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54th Ann Arbor Film Festival Program

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Publisher
Ann Arbor Film Festival
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Rights Held By
Ann Arbor Film Festival
OCR Text

Overview

Calendar of Events
Dedicated to the memory of John Caldwell (1948–2016),
who was an AAFF screener and Festival Co-Manager in
the 1970s. He devoted his life to a love of film as art and
was loved by all who knew him.
Leslie Coutant,
Stuart Klein,
John Caldwell,
Jay Cassidy,
Woody (At Woody
Sempliner’s Apt.
in alley off East
William between
State & Maynard)

Photo (1974)
by Jay Cassidy

O V E R VI EW

WOR K S H OP S & DI S C US S I ONS

2
4
5
6
8
10

12
12
13
15
16
17

24 Expanding Frames

Calendar of Events
Letter from the Executive Director
Letters of Support
Filmmaker Awards
Award Donors & Members
Staff, Volunteers &
Acknowledgements
Thank Yous
Raffle
Partners & Sponsors
Beyond the Fest: Tour
Beyond the Fest: DVD
Award Jurors

IN STA LLATIONS & EXHIB ITI ONS

18
19
20
22
23

Ah humanity!
Michigan Theater
North Quad, Space 2435
Storefront Installations
Afterparty Performances

P R OG R A MS

26
30
41
52
65
81
92

Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Awarded Film Programs

R E S OUR C E S

93
118
119
120

From our Sponsors
Title Index
Filmmaker Index
Map

FRONT C OVER DR A WING BY A LISHA WESS LE R

1

Overview

Calendar of Events
Tu — 03/15
2:30pm | Free
Expanding Frames:
Women and Video Games
Space 2435, North Quad, State St.
4:30pm | Free
Expanding Frames:
Making Movies Workshop
Space 2435, North Quad, State St.
6-8pm
Opening Night Reception
Mich Theater Grand Foyer
8:15pm
Opening Night Screening
Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
Sava’s 10pm–2am | Free

We — 03/16
10am | Free
Expanding Frames:
What's Your Day Job?
Space 2435
North Quad, State St.
1pm | Free
Garbiñe Ortega:
This Place Called Mexico
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room
3pm | Free
Expanding Frames:
Show and Tell
Forum and Reception
Space 2435, North Quad, State St.

7:15pm
Films in Competition 1
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:15pm
Counting
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Films in Competition 2
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
The Ravens Club
11pm–2am | Free
Enjoy independent and
experimental mixology in a
1920s speakeasy setting.

9:30pm
Out Night
Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
\aut\ Bar
11pm – 2am | Free
Out Night continues at the \aut\
BAR with complimentary appetizers
and fire pits in the courtyard!

Fr — 03/18
Th — 03/17
10am | Free
Expanding Frames:
How to be a Film Critic
Space 2435
North Quad, State St.
1pm | Free
Carl Bogner
Instruction Manual
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room
3pm | Free
Ernst Karel
Gallery Talk & Reception
3pm–5pm
Work Gallery 306 S. State St.
5:10pm | Free
Penny W. Stamps
Presents David OReilly
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

5pm
Chantal Akerman:
News From Home
Mich Theater Screening Room

7pm
Films by Curt McDowell
Mich Theater Screening Room

7pm
Andrew Noren: The Lighted Field
Mich Theater Screening Room

7:15pm
Films in Competition 3
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

2

9:15pm
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room

10am | Free
Expanding Frames:
Video as a Medium
Space 2435
North Quad, State St.
1pm | Free
Rebecca Baron
Juror Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room
3pm | Free
Light Music: Lis Rhodes
Expanded Cinema Film Screening
Ann Arbor Art Center
117 W. Liberty St.
5pm
Chantal Akerman:
D'est (From the East)
Mich Theater Screening Room
7pm
The Illinois Parables
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
7:15pm
Films in Competition 4
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

Overview

Calendar of Events
9:15pm
Films by Jem Cohen
Special Presentation
Mich Theater Screening Room

5:15pm
Fragment 53
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room

1pm | Free
Expanding Frames:
Regional Roundtable
Space 2435 North Quad, State St.

9:30pm
Animated Films in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

7pm
The Host
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room

1:15pm
Sixty Six: Lewis Klahr
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

Afterparty
Hathaway’s Hideaway
11pm – 2am | Free
Drinks, DJ and dancing at Ann
Arbor's historic Second Ward
meeting hall.

Sa — 03/19
11am | $5
Films in Competition 5 (Ages 6+)
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
1pm
Territorio
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
1:15pm
Films in Competition 6
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
2pm | Free
Expanding Frames:
Shoot, Scratch and Stomp!
Space 2435, North Quad, State St.
3pm
Britt Koostra: Northern Lights
and Phill Niblock: T H I R
Live Cinema Performance
and Film Screening
Mich Theater Screening Room
3:15pm
Films in Competition 7
Mich Theater Screening Room
5pm
Dead Slow Ahead
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Main Auditorium

7:15pm
Films in Competition 8
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
9:15pm
time / OUT OF JOINT
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
9:30pm
Films in Competition 9
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
The Club Above the Heidelberg
11pm – 2am
$5, Free w/ AAFF pass
Enjoy a live video performance,
followed by DJs and dancing!

Su — 03/20
11am | Free
Expanding Frames:
What the Hell was That?
Space 2435
North Quad, State St.

3pm
The Event
Feature in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
3:15pm
78 Letters: Grahame Weinbren
Interactive Cinema with
Films in Competition 11
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
5pm | $5
Music Videos in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
6pm
Award Program 1
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
8:15pm
Award Program 2
Mich Theater Main Auditorium
Afterparty
The Bar at 327
10pm – 12am | Free
Wrap up the festival with a drink at
our neighborhood upscale dive bar!

11am
Regional Films in Competition
Mich Theater Screening Room
11:15am
Films in Competition 10
Mich Theater Screening Room
1pm
Chantal Akerman:
No Home Movie
Mich Theater Screening Room

3

Overview

Letter from the Executive Director
Dear filmmakers and film lovers and everyone in between, we
are overjoyed to have you onboard for the 54th installment of the
Ann Arbor Film Festival. You actualize us with your presence, and
we are honored to embark on this remarkable journey with you.
For those who are new to the Festival, we welcome you!
To our returning travelers, we’re glad to have you back.
Going to the movies is a social endeavor. We are amongst people.
We share the experience with others in the big dark room. We dream
one dream together amongst strangers, acquaintances and compadres
alike. Friends become strangers; strangers become friends. We
enter the shared experience together and when we leave we all have
something to talk about with each other. The films make a space in
which we can reflect. See and respond. We have room to hear our
thoughts. Behold. Consider. Renew.
Many, many thanks to all of the artists for whom the Festival exists.
Your creative energy feeds us and leads us closer to ourselves and
each other.
We are also extremely grateful for the incredible support of our
community. The generous energy of each volunteer, member,
donor, sponsor, and partner is intrinsic to our success. To the
AAFF team of staff and interns, I proclaim an enormous thank you
for an incredible year.
Everyone embrace your sense of adventure and get ready to drift
together, on our collective voyage, towards the 54th springtime
of our existence.

Yours,

Leslie Raymond, Executive Director
Ann Arbor Film Festival

4

Overview

Letters of Support
Since 1979, the Michigan Film Office served to promote Michigan as a preeminent
production location for film, documentaries and television series. Our recent rebranding
to the Michigan Film & Digital Media Office (MFDMO) reflects a new vision: to position
Michigan as the creative media hub of the Midwest, growing and attracting content
creation across all media channels, including mobile, CGI, animation, digital, gaming and
social media.
However, our mission goes beyond retaining and growing film and digital media
business; it is also about cultivating creative culture. We know that film festivals serve
as the most visible and tangible markers of communities that foster a creative culture
for media production. The Ann Arbor Film Festival is one of our most valued partners in
building a positive perception of the state for its legacy of creativity and innovation as
well as a champion for talent development.
As the longest-running independent and experimental film festival in North America,
the Ann Arbor Film Festival is a true pioneer in advancing avant-garde, independent
filmmaking. The workshops it offers artists demonstrate the meaningful ways it
connects emerging talent with opportunities to network and learn from other creatives.
The dynamic ways it introduces and engages the public in the new media space is a
testament to its role as a vanguard for accessibility to the arts.
Michigan is fortunate to have an active and passionate film community and a robust
calendar of film festivals held across the state. The MFDMO recognizes the Ann Arbor
Film Festival’s incredibly important and distinguished role in that landscape and finds
immense value in supporting it through sponsorship and promotion. As a cultural
cornerstone of the community, we look forward to continuing that tradition!
Sincerely,

Jenell Leonard, Director
Michigan Film & Digital Media Office

On behalf of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), I’d like to congratulate the
Ann Arbor Film Festival on its 54th year as the longest running independent and
experimental film festival in North America. The NEA is proud to support the AAFF’s
ongoing commitment to present and support film, video, and moving image art, and to
continuously serve as an engaging public forum for experimental media makers to share
their work and practice. We acknowledge the significance of this long-standing tradition,
which continues to provide a valuable contribution to the field and enrich the community
that surrounds it through numerous partnerships with local schools, businesses, and
grassroots organizations. This is a time to celebrate the accomplishments of all involved,
whether you are a creative contributor, local patron, film enthusiast, student or volunteer:
YOU are all part of what makes this event a success!
With Enthusiasm,

Jax Deluca, Media Arts Director
National Endowment for the Arts

5

Overview

Filmmaker Awards
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is committed to providing direct support to filmmakers.
Our 2016 awards competition presents $22,000 to filmmakers through cash and
film stock/processing. Winning an award at the AAFF means not only prestige and
financial support, but can also qualify filmmakers for Oscar®-nomination by the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in the short film category (qualifying
awards: Best of Festival, Best Experimental Film, Best Animation, Best Narrative).

Ken Burns Award for
Best of the Festival $3,000
Presented to the film of any genre
or length that best represents the
artistic standards of excellence
for the Festival. This award is
generously provided by influential
documentary filmmaker Ken Burns,
a graduate of Ann Arbor’s Pioneer
High School.
Tom Berman Award for
Most Promising Filmmaker
$2,000
Supports an emerging filmmaker
expected, by the jury, to make a
significant contribution to the art
of film. Contributed by the Berman
family in honor of the memory of
Tom Berman, who was a student
of AAFF founder George Manupelli
at the University of Michigan. Tom
was an early Festival supporter
and close friend to many within the
Festival community.
Michael Moore Award for Best
Documentary Film $1,000
The best non-fiction film of the
Festival will receive this award
from documentary filmmaker
Michael Moore, who received
inspiration from hundreds of films
he viewed over the years at the
Ann Arbor Film Festival. Proceeds
from his film, Roger and Me, fund
this annual award.

6

Lawrence Kasdan Award for
Best Narrative Film $1,000
The narrative film that best makes
use of film’s unique ability to
convey striking and original stories
will receive this award distinction.
A notable Hollywood filmmaker,
Lawrence Kasdan got his start
in Ann Arbor at the University
of Michigan and continues his
connection through support of this
Festival award.
Chris Frayne Award for
Best Animated Film $1,000
In recognition of the animated
film that delivers the best style,
creativity, and content. This award
is given in honor of the spirit of
Chris Frayne, a key participant in
the Festival’s early years, whose
approach to life was reminiscent
of his colorful cartoon characters.
Special thanks to Ann Arbor’s
colorful Quack!Media for lead
support of this award.
Best Experimental Film $1,000
Celebrates the film that most
successfully showcases the use
of experimental processes, forms,
and topics.
Stan Brakhage Film at Wit’s
End Award $1,000
For a filmmaker who
demonstrates the utmost
dedication to their individual,
creative art practice. A deep
and personal necessity drives
this artist to make revealing
and thought-provoking work in
moving image art that embodies
both formal innovation and integrity.

The Barbara Aronofsky
Latham Award for Emerging
Experimental Video Artist
$1,000
This award provides support to
the most promising video artist
at the inception of her/his career.
Distributed by the Video Data
Bank, the award was conceived by
the Aronofsky family to honor the
late Barbara Aronofsky Latham, a
Chicago-based experimental video
artist who passed away in 1984.
Gil Omenn
Art & Science Award $1,000
This award honors the filmmaker
whose work best uses the art
form of film and video to explore
scientific concepts, research
natural phenomena or embrace real
world experimentation. Provided
by Gil Omenn who seeks to
encourage a positive exchange
between the arts and sciences.
Prix DeVarti for
Funniest Film $1,000
Awarded to the film likely to create
the most laughs in the Festival.
This prize recognizes the 54-year
friendship between Dominick’s pub
and the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and
honors the memory of Dominick and
Alice DeVarti. Supported by the D.
Devarti Family Trust.
Kodak Cinematic Vision Award
$2,500 in film stock
For the film that demonstrates the
highest excellence and creativity in
cinematography. The recipient of
this award will receive $2,500 in
film processing from Kodak.

Overview

Awards Announcement
Sunday, March 20 at 6pm

PROCAM Best Regional
Filmmaker Award $750
This award supports our
top Michigan talent. The winner
will receive $750 of store credit
from PROCAM, a family owned
and operated company based
in the Metro Detroit Area that
combines outstanding customer
care with a diverse product selection
and extremely competitive prices.
The Eileen Maitland Award
$600
This award is given to the film that
best addresses women’s issues
and gives voice to female voices.
It was created to honor the spirit
and memory of Eileen Maitland who
was a dear friend and long-time
supporter of the Festival, as well as
a patron and practitioner of the arts.
The No Violence Award $512
In a culture that relies on images
of violence to entertain, this prize
is awarded to the film which
engages or informs, explores or
celebrates life while also rising
to the narrative challenge of "No
Violence Depicted". Provided
by Ann Arbor residents Matthew
Graff and Leslie Lawther.
Leon Speakers Award for
Best Sound Design $500
Given for excellence and originality
in sound design. This award is
provided by Leon Speakers, custom
building high-fidelity home theater
speakers in Ann Arbor since 1995.

Awards Screenings
Sunday, March 20 at 6pm and 8:15pm
Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

George Manupelli
Founder’s Spirit Award $500
Provided to the filmmaker that best
captures the bold and iconoclastic
spirit of the founder of the Ann Arbor
Film Festival, George Manupelli,
whose vision for the Festival
continues to this day. Supported
by the D. DeVarti Family Trust.
Tios Award for
Best International Film $500
Granted to the film produced
outside of the United States which
most strongly wins over our Award
Jury. This award is provided by Tios
Mexican Cafe, serving Ann Arbor
since 1986.
Peter Wilde Award for
Most Technically Innovative
Film $500
The film which displays the
most pioneering, cutting-edge
technical innovations will receive
this award. Peter Wilde was a
long-time projectionist for the
Festival and master of special
effects. Contributed by Peter's
sister and her husband Susan and
Jim Warner. This award honors
his creativity and pursuit of new
techniques. We thank our generous
donors for their contributions to the
Peter Wilde Award Endowment
Fund, which is currently being
established: Constance Crump
& Jay Simrod, John Nelson &
Deb Gaydos, Woody Sempliner,
Robert Ziebell & Elizabeth Ward,
The LaBour Foundation for NonInstitutional Living, Kevin Smith,
Bernard Coakley, and Glenda
Pittman.

Vox Populi
Audience Award $500
Awarded to the highest-rated
audience selected film in
competition at this year’s Festival.
\aut\FILM Award for
Best LGBTQ Film $300
This award honors the film
that best addresses and gives
voice to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,
Transgender or Queer (LGBTQ)
issues. The \aut\BAR of Ann Arbor
contributes this award to promote
a diversity of voices that achieve
excellence in filmmaking.
Overture/Wazoo Award
for Best Music Video $300
Provided to recognize excellence in
the art form of music video, which
serves as a unique collaborative
relationship between musician and
film/video maker. This award is
supported by Ann Arbor’s beloved
and independently owned Wazoo
Records and Overture Audio.
Jury Awards $1,500
Remaining prize monies that are
distributed at the awards jurors’
discretion as special recognition
for films of distinction and artistic
accomplishment.

7

Overview

Award Donors
$3000
Ken Burns
$1,000–$2,000
Anonymous
D. DeVarti Family Trust
Gil Omenn and Martha Darling
Glenda Pittman
Kasdan Family Foundation
Michael Moore
Richard Berman
The LaBour Foundation for Non-Institutional Living
Video Data Bank and the Aronofsky Family
$500–$999
Claywood Sempliner
Constance Crump and Jay Simrod
Eagle Harbor Social Aid and Pleasure Club
George Fisher and Kari Magill
Jim and Susan Warner
John Nelson and Deb Gaydos
Leon Speakers
Leslie Lawther and Matthew Graff
Quack! Media
Tios

8

$250–$499
\aut\ Bar
Dan Gunning and Vicki Engel
Dennis Hayes and Mary Ellen Rounsifer
Kevin Smith
Lars Bjorn and Susan Wineberg
Piotr Michaelowski and Deanna Relyea
$50–$249
Anonymous
Bernard Coakley
John Caldwell and Susan Kalinowski
Myrna Rugg and Rick Cronn
Overture Audio
Wazoo
In-Kind
Kodak
PROCAM

Overview

Members and Donors
$250–$499
Anthony Buba and Janice McMannis
Bernard Coakley
Dan Gunning Vicki Engel
$5,000–$9,999
David Gilbertson and Anne Cutsinger
Cynthia Nicely
Deanna Morse
Ken and Julie Burns
Ross Birkhill and Laura Jean Birkhill Dennis Hayes and
Family Foundation
Mary Ellen Rounsifer
Frederick and Jean Birkhill
$2,500–$4,999
James Dwyer and Mars De Ritis
630 Club
Jim and Krissa Rumsey
D. DeVarti Family Trust
Joan BInkow
Deborah Greer
John and Jennifer Baird
Genie Wolfson and Bruce Baker
John Dryden and Diana Raimi
James Roll and Ruth Bardenstein
Judy and Alec Allen
Justin Bonfiglio and
Kevin Smith
Morgan McCormick
Lars Bjorn and Susan Wineberg
Leslie Lawther and Matthew Graff
Piotr Michaelowski and
Wendy Lawson
Deanna Relyea
Robert and Laurice Lazebnik
$1,000–$2,499
Cecilia Ponce de Leon
$150–$249
ECO PHYSICS
Becca Keating and Mark Toscano
Gil Omenn and Martha Darling
Benjamin Miller
Glenda Pittman
Barbara Brown and Howard White
Heidi Kumao and Michael Flynn
Barry Miller
Kasdan Family Foundation
Chris Peters
LaBouer Foundation For
Clark Charnetski
Non-Institutional Living
Deborah Koons Garcia
Michael and Lesa Huget
Dennis Carter
Michael and Peter Feeney
Ellen and Hugh Cohen
Michael and Susan Landauer
Frank and Gail Beaver
Michael Moore
Gary and Shelly Bruder
Richard Berman
Helder Sun
Ron and Robin Sober
John Sloat
Leo Titus LeBron
$500–$999
Mark Einfeldt
Barbara Murphy and Gavin Eadie
Mi-Jo and Kostas Pappas
Claywood Sempliner
Myrna Rugg and Rick Cronn
Constance Crump and Jay Simrod
Nancy Brucken
Dick Kessler and Barbara Soble
Nicholas Roumel
Ellen Rabinowitz and David DeVarti
Peter and Carolyn Mertz
George Fisher and Kari Magill
Phillip Hughes
Greg Merriman and Jill McDonough Robert Einfeldt
Jackie and John Farah
Robert Goodrich
Jeffrey Ferguson
Sacha Feirstein
Jennifer Conlin and Daniel Rivkin
Sean Kenny
Jim and Susan Warner
Sharon and Jack Kalbfleisch
John Nelson and Deb Gaydos
Thomas Chivens and
Jonathan Tyman and Deborah Bayer Katharine Jenckes
Nan and Kip Godwin
Tom Bartlett
Robert Ziebell and Elizabeth Ward
Susan Dise
$10,000–$20,000
Anonymous

$149 and below
Amanda Schott
Anonyous
Barbara and Ralph Neri
Barbara Hammer
Barbara Twist
Bob Moir
Brian Tomsic
Carl Medwedeff
Christine Tabaczka
Christopher Erickson
Daniel Herbert and Anna Sampson
Dean Yang
Diana Bowman and
Robert LaJeunesse
Donald Harrison
Ellen Spiller
Emily Posner
Friends of the Colonial
Ingrid and Clifford Sheldon
Jack and Brenda Cronin
John Caldwell and Susan Kalinowski
Jennifer Proctor and Aaron Valdez
John and Patricia Carver
Jonathan Skidmore
Joseph Walters
Judith Calhoun
Judtih Schwartz
Kathy and Steve Bergman
Katrina Hagedorn
Lacie Sandstrom
Leon Wyszewianski
Marie Woo and Harvey Levine
Martin Fischhoff
Michael Woodruff
Monica Holmes
Nancy Keough
Patti Smith
Paul Scher and Pamela Kisch
Phoebe Adams
Robin Kaplan and Roger Kerson
Sarah Fenstermaker
Sophie Manning
Theodore Lyman
Vanessa and Martin Thoburn

Membership / Support
Experience all the Ann Arbor Film
Festival has to offer by becoming
an AAFF member! For more
information, visit aafilmfest.org

9

Overview

Staff, Volunteers, & Acknowledgements
Executive Director
Leslie Raymond
Program Director
David Dinnell
Operations Director
Ellie White
Technical Director
R. Thomas Bray
Guest Services
Coordinator
Vanessa Sly Thoburn
Volunteer Coordinator
Lizzie Olenzek
Juror Liaison
Elizabeth Wight

