S. 1st St.

F

J

Sava’s
216 S. State St.

Space 2435
105 S. State St.

K The Ravens Club
207 S. Main St.

PERFORMANCES
AFTERPARTIES

E Performance
Network Theatre
120 E Huron St.

C State Theatre
233 S. State St.

WORKSHOPS AND
PRESENTATIONS

L

G \aut\BAR
315 Braun Ct.

The Bar
327 Braun Ct.

H Alley Bar
112 W. Liberty St.

NORTH

OIT

ST

E. KINGSLEY ST

DE

TR

L

LAWRENCE ST

BRAUN CT

G
CATHERINE ST

E. ANN ST

H

E. WASHINGTO N ST

N. STATE ST

N. 5 TH AVE

N. 4 TH AVE

N. MAIN ST

E

N. DIVISION ST

E. HURO N ST
N. ASHLE Y ST

F

J

K
E. LIBERTY ST

A

C
D

E. WILLIAMS ST

S. STATE ST

S. MAIN ST

N. 1 ST

I

120

B

Proud to partner
with the A AFF —
connecting our
students with
ground breaking
experimental film.

THE

BESTFILMS

The Stamps School—

FROM
THE WORLD’S BEST FESTIVALS

shaping a new generation
of multi-disciplinary
collaborators, global citizens,
and creative innovators.

JUNE 4-8, 2014
DETROIT • ANN ARBOR

Stay tuned to cinetopiafestival.org for details.

Mich_theater_AAFF 2014_full color_w bleed_Cinetopia_FINAL.indd 1

1/24/2014 12:56:33 PM

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