Catalog Text
David Dinnell
Mike Hoolboom
Julie Murray
filmmakers & distributors
Catalog Printing
The Prolific Group
under the supervision
of Chris Young
54th AAFF Trailers
Benjamin Gaydos &
Tadd Mullinix
David Dinnell
Fabian Euresti
Julie Murray
Mike Olenick
Russell Sheaffer &
Aaron Smith

Lobby Decorations
Opening Night Reception Ashanti Johnson
Chris Reilly
Food Coordinator
Grant Fomin
Paquetta A. Palmer
Jason Jay Stevens
Mathew De Lisle
Assistant Food
Richard Kalvaitis
Coordinator
Rita Lee
Andi Wilkins
Tierney Riggs
Graphic Design
Regional Program
Letterform
Ben Balcom
Web Coordinator
Opening Night
Drew Reed
Entertainment
Jeremy Wheeler
Raffle Coordinator
Jamie Webb
Afterparty
Entertainment
Festival Photographer
Alvin Hill
Doug Coombe
Brandon Walley
David Olson
Festival Videographer
Dustin Krcatovich
Jonathan Tyman
Ephraim Asili
Simon Alexander Adams

10

Board of Directors
Michael Huget (President)
Constance Crump
(Vice President)
Cynthia Nicely (Treasurer)
Matthew Graff (Secretary)
Daniel Rivkin
Jonathan Tyman
Justin Bonfiglio
Krissa Rumsey
Monica Holmes
Morgan McCormick
Robin Sober
Russ Collins (Ex Officio)
Susan Landauer
Advisory Board
Barbara Hammer
Becca Keating
Bryan Konefsky
Carl Bogner
Chris McNamara
Deanna Morse
Ken Burns
Lawrence Kasdan
Leighton Pierce
Mark Toscano
Mike Hoolboom
Michael Moore
Suzan Pitt
Development
Committee
Jill McDonough
Krissa Rumsey
Wendy Lawson
Education Committee
Chris McNamara
James Snazell
Jen Proctor
Roger Beebe
Scott Northrup
Ted Hardin

Education Program
Coordinator
James Snazell
Finance Committee
Constance Crump
Cynthia Nicely
Matthew Graff
Membership &
Outreach Committee
David DeVarti (Chair)
David Wolber
Jamie Webb
Leo LeBron
Sue Dise
Zach Damon
Marketing Committee
Al McWilliams
Constance Crump
Nominating Committee
Constance Crump
Susan Landauer
Screening Committee
Bruce Baker
Nazlı Dinçel
Jim Dwyer
David Gilbertson
Deborah Greer
Kat Hagedorn
Jen Proctor
Vanessa Sly Thoburn
Elizabeth Wodzinski
Patrick Wodzinski

Overview

Screeners
Alex Hansen
Alexa Borromeo
Amy Neeser
Barbara Twist
Barbara Ann O'Leary
Brandon Walley
Cole Bertsos
David Gazdowicz
David Gilbertson
Deb Greer
Dustin Krcatovich
Esther Kirshenbaum
Fabian Euresti
Fred Beldin
Garrett Stralnic
Gary Wise
Gerald McKay
Hilary Young
Jen Proctor
Jim Dwyer
Joy Hyatt
Julia Reardin
Kat Hagedorn
Kate Ewald
Ken Anderson
Lou Glorie
Lloyd Goldsmith
Maria Feldman
Mark Hardin
Martin Thoburn
Micah Vanderhoof
Monica Ross
Natalie Condon
Nazlı Dinçel
Patrick Wodzinski
Patti Smith
Phoebe Adams
Robin Sober
Ron Sober
Steve Patterson
Sue Dise
Vanessa Sly Thoburn
Zeynep Gürsel

Interns
Clare Higgins
Fahim Rahman
Haley Chynoweth
Kathleen Hiipaaka
Katie Baral
Katie Wedemeyer
Kyle Stefek
Maria Shin
Shannon Cash
Sophia Dai
Michigan Theater
Projection & Stage Staff
Dan Bruell
Dan Morey
Frank Uhle
J Scott Clarke
Jim Pyke
Rick Berthelot
Scott McWhinney
Walter Bishop
Technical Assistants
Conor Anderson
Jacob Barreras
Jameson Eisele
Mark Murrell
Rowan Niemisto
Patrick Wodzinski
Screening Room 16mm
Projection System
James Bond, Full
Aperture Systems
Granting Agencies
and Organizations
The Michigan Council for
Arts and Cultural Affairs
The National Endowment
for the Arts

After Party Venues
\aut\BAR
The Bar at 327 Braun
Court
Hathaway's Hideaway
The Heidelberg
The Ravens Club
Sava’s
Opening Night Catering
Arbor Brewing Company
\aut\BAR
Big City Bakery
The Brinery
Café Zola
Cherry Republic
The Earle Restaurant
Jefferson Market
Jerusalem Garden
The Lunch Room
Old Town Tavern
Paquetta A. Palmer
People’s Food Co-Op
Sava’s
Silvio’s Organic Pizza
Tantre Farm
Tracklements Smokery
Zingerman’s Bakehouse
VIP Fundraiser Catering
Bona Sera Café
Opening Night Drinks
Ann Arbor Distilling
Company
Arbor Brewing Company
The Bar at 327 Braun
Court
Isalita
The Ravens Club
TeaHaus
Unity Vibrations
The Green Room
Committee
Deborah Greer
Lou Glorie
Robin Sober

The Green Room
Donors
Deborah Greer
Michael Feeney
Peter Feeney
The Green Room
Catering
Arbor Brewing Company
El Harissa Market Cafe
Isalita
Jerusalem Garden
Lou & Francis Glorie
Mani
Pieology Pizzeria
Potbelly Sandwich Shop
Robin & Ron Sober
Sava’s
Zingerman’s
The Green Room
Art Installation:
The Neutral Zone
Armine Verdiyan
Casey Klobucar
Charlie Anderson
Chloe Di Blassio
Danijel Matanic
Felix Sommers
IO Soucy
Mary Thiefels
Mia Shin
Sam Brown
Zeke Casteel
Sneak Preview Caterers
Frita Batidos
TeaHaus
Special Event
Refreshments
Arbor Brewing Company
Jerusalem Garden
The Peoples Food Co-Op
Savco
White Lotus Farms
Filmmaker Dinner
Casa Dominick’s

11

Overview

Acknowledgements
Additional Thanks To:
Barbara Brown & Howard White, Annie White, Nick Bertsos, Maria Feldman, Jason Jay Stevens, Lalena Stevens,
Jennifer Tysse, Marie Woo & Harvey Levine, Bruce Baker, Ted Kennedy, Woody Sempliner, John Caldwell,
Jay Cassidy, Julie Murray, Becca Keating, Mike Hoolboom, John Nelson, Robert Ziebell, Ruth Bardenstein,
David DeVarti, Deborah Greer, Tom Bartlett, Nayiri Mullinix, Jack Cronin, Donald Harrison, Zack Zavisa, Kelly Luck,
Almudena Escobar López, Roger Beebe, Trenton Corp, Mark Toscano (Academy Film Archive); Russ Collins and the
entire staff and management at the Michigan Theater; IATSE Local 395; Caryl Flynn, Mary Lou Chilapia (UM Screen
Arts & Cultures); Gunalan Nadarajan, David Chung, Heidi Kumao, Carol Jacobsen (Penny W. Stamps School of Art &
Design); Chrisstina Hamilton (Penny Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series & Witt Visiting Artist Program); Jax Deluca
(National Endowment for the Arts); Jenell Leonard & Selam Ghirmai (Michigan Film & Digital Media Office);
Marie Klopf, Megan Winkel, Angela Lenhardt, Omari Rush (Ann Arbor Art Center); Elliott Wilhelm (Detroit Film
Theater); Linda Knox, Justin Schell (M Library), Rose Stacy (Animation Club); Mark Nielsen (UM Work Gallery);
Rich DeVarti (Casa Dominick’s); Josie Parker, Eli Neiburger, Tim Grimes (Ann Arbor District Library); Karl Seibert
(WCBN); Deb Polich (Arts Alliance); Barbara Twist (Art House Convergence); Alvin Hill, Emilia White (UM North
Quad Programming); Ruth Slavin, Lisa Borgsdorf (University of Michigan Museum of Art); Noah Kaplan, Ethan Kaplan
(Leon Speakers); Marcin Giżycki and Anna Głowińska (Animator Festival); Andréa Picard and Eli Horwatt (Wavelengths, TIFF); Ralph McKay (Sixpack Film Americas); Aily Nash, Gavin Smith and Dennis Lim (Projections, NYFF);
Hilke Doering (Internationale Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen); Ruth Hodgins, Zachary Vanes and Abina Manning (Video
Data Bank); Mads Mikkelsen (CPH:DOX); Ben Cook and Matt Carter (LUX); Daïchi Saïto and Malene Szlam (Double
Negative Collective).

Raffle
The AAFF Raffle will take place upstairs at the Michigan Theater for the duration of
the Festival. Tickets will be sold throughout the week, and the final drawing will be
held on Sunday, March 20th at 4:30pm.
The AAFF Raffle will feature beautiful baskets with a range of items from filmmakers,
artists and local businesses. All tickets sales will benefit the Ann Arbor Film Festival,
a mission-driven non-profit organization.
We would like to thank our generous donors for this year’s raffle.
Café Zola
City Bird Gift Shop
Comet Coffee
Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Downtown Home and Garden
Encore Record Store
Green Dot Restaurant
Julia Kjelgaard

12

Katie Westgate
Old Town Restaurant
People Dancing Company
Pure Detroit
Radius Garden
Ruth Taubman
Slows Restaurant
The Earle

The Inn on Ferry Street
The Purple Dragonfly
The Purple Rose Theatre
Tiny Buddha Yoga
Unity Vibration
University Music Society
Wheelhouse Detroit

Overview

Partners & Sponsors

Partners & Foundational Support

Key Sponsors

13

Overview

Partners & Sponsors

Contributing Sponsors

Core Sponsors

14

Overview

Beyond The Fest
Tour
The 53rd Ann Arbor Film Festival Traveling Tour visited many wonderful
locations in the United States and abroad with award-winning and
select short films from the 2015 Festival. All filmmakers participating
in the tour receive income for each screening of their work, providing
direct support to independent artists. To learn more about the AAFF
Traveling Tour please visit: aafilmfest.org/tour.

Frankfort, MI
The Garden Theater
August 6th, 2015

Oakland, CA
Black Hole Cinematheque
January 7, 2016

Iowa City, IA
University of Iowa
February 5, 2016

Cincinnati, OH
The Mini Microcinema
August 6th & 8th 2015

Los Angeles, CA
Los Angeles Filmforum
January 10, 2016

Milwaukee, WI
UWM Union Theater
February 9, 2016

Pittsburgh, PA
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
October 2nd & 3rd, 2015

Ann Arbor, MI
Ann Arbor District Library
January 14, 2016

Detroit, MI
Detroit Film Theater
February 20, 2016

Columbia, SC
The Nickelodeon
October 27th, 2015

Montreal,
Quebec, Canada
Cinematheque Quebecoise
January 21 - 23, 2016

Seattle, WA
Grand Illusion Cinema
March 8, 12, & 15, 2016

Claremont, CA
Pitzer College
October, 2016

Hamilton, NY
Colgate University
January 26, 2016

Providence, RI
Rhode Island
School Of Design
November 15, 2015

Rochester, NY
University Of Rochester
January 28 & 29, 2016

Baltimore, MD
Sight Unseen
/ Psychic Readings
December 9, 2015

Ormskirk,
United Kingdom
Edge Hill University
February 3, 2016

15

Overview

Beyond The Fest
DVD Collections
Volumes 1–8 are on sale at the merchandise table in the Michigan
Theater lobby through the duration of the festival and available on
our website: aafilmfest.org/store

Volumes 4–8
Feature beautiful design work from our
friends at letterform, and one of a kind
screen-printed cases from VGKids.

16

Coming Soon: Volume 9!
A compilation of award-winning
and select short films from this
year’s 54th Festival.

Overview

Award Jurors
Garbiñe
Ortega
originally from the Basque Country, Spain, is a film curator based
in Mexico City. Her curatorial
projects have been programmed
at Anthology Film Archives, San
Francisco Cinematheque, La
Casa Encendida (Madrid) and

Pacific Film Archive among other
international venues. Garbiñe's
curatorial practice focuses on the
creation of specific frameworks
through which the collective
audiovisual experience can be
amplified. Among these projects
are many interdisciplinary workshops as well as the filmic exhibition Miradas Al Límite (Artium,
2008). She has worked at Centro
de Cultura Digital and she is the
former co-director of programming of Ambulante Documentary
Film Festival in Mexico. Garbiñe
is currently working with Bruce
Baillie on a bi-lingual book and
on a series about his cinema that
will be presented in 2016.

Carl
Bogner
teaches in the Department of Film,
Video, Animation and New Genres
at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where, for some 15
years, he has led the program’s
foundational two-semester Introduction to Experimental Media
class and, for the last five years,
served as a member of the Graduate Faculty. For the last 18 years,
Bogner also has been director of

Free Presentation
Wednesday 1pm
See pg 32 for details
the Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video
Festival. As a curator, he helped
initiate two Milwaukee screening
series, the once monthly experimental film/video series at Woodland Pattern Book Center and the
ongoing Experimental Tuesdays
series at UWM’s Union Cinema.
Other histories include grad
school (MFA in non-fiction writing)
and various stints as a bookseller
and as a film programmer.

Rebecca
Baron
is known for her essay
films concerned with the
construction of history,
with a particular interest
in still photography and
its relationship to the
moving image. Her work
has screened widely at
international film festivals and media venues
including Documenta 12,
New York Film Festival,
Centre Pompidou, Anthology
Film Archives, Toronto International Film Festival, London Film
Festival, Pacific Film Archive,
Flaherty Film Seminar and the
Whitney Museum of American
Art. She was the recipient of a
2002 Guggenheim Fellowship
and a 2007 Fellowship at the

Free Presentation
Thursday 1pm
See pg 42 for details
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced
Study. In 2010, the Austrian Film
Museum presented a retrospective of her work. She teaches at
CalArts School of Film/Video.
Free Presentation
Friday 1pm
See pg 54 for details

17

Exhibition

Ah humanity!
March 15 – April 1, Work Gallery, 306 S. State St. 

Ah humanity!

Ernst Karel, Véréna Paravel, and Lucien Castaing-Taylor
video and four-channel audio

Ah humanity! reflects on the fragility and folly of humanity in the age
of the Anthropocene. Taking the 3/11/11 disaster of Fukushima as
its point of departure, it evokes an apocalyptic vision of modernity,
and our predilection for historical amnesia and futuristic flights of
fancy. The images were shot on a telephone through a handheld
telescope, at once close to and far from its subject, while the audio
composition combines empty excerpts from Japanese genbaku and
related film soundtracks, audio recordings from seismic laboratories,
and location sound.

Ernst Karel will talk about Ah humanity!
at 3pm, Thursday, March 17.

MAJOR PARTNER

University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps
School of Art & Design
18

About the Artists
Castaing-Taylor and Paravel
collaborate as anthropologists,
artists, and filmmakers in the
Sensory Ethnography Laboratory,
based in Cambridge, USA, at
Harvard University, and in Paris,
France. Their work conjugates
art's negative capability with an
ethnographic attachment to the
flux of life. 
Ernst Karel's multidimensional
audio work includes electroacoustic improvisation and composition,
location recording, and solo and
collaborative sound installations.
Karel’s audio pieces move between
the abstract and the documentary.
He works as the Lab Manager for
the Sensory Ethnography Lab and
has previously collaborated with
Castaing-Taylor and Paravel on
their 2012 film Leviathan. 

Installations

Michigan Theater
March 15 – April 1, Work Gallery, 306 S. State St. 

Theta (2016)

by Flatsitter
Virtual Reality Installation
THETA (Θ) is a guided meditation virtual reality spa experience founded on principles of sensorial decadence
and theta brainwave entrainment. An existential guided
meditation experiment made possible with generous
support from the New York State Council on the Arts.
Virtual Reality Experience by Flatsitter
Guided Meditation by Noah Falck
Lighting Design by Carlie & John Rickus
Bubble Spa Sculpture by Frank Napolski
Biofeedback Medical Systems by Volker Einsfeld
Flatsitter is a media arts collaborative founded in 2013
in Buffalo, NY. Flatsitter uses old and new technologies,
combined with elements of performance art, to craft
strange and surreal experiences in an array of formats: live
expanded cinema performance, web collections, site-specific installation, and live virtual reality experiences.

What We Saw (2016)

by Everyone
Social Sculpture
In the screening room lobby, cards are provided for
you—the audience—to write down what you see at the
festival, on or off-screen! Leave these cards in the box
provided at the What We Saw station and they will be
photographed for inclusion in the ongoing slideshow
which will be shown in the screening room lobby and
on the box-office monitor outside the Michigan Theater.
This slide show is an experimental remix documentary made possible by everyone—our smart, diverse,
film-loving AAFF audience.
Everyone includes all spectators of the 54th Ann
Arbor Film Festival. All are invited to contribute to this
collaborative piece.

Touch Tone (2016)

Martin Thoburn
Interactive Installation
Telephonic sonic tones resonate at the push of a button, lights dance to the pulse of the tone. Dial in your
musical spirit through the ghost of telephony’s past.
Martin Thoburn is a local animator and artist working
in a variety of media. Working with both modern and
antique technologies sometimes in tandem, his work
explores the uniqueness of the medium, technology,
and/or tool.

GameStart’s Digital Animation
Community Creation (2016)

by GameStart and Everyone
Piskel, a digital art sprite editor; HTML & Javascript
Create pixel art character animations, and, with the help
of GameStart School team members, bring them to life
in the digital world that will be on display for everyone
to see - populated and growing with your creations!!
The world will fill with your unique humanoids, crazy
creatures, abstract art monsters - anything you make!
The more people that participate, the more the creativity
accumulates; by the end of the festival, we will have a
wonderful diverse digital art world population!
At Gamestart School, our curriculum leverages
students' passions for video games, like Minecraft, to
make learning STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) skills relevant. We believe
games inspire discovery, foster innovation, and reward
playfulness. Our instructors teach design, programming, digital art, and animation skills while encouraging
self-expression and collaboration.

19

Installations

North Quad, Space 2435
March 15–20, 10am–6pm, 105 S. State St, Free & Open to the Public 

Laser Loops (2015)

Special Cinématic Contraption (2016)

Manda Moran
GIF

Manfrotto tripod, 16mm Kodak Ciné Special, Intervalometer, Projected 16mm countdown leader

These GIFs document experiments manipulating green,
red and ultraviolet lasers to reveal light's mysterious
physical behaviors.
Manda Moran is an artist working primarily with video,
photography and light. She is currently based in Detroit
via California.

Gary Schwartz is an Academy Award nominated
filmmaker, award winning animator, director, artist &
educator. He conducts intensive hands-on Kinetic Visual
Storytelling Animation workshops in elementary, middle,
high school, under-graduate, graduate, post-graduate,
professional training, film festivals, museums, summer
camps, community centers, prisons and psychiatric
hospitals national and internationally in an environment
of creativity, imagination and self-expression. His kinetic
cinema sculptures, installations & films have been exhibited in major museums & galleries internationally.

20

Installations

sway (2015)

Is This It? (2015)

Fidelia Lam
interactive sculpture installation

Joanie Wind
digital video

Sway is an interactive sound and visual art sculpture
installation involving custom modified hammocks with
interactive audio/visual elements. The installation tracks
the participant’s movements in the hammock and
generates tones based on their motions, while diffused
LED lights wash over the participant from above. The
combination of soft, slow audio/visual elements work
together to create a sensory microenvironment for
the participant. The hammocks invite people passing
through the installation space to take a moment to sit,
be still, breathe and sway.
Fidelia Lam is a Canadian-born experiential designer and artist specializing in interactive audio/visual
work for live performance and installation. She likes to
explore how the growing role of technology in society
impacts and influences humans' relationships with
technology, with each other, and with ourselves. She is
currently completing a Master of Arts in Media Arts at
the University of Michigan.

Chafed by societal pressures and gender roles, a
woman uses the solitude of domesticity to confront
herself. Intimate moments of reflection expose a
tumultuous internal dialogue, narrating the constant
struggle between confidence and self-loathing. The
audio and visual components are similarly troubled,
gendered, and otherwise conflicted as they contrast,
jump around, overlap, and repeat. Humor allows the
viewer to critically confront and dismantle social conventions in a way that suddenly becomes comfortably
and effortlessly obvious. Sometimes just seeing an
action or phrase out of context—in a humorous light,
exaggerated, or repeated—is enough to illuminate a
completely alternate perspective.
Joanie Wind studied interdisciplinary art at Eastern
Michigan University. She started as a painter, creating
expressive oil portraits, and then moved on to video
performance art, creating self portrait after self portrait.
She currently lives and works in Ypsilanti.

Student videos
on display from:
Edge Hill University (UK)
College for Creative Studies (Detroit)
University of Michigan
Michigan State University
Oakland University (Rochester, MI)
University of the Incarnate Word (San Antonio, TX)

21

Overview

Storefront Installations
Various Locations, Downtown Ann Arbor

photo: Miranda Clark

Aquarium Gallery

Encore Records

Where The Boys Are (2015)
Scott Northrup
9-channel found footage video installation

Music in Heaven and Magic on Earth (2016)
Tom Carey
mixed media

Seminal 1980s coming-of-age films have been
reduced and re-cut, focusing on the male characters
isolated in their rooms and presenting them on a bank
of surveillance monitors. These sleepy objects of desire
might be thinking of you, themselves, or each other —
what it feels like for a boy.
Scott Northrup is a Detroit-based multi-media
artist whose work includes film, video, assemblage,
collage, photography, handmade books, and more.
He teaches filmmaking, concept, and interdisciplinary
courses in the Entertainment Arts Department at the
College for Creative Studies.

A tribute to experimental filmmaker and record collector Harry Smith, this installation features shadow
puppets of esoteric religious figures and space aliens
along with eighteen paintings created to resemble
soundtrack LP jackets for famous experimental films.
This installation was inspired by the paper cutout
figures in Harry Smith's 1962 stop motion animated
film Heaven and Earth Magic, his study of the occult,
the vast collection of vernacular music collected on
his “Anthology of American Folk Music,” and his place
in the New York avant-garde cinema of the 1960s.
Tom Carey creates shadow puppets, relief prints,
and art zines. His visual art has been shown in
Detroit, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia.
Tom has performed his handmade shadow puppet
shows at venues including the Detroit Institute of
Arts and Issue Project Room in Brooklyn, New York.

111 S. 4th Ave.

Presentiments (2014)
Miranda Dershimer
16mm to HD
Born inside of a fig and without wings, the male fig
wasp mates with a female then chews through the fig
creating a tunnel to the exterior world through which
the female will exit. Born also without eyes, and thus
unable to see any light coming through the tunnel, does
it postulate the existence of any world beyond its own
fig? Presentiments is an exploration of human life seen
through a comparison with the life story of the fig wasp.
This excerpt features hand-processed film exposed
out-of-camera with rayogram techniques (laying objects
directly onto the film strip which leave their shadow
when exposed to light).
Miranda Dershimer works in a variety of media
currently investigating the ways that surprises and mysteries cause us to rethink our relationship to the world.
From Ann Arbor, she is a recent graduate of Amherst
College. Wind makes her laugh.
22

Tom Carey will open the 11am Saturday morning
Family Friendly program on March 19 in the Main.

Overview

Afterparty Performances
Wednesday

The Ravens Club | 11pm – 2am | Free
Ballet Numerique (2016) is David Olson's live visual
performance, remixing vintage avant-garde film clips
with original photos, video loops, computer generated images and visuals from Ann Arbor Film Festivals
past and present. Stills and loops from the after-party
itself will also be incorporated, inviting the audience to
become part of the performance. The front windows of
The Raven’s Club will be transformed into a translucent
screen allowing the visuals to be seen from both inside
and outside the venue.
David Olson is a multimedia artist, producer and
publisher. His live performances remix a variety of original
and found media including stills, videos, paintings, drawings, glitch, film and live input. Past venues include Joe’s
Pub/NYC, CBGB’s Howl Festival/NYC, Galapagos Art
Space/Brooklyn.

Alvin Hill is a multi-media composer and DJ who has
worked with many Detroit luminaries, including Derrick
May, Kevin Saunderson, and Carl Craig. He has composed scores and performed with dance companies
throughout the US, including Arachne Aerial Arts, The
Playground, Koichi Tamano & Harupin-Ha, and Chavasse
Dance and Performance.

Friday

Hathaway’s Hideaway | 11pm – 2am | Free
Vestibular Variable (dual sinusoid version) (2016), a
work by Brandon Walley for two 16mm projectors and
video, is the visual representation of a series of simple
systems that interact with each other at divergent
nodes on their respected cycles to reveal complex
results that deal with physiology, mentality, the social
condition and human conditioning.
Brandon Walley creates film and multimedia that are
predominately abstract and nontraditional in nature. He
has shown at film festivals and art galleries internationally. Brandon also serves as Program Director for
Corktown Cinema in Detroit and Region Programmer
for the Media City International Film Festival.

DJ Ephraim Asili travels the world in pursuit of rhythm
on records. His all vinyl live sets consist of the finest
in Soul, Funk, Disco, Boogie, Reggae, Afro Beat and
Latin Groove. Asili has been collecting vinyl and playing
venues and clubs around New York and Philadelphia
for the last 15 years. He has performed with bands including The Budos Band, Tal National, and Nomo. Asili
hosts a weekly radio show on WGXC.

Saturday

The Club Above the Heidelberg
11pm – 2am | $5, free with AAFF Pass
efflux (2016) is a live audio-visual performance by
Simon Alexander-Adams (keyboard, electronics, visuals
programming) with Jonathan Taylor (drum kit, found
percussion, effected tabla). They draw on elements
of free improvisation, electronic music, jazz and Indian
classical music. The two create unexpected textures,
seamlessly shifting between meditative drones, pulsing
rhythms, and pointillistic scatterings. The real-time audio reactive visuals, created by Alexander-Adams and
performed by Charles Samuels, are inspired by fractal
relationships ever-present in nature, advancements in
space exploration, and a fascination with glitch art.
Simon Alexander-Adams is a composer, designer and
multimedia artist working within the intersection of art
and technology. Simon's practice in sonic and visual art
has lead him to create experimental animations, graphic
scores, interactive installation art, novel performance
systems, and multimedia performances enabling connections between sonic, visual and kinetic forms.

As "DJ Danny Glover's Kid", Dustin Krcatovich has
provided aural party lubricant for AAFF afterparties for
several years (including, debatably, the most infamous
AAFF afterparty of the last decade), culling most of his
selections from an ample collection of classic 45 rpm
records. He is the former host of "Hit Parade of Hits"
on Ann Arbor's own WCBN. Krcatovich also records,
tours, and performs improvised music as Skin Lies and
runs the underground cassette label FM DUST.

23

Workshops & Discussions

Expanding Frames:
AAFF Workshops & Discussions
North Quad, Space 2435 | 105 South State St., Ann Arbor

Tu — 03/15
2:30–4:30pm
Young Women & Experimental
Video Game Themed Films:
A Game Changer student
round-table moderated by
Joseph Lopez
Join us for a conversation about
women and the virtual world. In the
21st century, young filmmakers are
no longer only influenced by film or
even their physical or mental surroundings, but by the virtual. These
virtual environments have created
potential narratives which we have
yet to fully explore. This panel of
women includes experimental digital
artists, specifically working with
video games and digital themed
mediums. They will show short examples of their works and engage in
a dialog about filmmaking as women
in the digital age.
Joseph Lopez is a professor at
the University of the Incarnate Word
where he runs a convergent media
program. His work spans many
fields, he is always looking for the
next adventure.

event is co-sponsored by the Ann
Arbor District Library and is intended
for adults and teens grade 6 and up.
Justin Schell is a filmmaker, writer,
and Learning Design Specialist for
the University of Michigan Libraries,
where he heads the Shapiro Design
Lab. His work has been shown in the
Walker Art Center, Twin Cities Public
Television, and online at the Huffington Post and the Progressive and
screened in the Twin Cities Film Fest,
Twin Cities Underground Film Festival, and the Qhia Dab Neeg Hmong
Film Festival. He regularly teaches
courses on documentary production,
interviewing, and editing.

We — 03/16
10am–Noon
What's Your Day Job?
Panel Discussion
moderated by Ted Hardin

Join us for a discussion, show and
tell, and debate about the merits of
living in the multiple worlds of art
film, commercial work, and education. How does an organic interplay
between innovation, creativity, and
4:30–6:30pm
compelling ideas exist regardless of
Making Movies: Remixing
an artistic or commercial framework?
Narratives Workshop with
Panelists will discuss making artwork
Justin Schell
on the fringe while holding day jobs
and artists who left an individual
Make your own documentary film
practice to apply their creative
in this hands-on workshop. Explore
talents to the industry.
how filmmakers create meaning using Ted Hardin is an Associate Profesimage, voice, and audio. You’ll edit
sor at Columbia College Chicago.
video clips from public domain films
Ted worked at art centers, but also
and add music of your choosing. Tie shot films for German Television.
it all together by adding your own nar- Commercially he created content for
ration track. Documentary filmmaker
companies as a strategy to gain acJustin Schell will lead the participants cess to equipment and circumstancthrough the process. At the end of
es for his own experimental work.
the workshop, participants will have
completed a 30 second film. This

24

3–5pm
Show and Tell
Forum and Reception
10 seven-minute presentations, in
the form of 20 images for 20 seconds each, by attending filmmakers
and other AAFF guests.

Th — 03/17
10am–Noon
How to be a Film Critic
Discussion w/ Michael Sicinski
and Almudena Escobar López
Geared towards anyone with an
interest in writing about film. Our
panelists will discuss various
platforms and publications for film
writing and criticism including online,
print, newspaper, magazine and
academic journals and share their
practical experiences.
Michael Sicinski is a film critic
based in Houston who specializes in
experimental film, documentary, and
international art cinema. He is a regular contributor to Cinema Scope,
Cineaste, Cargo, Reverse Shot,
and the Nashville Scene. In 2003
he started The Academic Hack, one
of the first film criticism websites
largely focused on avant-garde film
and video. Michael currently teaches
in the English and Art History departments at the University of Houston.
Almudena Escobar López is a PhD
student in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester.
Her research focuses on collectivity
and filmmakers’ cooperatives. She
combines her academic research
and writing with her practice as a
film archivist and curator. She has
published essays in Afterimage,
Journal of Film Preservation, Little
White Lies and Desistfilm Magazine.

Workshops & Discussions

Participate in this forum for talking, learning and doing.
We aim to nurture both community and critical thinking while fostering
a deeper understanding of the work showing at the Festival.

Fr — 03/18

original images and movies. The
workshop will be broken into two
parts: traditional image-making, and
hands-on image-making. We will
10am–Noon
shoot on Super 8mm cameras and
hand-process the film in eco-friendly
Video as a Medium: the
Materiality of Low-Tech Video Art solution. Then, we will play and explore how we can create images on
Presentation by Lyn Goeringer
the film itself using everything from
markers to glitter to leaves of grass.
As an art form, video art is often
difficult to understand as it challenges Joel Rakowski works primarily in
what viewers have learned to expect. Super 8, on projects with fellow
faculty members and local artists.
Therefore, in video art, the labor and
He holds numerous awards for his
beauty that is encoded within the
work in public television production
form is often lost. Lyn Goeringer will
and local film festivals, and is prilead a demonstration of techniques
marily responsible for UM Screen
that replicate the kind of work that
Arts & Cultures' production equipwas done in early video art. This
workshop will help better explain the ment, web resources, and general
world of historical and contemporary knowledge resource
Barbara Twist is a film producer
video art practices through handsand director based in Detroit, MI.
on exploration. There will be several
She is a member of the national orcomputer workstations to allow
participants to explore various effects ganization Film Fatales, and a founding member of Final Girls, a women's
that emulate the early video explorafilmmaker collective in Detroit. She
tions of well-known video artists.
also runs an international organiza Lyn Goeringer is an experimental
artist who works primarily with video, tion for the art house community, the
Art House Convergence. She works
light, and sound. She has exhibited
in narrative and experimental media,
her work in Seattle, WA, Boulder,
with a current focus in Super 8 and
CO, Providence, RI, and performed
8mm filmmaking.
throughout the United States. She
currently is a Visiting Assistant
Professor of Film Studies in the
Department of English at Michigan
State University.

Su — 03/20

Sa — 03/19
2–5pm
Shoot, Scratch and Stomp:
Let’s Play With Film!
Workshop presented by Joel
Rakowski and Barbara Twist
This workshop is perfect for families
and kids ages 3-18. We will work
directly with film stock to create

11am–1pm
What the Hell Was That?
Panel moderated by
Daniel Herbert
This panel has been an Ann Arbor
Film Festival favorite for over a decade, and began when a filmmaker
overheard an audience member
declare "What the hell was that?"
about his own film. An enlightening
discussion ensued and the idea for
the panel was born. Join us for an

opportunity to watch and discuss
three short experimental films from
this year's Festival selected by
visiting AAFF filmmakers and other
special guests.
Daniel Herbert is a scholar of media culture and Associate Professor
of Screen Arts and Cultures at the
University of Michigan. His book Videoland examines the ways that video
rental stores altered movie culture
from the 1970s through the 2000s.
1–3pm
Regional Roundtable
Panel moderated by
Roger Beebe
The history of U.S. experimental
film has often focused on the major
urban centers of New York, San
Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago. However, there are filmmakers
scattered all over the country, in
places like Iowa City, Milwaukee,
Orlando, Boulder, and Binghamton. It might be time to question
the centrality of those traditional
urban centers and start writing the
history/histories of these other local
scenes. Additionally, with the interconnections provided by social media and online access to so much
contemporary experimental media,
we will consider that global web of
connections that links these makers
scattered across the continent and
around the world.
Roger Beebe is an Associate
Professor in the Department of Art
at the Ohio State University. He has
screened his films around the globe
with solo shows at the Laboratorio
Arte Alameda (Mexico City), Anthology Film Archives, and dozens
of other venues. He has won numerous honors and awards including a
2013 MacDowell Colony residency,
and a 2009 Visiting Foreign Artists
Grant from the Canada Council for
the Arts.
25

26
26

T UESDAY

Tu
03/15
Back Track
pg 28

27
27

Tuesday, 8:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Opening Night Screening
Films in Competition

The 54th Festival opens with a reception featuring an open bar with wines from
Owen Roe, Arbor Brewing Company beer, and signature cocktails mixed by guest
bartenders from the Ravens Club, Isalita, 327 Braun Court, and Ann Arbor Distillery.
Refreshments from local favorites Jerusalem Garden, Sava’s, The People’s Food
Co-op, Zingerman’s and more. Music by DJ Jeremy Wheeler.
REGAL

Karissa Hahn
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 2 min | 16mm
US PREM I ERE from: film (theater) to > youtube (home)
> to film (theater) torrented/pirated (digital) images as
found footage....printed from a household printer onto
16mm clear film.... Such as the loading dial, REGAL
aims to circulate and find its way back to the screen.
Take this proxy and see that the ghost has become
tangible. informed largely by: Hito Steyerl’s “In
Defense of the Poor Image” – KH

Back Track

Virgil Widrich
Vienna, Austria | 2015 | 7 min | DCP
A 3D-remix of feature films from the 1950s and 60s
which were projected on glass and photographed in 3D. 

A Visit to Indiana

Curt McDowell
1970 | 10 min | 16mm
NOT I N COM PET I T I O N Curt McDowell is not so
enchanted with his return home in A Visit to Indiana;
home movies from the heartland play off his droll
disappointment. – Steve Seid

Drive In

Joel Rakowski and Terri Sarris
Ann Arbor, MI | 2015 | 2 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE Shot on Max 8mm, Drive In is a
“snapshot” of a summer evening at what was once the
largest, and now one of the last, Detroit area drive-in
theaters, still going 5-screens strong.

The Place

Julia Popławska
Poland | 2015 | 15 min | DCP
At a weather station in the High Tatras, a workplace
situated higher than any other in Poland, the constant
nocturnal observation of the surrounding world is
an unbroken norm. The workers remain at their posts
in a suspended state of timeless time, unshaken and
immovable, despite reversals, adversities and
startling situations.
SPONSOR

Michigan Film & Digital Media Office
28

Hotel 22

Elizabeth Lo
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 9 min | DCP
The Line 22 is the only overnight bus route in Silicon
Valley. During the day, it is a regular city bus. But by
night, it makes an unofficial transformation into a shelter
for the homeless. Commonly referred to as ‘Hotel
22,’ the bus has become a mobile testament to the
painful challenges of finding housing in an increasingly
unaffordable landscape. When evening falls, weary
riders begin their Sisyphean journey between opposite
ends of a two-hour bus route. Tensions run high when
people are forced to commit the most private act—
sleep—in the most public of spaces.

Isola del Giglio

Tom Schroeder
St. Paul, MN | 2014 | 10 min | DCP
Sunday morning on the long curve of Campese, Isola
del Giglio. Impressions of the Italian island in sketchbook form.

Life with Herman H. Rott

Chintis Lundgren
Tallinn, Estonia | 2015 | 11 min | DCP
Herman is a rat who enjoys heavy drinking, loud grind
music and chess. He doesn’t care much for cleaning
and the disorder in his apartment only makes him
feel more at home. One day a very tidy cat who has a
weakness for messy macho-men, decides to move in.
She also brings a vacuum cleaner, a piano, and what’s
worse - a collection of classical music records.

Discontinuity

Lori Felker
Chicago, IL | 2016 | 15 min | DCP
Discontinuity highlights the unexpected fissures that
can form between us, including the things that can fall
in and get lost. When Tabitha returns “home” after a
separation from her boyfriend, Stephen, what they’ve
been missing becomes opaquely clear and who they’re
becoming makes it hard for them to see each other.
Their disconnections are mirrored in the film’s approach
to editing, its confusion of time and space, and a freewheelin’ clowder of cats.

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Back Track

REGAL

A Visit to Indiana

Isola del Giglio

Drive In

Life with Herman H. Rott
Hotel 22

Discontinuity

Afterparty

Sava’s | 10pm–2am | Free

The Place

Continue the Opening Night celebration
with a champagne toast at Sava’s!
29

30

Blue & Red
pg 39

31

WEDNESDAY

We
03/16

Wednesday, 1pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room, Free

Garbiñe Ortega:
This Place Called Mexico
Juror Presentation

Ofrenda oaxaqueña, by the artist Bruno Varela, describes, with a sense
of irony, the regional traditions of Oaxaca as they take place in the
present. In Impresiones para una máquina de luz y sonido, the political
art collective Los Ingrávidos, inspired by Peter Tscherkassky’s film of
a similar title, address the question of the representation of violence
through the manipulation on celluloid of a film from the Golden Age of
Mexican Cinema. Minotauro, the most recent film by Nicolás Pereda,
observes three lovers that move choreographically in a mysterious
silent domestic space while the outside world is burning. Xilitla by
Melanie Smith and Rafael Ortega builds in 35mm a fragmented mental
space in a semitropical surreal landscape. This selection of recent
experimental films portray the social upheaval of a country that falls
apart into pieces. This place is called Mexico. – Garbiñe Ortega

Ofrenda oaxaqueña

Bruno Varela
Oaxaca, Mexico | 2012 | 2 min | digital file
Media recycling of old regional traditions. An
ecotouristic détournement in the main square
in Oaxaca in Southern Mexico. – BV

Impresiones para una
máquina de luz y sonido

Los ingrávidos
Mexico | 2015 | 7 min | digital file
A woman raises her voice and gives a speech,
painful and endless, that with time becomes
even more overwhelming, because they are
heart-breaking and permanent impressions
in the collective memory that stabs with
words an old Mexican film, a celluloid that
tears apart until its disappearance. – Mónica
Corona Quiñones

EDUCATION PARTNER

The University of Michigan Center for
Latin American and Caribbean Studies

32

Minotauro

Nicolás Pereda
Mexico/Canada | 2015 | 53 min | DCP
Minotauro takes place in a home of books,
of readers, of artists. It’s also a home of soft
light, of eternal afternoons, of sleepiness, of
dreams. The home is impermeable to the
world. Mexico is on fire, but the characters of
Minotauro sleep soundly. – NP

Xilitla

Melanie Smith/Rafael Ortega
Mexico | 2010 | 12 min | digital file
This film, shot in 35mm, calls into question
the imaginary limits between modern and
contemporary art practices. The surreal
construction mechanisms that Edward James
used to build his semitropical enclave are
disassembled. – MS/RO

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Minotauro

Ofrenda oaxaqueña

Xilitla

Impresiones para una máquina de luz y sonido

33

Wednesday, 5pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Chantal Akerman: News from Home

News from Home

Chantal Akerman (1950–2015)
1977 | 85 min | 16mm presented as DCP
News From Home is one of Akerman’s essential films from the
1970s, an especially vibrant period in the director’s life. Letters
from Chantal Akerman’s mother are read over a series of elegantly
composed shots, by Babette Mangolte, of 1976 New York, where
our (unseen) filmmaker and protagonist has relocated. Akerman’s
unforgettable time capsule of the city is also a gorgeous meditation
on urban alienation and personal and familial disconnection.
“By punctuating News From Home’s 16mm footage of desolate
cityscapes with her own voice reading her mother’s letters,
Akerman creates the perfect combination of the personal and the
formal. The film’s long takes (about fifty in total) add up not to a
simple compendium of detached urban imagery but to a kind of
autobiography.” – Michael Koresky

About the Filmmaker
At the age of fifteen Chantal Akerman saw Godard’s Pierrot le fou and
realized that filmmaking could be
experimental and personal. During a
self-administered apprenticeship in
New York (1972–73), making short
films on very low budgets, she was
introduced to the work of the North
American avant-garde by Babette
Mangolte who lensed several of
her early movies. In her deliberately
paced films there are long takes,
scenes shot with a stationary camera, and a play of light in relation to
subjects and their space. The films
(some are semi-autobiographical)
are not dramatic in the conventional
sense, nor glamorized or eroticized; the excitement is inside the
characters or location, or in the act
of looking itself. (adaption of text by
Lillian Schiff)

EDUCATION PARTNER
SPONSOR

University of Michigan
Institute for the Humanities
34

University of Michigan Jean
& Samuel Frankel Center for
Judaic Studies

EDUCATION PARTNER

University of Michigan Institute for
Research on Women and Gender

Wednesday, 7pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Andrew Noren: The Lighted Field

About the Filmmaker
Andrew Noren created sixteen
films, beginning in 1965, at age
22, after moving to NYC and
acquiring a 16mm Bolex camera. J. Hoberman includes Noren
among the significant film artists of
his generation, and characterizes
Noren as “the quintessential counterculture filmmaker... notorious
for his taboo-breaking eroticism”
for his lyrical, diaristic films of the
1960s, and “a cinematic outlaw
who described himself as a ‘shadow bandit’ and a ‘light thief’.” The
eroticism of his earlier work was
sublimated into the sensuous play
of light and shadow within his nine
film series, “The Adventures of the
Exquisite Corpse”, made between
1968 and 2008. Andrew Noren
passed away in May, 2015.

The Lighted Field

Andrew Noren (1943–2015)
1987 | 62 min | 16mm
The Lighted Field is the fifth in a nine work series known as
“The Adventures of the Exquisite Corpse”.
“I see “The Exquisite Corpse” as a kind of cinematic alchemy, the
goal of which is the revelation of the ordinary, as being in fact,
extraordinary and magical, for anyone to see if they have the eyes for it.
In a way, it is the world’s oldest story: the Fool’s progress around the
wheel of the world of appearances and illusions. Starting from nothing/
darkness, becoming something/light, ending again in darkness, moving
from the small to the large, the particular to the whole. In the end, the
finished work will incorporate my entire life, and will contain all that I was
ever able to think, feel, know, see. It will end at the last moment I am able
to register light on the ghostly flesh of film, bringing the circle to a close.”
– Andrew Noren
“Noren’s films were among the most visually intense and overwhelming
films ever created, incorporating relentless barrages of imagery, rapid
in-camera editing, incredible single-framing and time lapse photography,
only pausing for the briefest of moments. Noren was a master 16mm
photographer, a master of capturing motion and a master of black &
white composition.” – Steve Polta, SF Cinematheque

STILL IMAGE

COMMUNITY PARTNER

SPONSOR

Estate of Andrew Noren;
courtesy of Risé Hall-Noren

Museum of Contemporary
Art Detroit

University of Michigan
North Quad Programming
35

Wednesday, 7:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 1
An Ecstatic Experience

Ja’Tovia Gary
Brooklyn, NY | 2015 | 6 min | digital file
An invocation and a meditation on transcendence
as a means of restoration and resistance. – JG

The Perpetual Motion
of My Love For You

Karen Yasinsky
Baltimore, MD | 2016 | 8 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE A collage film slipping between
narrative starts of images and sounds: May Sarton’s
snapshots, a resplendent Liz Taylor, internal and
external awkwardnesses, a short respite of peace and
a dogged, deeply sad positivism. If this movie was a
person it would be the awkward girl, but she will never
gain grace and confidence in her intelligence when
older. She will forever remain in 8th grade with her
frustrations and ambiguities. – KY

The Mess

Peter Burr
Brooklyn, NY | 2015 | 14 min | digital file
In this game-like computer animation we take a journey
to the threshold of a utopian labyrinth. Following the
perspective of a solitary female figure whose job is to
clean up the mess it inadvertently spawned, we end up
in a seemingly endless hall of mirrors. – PB

Dingbat’s Revenge

Scott Fitzpatrick
Winnipeg, Canada | 2015 | 7 min | 16mm
US PREM I ERE Can an experimental animator follow
contemporary Hollywood logic? New ideas are out
of fashion; everything’s a trilogy. Laser-printed onto
recycled 16mm film in 2015, Dingbat’s Revenge is a
coded, stroboscopic manifesto pitched somewhere
between abstraction and representation. – SF

Vague Images at the Beginning and
End of the Day

Carl Elsaesser
Iowa City, IA | 2016 | 8 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE A sketch book of images and sounds
from the year wrapped around a trip out to Loomis,
South Dakota to find the abandoned farm where my
Grandfather grew up. A hug/punch eulogy for all things
impossible now. – CE

Rock Roll

Josh Guilford
Holyoke, MA | 2015 | 3 min | 16mm
A camera roll film shot on Rabbit Island, an islet in
Lake Superior three miles east of Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula. Mapping the surface of a rock at the
island’s northwest edge, a single expanse of sandstone
that dates back over 900 million years. Thinking about
geologic time and the slow action of sedimentation and
compaction. Shooting in short bursts so that images
might accumulate like falling waves. – JG

Iron Condor

Meredith Lackey
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 10 min | 16mm
Iron Condor presents the sensible evidence of the Chicago Futures and Options Exchange from grain to data.
The film takes its name from an option trading strategy
whose profit/loss graph resembles a large bird. Static
objects contend with a virtual atmosphere that renders
the physical obsolescent. – ML

Pixel Jungle

Klara Ravat
Berlin, Germany | 2015 | 3 min | 16mm
Two enlarged 35mm pictures are used to recreate the
olfactory sensations of Barcelona. The pixel patterns
are a graphical representation of the city night and the
orange courtyard in the district of Raval. Each scented
frame is printed on transparent labels, and glued on
clear 16mm leader. – KR

KCBT - Khoan Cắt Bê Tông
Concrete Cutting and Drilling

Lauren Cook
Holyoke, MA | 2015 | 5 min | digital file
U S P R E M I E R E KCBT explores the shifting urban landscape and rapid economic growth of Hanoi, Vietnam
through stenciled demolition ads that both visibly mark
the entire city and internally mark its residents. – LC

Traces/Legacy

Scott Stark
Austin, TX | 2015 | 9 min | 35mm
Traces/Legacy uses a device called a film recorder to
print a series of digital still images onto 35mm film. Discarded Christmas trees, colorfully arranged flea market
finds, a museum of animal kills, microscopic views of
kitchenware, and other overlooked cultural artifacts are
interwoven with flickering journeys through mysterious,
shadowy realms. –SS

SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Honigman

Michigan Psychoanalytic Society

36

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

An Ecstatic Experience

Rock Roll

The Perpetual Motion of My Love For You

Iron Condor

The Mess

Pixel Jungle

Dingbat’s Revenge

KCBT

Vague Images at the Beginning and End of the Day

Traces/Legacy

37

Wednesday, 9:15pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Counting
Feature in Competition

Counting

Jem Cohen
2015 | 111 min | DCP
Laid out in fifteen discrete chapters that are very nearly short movies
unto themselves, Cohen brings his lyrical camerawork into New York,
Moscow, Istanbul, London, New Jersey, St. Petersburg. A laconic,
observational doc, equal parts diary flick and visual essay, the filmer
invites the viewer to hang out with him as he dishes a suite of small
noticings. The mark on a dirty sheet of plastic, a coffin being delivered
to a funeral home, the movement of small birds. Masterfully edited,
Cohen reshapes his encounters into mini-dramas of seeing, building
picture phrases that accumulate into a dizzying vertigo of associations:
black lives matter, a flyer for lost items, climate march, faces on a metro. Though sometimes it’s enough to wait with her perfect face, softly
focused, as she receives the last light of the afternoon.
In its insistent juxtaposition of East and West, of Moscow and New
York City, Cohen reconjures the Cold War as a tale of two countries
newly aimed against its own populations. Lonely citizens wander inside
their own thought balloons, mercilessly contained by the state apparatus. While the filmer brings his camera round the world, in many ways
Counting remains an essay about America and its ongoing class war.
Can we give these forgotten subjects the time it takes to receive their
faces, to notice, to bear witness? – Mike Hoolboom

About the Filmmaker
Jem Cohen is a New York-based
filmmaker and media artist whose
works are built from his own
ongoing archive of street footage,
portraits, and sound. His films and
installations often navigate the
grey area between documentary,
narrative, and experimental
modes. Cohen is best known for
the feature films Museum Hours
(2012), Chain (2004), Instrument
(1999), Benjamin Smoke (1999);
his short films Lost Book Found
(1996) and NYC Weights and
Measures (2005); his 2015
installation We Have an Anchor;
and his work with musicians
such as Patti Smith, Godspeed
You! Black Emperor, Fugazi, Vic
Chesnutt, the Ex, Terry Riley, Elliott
Smith, and R.E.M. among others.

PARTNER

Jem Cohen
in attendance
38

COMMUNITY PARTNER

WCBN

University of Michigan Penny
Stamps Speaker Series & Roman
Witt Visiting Artist Program

Wednesday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 2

Quimtai

Blue and Red

Quimtai

Camilo Colmenares
Berlin, Germany | 2015 | 6 min | DCP
NORT H AM ERI CA N P R E MI E R E Play of geometrical
forms, patterns, rhythms and sounds, Quimtai is
an abstract animation based upon pre-Colombian
patterns of the now extinct Tairona and Quimbaya
indigenous cultures of Colombia and was inspired
by the German absolute film of the 1920s. The animation was laser engraved directly onto 35mm black
leader film. It was developed from ongoing research
on direct animation in which technical experimentation
to alter the celluloid was central. – CC

Blue and Red (藍與紅)

Zhou Tao
Guangzhou, China | 2014 | 25 min | DCP
From people’s complexion lit by natural light, to the
crowd bathed in the color of night; from Guangzhou
square stained blue by LED billboards, and the
anti-government protestors reveling all night in
Bangkok square, to the rust and oxidized-green
surface of a rural metal mine; a spectrum of the
surface, image and reality are mutually creating a
“political skin”. – ZT

Event Horizon

The Last Mango Before the Monsoon

Event Horizon
(L’horizon des évènements)

Guillermo Moncayo
Colombia/France | 2015 | 16 min | DCP
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E Due to the discovery of an
ancient manuscript, new perspectives emerge about
the mysterious vanishing of a community of men.
“...resonant with the founding American narratives
from the time of conquest, these ‘tales of the voyage’,
for centuries, fed the ghosts of the West. In the domain
of astrophysics, (and particularly in the context of
general relativity) an “event horizon” broadly represents
the imaginary surface that envelops a black hole. Its
‘function’ is to define the region from which no elements that exist in the universe can escape the force of
its gravitational field. – Guillermo Moncayo (translated
by Katie Wedemeyer)

The Last Mango Before the Monsoon

Payal Kapadia
Pune, Maharashtra, India | 2015 | 18 min | digital file
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E Two technicians set up
cameras in a forest to capture animal activity at night.
A woman moved away from the forest a long time ago.
She yearns for her late husband and the forest. – PK

39

Films in Competition 2 — Wednesday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Fish Point

(conical signal)

Fish Point

Pablo Mazzolo
Buenos Aires, Argentina | 2015 | 6 min | 16mm
US PREM I ERE An impressionist, kinetic exploration
through the natural landscape of Fish Point, the Provincial Nature Reserve on Pelee Island (Ontario, Canada).

(conical signal)

arc
Oakland, CA | 2015–16 | 10 min | 16mm (x2)
A performance for two 16mm projectors and magnetic
tape. “...beneath the perceptible form of sound is hidden a silent essence. It is from this, this crucial point at
which the kernel of the perceptible has yet to choose to
be sound or light or something else, from this hinterland
of nature where to see is to see sound and to hear is
to hear suns, it is from this very essence that sounds
draws its ordering force.” – Rene Daumal

Afterparty

The Ravens Club | 11pm–2am | Free

40

Primary Stimulus

Primary Stimulus

Robert Russett (1935–2015)
1977/1980 | 8 min | 16mm
In Primary Stimulus, the soundtrack printing process
was kept completely photographic so that “the sound
emitted is the sound the projector interprets from the
lines which are the film’s image. What comprises the
film are sixteen different ‘grates’ of varying amplitudes
(sixteen compositions of black and white horizontal
lines): onto each frame of film one of these patterns is
printed. The sequence varies. The compositions are similar enough to one another so that the afterimage of one
relates compositionally to the next. – Laurence Kardish
F I L M P R E S E R V E D BY A N D C O U R T E SY O F
THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE

Enjoy independent and experimental mixology
in a 1920s speakeasy setting with DJ Alvin Hill
and a live video remix by David Olson.
(See pg 23 for details)

Our Selves Unknown
pg 47

41

THURSDAY

Th
03/17

Thursday, 1pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room, Free

Carl Bogner: Instruction Manual
Juror Presentation

Bogner, the, for some time, lecturer for the foundational experimental film
class in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Film Department here cribs
from past syllabi to share some demonstrations, testimony, and gestures, all
possibly—in some direction—edifying.
“When it comes to children, let the air comb them.”
Julio Cortázar, “Instructions on How to Comb the Hair”

Jack’s Dream

letters, notes

Joseph Cornell | 1938 | 4 min | 16mm
Jack’s Dream is a puppet animation into which
Cornell has inserted a few shots from other
material - just enough to throw it into the sphere
of artful fantasy. – Lawrence Jordan

Stephanie Barber | 2000 | 4 min | 16mm
Associations staged and tested, from across a serendipity of found photographs and texts claimed and
transcribed: “Niki Armstrong… Niki …Nicole…Niki…
Niki…. Nicole… Niki… Nicole Armstrong.”

Mirror

Standard Gauge

Robert Morris | 1969 | 8.5 min | 16mm
Morris, in a winter landscape, holds a mirror to
nature, and to the camera. – LUX

Anal Masturbation and Object Loss

Steve Reinke | 2002 | 6 min | video
“I think what will make my new school better than the
old ones – well, maybe not better, but more precise –
is that we will limit the type of discourse allowed. We’ll
create a common critical vocabulary based on three
things: classical rhetoric, theosophy, and Heidegger – not as a philosophic system but as a series of
provocative compound words.”

My Parents Read Dreams
That I’ve Had About Them

Neil Goldberg | 1998 | 8.5 min | video
With Shirley and Elliott Goldberg. Son Neil writes: “As
the title suggests, in this work I videotaped my parents
reading a series of dreams I’ve had about them....I
provided my parents with no direction except to read
the dreams in whatever manner they wished.”

Je Suis Une Bombe (I Am a Bomb)

Elodie Pong | 2006 | 6.5 min | video
A figure in a panda bear costume performs an erotic
pole dance. The dance becomes more and more
heated up, until it abruptly comes to an end. The panda
removes its mask and a woman appears. She steps up
to the camera to deliver her own praises of a complex
image of woman, simultaneously strong and vulnerable,
a potential powder keg. – EP

42

Morgan Fisher | 1984 | 35 min | 16mm
“In the time since I’ve worked around 35mm on and off,
I’ve never seen a piece of 35 that I didn’t want to pick
up and look at, and sometimes I’ve been free to keep
pieces that I’ve come across.”

Hand Movie

Yvonne Rainer
1966 | 7 min | 8mm film transferred to video
Rainer’s first movie and also a digital work: a hand
raised from a hospital bed posing a series of questions
and/or their possible answers.

A & B In Ontario

Joyce Wieland and Hollis Frampton
1967/1984 | 16 min | 16mm
Joyce Wieland: “Hollis and I came back to Toronto on
holiday in the summer of ‘67. We were staying at a
friend’s house. We worked our way through the city
and eventually made it to the island. We followed each
other around. We enjoyed ourselves. We said we were
going to make a film about each other - and we did.”
After Frampton’s death in 1984, Wieland assembled
the material into this conversation, the game set, once
again, afoot.

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Je Suis Une Bombe (I Am a Bomb)

Mirror

My Parents Read Dreams
That I’ve Had About Them

letters, notes

Jack’s Dream

43

Thursday, 3pm–5pm, Work Gallery, 306 S. State St, Free

Ernst Karel
Gallery Talk & Reception

Ah humanity! an installation by
Ernst Karel, Véréna Paravel, and
Lucien Castaing-Taylor, is exhibited at
the Work Gallery, March 15 – April 1st
(see p.18). Ernst Karel will talk about
the installation and his work.
Karel makes electroacoustic music and experimental
nonfiction sound works for multichannel installation
and performance. His recent projects are edited/
composed using unprocessed location recordings; in
performance he sometimes combines these with analog electronics to create pieces which move between
the abstract and the documentary.
Karel, with Toby Lee and Pawel Wojtasik created
Single Stream (2014). He has done sound work on
non-fiction films including, Manakamana, Leviathan,

and The Iron Ministry all
produced in the Sensory Ethnography Lab at
Harvard University,
where as a Lecturer
on Anthropology, he
teaches a class in sonic
ethnography. His sound
projections have been
presented at Oboro,
Montreal; EMPAC, Troy
NY; Arsenal, Berlin; and
the 2014 Whitney Biennial. He has also created several sound installations
in collaboration with artist Helen Mirra; is a member of
the long-running electroacoustic duo EKG and part of
the New England Phonographers Union recording and
performance collective.

MAJOR PARTNER

University of Michigan Penny
W. Stamps School of Art & Design

W/ ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Leon Speakers

Ann Arbor Art Center

Thursday, 5:10pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium, Free

David OReilly
Presented by the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speaker Series

Irish-born and Los Angeles-based, David OReilly is one
of the most adventuresome and innovative independent
animation filmmakers working today. OReilly’s animations include Please Say Something (awarded Best
Animation at 48th AAFF), and The External World (49th
AAFF). He directed “Alien Child”, the unforgettably
funny and touching faux-animated video game in Spike
Jonze’s Her (2013). He was also the first guest director
in Cartoon Network’s 20-year history, creating the
Adventure Time episode “A Glitch Is a Glitch.” OReilly is
the creator of the acclaimed 2014 video game “Mountain”. OReilly is resolutely independent, moving freely
among television network, feature film, and music video
commissions; metaphysical, otherworldly video games
and interactive projects that question ideas of the self
and the nature of role-playing; Tumblr games, iPhone
hologram apps, and Twitter-based comic strips; and
virtual reality environments.

44

Thursday, 7pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Films by Curt McDowell
Presented in partnership with
the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

“Curt was curt, cute,
controversial, and not
celibate. He was a barrel
of laughs and a roller
coaster ride to hell and
back. Life for him was a
fast track to fast times that
included devilish detours
into forbidden erogenous
zones. He explored all
those zones with a zealous
zeal: painter, pornographer,
poet of the plebeian and
the perverse; you name
it (or sing it since he also
wrote songs) and it all rings
true.” – George Kuchar

Confessions

A program of newly restored 16mm films by
Curt McDowell (1945-1987), whose legendary
body of work is wildly life-affirming, bawdy,
tender, often hilarious, sassy, and frequently
penetrating. McDowell’s films screened
regularly at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in the
1970s, and this program of Academy Film
Archive restorations occasions a long-awaited
return of his work to our screens.
Leaving his Indiana hometown in the mid-1960s, McDowell
attended the San Francisco Art Institute as a talented
painter, before discovering cinema under the tutelage of
filmmakers Robert Nelson and George Kuchar. He started
making films in 1969, working with a regular and memorable
entourage of friends and collaborators, including Kuchar,
who, in addition to appearing in many of the films, scripted
and co-stars in McDowell’s best-known work, the epic cult
feature Thundercrack! (1975).
In addition to his four features, McDowell also produced
a large body of memorable short films, ranging from brief,
gloriously ludicrous tossed-off one-liners to elaborate,
set-designed, multi-character musical comedies, to deeply
felt autobiographical works, all of which will be on display
in this program.
These seven films, made over a four year period, include the
rarely seen Beaver Fever, starring George Kuchar and Curt’s
sister, Melinda McDowell; the surrealist melodrama True Blue
& Dreamy; the nakedly personal Confessions and Ronnie;
the never before seen The Mean Brothers “Get Stood Up”;
the darkly absurdist Wieners & Buns Musical; and the selfexplanatory Stinky-Butt. – Mark Toscano

The Mean
Brothers
“Get Stood Up”

Beaver Fever

Wieners & Buns
Musical

1973 | 3.5 min

Ronnie

1972 | 13.5 min

Stinky-Butt

1971 | 11 min

1974 | 19.5 min

1972 | 4 min
1974 | 3 min

Presented by
Mark Toscano,
preservationist at the
Academy Film Archive,
and Melinda McDowell,
Curt’s sister and actor
in many of his films.

True Blue
& Dreamy

1973 | 12.5 min

45

Films by Curt McDowell — Thursday, 7pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Beaver Fever

Confessions

The Mean Brothers “Get Stood Up”

Wieners & Buns Musical

Stinky Butt

PRESERVED BY

PRINTS COURTESY OF

The Academy Film Archive

The Academy Film Archive

46

Thursday, 7:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 3

Irradiant Field

Our Selves Unknown

Gasometers 3

Irradiant Field

Laura Kraning
Altadena, CA | 2016 | 9 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I E R E Mirroring sky and earth, solitary
mechanical sentinels follow the sun, while metal grids
rain in a parched California landscape. Irradiant Field is
a visual and sonic portrait at the intersection of nature
and machine - a desert mirage of light, wind, water,
and metallic reflection.

Gasometers 3

Nicky Hamlyn
Kent, UK | 2015 | 14 min | 16mm
NORT H AM ERI CA N P R E MI E R E Gasometers 3 is from a
series of films of gasometers in North London. Relationships between energy systems, localized and national,
and the weather with its own structures and rhythms
are closely observed. “These gas holders were mostly
built in the 19th century and most have been decommissioned for several years now, they will gradually be
demolished apart from a handful listed examples, such
as the ones at The Oval cricket ground and behind
Kings Cross station in London.” – NH

Bending to Earth

Our Selves Unknown

Edwin Roston
London, UK | 2014 | 3 min | digital file
U S P R E M I E R E Our Selves Unknown explores ideas of
landscape and dislocation. The film takes architect
Lionel Brett’s 1965 book Landscape in Distress as
its sole raw material, isolating and reconfiguring its
photographic illustrations, text and cover design as
pencil and ink drawings, and using a working process
of self-enforced rules and restrictions, obstacles and
chance. – ER

Bending to Earth

Rosa Barba
Berlin, Germany | 2015 | 15 min | 35mm
Bending to Earth is Rosa Barba’s newest film and a
further investigation into inscriptions and transformation
of society, manifested in the landscape. Several radioactive fields are circled by a handcamera from a helicopter
while a recorded voice over which appears through
several -often distorted world radio stations is describing
the materials of those constructions and offers a
mediation of order systems and landscape archives.
3 5 M M P R I N T C O U R T E SY O F S T U D I O R O S A B A R B A

47

Films in Competition 3 — Thursday, 7:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Coming Cold

King of Boys

There is a Happy Land Further Awaay

King of Boys

Karimah Ashadu
Nigeria | 2015 | 5 min | digital file
NORT H AM ERI CAN PR E MI E R E King of Boys is a window
into the abattoir of Makoko - a floating water community
established over 200 years ago in Lagos, Nigeria. The
film explores the ways in which color manipulates filmic
language. Filmed with an analogue red filter crafted from
a found commercial beer keg, the camera shifts between
a state of fantasy and reality, offering snippets of the
real and engulfing us into the dream-like state of a red
filtered world. The device becomes such an instigator of
narrative and atmospheric resonance that in this almost
violent world with macabre undertones and hyper repulsive conditions, the viewer is strangely seduced by the
device’s red filter and compelled to watch. – KA

Coming Cold

Robert Todd
Boston, MA | 2015 | 8 min | 16mm
Shiverings in anticipation of the approaching chill. – RT

There is a Happy Land Further Awaay

Ben Rivers
London, UK | 2016 | 20 min | S16mm as DCP
W O R L D P R E M I E R E “Nothing, and yet we tremble. Why?”
Images collected on the remote island of Vanuatu in
the South Pacific unfold in loose and elliptical order
as an unseen woman reads lines from I Am Writing
to You From a Far Off Country by Henri Micheaux.
Shaping and reshaping words as she speaks, stumbling, abandoning and starting over, words are hewn
anew by her complex accent. There is a conjoining
of elements of image and sound in the thunderous
wheezes that issue from the throat of the island’s
active volcano which, in massive gasps flings bloody
bits of the earth’s insides chaotically into the air. The
scenes, buildings and people accompany the hesitant
spoken word so the whole feels visited as though
through a dream. The island was devastated one year
later by Hurricane Pam.  – Julie Murray

SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

VG Kids

A2 Geeks

48

Thursday, 9:15pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

The Prison In Twelve Landscapes
Feature in Competition

About the Filmmaker
Brett Story is a writer and
non-fiction filmmaker based out of
Toronto and New York. Her first
feature-length documentary, the
award-winning Land of Destiny
(2010), screened internationally
and was broadcast on both Canadian and American television.
Brett holds a PhD in geography
from the University of Toronto
and is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the City
University of New York Graduate
Center. She was the recipient of
the Documentary Organization
of Canada Institute’s 2014 New
Visions Award.

The Prison In Twelve Landscapes

Brett Story
USA/Canada | 2016 | 87 min | DCP
A meditation on the prison and its disappearance in the era of mass
incarceration, The Prison in Twelve Landscapes unfolds as a cinematic journey through a series of landscapes across the United States
where prisons do work and affect lives: from a California mountainside where female prisoners fight the region’s raging wildfires; to an
anti-sex offender pocket park in Los Angeles; to a congregation of
chess players in Manhattan who did their time becoming masters of
the game; and to an Appalachian coal town betting its future on the
promise of prison jobs.
The director profiles SendAPackage, a wholesale warehouse
founded by ex-prisoner Chris Barrett where all of the items sold meet
the 36-page list of rules regulating packages allowed into the New
York prison system. From pattern-less boxer shorts to hip hop cassette
tapes specially produced for New York State’s 54,000 prisoners, this
chapter offers a tender glimpse into life in prison through the circulation of regulated goods.
More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than
in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt
further away or more out of sight. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is
a film about the prison in which we never see an actual penitentiary.

EDUCATION PARTNER

University of Michigan
Department of English
Language and Literature

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Prison Creative
Arts Project

COMMUNITY PARTNER

CivCity

Brett Story
in attendance
49

Thursday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Out Night
Films in Competition

Out Night is an annual celebration of queer cinema at the AAFF, first
started as a side program at the 40th AAFF. Tonight’s program marks
the 15th edition at the Festival. Films will be preceded by a live drag
performance by local rising stars Girlz Will be Girlz.

Reluctantly Queer

Akosua Adoma Owusu
Ghana/USA | 2016 | 8 min | digital file
This epistolary short film invites us into the
unsettling life of a young Ghanaian man
struggling to reconcile his love for his mother
with his love for same-sex desire amid the
increased tensions incited by same-sex
politics in Ghana. Focused on a letter that is
ultimately filled with hesitation and uncertainty, Reluctantly Queer both disrobes and
questions what it means to be queer for this
man in this time and space. – AAO

Summer 1975

Wrik Mead
Toronto, Canada | 2014 | 10 min | digital file
Hand-drawn rotoscoped figures are layered
with stills and live footage to create an
open narrative based on events in the
artist’s life. In the summer of 1975 he was
thirteen, a pivotal year. He discovered
the magic of animation and made his first
animated film. Together with his best friend,
they locked themselves away for the whole
summer to complete the film, and had their
first sexual experience with each other. It
was a time of great excitement, confusion,
fear and withdrawal.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

University of Michigan Spectrum Center
50

I Remember Nothing

Zia Anger
Hudson, NY | 2015 | 18 min | digital file
Joan is a young college student who doesn’t
know that she has epilepsy. Another boring
night takes an ominous turn when she meets
two strangers at a softball game.

Loads

Curt McDowell
1980 | 20 min | 16mm
An intensely personal, autobiographical, and
at times humorous filmic account of McDowell’s “adventures with straight boys and the
hospitality he extends to them”.
FI L M CO U R T E SY O F T H E A C A D E M Y F I L M A R C H I V E

A Boy Needs a Friend

Steve Reinke
Canada/USA | 2015 | 23 min | digital file
NO R TH A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E In this latest
installment of his ongoing video essay,
“Final Thoughts,” Steve Reinke ostensibly
turns to the subject of friendship. A Boy
Needs a Friend delves into its topic head on,
in particular investigating the notion of queer
Nietzschean friendship. Using his signature
dry voice-over monologue to tie together an
eclectic array of disparate images, ranging from found footage collages to digital
animation and cell phone video, Reinke sets
forth theories about the identity of Stephen
King and Joyce Carol Oates, needle point
doodles, the upsides of owning both US
and Canadian citizenship, and the ability of
corpses to have sex. – Berlinale

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

I Remember Nothing

Summer 1975

Loads

Reluctantly Queer

Afterparty

\aut\ BAR | 11pm–2am | Free

A Boy Needs a Friend

Out Night continues at \aut\ BAR with complimentary
appetizers and fire pits in the courtyard!
51

52

The Illinois Parables
pg 57

53

FRIDAY

Fr
03/18

Friday, 1pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room, Free

Rebecca Baron
Juror Presentation

Rebecca Baron’s films are concerned with the construction of history, taking a
particular interest in still photography and its relationship to the moving image.
This program reflects two decades of Baron’s filmmaking, including her earliest
work, The Idea of North (1995); the 1998 film okay bye-bye; and her most recent
film, Detour de Force (2014). Her work also includes How Little We Know of Our
Neighbours (2005); and the series Lossless # 1-5 (2008, w/Doug Goodwin).

okay bye-bye

1998 | 38 min | 16mm
In okay bye-bye, so named for what Cambodian
children shouted to the U.S. ambassador in 1975 as he
took the last helicopter out of Phnom Phenh in advance
of the Khmer Rouge, Rebecca Baron explores the
relationship of history to memory. She questions whether, “image and memory can occupy the same space.”
Building on excerpts from letters, found super-8 footage of an unidentified Cambodian man, iconographic
photographs from the Vietnam War and other partial
images, Baron combines epistolary narrative, memoir,
journalism, and official histories to question whether
something as monumental as the genocidal slaughter
of Cambodians during the Pol Pot regime can be examined effectively with traditional methodologies.
“In treading a very fine line between documentary and
personal diary, okay bye-bye suggests that treating
history as a discourse different from other forms of
memory is misleading…Following the photographs of
the victims of a Cambodian political prison from their
status as mug shots to their commodification as part
of a gallery exhibition, and comparing Richard Nixon’s
cult of personality to Pol Pot’s utter lack of one, Baron
proposes that what is worse than forgetting the past
is, “forgetting the relationship between the past and the
present.” – 2000 Whitney Biennial exhibition catalogue.

The Idea of North

1995 | 14 min | 16mm
In the guise of chronicling the final moments of three
polar explorers marooned on an ice floe a century ago,
Baron’s film investigates the limitations of images and
other forms of record as a means of knowing the past
and the paradoxical interplay of film time, historical
time, real time and the fixed moment of the photograph.
Marrying matter-of-fact voiceover and allusive sound
fragments, evidence and illustration, in Baron’s words,
“meaning is set adrift”. – Mark McElhatten, NYFF
program notes

54

Lossless #3

w/ Doug Goodwin
2008 | 10 min | digital file
Removing keyframes from a digital version of John
Ford’s The Searchers, Baron and Goodwin attack the
film’s temporal structuring to render a kinetic “painted desert” of the West. The dust kicked up by the
movement in the film is pure pixel, unanchored from the
photographic realism that used to constrain it. “Truth,
24 frames a second!” is rewritten according to the odd
clock-times of digital processing, splaying movement
and transition into the void of machine temporality. In
the Lossless series, the artists themselves are the
searchers, seeking to uncover differences between
the bitstream and the celluloid strip. These differences
might be blurry at our historical juncture, but Baron
and Goodwin’s work leads us closer to the over-coded
heart of the digital video image, dissecting its anatomy
to expose its entrancing mechanisms.
“In Baron and Goodwin’s Lossless series the “materiality” of the digital becomes the source-code for experimental execution. The artists’ renditions of appropriated films
are certainly not “lossless” (i.e. a copy of the original in
which nothing is lost), but rather gainful: through various
techniques of digital disruption - compression, file-sharing,
the removal of essential digital information - the artists
reveal the gain of a “new” media, full of material forms ripe
for aesthetic sleuthing.”  – Braxton Soderman

Detour de Force

2014 | 29 min | digital file
Detour de Force presents the world of thoughtographer
Ted Serios, a charismatic Chicago bell hop who, in the
mid-1960’s produced hundreds of Polaroid images
from his mind. Constructed from 16mm documentation of Serios’s sessions and audio recordings of
Serios speaking with Dr. Jule Eisenbud, the Denver
psychiatrist who championed his abilities, the film is
more ethnography than biography, portraying the social
and scientific environments in which Serios thrived.
The film foregrounds the state of image and sound
recording technologies of the period as essential to
the emergence of Serios’s psychic photography. It is
also a document of the filmmaker’s encounters with the
archival materials themselves.

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Lossless #3

okay bye-bye

STILL IMAGES COURTESY

Video Data Bank

The Idea of North

Detour de Force

55

Friday, 3pm, Ann Arbor Art Center, 117 W. Liberty St., Free

Light Music: Lis Rhodes
Expanded Cinema Film Screening

A very special presentation of Light
Music (1975/1977) an expanded cinema
work for two 16mm projectors and sound
system by British artist and filmmaker
Lis Rhodes (b.1942).
In this groundbreaking work, Rhodes plays with our
preconception of film by presenting the soundtrack as
a series of horizontal and vertical lines that were drawn
with pen and ink on the optical edge of the filmstrip.
These are projected onto two opposite facing screens
in a hazy room. As the films roll, they appear as an ‘optical soundtrack’. What the viewer hears, on the other
hand, is the audible equivalent of the alternating images
on the screens. The space between the two screens
turns the beams into airy sculptural forms consisting
of light, shadow and smoke, which encourages the
viewer to move around the room. This in turns destroys
conventional film watching codes and turns the film into
a collective practice where the audience is

expected to intervene into the work and thus, become
the performer. This work was the artist’s reaction to
what she perceives as a lack of interest and appreciation of European women composers. Thus in Light
Music, Lis Rhodes interweaves cinematic practices
with a range of topics from gender politics to phenomenological experience. – Deren Erelçin

MAJOR PARTNER

COMMUNITY PARTNER

University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps
School of Art & Design

Ann Arbor Art Center

Friday, 5pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Chantal Akerman: D’est (From The East)
D’est (From The East)

Chantal Akerman (1950–2015)
1993 | 110 min | 16mm
Chantal Akerman, with her cinematographers Rémon
Fremont and Bernard Delville, retrace a journey from the
end of summer to deepest winter, from East Germany, across Poland and the Baltics, to Moscow. It is a
voyage Chantal Akerman wanted to make shortly after
the collapse of the Soviet bloc “before it was too late,”
reconstructing her impressions in the manner of a documentary on the border of fiction. By filming “everything
that touched me,” Akerman sifts through and fixes upon
sounds and images as she follows the thread of this
subjective crossing. Without dialogue or commentary,
From the East is a cinematographic elegy.

EDUCATION PARTNER

University of Michigan
Center for Russian,
East European, and
Eurasian Studies
56

EDUCATION PARTNER

EDUCATION PARTNER

16MM PRINT COURTESY OF

University of Michigan
Institute for Research
on Women and Gender

University of Michigan
Jean & Samuel Frankel
Center for Judaic Studies

Cultural Services of
the French Embassy,
New York

Friday, 7pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

The Illinois Parables
Feature in Competition

PRECEDED BY

Police Power and
Freedom of Assembly:
The Gregory March 

The Film Group
1969 | 8 min | 16mm
The film documents the protests
on Thursday, August 29th at the
1968 Chicago Democratic National
Convention. Comedian/activist Dick
Gregory is arrested as he attempts to
lead a march to break the police cordon around the Chicago Loop. From
the seven part series The Urban Crisis and the New Militants, that “teach
by raising questions rather than by
attempting to answer them.” 
F I LM COURT ESY O F THE
CHI CAGO F I LM A R C H I V E

SPONSOR

TeaHaus

The Illinois Parables

Deborah Stratman
2016 | 60 min | 16mm
An experimental documentary comprised of regional vignettes about
faith, force, technology and exodus. Eleven parables relay histories of
settlement, removal, technological breakthrough, violence, messianism
and resistance, all occurring somewhere in the state of Illinois. The state
is a convenient structural ruse, allowing its histories to become allegories that explore how we’re shaped by conviction and ideology.
The film suggests links between technological and religious abstraction, placing them in conversation with governance. Locations are
those where the boundaries between the rational and supernatural are
tenuous. They are “thin places” where the distance between heaven
and earth has collapsed, or more secularly, any place that bears a heavy
past, where desire and displacement have led us into or erased us from
the land. What began as a consideration of religious freedom eventually
led to sites where belief or invention triggered expulsion. The film utilizes
reenactment, archival footage, observational shooting, intertitles and voiceover to tell its stories and is an extension of previous works in which
the director questioned foundational American tenets.
Parables considers what might constitute a liturgical form. It is not a
sermon, but a form that questions what morality catalyzes, and what
belief might teach us about nationhood. In our desire to explain the
unknown, who or what do we end up blaming or endorsing? – DS

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Mothlight Microcinema

Deborah Stratman in attendance
57

Friday, 7:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 4
Notes From the Interior

Ben Balcom
Milwaukee, WI | 2015 | 11 min | 16mm
Wandering through the body puzzling out a system of
symbols. The trouble is, affect resists signification outright. The inside and outside become muddled when you
start to feel your body in relation to the image. – BB

First Rodeo

Vera Brunner-Sung
Columbus, OH | 2015 | 3 min | 16mm
US PREM I ERE An homage to performance, pain,
and perfection. – VBS

Analysis of Emotions and Vexations

Wojciech Bąkowski
Warsaw, Poland | 2015 | 14 min | DCP
This movie is a representation of my spirit’s volatile
state. I used animation with poetic comment to analyze
my emotions and vexations. I used pencil drawings in
translucent frames to show a state of lightness. On the
drawings you can see the elements taken from imagination and from real external sights. I did so because our
mental states are built from what we can see and what
we remember or imagine in abstraction. – WB

Vivir Para Vivir / Live to Live

Mica O’Herlihy
Westby, WI | 2015 | 4 min | digital file
A a psychotronic genderfucked pagan
meditation on the animal in us all. – MOH

Laida Lertxundi
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 11 min | 16mm
A certain trajectory of being lost is drawn
across sparsely populated mountain regions
while physical processes from heartbeat to orgasm
shape image, sound and color patterns until the
horizon is reached. – LL

House and Universe

Hard as Opal

Love Under the Will of the
Hags of the Long Tooth

Antoinette Zwirchmayr
Vienna, Austria | 2015 | 4 min | 16mm
The contemplative serenity Antoinette Zwirchmayr
creates in House and Universe is offset by notions of
restlessness and unease that the images of a dormant,
naked young woman – alternately shown in a sparse,
bright motel room and the blooming desert landscape
outside – provide. Shown only in fragments, the sleeper
seems blissfully unconnected to her surroundings.
Tinged in warm sunlight yet subtly charged with associations of isolation and vulnerability, the film presents a
dreamlike, almost hallucinogenic portrayal of a person
in a state of transcendence.

Cathode Garden

Jared Buckhiester and Dani Leventhal
NYC/Columbus, OH | 2015 | 29 min | digital file
A soldier’s trip to Syria is complicated when he
accidentally impregnates a friend. Meanwhile, a horse
breeder from Ohio is driven away from home by her
own desire to become pregnant. In Hard as Opal the
lines between truth and fiction, fact and fantasy, are
reined in and treated not as fixed, divisive markers but
as malleable threads of narrative potential. Buckhiester
and Leventhal perform alongside other non-actors who
are filmed in their own varying domestic and professional environments. The result is a rich accumulation
of narratives held together by questions concerning the
nature of objectification, loneliness, and dissociative
fantasy. – Brett Price

Janie Geiser
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 8 min | digital file
A young woman moves between light and dark, life and
death; a latter day Persephone. The natural world responds accordingly. Neglected negatives, abandoned
envelopes, botanical and anatomical illustrations, and
found recordings re-order themselves, collapsing and
re-emerging in her liminal world. – JG

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College for Creative Studies

AMP!

58

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Notes From the Interior

Cathode Garden

Analysis of Emotions and Vexations

First Rodeo

Vivir Para Vivir / Live to Live

House and Universe

Hard as Opal

Love Under the Will of the Hags of the Long Tooth

59

Friday, 9:15pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Films by Jem Cohen
Special Presentation

“Over the course of 30 years, Jem Cohen has built up a striking body of work –
intuitively edited, sonically rich assemblages that evoke places and the ghosts of
places, spots and fragments of time, the stolen and sometimes subversive poetry of
daily life, snapshots of social defiance, visions of ragged beauty.” – Sukhdev Sandhu
Since 1983 Jem Cohen has created over seventy films and installations. This program
of nine of his works spans two decades and nearly all these were filmed in New York
City, Cohen’s adopted home. His exquisitely tuned eye, both patient and precise,
creates subtle symphonic movements to the roiling order of a city. 

On Essex Road

2016 | 12 min | digital file
A watchful dog in a confusion of reflected chairs begins
and ends Cohen’s finely tuned observational portrait of
London’s Essex St, and the inhabitants who work the
shops and throng the pavement there. People hurrying,
pausing, waiting or simply standing, intermingled with
worn statues of historic peerage in the slanted light
of late afternoon. A man holds a copy of The Law of
Privacy and the Media as though testing its resilience
against the quiet onslaught of an average work day. It is
a work composed entirely of interstitial zones, temporal
as well as spatial, perfectly balanced one against the
other with each having plenty of room in the broad
space of the given moment. – Julie Murray

Helianthus Corner Blues    
2013 | 3 min | digital file
There is no better place to meet people than in the temporary community which gathers under a scant awning
on a New York street in a downpour.
Gravity Hill Newsreels (Occupy Wall St.)
Numbers 2, 3, 5, & 9  

2011 | 22 min | digital file
From a series of short “newsreels” Cohen recorded
in the fall of 2011 during the Occupy Wall Street
protests in NYC’s Liberty Plaza (Zuccotti Park)
and Times Square.

Night Scene New York

2009 | 10 min | 16mm as digital file
Chance observations of New York’s Chinatown.
“A sleepwalker’s circumnavigation of one of the less
homogenized parts of the city.” – Jem Cohen

The Passage Clock
(For Walter Benjamin)

2008 | 10 min | 16mm as digital file
An homage to Walter Benjamin and other time-traveling
artists and expatriates that have inspired me, especially Chris Marker. Benjamin, fleeing from fascism in
the 1930s, took refuge in Paris where Bibliothéque
Nationale became his home away from home. In this
library, a sanctuary made of books, he eventually left a
secret copy of much of what remains of his Arcades
Project, Das Passagen-Werk. Much of the narration
for the film came from a chance operation or literary
cut-up exercise done with Patti Smith, using dictionary
definitions of the word “passage” which I later edited
and augmented with text of my own. – Jem Cohen

Lost Book Found

1996 | 37 min | Super 8mm /16mm as digital file
The result of over five years of Super-8 and 16mm filming on New York City streets, Lost Book Found melds
documentary and narrative into a complex meditation
on city life. The piece revolves around a mysterious
notebook filled with obsessive listings of places, objects, and incidents. These listings serve as the key to
a hidden city: a city of unconsidered geographies and
layered artifacts—the relics of low-level capitalism and
the debris of countless forgotten narratives. The project
stems from the filmmaker’s first job in New York—working as a pushcart vendor on Canal Street. As usual,
Cohen shot in hundreds of locations using unobtrusive
equipment and generally without any crew. Influenced
by the work of Walter Benjamin, Cohen created “an
archive of undirected shots and sounds, then set out to
explore the boundary” between genres. During the process, Cohen said, “I found connections between the
street vendor, Benjamin’s ‘flaneur’, and my own work as
an observer and collector of ephemeral street life.”

PARTNER

University of Michigan Penny Stamps Speaker
Series & Roman Witt Visiting Artist Program
60

COMMUNITY PARTNER

WCBN

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Gravity Hill Newsreels

Lost Book Found

The Passage Clock (For Walter Benjamin)

Night Scene New York

On Essex Road

61

Friday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Animated Films in Competition

Blops

Bottom Feeders

Coma Software

Pearl Pistols

TV PSA

Tracheal Shave

TV PSA

Coma Software

Pearl Pistols

Bottom Feeders

Brendt Rioux and Zena Grey
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 1 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE “Are you caught up?” An important
reminder about TV on behalf of movie theaters everywhere. A “snipe film” in stop-motion collage.

Kelly Gallagher
Yellow Springs, OH | 2014 | 3 min | digital file
A glitter bombed, pistol-whipping, animated, resurrection of a speech by the exuberant and powerful civil
rights revolutionary Queen Mother Moore.

Blops

John Klacsmann
Brooklyn, NY | 2014 | 3 min | 16mm
BLOPBLOPBLOPBLOPBLOPBLOPPOLBPOLBPOLBBLOPBLOPBLOPBLOPBLOPBLOP.....an
‘anxious animation’.
62

Ben Rinehardt
Richmond, VA | 2015 | 3 min | digital file
W O R L D P R E M I E R E A graphic plots with psychiatric precision the intensity of that which has for eons perplexed
description in this hand-drawn animation.

Matt Reynolds
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 3 min | DCP
Two fictional species try to make it through the day in
this bleak parody of the natural world.

Tracheal Shave

Gina Kamentsky
Boston, MA | 2016 | 1.5 min | digital file
W O R L D P R E M I E R E Ink and paint on found 35mm movie
trailers. “Think of a small dot in space.”

Animated Films in Competition — Friday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Däwit

King James Version
Genesis Chapter Nineteen

King James Version
Genesis Chapter Nineteen

Martin Sulzer
Berlin, Germany | 2015 | 8 min | digital file
NORT H AM ERI CA N P R E MI E R E Utilizing motion capture
and live performers, the 3D video attempts a literal
re-enactment of the biblical passage of Genesis
19. The work shares an elemental challenge with all
religions: how can religious stories be read and retold
without affecting the sacred original text through
human interpretation?

Islander’s Rest

Däwit

David Jansen
Hamburg, Germany | 2015 | 15 min | digital file
A wolf child, an angel, a cat. The film animated in the
tradition of wood cuts, this film tells the story of an
abandoned child, who grows up with wolves after his
mother rescued him from his violent father. Following
an enigmatic journey full of privations and in quest for
identity, he finds his peace in forgiveness. – DJ

Islander’s Rest

Claudius Gentinetta and Frank Braun
Zürich, Switzerland | 2015 | 18 min | DCP
U S P R E M I E R E Strange customs govern a little village on
a windswept isle in the Atlantic. Every now and again, a
boy collects a heavy package from the pub and brings
it to his grandmother. He returns with a ship in a bottle.
Boy and bottle are received by the men in the pub with
an ominous chant. A boat raises anchor.
SPONSOR

University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps
School of Art & Design

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Huron High School
63

Animated Films in Competition — Friday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Heila Ormur

The Twist

Still Life

Love

Edmond

Heila Ormur

Rose Stark
Queens, NY | 2014 | 4 min | digital file
A man, infected, runs for his life.

Still Life

Kevin Eskew
Newhall, CA | 2015 | 4 min | digital file
Et tu doggy?

Edmond

Nina Gantz
London, UK | 2015 | 9 min | DCP
Edmond’s impulse to love and be close to others is
strong... Maybe too strong. As he stands alone by a
lake contemplating his options, he goes on a journey
backwards through his life, and revisits all his defining
moments in search for the origin of his desires.

Love

The Twist

Réka Bucsi
Hungary | 2016| 14 | DCP
Love describes affection in 3 different chapters,
through an impact on a distant solar system. Abstract
haiku-like situations reveal the change in atmosphere
on one planet, caused by the gravity and light. This
pulsing planet makes the inhabitants become one with
each other in various ways. – RB

Afterparty

Drinks, DJ and dancing at Ann Arbor’s historic
Second Ward meeting hall with a special all-45 set by
DJ Ephraim Asili and a multi-projector performance by
Brandon Walley. (See pg 23 for details)

Amelia Giller
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 2 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE Giller uses traditional animation
media including pencil, ink, and paper, to express
a modern outlook on female sexuality. The film considers the concept of rotation, and employs looping
animations to emphasize the cyclical and routine
nature of relationships.

Hathaway’s Hideaway | 11pm–2am | Free

64

Sa
03/19

65

SATURDAY

The Host
pg 75

Saturday, 11am, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium, $5

Films in Competition 5 (Ages 6+)
Thoth in the Kaleidoscope UFO

Tom Carey | 2016 | 9 min | live performance
NOT I N COM PET I T I O N Thoth, the dog-faced baboon
god of ancient Egypt, is taken on a trip through outer
space by a group of extra terrestrials. Thoth’s journey
is projected live on screen using shadow puppets and
hand drawn transparencies manipulated directly on an
overhead projector.

Catfilm for Katy and Cynnie

Standish Lawder
1973 | 3 min | 16mm
Made for the “Cat Film Festival”, which took place in
NYC in the early 70’s. “At the time, I lived with my wife
Ursula and our daughters Katy and Cynnie, together
with many, too many cats. I loved my family but not the
cats.” – SL

In The Canyon

Sami Chan and Alexandra Swati Guild
Stanford, CA | 2015 | 7 min | digital file
US PREM I ERE A solitary horse lives out her life in a
remote canyon.

A Rough Sketch for a Proposed Film
Dealing with the Powers of Ten and the
Relative Size of Things in the Universe

Australian Paper

Minjung Kim
Val Verde, CA | 2015 | 2 min | 16mm
U S P R E M I E R E 1400 tints printed onto paper in 2005 are
transferred to the emulsion to be seen in a new light.

Phantasmata

Grace Shin
Brooklyn, NY | 2015 | 5 min | digital file
W O R L D P R E M I E R E An insomniac stumbles between
dreams and waking life in a state of hypnagogia. – GS

Sto[ne]s

Marcin Gizycki
Warszawa, Poland | 2015 | 2 min | digital file
The English word STONES contains two Polish words:
STO = ONE HUNDRED and STOS = PILE. A pile of
stones was used to create this abstract extravaganza
of moving stripes and circles. – MG

Goodbye Rabbit, Hop Hop

Caleb Wood
Japan/USA | 2013 | 4 min | digital file
A mind in the city turns inwards, and escapes to
the rabbit’s domain. – CW

Sonámbulo (The Sleepwalker)

Charles and Ray Eames
1968 | 8 min | 16mm
A depiction of the relative scale of the Universe
according to an order of magnitude (or logarithmic
scale) based on a factor of ten, first expanding out from
the Earth until the entire universe is surveyed, then
reducing inward until a single atom and its quarks are
observed. 

Theodore Ushev
Montreal, Canada | 2015 | 4 min | digital file
A surrealist journey through colors and shapes inspired
by the poem “Romance Sonámbulo” by Federico
García Lorca. Visual poetry in the rhythm of fantastic
dreams and passionate nights. – TU

Liquid Solid

Konstantin Bronzit
St. Petersburg, Russia | 2014 | 15 min | digital file
Two cosmonauts, two friends, try to do their best in
their everyday training life to make their common dream
a reality. But this story is not only about the dream.

Nicky Assmann & Joris Strijbos
Netherlands/Finland | 2016 | 7 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE An exploration of the cinematic
qualities of a freezing soap film, shot in the sub-Arctic
region of Finland. Assmann and Strijbos focused on the
accelerated freezing process which occurred at very
low temperatures and the moment when ice crystals
appear and grow into complex fractal-like patterns.

We Can’t Live Without Cosmos
(Mi ne mozhem zhit bez cosmosa)

SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

COMMUNITY PARTNER

COMMUNITY PARTNER

State Street Area
Association

Leslie Science and
Nature Center

Ann Arbor Summer
Festival

Ann Arbor
District Library

66

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Thoth in the Kaleidoscope UFO

Australian Paper

In The Canyon

Phantasmata

Powers of Ten

Sto[ne]s

Liquid Solid

Sonámbulo (The Sleepwalker)

Goodbye Rabbit, Hop Hop

We Can’t Live Without Cosmos

67

Saturday, 1pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Territorio
Feature in Competition

December

Le Pays Dévasté 

Territorio

PRECEDED BY

Alexandra Cuesta
Ecuador | 2016 | 65 min | DCP
WORLD PREM I ERE A fragmented voyage. Voyage as movement, encounter, traversal, recognition. Shot in Ecuador, the journey opens in
the ocean, crosses the mountains, and descends into the jungle. The
film constructs a temporal experience while thinking of geography
as both real and imaginary. A stationary camera frames images of
people and landscape and unveils spaces of waiting, of memory, of
work, and of being.
Early on in thinking about this film I encountered the book Ecuador:
A Travel Journal by the French avant-garde poet Henri Michaux. The
journal recounts Michaux’s journey to Ecuador in 1927. He arrives by
boat and explores the various geographies found in this small country.
He describes his encounters through detailed observation, yet by his
own account, he considers the book to be incomplete. It was precisely
this fragmented description that led to my own formal description.
Because this was the first time I filmed in Ecuador, my country of origin, the encounter with the land and the people was both familiar and
distant. It was through this conflict that the temporal experience was
constructed. The idea of territory oscillated between the real and the
imaginary. The narrative appears in the interstices. – Alexandra Cuesta

December

Nathaniel Dorsky
San Francisco, CA | 2014
14.5 min | 16mm
I have been wanting to make a
shorter film in and about a briefer
period of time. December was photographed during this often turbulent
month and edited soon after. It has
a purity of form which I find quite
rewarding.  – ND

Le Pays Dévasté 

Emmanuel Lefrant
Paris, France | 2015
11.5 min | 35mm
Le Pays Dévasté relates to the
Anthropocene, the current geological age, viewed as the period during
which human activity has been the
dominant influence on climate and
the environment. – EL

EDUCATIONAL PARTNER

Alexandra Cuesta &
Emmanuel Lefrant
in attendance
68

SPONSOR

Metro Times

The University of Michigan
Center for Latin American and
Caribbean Studies

Saturday, 1:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 6

We Chose the Milky Way

Halimuhfack

He Who Eats Children

Halimuhfack

Christopher Harris
Orlando, FL | 2016 | 4 min | digital file
A performer lip-synchs to archival audio featuring the
voice of author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston
as she describes her method of documenting African
American folk songs in Florida. By design, nothing
in this film is authentic except the source audio. The
flickering images were produced with a hand-cranked
Bolex so that the lip-synch is deliberately erratic and
the rear projected, grainy, looped images of Masai
tribesmen and women recycled from an educational
film become increasingly abstract as the audio transforms into an incantation. – CH

He Who Eats Children

Ben Russell
Los Angeles, CA | 2016 | 24 min | digital file
NORT H AM ERI CA N P R E MI E R E “A speculative portrait of a
Dutchman living in the Surinamese jungle - fixing canoe
motors, accused of eating the locals’ children...” – BR
“...and we Antilleans, we know only too well that – as
they say in the islands – the black man has a fear of
blue eyes.” – Franz Fanon, Black Skin White Masks

SPONSOR

Toré

We Chose the Milky Way

Eva Marie Rødbro
Copenhagen, Denmark | 2015 | 26 min | DCP
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E Scenes from life on another
planet, where a hedonistic civilization of young women
decorate themselves with artificial nails, white clothes
and a fake tan before taking the limo to the city. But
Rødbro’s film is from the suburbs of Copenhagen,
and is shaped by its environment - an anthropological
something between a bling hip hop video, social-realist
science fiction and a documentary version of Spring
Breakers, whose surreal shock cuts place us as participants, more than spectators, in a world where everything is artificial – except friendships. Rødbro has made
an extremely style-conscious and intelligent study of
a lifestyle and an environment, where pure excess is
elevated to an existential principle. – CPH:DOX

Toré

Joao Vieira Torres w/Tanawii Xukuru-Kariri
Brazil/France | 2015 | 15 min | digital file
U S P R E M I E R E Filmed in the Xucuru-Kariri, in Alagoas,
Brazil. There is what I see, what is shown to me, what I
can’t see, what I don’t see. I was invited to film a ritual.
One that can be shown to foreigners. A child of the
tribe watches Disney’s Fantasia on TV. He is interrupted. What does the child live when he dances? What
am I able to see from what is shown to me? – JVT

Weber’s
69

Saturday, 3pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Britt Kootstra: Northern Lights
and Phill Niblock: T H I R
Live Cinema Performance & Film Screening

Northern Lights

Britt Kootstra w/ Arvid van der Rijt
Finland | 2015 | 45 min
16mm (x 5) w/ sound - live performance
Northern Lights is a live cinema performance for five
16mm projectors and hand-processed film loops. Kootstra, a visual artist based in Finland, in collaboration with
audio artist Arvid van der Rijt, construct a continuously
shifting spatial and immersive environment, with images
of natural phenomena emerging and receding from
legibility. “Footage taken from real life alternates with
hand-drawn patches of colors, switching back and forth
between the projected illusion and the raw material of
film. Flying birds show themselves barely recognizable
as we arrive in the dusk. Artificial lights arise and pop up
in a dreamlike landscape of light and darkness. From the
pulsating film loops, colors start to emerge out of the
black and white images. As the last colors disappear,
the lights fade away into the darkness again.” – BK
Britt Kootstra (1976) graduated with a B.A. in Mixed
Media from AKI, art academy in Enschede (1998-2001),
and with a Masters in Fine Arts from the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (2002-2004). Her
work shows itself as ‘tableaux vivants’, either in hand
processed analogue films, film installations or live cinema performances in which seemingly everyday places
and events separate themselves from our world. Since
2014 she has teamed up with audiovisual artist Arvid
van der Rijt (1976). Graduated in 2001 as a sculptor
from AKI, Enschede, The Netherlands, he is now active
in the boundaries of art, music, film and expanded cinema. Since 2009, they work and live in Finland, where
they founded the artist run filmlab Filmverkstaden.

THIR

Phill Niblock
1972/2015 | 43 min | 16mm as digital file
From 1968 to 1972, Phill Niblock created four distinct
intermedia projects, Environments I-IV, presented at
various venues in NYC. Each of these works incorporated a different combination of multi-screen film
projection, dance, 35mm color slides, and original music
(from tape or occasionally performed live).
His last work in this series, from 1972, was T H I R
(aka Ten Hundred Inch Radii) (Environments IV), a
performance event that incorporated over two hours of
original 16mm footage from the Adirondack Mountains of
northern New York state, originally presented as triptych
of large 16mm projections with Niblock’s music compositions and live dance by Ann Danoff and Barbara Lloyd.
T H I R is one of Niblock’s major films and the foundational project for his shift into a purely observational
mode of filmmaking, an approach he would continue
throughout his work in the moving image.
T H I R has been recently reedited into a single-channel form, featuring thirty discrete shots with no repetition, of extreme close-ups of leaves, streams, flowers,
and crawling ants- evincing a deliberate and meticulous
compositional sense that produces a rich nuanced, and
sumptuous visual field. T H I R often features heavy
patches of chiaroscuro lighting and almost microscopic
close-ups of tactile, concrete, and shimmering detail,
all filmed within ten roughly eight-foot circles of space
within the wooded landscape of upstate New York. This
version is presented with Niblock’s 2008 composition
“One Large Rose”, for bowed piano, violin, cello, and
bass.  – adapted from an essay by Juan Carlos Kase

MAJOR PARTNER

University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps
School of Art & Design
70

COMMUNITY PARTNER

MOCAD New Wave

Saturday, 3:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 7
Mr. and Mrs. Compost

Seamus Harahan
Belfast, N. Ireland | 2013 | 1.5 min | digital file
An incident is caught on camera on a residential
street in Belfast. You might hear the shouts were it
not for the song telling of a time when hands were
tougher than the plough.
Mr. and Mrs. Compost

Two Clothespins in an Envelope

Two Clothespins in an Envelope

Susanna Wallin
London, UK | 2015 | 14 min | DCP
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E Shot over four days,
this work observes a pair of brothers, Johnny and
Justin, as they clear out their deceased mother’s
house. A dead oak tree stands outside, framing
an inventory of effects, a storehouse of memories,
an exploration of the intersection between archive
and identity.

Expression of the Sightless

Jessica Sarah Rinland
Surrey, UK | 2016 | 7 minutes | digital file
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E Expression of the Sightless
follows artist and piano tuner David Johnson in an
exploration of visual language and blindness. Inspired
by Harun Farocki’s The Expression of Hands and Jorge
Luis Borges’ essay Blindness, the film only reveals
certain details of the sculpture, allowing Johnson’s
inquisitive hands to guide the way and leaving us to
imagine, just as he did, the sculpture as a whole.
Expression of the Sightless

Jáaji Approx.

Sky Hopinka
Milwaukee, WI | 2015 | 8 min | digital file
Logging and approximating a relationship between audio recordings of my father and videos gathered of the
landscapes we have both separately traversed. The initial distance between the logger and the recordings, of
recollections and of songs, new and traditional, narrows
while the images become an expanding semblance
of filial affect. “Jáaji” is a near translation for directly
addressing a father in the Ho ak language. – SH

Jáaji Approx.

6500

6500

Lisa Truttmann
USA/Austria | 2015 | 9 min | digital file
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E A video essay on the
relativity of words, questioning the application of
absolute values in an argument, visualized through
a play on colors, their spaces, and their highly subjective perception. Quotes from Ludwig Wittgenstein’s
Remarks on Color emphasize this rhythmic flickering
and slightly absurd conversation between color and
language. – LT
71

Films In Competition 7 — Saturday, 3:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

A mystery inside of a fact

Jonathan Schwartz
Brattleboro, VT | 2016 | 16 min | 16mm
WORLD PREM I ERE It arrives, in a fog, with songs,
through dance or majestic animals or faces (gliding
on the street), and in shapes of light, maybe on a
large bird of prey in flight - gesture skyward. Some
origins can be difficult to pinpoint, others blink back
- infinitely. – JS

26 Pulse Wrought - (Film for
Rewinds) Vol. I Windows for
Recursive Triangulation

Andrew Busti
Denver, Colorado | 2014 | 3 min | 16mm
US PREM I ERE From a series of nine films investigating subjective languages, languages of subjectivity,
and interpretive modes thru coded polyphonic
articulate signals. A cinema for illumination and
reflection. Vol. I Explores travel from east to west
and from west to east. Reflecting on the setting Sun
of the Winter Solstice, the crux of increasing light…
seen thru apertures…setting over the Pacific. Yes it
is here…it is here, where we are… – AB

A mystery inside of a fact

26 Pulse Wrought

House Fire

Micah Weber
Portland, OR | 2014 | 5 min | digital file
US PREM I ERE What does one bring to a house fire,
what does one wear? This project attempts to suss
out a perimeter of unknowability, when disaster
exceeds knowledge, and the point where an inadequacy of language can reveal itself in the grief of
another. – MW
House Fire

Ears, Nose & Throat

Kevin Jerome Everson
Charlottesville, VA | 2016
10 min | 16mm as digital file
NORT H AM ERI CAN PR E MI E R E During an ear, nose and
throat examination, Shadeena Brooks recounts a
horrible event she eye witnessed.

Ears, Nose & Throat

SPONSOR

Savco

72

Saturday, 5pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Dead Slow Ahead
Feature in Competition

PRECEDED BY

Looking at the Sea

Peter Hutton
USA/Ireland | 2001
15 min | 16mm
A meditation on the light, color
and texture of the land and
seascapes along the west
coast of Ireland.

Looking ar the Sea

Dead Slow Ahead

SPONSOR

Detroit Public Television

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Chelsea River Gallery

Mauro Herce
Barcelona, Spain | 2015 | 74 min | DCP
A freighter crosses the ocean. The hypnotic rhythm of its gears reveals
the continuous movement of machinery devouring its workers: the last
gestures of the old sailors’ trade disappearing under the mechanic and
impersonal pace of 21st century neocapitalism. Perhaps it is a boat adrift,
or maybe just the last example of an endangered species. Although we
don’t know it, the engines are still running, unstoppable. Dead Slow Ahead
is a feverish and hallucinatory portrait of machinery that has overwhelmed
the men living in it: they no longer know if they are operating the machine
or if it is the other way round. Dead Slow Ahead is the portrayal of this very
contemporary nightmare, with no intention, however, to condemn nor to
provide a sociological pamphlet. The mission is a different one, it’s about
capturing the most primitive and essential images of this universe: the forge
where man becomes smaller in the face of a sentence that the exceeding
and overwhelming machinery imposes on him. A machine that never rests,
just like the numb head of the man who created it or the exhausted sailor
who lives on it also never rest; both seem to have forgotten the meaning of
creation in some foreign corner of the universe.
73

Saturday, 5:15pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Fragment 53
Feature in Competition

PRECEDED BY

Vapour

Vapour

Fragment 53

Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli and Federico Lodoli
Italy/Liberia | 2015 | 71 min | DCP
NORT H AM ERI CAN P R E MI E R E In this harrowing journey the artists present us with a suite of seven encounters recorded in Liberia between
2011 and 2014. The title points to a surviving fragment authored
by Heraclitus of Ephesus (500 b.c.) noting that “War is the father of
all.” Each portrait opens with a lyric set of landscape shootings, a still
point of beauty before the testimonials of slaughter begin. For six years
Liberia was gripped by civil war, led by CIA-assisted Charles Taylor.
Here for the first time the men in charge of the Liberian armies come
forward to offer their blunt recountings. Because some began fighting
as teenagers, no one looks old, and their living circumstances appear
modest, even substandard. Each man talks about what it means to
be a soldier, what it feels like to kill and to be shot. As each narrates
the necessary cruelty of their actions, a single unspoken question
emerges to cast a shadow across each of them. Why are you saying
these words? What is compelling you to bear witness in front of the
camera? – Mike Hoolboom

74

Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Thailand | 2015 | 21 min | DCP
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E The
clouds descend onto a village and
engulf it for a day. They touch the
roof tiles, the beds, the chairs, the
carpets, the grass, and the bodies,
infecting everything with the fever
of white stupor. Vapour takes
place at Toongha village in
Mae Ram district that has been
Apichatpong’s home for the past
eight years. The village is one of
several areas in the country that
are plagued with land management issues. For the past sixty
years, it has been a battleground
between the people and the state. 

SPONSOR

Maple Theater

Saturday, 7pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

The Host
Feature in Competition

PRECEDED BY

Decodings

Michael Wallin (1948-2015)
1988 | 15 min | 16mm
“A profoundly moving, allegorical
search for identity from the
documents of collective memory,
in this case, found footage from
the ‘40s and ‘50s. ... The search
for self ends in aching poignancy
with stills of a boy and his mother
at the kitchen table, catching the
moment that marks the dawning
of anguish and loss; desire
becomes imprinted on that which
was long ago.” – Manohla Dargis,
The Village Voice

SPONSOR

M Library

Decodings

The Host

Miranda Pennell
UK | 2015 | 60 min | DCP

NO R TH A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E While investigating her late parents’
involvement with the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (now known as
British Petroleum) the filmmaker comes across the letters of a petroleum geologist in Iran in the 1930’s, who later embarked on a search
for the origins of civilization. The film sets out on its own exploration,
to decipher signs of the past from fragmented images buried in the
BP archive. It interweaves a number of stories drawn from both
personal memory and from the records of an imperial history, gradually
building a picture of a 20th century colonial encounter. The Host is
about the stories we tell about ourselves and others, the facts and
fictions we live by – and their consequences.
“As I put the archival images together, I looked for coincidences and
allowed my speculations to create connections with other images and
stories. Although all of the film’s sources are either archival or family
documents, the film often takes on a fictional character. This happens
partly because the film is narrated as a dramatization of my historical
investigation, but mainly because it deals with the fantasies and projections of the British colonizers.” – MP

75

Saturday, 7:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 8
Object

Paulina Skibińska
Poland | 2014 | 15 min | DCP
Mysterious abstract shapes are the subject
of an underwater search. The film’s action
is located in two worlds – the horizon of ice
and the water that lies underneath. The story
is told from the point of view of the rescue
team. Their efforts are observed by onlookers
waiting on the shore.

Fundir

Allison Cekala
Boston, MA | 2015 | 23 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE Each winter hundreds of
thousands of tons of salt are transported to
Boston via cargo ship to spread on icy roads.
Fundir traces this salt from one of its main
sources in the Atacama Desert of northern
Chile. The film is biography of a material--a
record of extraction, migration, and physical
transformation, initiated by a vast and intricate
choreography of human labor and global
trade. – AC

Bisonhead

Elizabeth Lo
Los Angeles, CA | 2015
10 min | digital file
A family of Ponderai Native Americans embark on a controversial journey from northern
Montana to Yellowstone to take part in the
federal culling of 900 wild bison.

Down Hear

Mike Henderson
1972 | 12 min |16mm
A raw, penetrating, talking Blues pantomime,
radical in its undiluted directness and captivating in its second-person address, collapses the history of Black America into a series
of hyper-distilled kitchen performances by the
filmmaker and his brother.  This singular film
emerged from Henderson’s own frustration at
the deeply embedded legacy of racism and
victimization of African-Americans, proposing that change must start with reaffirming
identity, self-awareness, and personal power.
– Mark Toscano
FI L M P RE S E R V E D BY A N D C O U R T E SY O F
THE A CA D E M Y F I L M A R C H I V E

Old Dog’s Diary

Shumona Goel and Shai Heredia
Bombay/Bangalore, India | 2015
12 min | DCP
U S P R EM I E R E An Old Dogs Diary assembles,
in puzzle-piece evocations, a portrait of Indian
avant-garde painter Francis Newton Souza.
The film links fragments of his writings, letters
and drawings that are charged with memories
of an unsettled life.

Auditioning for Nathaniel

Kevin Jerome Everson
Charlottesville, VA | 2016
14 min | digital file
WO R L D P R E M I E R E The famous actor Nathaniel
Jitahadi Taylor waxes poetically on dancers,
painters, actors and filmmakers. Taylor played
the character “Rollo Larson” on the 1970s TV
series Sanford and Son, a show referenced in
Everson’s 2012 film Rita Larson’s Boy.

SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

University of Michigan Department
of Screen Arts & Cultures

Film Video Student Association

76

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Object

Down Hear

Fundir

Old Dog’s Diary

Bisonhead

Auditioning for Nathaniel

77

Saturday, 9:15pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

time/OUT OF JOINT
Feature in Competition

time/OUT OF JOINT

Caspar Stracke
USA/Germany | 2015 | 85 min | DCP
US PREM I ERE A maximalist freefall into the world of time reversal via science and art. Stracke’s delirious visual inventions propel this cross-cutting essay doc that replays backwards birthing, the supposedly Satanic
verses from backwards Led Zep records, and Japan’s famous Tsukiji
fish market. Twelve years in the making, the artist brings his roots as an
experimental filmmaker fully into the digital realm, producing inventive
and playful procedures for information processing. His musical inclinations are everywhere present, this is a movie that is composed and
de-composed, sliding between hi-tech science labs and countryside
ruminations on mortality with an internationalist’s ease.
  The subject of time is particularly well suited to the film medium,
where time is an essential and plastic element, it can be stretched or
compressed, and reaching deep into his experimentalist’s trick bag, the
artist offers us astonishing views of city streets rolling backwards, or
unbirths, or hypnagogic forests. These alternate with performative turns
where a street hawker sells his ability to say anything backwards, or
scientists geek out on time/light demos.
The global cast includes punk super 8 icon turned philosopher Manuel
DeLanda, Marxist philosopher Agnes Heller, experimental filmmakers Alexander Galeta and Narcisa Hirsch, BioTime researcher Michael West,
atomic physicist Mikhail Lukin (Harvard), bioenterologist Aubrey DeGrey
(Cambridge), biologist Stephen Spindler, particle researcher John D.
Cramer and NY choreographer Sara Rudner. – Mike Hoolboom

About the Filmmaker
Caspar Stracke is an
interdisciplinary artist and
filmmaker from Germany, living
and working in New York City
since 1993 and Helsinki since
2012. His work is situated around
architecture and urbanism, media
archaeology, as well as various
social aspects of cinema. His
films, videos and installations
have been shown in numerous
exhibitions, retrospectives and
festivals throughout North and
South America, Europe and Asia.
In 1999 he completed his first
feature-length 35mm film project
Circle’s Short Circuit which
toured throughout the US and
Europe and was selected for the
American Century Part II exhibition
at the Whitney Museum, NY.
Caspar Stracke is a professor for
Contemporary Art and Moving
Image at KUVA Art Academy
Helsinki.

Caspar Stracke
in attendance

University of Michigan
Museum of Natural History

COMMUNITY PARTNER

78

SPONSOR

Bauer Dunham & Barr

Saturday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 9

not even nothing can be free of ghosts

Neither God nor Santa Maria

Neither God nor Santa Maria

Samuel M. Delgado and Helena Girón
Madrid, Spain | 2015 | 12 min | DCP
Since airplanes did not exist, people moved around
using prayers, they went from one land to another and
returned early, before dawn. In old audio recordings,
the voices of pastors speak of the mythical existence
of witches and their travels. In the daily life of a woman
the magic of her tales begin to materialize as night falls.
Night is the time when travel is possible. – SD & HG

Faux Départ (False Start)

not even nothing can be free of ghosts

Rainer Kohlberger
Vienna, Austria | 2016 | 11 min | DCP
N O R T H A M E R I C A N P R E M I E R E An algorithmic work generated entirely from computer-generated code; where
“the intentional overload of the human perception apparatus leads to visual impressions that appear exclusively
in the literal ‘eye of the beholder.’ These ‘ghosts’ appear
from ‘nothing’ and are ‘nothing’; they are mere hallucinations evoked by the imperfect human-biological data
processing system” (Norbert Pfaffenbichler).

Faux Départ (False Start)

Yto Barrada
Morocco | 2015 | 23 min | DCP
US PREM I ERE Barrada observes the elaborate fossil industry in Morocco, paying homage to the “preparators”
in the arid region between the Atlas Mountains and the
Sahara Desert, whose intrepid work is fuelling a thriving
trade in artifacts real, faux and hybrid. Faux Départ is a
rebuke to the fetishistic thirst for foreign objects, a sly
meditation on authenticity, and a paean to creativity.
SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Edge Hill University

YPSI 24-Hour Film Shootout
79

Films in Competition 9 — Saturday, 9:30pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Engram of Returning

Here There

Here There

Alexander Stewart
Chicago, IL | 2015 | 5 min | digital file
Here There gives graphic form to memory’s malleable,
straying lines. It begins as a traveler’s sketchbook,
drawn in Croatia in the summer of 2014, but details
soon fade away into abstract impressions on the edges
of memory. This film is a reduction to the essence, a
condensed feeling of one place and time.

Prima Materia

Charlotte Pryce
Los Angeles, CA | 2015 | 3 min | 16mm
Prima Materia is inspired by the haunting wonderment
of Lucretius’: De Rerum Natura. It is an homage to the
first, tentative photographic records that revealed the
extraordinary nature of phenomena lurking just beyond
the edge of human vision. – CP

Afterparty

The Club Above the Heidelberg
11pm–2am | $5, free with AAFF Pass
80

Prima Materia

Engram of Returning

Daïchi Saïto
Montréal, Canada | 2015 | 19 min | 35mm
U S P R E M I E R E Engram of Returning (“engram,” also
called “memory-trace,” is a physical alteration thought
to occur in living neural tissue in response to stimuli,
postulated to account for the persistence of memory)
is a film about memory and recollection. A metaphysical travelogue, Engram of Returning attempts to give
form to a constellation of the introspective mirages of
what the filmmaker left behind, reconstructed through
interwoven backward glances at the real, the imagined
and the remembered. – DS

Live cinema performance by Simon Alexander-Adams
w/ Johnathan Taylor & Charles Samuels followed
by DJ Dustin Krcatovich and dancing.
(See pg 23 for details)

Su
03/20
Sixty Six
pg 87

SUNDAY

81

Sunday, 11am, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Regional Films in Competition
Recent films from Michigan and northern Ohio. Program guest-curated
by Milwaukee-based filmmaker and programmer Ben Balcom.
Pretty Good Product

Christine Hucal
Detroit, MI | 2015 | 3 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE Salesman Zip Sellermnn
would like to sell you a pretty good product.
– CH

Our Last Hurrah

Terri Sarris
Ann Arbor, MI | 2015 | 8 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE A lifetime of Fourth of July
holidays spent with my family at a northern
Wisconsin lake. Impending change, loss, and
learning to let go. – TS

Roubado

Erica Watson
Los Angeles/Detroit | 2014 | 18 | DCP
A teen photographer in the south of France
develops a tense relationship with his mother’s
new boyfriend after his parents’ breakup. – EW

Who painted the sky
with wispy clouds?

Miranda Dershimer
Ann Arbor, MI | 2014 | 9 min | 16mm
He stood on a hilltop and saw the moon rise
up in front of the clouds. And thus he made
his goal: to forget that which he had been
taught. –MD

How to Rust

Julia Yezbick
Detroit, MI | 2016 | 25 min | digital file
WORLD PREM I ERE Detroit artist Olayami
Dabls’ installation “Iron Teaching Rocks
How to Rust” is a metaphor for the forced
assimilation of Africans to European culture
and language. Here Dabls’ bricolage of the
postindustrial landscape becomes a commentary on the half-life of Fordism, where
the relationship between cultural production,
history, and place is recast, revealing larger
truths about how we mythologize a former
glory and shape an imagined future. – JY

Toledo, My Father

Carson Parish
New York, NY | 2015 | 8 min | digital file
WO R L D P R E M I E R E An underexposed night on
the town with my father. Inspired by a dream,
he drives around Toledo, Ohio remembering
his favorite bygone movie theaters. Highlights
include the Valentine Theater, the Westwood
Theater for the Arts, and the Jerry Lewis
Cinemas. – CP

Heck.exe

Charles Toeppe & Andy Heck Boyd
Dearborn, MI | 2015 | 6 min | digital file
WO R L D P R E M I E R E Flickering in virtual infinity,
a violent and cartoon singularity is the only
home we’ve ever known. – CT & AHB

The Human Body, Our Friend

Andrew Day
Ann Arbor, MI | 2015 | 3 min | digital file
Filmformational Productions presents an
enlightening view of The Human Body, Our
Friend. With renowned tour guide, Philip Gilgamesh, we explore nooks, crannies, depths,
and canals with a measured approach. This
new perspective is sure to become a staple
of finer classrooms across the nation. – AD

Solitary Acts 4

Nazlı Dinçel
Ann Arbor, MI | 2015 | 8 min | 16mm
Exacto Knife, Typewriter. The filmmaker films
herself masturbate the object of debate. She
hears others claim her body, her habits: those
in her conservative surroundings as a child.
She learns how to read. – ND

SPONSOR

Ann Arbor Area Convention and Visitors’ Bureau
82

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Toledo, My Father

Pretty Good Product

Heck.exe

Roubado

Solitary Acts 4

Our Last Hurrah

Who painted the sky with wispy clouds?

How to Rust

The Human Body, Our Friend

83

Sunday, 11:15am, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Films in Competition 10
Le Boudin

Omnia

Solace

Baba Dana Talks To The Wolves

Salomé Lamas
Portugal/Germany | 2014 | 16 min | DCP
‘None of the people who were asked about
me had seen me.’ Le Boudin documents the
encounter of the young Elias Geißler with the
testimony of Nuno Fialho who at the age of
16 was forced to enlist in the French Foreign
Legion. ‘I didn’t enlist. They enlisted me.’

Katarzyna Płazińska
New York, NY | 2016 | 16 min | DCP
WORLD PREM I ERE A father, mother, and child
lead their life in the midst of a remote landscape. The prairie breathes its natural rhythm
just like the family does. The young girl wanders around the land’s confined infinity. What
seems like an innocent exploration becomes a
confrontational awakening. – KP

Sorelle Povere di Santa Chiara

Nina Danino
London, UK | 2016 | 12 min | 16mm
WORLD PREM I ERE A photographic portrait
in response to the idea of simplicity and
poverty which is the guiding principle of the
Poor Clares and their ‘hidden’ life. The nuns
spend the morning in the ‘laboratorio’ sewing,
mending, ironing, in the garden, tending to
the animals, cultivation and in the kitchen
preparing the midday meal. Filmed on location
in the enclosed Monasterio di Santa Chiara,
San Marino.

Amena Al Nowais
United Arab Emirates | 2015
9 min | digital file
Omnia, a young Egyptian woman, is still
struggling with an incident from her childhood
that left her with no sense of her body, of
“what it means to be a female, a girl”, or of
what it means to be loved.

Ralitsa Doncheva
Bulgaria/Canada | 2015
11 min | digital file
U S P R EM I E R E An impressionistic portrait of
Baba Dana, an 85 year-old Bulgarian woman
who has chosen to spend her life in the
mountains, away from people and cities.

The Digger

Ali Cherri
United Arab Emirates/Lebanon/France
2015 | 25 min | DCP
Shot in the Sharjah desert in the United Arab
Emirates, The Digger follows the everyday life
of Sultan Zeib Khan, the Pakistani caretaker
who has been guarding the ruins of a Neolithic necropolis for twenty years. A witness
to the nation’s founding mythologies, Sultan
preserves archeological ruins, keeping them
from falling into ruin. In the midst of these
empty graves that echo the vastness of the
desert, the absence of corpses is more unsettling than their presence.

SPONSOR

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Zip Car

WSG Gallery

84

54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, March 15–20 2016

Solace

Le Boudin

Baba Dana Talks To The Wolves

Omnia

Sorelle Povere di Santa Chiara

The Digger

85

Sunday, 1pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

Chantal Akerman: No Home Movie
Special Presentation

No Home Movie

Chantal Akerman (1950–2015)
2015 | 115 min | DCP
NOT I N COM PET I T I O N At the center of Chantal Akerman’s enormous
body of work is her mother, a Holocaust survivor who married and
raised a family in Brussels. In recent years, the filmmaker has explicitly
depicted, in videos, books, and installation works, her mother’s life
and their own intense connection to each other. No Home Movie is
a portrait by Akerman, the daughter, of Akerman, the mother, in the
last years of her life. It is an extremely intimate film but also one of
great formal precision and beauty, one of the rare works of art that
is both personal and universal, and as much a masterpiece as her
1975 career-defining Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080
Bruxelles. —New York Film Festival, Film Society of Lincoln Center

About the Filmmaker
Chantal Akerman, born in Brussels in 1950, created over forty
films, beginning with the 1968
short Saute ma ville, at age 18.
She was 25 when she made her
groundbreaking Jeanne Dielman,
23 Quai du Commerce, 1080
Bruxelles (1975). Akerman followed Jeanne Dielman with more
than three dozen films including
narrative features such as Toute
une nuit (1982); Couch in New
York (1996); The Captive (2000);
and Almayer’s Folly (2011).
Her non-fiction works include
News From Home (1977); D’est
(1993); South (1999); From the
Other Side (2001); and La-Bas
(2006). Akerman completed
No Home Movie (2015) shortly
before her death, at age 65, in
October, 2015.

SPONSOR

EDUCATION PARTNER

EDUCATION PARTNER

University of Michigan
Institute for the
Humanities

University of Michigan
Institute for Research
on Women and Gender

University of Michigan
Jean & Samuel Frankel
Center for Judaic Studies

86

COMMUNITY PARTNER

Final Girls

Sunday, 1:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Sixty Six: Lewis Klahr
Special Presentation

About the Filmmaker
Called “the reigning proponent of
cut and paste” by J. Hoberman of
the Village Voice, master collagist
Lewis Klahr has been making films
since 1977. He is known for his
uniquely idiosyncratic collage films
which have screened extensively
in the United States, Europe and
Asia—in venues such as MoMA, the
Whitney Biennial, New York Film
Festival, Toronto International Film
Festival, Hong Kong International
Film Festival, London Film Festival,
the LA County Museum of Art, the
Tate Modern and REDCAT; with
recent retrospectives at the Wexner
Center for the Arts and the Museum
of the Moving Image. His work is in
the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and
is a recent addition to the Coleccion
Inelcom. Lewis Klahr’s work is represented by The Anthony Reynolds
Gallery in London, UK.

Sixty Six

Lewis Klahr
2002–2015 | 90 min | DCP
NOT I N C O M P E T I T I O N Organized in 12 discrete chapters, Sixty Six is a
milestone achievement, the culmination of Klahr’s decades-long work
in collage filmmaking. With its complex superimpositions of imagery
and music, and its range of tones and textures at once alluringly erotic
and forebodingly sinister, the film is a hypnotic dream of 1960 and
70s Pop. Elliptical tales of sunshine noir and classic Greek mythology
are inhabited by comic book super heroes and characters from
Portuguese foto romans who wander through midcentury modernist
Los Angeles architectural photographs and landscapes from period
magazines. Sixty Six is the latest, and perhaps most magisterial, entry
in Lewis Klahr’s open-ended digital series Prolix Satori, in which
the artist mines his vast 30-year archive of collage materials. As the
historian Tom Gunning observes, “Klahr’s films generate a blend of
melancholy and desire from this interplay of grasping and losing,
remembering and forgetting.” – Josh Siegel, Curator MoMA

COMMUNITY PARTNER

EDUCATION PARTNER

SPONSOR

Michigan Animation
Club

Oakland University
Cinema Studies Program

Michigan State University
Film Studies Program

Lewis Klahr
in attendance
87

Sunday, 3pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room

The Event
Feature In Competition

One Document for Hope

The Event

A Partial History of the Natural World, 1965

The Event

PRECEDED BY

Sergei Loznitsa
2015 | 74 min | DCP
The Event is constructed from black-and-white 35mm footage shot by
eight independent documentary filmmakers in St. Petersburg in August,
1991 when a failed coup d’état attempt led by a group of hard-core
communists in Moscow ended the 70-year-long rule of the Soviets. The
USSR collapsed soon after, and the tricolor of the sovereign Russian
Federation flew over the Kremlin.
As President Gorbachev was detained by the coup leaders, state-run
TV and radio channels broadcast Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” instead of
news bulletins, and crowds of protestors gathered around Moscow’s
White House, preparing to defend the stronghold of democratic opposition led by Boris Yeltsin. In the city of Leningrad thousands of confused,
scared, excited and desperate people poured into the streets to become
a part of the event which was supposed to change their destiny.
A quarter of a century later, Sergei Loznitsa revisits the dramatic moments of August 1991 and casts an eye on the event which was hailed
worldwide as the birth of “Russian democracy.” What really happened in
Russia in August 1991? What was the driving force behind the crowds
on the Palace Square in Leningrad? What exactly are we witnessing:
the collapse of the regime or its creative re-branding? Who are these
people looking at the camera: victors or victims?
The Event is an act of street portraiture, as the old state cracks and
the revolutionary moment impels thousands into the public square. Here
is a state of emergency where new conversations might be possible at
last. Who are we without our president, when the descriptions of the
state fall away? How could the people decide for themselves, what
does democracy look like? This masterful collection of newsreel shootings show people fighting over info sheets as if they were food. Where
are my cherished facts? What could we become?

A Partial History of
the Natural World, 1965

Sasha Waters Freyer
Richmond, VA | 2015
7 min | digital file
A meditative exploration of the
violent struggle for independence
in southeast Asia and butterfly
metamorphosis. Framed by excerpts
from Sylvia Plath’s poem “Tulips,”
the film reminds us that comfort is a
privilege and denial of the suffering
of others is not an option. With a live
1965 performance of Bartok’s Solo
for Violin 3. – SWF

One Document for Hope

Margaret Rorison
Baltimore, MD | 2016
8 min | 16mm
The sterile and procedural narrative of the Baltimore City Police
Scanner recorded on Monday, April
27, against precious moments of
gathering, celebration and protest
in Baltimore from April 28 – May 3,
2015. – MR
EDUCATION PARTNER

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The Ravens Club

Allied Media Projects

88

University of Michigan Center
for Russian, East European,
and Eurasian Studies

Sunday, 3:15pm, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

78 Letters: Grahame Weinbren
and Films in Competition 11
Interactive Cinema

Presented by filmmaker and artist
Grahame Weinbren, a pioneer of
interactive cinema and new media.
Letters, an ongoing series, from 1997
through the present, is composed of
one minute films with the sequence
determined by the audience. The most
recent iteration, 78 Letters, is presented
at the 54th AAFF for the first time.
78 Letters

Grahame Weinbren
New York, NY | 2016 | 35 min | digital files
Letters is a collection of one minute films, each associated with a letter of the alphabet. The audience selects
the sequence of films by acclamation, i.e. shouting out
the letter film they’d like to see next, so it is ‘interactive’
in a kindergarten kind of way—a parody of democracy.
GW acts as MC, encouraging viewers to select the
next letter, and occasionally commenting on one of the
films. An assistant operates the computer which houses both the films (in a special high resolution format
developed by engineer Isaac Dimitrovsky for this work),
and a menu showing which letters are still to be seen.

The menu appears whenever it is time for the audience
to make the next choice.
Letters is a kind of container of and test-ground for
ideas: certainly ideas about cinema, both technical and
conceptual, but also another kind of idea, the externalization of an inner life, inasmuch as that tired phrase
describes anything. For the AAFF screening, there will
be 78 Letters, including some that are quite personal
and private, and several which will be shown for the
first time. The subjects range from portraiture to still life,
from musical to memorial, from landscape to kitchen,
from manic to depressive. As the work progresses,
themes emerge, as well as short narratives fragmented
across several letters.
With the increasing idea of art as material commodity
and investment instrument, I have become somewhat
allergic to making a work that could be conceived as
a ‘product.’ Letters is a single work that constantly
changes over the years, shedding some parts and gaining others. There isn’t and won’t be a definitive version
of the piece. It is deliberately elusive and impossible
to pin down as a single object. The upper limit will be
100 Letters, if we make it that far but the 100 Letters
version will, like any living creature, always be in the
process of discarding some cells while developing
new ones. – Grahame Weinbren
89

78 Letters & Films in Competition 11 — Sunday, 3:15pm, Mich Theater Main Auditorium

Fugue for cello, trumpet and landscape

(I) Frame

Fugue for Cello, Trumpet and Landscape
Jerzy Kucia
Poland | 2014 | 18 min | 35mm
US PREM I ERE Legendary animator Jerzy Kucia’s first
work since Tuning the Instruments (2000); Fugue for
Cello, Trumpet and Landscape is a meditative story
in the form of a poetic film based on a relationship
between music and images.

The Resonance (Rezonans)

Mateusz Sadowski
Poznań, Poland | 2013 | 6 min | digital file
NORT H AM ERI CAN P R E MI E R E A stop motion animation;
Sadowski split the recorded footage into separate
frames which were printed and rephotographed. The
process underlined the characteristics of two contrary
realities – photography and video. Providing the viewer
with an insight into its own making, Rezonans is both
a reflection on scientific theories about the structure of
the world and an attempt to create an alternative reality.

The Resonance (Rezonans)

(I) Frame

Karissa Hahn and Andrew Kim
Los Angeles, CA | 2016 | 10 min | 35mm
A video is a stream of information, and this moving image relies upon the relationship of static frames which
are algorithmically determined. In the language of video
compression, the (I) frames are the reference points
between which movement is interpolated. Manual
deletion or misplacement of (I) frames results in a video
glitch known as a datamosh … the stream of nformation d srupted, d sorgan zed … nterupeted … lost …
the ( ) frame removed, rejected … BUT, reclaimed, the
(I) frame, the burning bolts of the machine, are at once
reasserted in this dance macabre… (I) FRAME is a
mechanical ballet set to the original tempo that characterizes motion on screen at 24 (I) frames a second….
– KH & AK

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COMMUNITY PARTNER

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90

Sunday, 5pm, Michigan Theater Screening Room, $5

Music Videos in Competition

Beasts in the Garden

So Etched in Memory

Steve Polyester

Needle in the Sway

Concussion

Lights Out

Pa Boo La (Noah Wall)

Daniel Brantley | Los Angeles, CA | 1.5 min

So Etched in Memory (Benoît Pioulard)
Sean Curtis Patrick | Ann Arbor, MI | 3 min

Needle in the Sway (Holo Paw)

Pretty Please (Josephine Foster)

Roger Beebe | Columbus, OH | 3 min

Steve Polyester (Ava Luna)
Angela Stempel | Los Angeles, CA | 4 min

Ephraim Asili | Hudson, NY | 3.5 min

Beasts in the Garden
(Spires that in the Sunset Rise)
Lori Felker | Chicago, IL | 6.5 min

California Sun
(The Farmingdale Sound Machine)
Thom Andersen | Los Angeles, CA | 4 min

Secret Claw (Roommate)

Do the Dishes (Circuit des Yeux)
Julia Dratel | Chicago, IL | 4 min

Gazelles in Flight

Concussion (Elzéard)

Sasha Litvintseva | London, UK | 5 min

Kent Lambert | Chicago, IL | 5.5 min

(SUUNS + Jerusalem in My Heart)
Charles-André Coderre | Montreal, QC, Canada | 5 min

Lights Out (Angel Olsen)
Amelia Giller | Los Angeles, CA | 1.5 min

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91

Sunday, Michigan Theater Main Auditorium

Awarded Film Programs
The 54th Ann Arbor Film Festival closing event provides two screenings with
selections of award-winning films as chosen by our Awards Jury. Awarded Film
Program line-ups will be posted late afternoon on Sunday, March 20th at the
Michigan Theater and at aafilmfest.org.
Award Screening 1

Award Screening 2

Afterparty

Wrap up the festival with a drink at our neighborhood
upscale dive bar!

6pm | Michigan Theater Main Auditorium
Onstage announcement of the 54th jury awards,
followed by a select screening of awarded films.

The Bar at 327 | 10pm–12am | Free

8:15pm | Michigan Theater Main Auditorium
A second select screening of awarded short films
from the 54th Festival.

Academy Award® Qualifying
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is
recognized as a qualifying film festival for
the short film category of the Academy
of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. A
short film that wins one of the following
awards at the AAFF is eligible: Best
of Festival, Best Experimental, Best
Narrative, and Best Animation.
There are currently two-dozen qualifying festivals in
the U.S. For Academy Awards consideration, a short
film that is not more than 40 minutes in running time
(Including all credits) and which falls into the animated
(cel animations, computer animation, stop-motion, clay
animation, puppets, pixilation, cutouts, pins, camera
multiple pass imagery, kaleidoscopic effects and drawing on the film frame itself for example) or live-action
film categories, can qualify in one of two ways:

1. The film must have been publicly exhibited for paid
admission in a commercial motion picture theater in
Los Angeles County for a run of at least three consecutive days with at least two screenings a day prior
to public exhibition or distribution by any nontheatrical
means or
2. The film must have won a qualifying award at a
competitive film festival, as specified in the Short Film
Qualifying Festival List, regardless of any prior public
exhibition or distribution by nontheatrical means.
 
All eligible motion pictures must be publicly exhibited
using 35mm or 70mm film, or in a 24- or 48- frame
progressive scan Digital Cinema format in English or
English subtitles. Television or internet exhibition anywhere does not disqualify a film, provided such exhibition occurs after its Los Angeles theatrical release,
or after receiving its festival award. Documentaries,
previews, trailers or advertising films are excluded.
Please see www.oscars.org for a complete
outline of rules and eligibility.

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Title Index
6500..............................................................71
(I) Frame........................................................91
26 Pulse Wrought......................................73
78 Letters.....................................................90
A & B In Ontario..........................................43
A Boy Needs a Friend................................51
A mystery inside of a fact..........................73
A Partial History of the
Natural World, 1965.............................89
A Visit to Indiana.........................................29
Ah, humanity!............................................... 20
An Ecstatic Experience ............................37
Anal Masturbation and Object Loss.......43
Analysis of Emotions and Vexations.......59
Auditioning for Nathaniel...........................77
Australian Paper..........................................67
Baba Dana Talks to Wolves.....................85
Back Track....................................................29
Beasts in the Garden by Spires
that in the Sunset Rise..........................92
Beaver Fever................................................46
Bending To Earth........................................48
Bisonhead.....................................................77
Blops..............................................................63
Blue and Red...............................................40
Bottom Feeders...........................................64
California Sun by The Farmingdale
Sound Machine.......................................92
Catfilm for Katy and Cynnie......................67
Cathode Garden.........................................59
Coma Software...........................................63
Coming Cold................................................49
Concussion by Elzéard..............................92
Confessions.................................................46
Conical Signal............................................ 41
Counting.......................................................39
D’est (From the East).................................57
Dawit..............................................................64
Dead Slow Ahead.......................................74
December.....................................................69
Decodings....................................................76
Detour de Force..........................................55
Dingbat’s Revenge.....................................37
Discontinuity.................................................29
Do the Dishes by Circuit des Yeux.........92
Down Hear...................................................77
Drive In..........................................................29
Ears, Nose & Throat...................................73
Edmond.........................................................65
Engram of Returning..................................81
Event Horizon...............................................40
Expressions of the Sightless....................72
Faux Depart (False Start)..........................80
First Rodeo...................................................59
Fish Point......................................................41
Fragment 53.................................................75
Fugue for cello, trumpet and landscape...91
Fundir.............................................................77
Gasometers 3..............................................48
Gazelles in Flight by
SUUNS + Jerusalem In My Heart......92
Goodbye Rabbit Hop Hop.......................67
Gravity Hill Newsreels (Occupy Wall St.)
Numbers 2, 3, 5, & 9.............................61

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Halimufack....................................................70
Hand Movie..................................................43
Hard as Opal................................................59
He Who Eats Children..............................70
Heck.exe.......................................................83
Heila Ormur..................................................64
Helianthus Corner Blues...........................61
Here There....................................................81
Hotel 22........................................................29
House and Universe...................................59
House Fire....................................................73
How to Rust.................................................83
I Remember Nothing..................................51
Impresiones para una máquina
de luz y sonido........................................33
In the Canyon...............................................67
Iron Condor..................................................37
Irradiant Field...............................................48
Islander’s Rest.............................................65
Isola del Giglio ............................................29
Jaaji Approx..................................................72
Jack’s Dream................................................43
Je Suis Une Bombe (I Am a Bomb)........43
KCBT.............................................................37
King James Version Genesis
Chapter Nineteen...................................64
King of Boys.................................................49
Last Mango Before the Monsoon............40
Le Boudin.....................................................85
Le Pays Dévasté..........................................69
letters, notes.................................................43
Life With Herman H Rott...........................29
Lights Out by Angel Olsen.......................92
Liquid Solid..................................................67
Loads.............................................................51
Looking at the Sea......................................74
Lossless #3..................................................55
Lost Book Found.........................................61
Love................................................................65
Love Under the Will of the
Hags of the long Tooth.........................59
Milky Way.....................................................70
Minotauro......................................................33
Mirror..............................................................43
Mr and Mrs Compost.................................72
My Parents Read Dreams
That I’ve Had About Them...................43
Needle in the Sway by Holo Paw............92
Neither God nor Santa Maria...................80
News From Home.......................................35
Night Scene New York..............................61
No Home Movie..........................................87
Northern Lights............................................71
not even nothing can be free of ghosts....80
Notes From the Interior..............................59
Object............................................................77
Ofrenda oaxaqueña....................................33
okay bye bye................................................55
Old Dog’s Diary...........................................77
Omnia............................................................85
On Essex Road............................................61
One Document for Hope..........................89
Our Last Hurrah..........................................83
Our Selves Unknown.................................48

Pa Boo La by Noah Wall...........................92
Pearl Pistols.................................................63
Phantasmata................................................67
Pixel Jungle...................................................37
Police Power and Freedom
of Assembly: The Gregory march.......58
Powers of Ten..............................................67
Pretty Good Product..................................83
Pretty Please by Josephine Foster..........92
Prima Materia...............................................81
Primary Stimulus.........................................41
Quimtai..........................................................40
REGAL..........................................................29
Reluctantly Queer.......................................51
Resonance (Rezonans).............................91
Rock Roll.......................................................37
Ronnie...........................................................46
Roubado.......................................................83
Secret Claw by Roommate......................92
Sixty Six.........................................................88
So Etched in Memory by Benoît Pioulard..92
Solace............................................................85
Solitary Acts 4.............................................83
Sonámbulo (The Sleepwalker).................67
Sorelle Povere di Santa Chiara...............85
Standard Gauge.........................................43
Steve Polyester by Ava Luna....................92
Still Life..........................................................92
Stinky-Butt....................................................46
Sto[ne]s.........................................................67
Summer 1975..............................................51
T H I R...........................................................71
Territorio........................................................69
The Digger................................................... 85
The Event......................................................89
The Host.......................................................76
The Human Body, Our Friend..................83
The Idea of North........................................55
The Illinois Parables....................................58
The Lighted Fiel...........................................36
The Mean Brothers “Get Stood Up”......46
The Mess......................................................37
The Passage Clock (For Walter Benjamin)....61
The Perpetual Motion of My Love for You....37
The Place......................................................29
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes..........50
The Twist.......................................................65
There is a Happy Land Further Awaay....49
Thoth in the Kaleidoscope UFO..............67
Time/Out of Joint.........................................79
Toledo, My Father.......................................83
Toré................................................................70
Traces/Legacy.............................................37
Tracheal Shave............................................64
True Blue and Dreamy...............................46
TV PSA..........................................................63
Two Clothespins in an Envelope.............72
Vague Images..............................................37
Vapour...........................................................75
Vivir Para Vivir..............................................59
We Can’t Live Without Cosmos.............67
Who painted the sky with wispy clouds?...83
Wieners and Buns .....................................46
Xilitla...............................................................33

Resources

Filmmaker Index
Ackerman, Chantal ..................... 35, 57, 87
Al Nowais, Amena.......................................85
Andersen, Thom .........................................92
Anger, Zia ....................................................51
Ashadu, Karimah ........................................49
Asili, Ephraim ..............................................92
Assmann, Nicky ..........................................67
Bąkowski, Wojciech .................................59
Balcom, Ben ........................................59, 83
Barba, Rosa ................................................48
Barber, Stephanie ......................................43
Baron, Rebecca ..................................18, 55
Barrada, Yto ................................................80
Beebe, Roger .............................................92
Bogner, Carl .........................................18, 43
Boyd, Andy Heck .......................................83
Brantley, Daniel ..........................................92
Braun, Frank ................................................65
Bronzit, Konstantin ....................................67
Brunner-Sung, Vera ..................................59
Buckhiester, Jared .....................................59
Bucsi, Réka .................................................65
Burr, Peter ...................................................37
Busti, Andrew .............................................73
Carey, Tom ...........................................23, 67
Castaing-Taylor, Lucien ...........................20
Cekala, Allison ............................................77
Chan, Sami ..................................................67
Cherri, Ali .....................................................85
Coderre, Charles-André ..........................92
Cohen, Jem ..........................................39, 61
Colmenares, Camilo ..................................40
Cook, Lauren ..............................................37
Cornell, Joseph ...........................................43
Cuesta, Alexandra .....................................69
Danino, Nina ................................................85
Day, Andrew ................................................83
Delgado, Samuel M. ..................................80
Dershimer, Miranda ...................................83
Dinçel, Nazlı ................................................83
Doncheva, Ralitsa ......................................85
Dorsky, Nathaniel .......................................69
Dratel, Julia ..................................................92
Eames, Charles ..........................................67
Eames, Ray ..................................................67
Elsaesser, Carl ...........................................37
Eskew, Kevin ...............................................92
Everson, Kevin Jerome .......................73, 77
Felker, Lori ............................................29, 92
Fisher, Morgan ............................................43
Fitzpatrick, Scott ........................................37
Frampton, Hollis .........................................43
Freyer, Sasha Waters ...............................89
Gallagher, Kelly ..........................................63
Gantz, Nina ..................................................65
Gary, Ja’Tovia ..............................................37
Geiser, Janie ...............................................59
Gentinetta, Claudius .................................65
Giller, Amelia ........................................65, 92
Girón, Helena ..............................................80
Gizycki, Marcin ...........................................67
Goel, Shumona ..........................................77
Goldberg, Neil ............................................43
Grey, Zena ...................................................63

Guild, Alexandra Swati..............................67
Guilford, Josh...............................................37
Hahn, Karissa .......................................29, 91
Hamlyn, Nicky .............................................48
Harahan, Seamus ......................................72
Harris, Christopher ....................................70
Henderson, Mike ........................................77
Herce, Mauro ..............................................74
Heredia, Shai ..............................................77
Hopinka, Sky ...............................................72
Hucal, Christine ..........................................83
Hutton, Peter ...............................................74
Jansen, David ..............................................64
Kamentsky, Gina ........................................64
Kapadia, Payal ............................................40
Karel, Ernst ..................................................20
Kim, Andrew ................................................91
Kim, Minjung ...............................................67
Klacsmann, John ........................................63
Klahr, Lewis .................................................88
Kohlberger, Rainer .....................................80
Kootstra, Britt ..............................................71
Kraning, Laura .............................................48
Kucia, Jerzy ..................................................91
Lackey, Meredith ........................................37
Lamas, Salomé ...........................................85
Lambert, Kent .............................................92
Lawder, Standish .......................................67
Lefrant, Emmanuel .....................................69
Lertxundi,Laida ...........................................59
Leventhal, Dani ...........................................59
Litvintseva, Sasha ......................................92
Lo, Elizabeth .........................................29, 77
Lodoli, Federico ..........................................75
Los ingrávidos..............................................33
Loznitsa, Sergei ..........................................89
Lundgren, Chintis ......................................29
Mazzolo, Pablo ...........................................41
McDowell, Curt ........................... 29, 46, 51
Mead, Wrik ..................................................51
Moncayo, Guillermo ..................................40
Morris, Robert .............................................43
Niblock, Phill ...............................................71
Noren, Andrew ...........................................36
O’Herlihy, Mica ...........................................59
OReilly, David .............................................45
Ortega, Garbiñe...................................18, 33
Ortega, Rafael ............................................33
Owusu, Akosua Adoma ............................51
Paravel, Véréna ...........................................20
Parish, Carson ............................................83
Patrick, Sean Curtis ..................................92
Pennell, Miranda .........................................76
Pereda, Nicolás ..........................................33
Płazińska, Katarzyna ..................................85
Pong, Elodie ................................................43
Poplawska, Julia .........................................29
Pryce, Charlotte .........................................81
Rainer, Yvonne ...........................................43
Rakwoski, Joel ............................................29
Ravat, Klara .................................................37
Reinke, Steve .......................................43, 51
Reynolds, Matt ............................................64
Rinehardt, Ben ............................................63

Rinland, Jessica Sarah ..............................72
Rioux, Brendt ..............................................63
Rivers, Ben ..................................................49
Rødbro, Eva Marie .....................................70
Rorison, Margaret ......................................89
Roston, Edwin ............................................48
Russell, Ben ................................................70
Russett, Robert ..........................................41
Sadowski, Mateusz ....................................91
Saïto, Daïchi ................................................81
Sarris, Terri ...........................................29, 83
Schroeder, Tom .........................................29
Schwartz, Jonathan ...................................73
Shin, Ji Young .............................................67
Skibińska, Paulina ......................................77
Smith, Melanie ............................................33
Stark, Rose ..................................................64
Stark, Scott .................................................37
Stempel, Angela .........................................92
Stewart, Alexander ....................................81
Story, Brett ..................................................50
Stracke, Caspar .........................................79
Stratman, Deborah ....................................58
Strijbos, Joris ..............................................67
Sulzer, Martin ..............................................64
Tao, Zhou .....................................................40
The Film Group............................................58
Todd, Robert ...............................................49
Toeppe, Charles .........................................83
Torres, Joao Vieira .....................................70
Tribbioli, Carlo Gabriele ...........................75
Truttmann, Lisa ...........................................72
Ushev, Theodore ........................................67
Van der Rijt, Arvid ......................................71
Varela, Bruno ..............................................33
Wallin, Michael ...........................................76
Wallin, Susanna .........................................72
Watson, Erica .............................................83
Weber, Micah .............................................73
Weerasethakul, Apichatpong ..................75
Weinbren, Grahame ..................................90
Widrich, Virgil .............................................29
Wieland, Joyce ...........................................43
Wood, Caleb ..............................................67
Xukuru-Kariri, Tanawii ...............................70
Yasinsky, Karen ..........................................37
Yezbick, Julia ...............................................83
Zwirchmayr, Antoinette .............................59
ARC...............................................................41

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Resources

NORTH

it

St

Map

De

tro

I
Braun Ct

F
Catherine St

H

N. State St

E. Washington St

N. Divisio n St

N. 4th Ave

J

N. 5th Ave

E. Huron St

N. Main St

N. Ashley St

E. Ann St

D

E

G

B

E. Liberty St

L

K

A
C

Screening Venues
A Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty St
Expanding Frames
B Space 2435, North Quad
105 S. State St
Exhibitions
C Work Gallery
306 S. State St

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S. State St

S. Main St

E. Williams St

Afterparties
D Sava’s
216 S. State St
E The Ravens Club
207 S. Main St
F \aut\ BAR
315 Braun Court
G Hathaway’s Hideaway
310 S Ashley St
H The Club Above the Heidelberg
215 N. Main St
I The Bar at 327
327 Braun Court

Installations
J 111 S. 4th Ave
K Encore Records
417 E Liberty St
L Ann Arbor Art Center
and Aquarium Gallery*
117 W Liberty St

* The Aquarium Gallery is a
microgallery around the
corner on Ashley St.

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