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Ladies Library Association Secretary's Book, Vol 4: 1983-1995

Year
1983
Rights Held By
Ladies Library Association of Ann Arbor
OCR Text

 -..._;'
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION THE SECRETARY'S BOOK VOLUME IV
REPORTS 1983 - 19

   THE ANN ARBOR LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Founded March 19, 1866.
Said to have been incorporated
in April, Building at
finished
1866.
324 E. Huron Street in 1885, deeded to Education in 1916.
Board of
Demolished in 1946 to make way
for an office building of the Michigan Bell Telephone Company.

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  SUGGESTIONS FOR THE SECRETARY of the Ladies' Library Association, from the Historian.
Since the virtue of its
the historian Manent records:
Ladies'
nearly one hundred makes the following
is
now an historical and twenty years
recommendations
institution of existence,
for keeping
by
per-
Library
1. The ribbon and ty~efaces.
uses the same ribbon over and over
some electric models do this), the first thing to do is to put in
a new ribbon and clean with a "Q-tip" I find
also ~o a good job.
2. It is imperative
preferably 20 pound weight,
A quite large packet of that paper is at the bottom of the box of supplies for the secretary. Both 16 pound and 20 pound paper have been use<l for most of the records of the Ladies' Library Association ., compiled from 1930.
3. Form of the minutes. At the top of the page it is best to give the full name of the Association. However, since the
'Ann Arbor, Michigan' part of our name is on the title page of each volume of reports, I have not always thought it necessary that it
be repeated.
In the first paragraph listing those present be sure to give
your type the most
faces. effective,
Nail polish remover applied
to use only 100% available in an
cotton fiber Eaton paper
paper,
at Ulrich's.
If you have a typewriter again (all manual machines
that and
but rubbing
alcohol will

  -......,/
the
add
to officers, them.
names of the ladies, not just titles when appropriate. Most
the
consequently it is difficult now to reconstruct many of
complete their
their last the early
names, and
give
full names and only occasionally
mention
4. Layout of the typed page. I prefer a large type, such as Pica or the IBM Courier (which is used in these suggestions).
The top line is 7 full spaces from the top edge (14 half-spaces,
such as are common on machines in 1984). The left hand margin in
these suggestions and in most of the
spaces from the left edge (or 1 1/8
line is not more than 66 or 67 spaces.
ard typed page of 250 words was widely used in the western world.
It
the
still use double
there are more than 250 words on them. [The margins of the old standard page were, on the left 1 1/2 inches, or 15 spaces in pica, on the right about 1 1/4 inches; a top margin of 1 1/4 inches,
was in pica manuscript
type, each double-spaced spacing
line was approximately
with 25 lines to the page].
bottom margin 1 3/4 inches].
inches a bit. courier
on each side. However, if is used, the
Our elite
records are getting or another smaller
bulky and this type than pica or
on the same scheme.
Wethey
June 25,
1984.
margins should
be planned
of
minutes fail who are the
recently typed records is 11 inches). The length of the
[Twenty years ago a stand-
but
My margins today are about 1 1/8
and my pages still have 25 lines,
Alice Sunderland
60 spaces
long, Today I
helps

  through
be obtained than These have been by generations
guarding their
rights of
YOUR SPEECH AND MINE
is a set
the rights of all members.
"No
better knowledge of actual practices of
self-government
can forms.
parliamentary of political of liberty-loving but fair-minded men,
through centuries own rights, but conceding the
Watkins and Frost, Parliamentary procedure
changes jealously
formulated
business, while protecting
of rules designed to expedite When proper-
ly
1.
2. 3. 4. 5.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5. 6.
1. 2. 3.
understood and applied,
these rules can assure
us
of
Majority rule with respect the minority.
for and
protection
PARLIAMENTARYPROCEDURE
of the following: the rights of
topics not per-
The chairman must impartially and fairly recognize
both sides of a question. He must preside without becoming
involved in the actual debate.
All remarks must be addressed to the chair, who in turn must
Equal rights for all members to speak and vote.
Free and full debate.
Consideration of one matter at a time.
Courtesy prevails with the discussion limited to sonalities.
GENERAL RULES
recognize No one may
No
all speakers before they may have the
floor.
incidental or
subsidiary motions
motions.
except privileged or subsidiary
may be
enter-
The
Courtesy must prevail
Call to order.
Roll call.
Minutes of previous
quiet and attentive. at all times.
ORDEROF BUSINESS
meeting: reading, correction,
interrupt
a speaker except for certain
motions tained when there is a motion on the floor.
audience must be
others."
speakers on
approval.

 4. Reports of officers: President, Secretary, Treasurer.
5. Announcements.
6. Reports of committees: standing, special.
7. Unfinished business.
8. New business.
9. Program.
10. Adjournment.
PROCEDUREFOR MAKINGA MOTION
1. Obtaining the floor. A member of the srroup rises and says, "Mr. Chairman" or "Mr. President." In case a woman is presiding
2.
3.
4.
Being recognized. The ·chairman
in the member's direction and "John has the floor."
recognizes
calling
the member his/her name,
by nodding or saying
she is always referred to as "Madame President" (never as Miss or Mrs.).
Chairman" or "Madame
presents his motion by saying, "I move that ... " (Never say, "I make a motion that ... ").
Stating the Motion. The member
Seconding the Motion. Another person who is willing to motion discussed seconds the motion by saying either the motion" or simply "second." (If no one seconds,
man says, "The motion is lost for want of a second.").
have the "I second the chair-
5. Repeating the Motion. The chair puts the motion before the group
by saying, "It has been moved and seconded tion is open for discussion. The chairman to use the exact words of the motion.
that " The ques-
6. Discussing the Motion. Members may now discuss
amendments, or many other type of motion that may be applied.
Members should be recognized
by the topic
chair and
and time be allowed
their
person
before
a question). debate he may
relevant
remarks to the who desires to
anyone
it
call out "Question," meaning he wishes the chair-
man to call
or hear from others
should
limits. Each
to do so once is to answer
vote. The chairman may honor the request still wishing to speak.
speak
receives a second turn
should
(unless
When a member feels there has been sufficient
for a
must always
remember
the motion,
offer
limit

 7. Voting. The chairman (voice, standing,
the votes.
8. Announcing results.
declares what type of voting will be used
The chairman voting before moving on to other
show of hands
or ballot) and then counts
must announce the results of business.

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
SECRETARY'S REPORT April 29, 1983
The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan, held its Spring meeting on Friday, April 29, 1983 at the home of Marcy
Westerman. Members Bader, Mrs. Jonathan
present were:
Bulkley, Mrs. George Cameron, Miss Eleanor
Mrs. James
Mrs. Kirby Hall, Mrs. Joseph
Westerman After
to order
who had been asked by Mrs. Oneal to explain the necessity of estab-
to these
proposed
dividends
copy of
and by-laws. mously approved.
Mr. elected
The
Bailey so that
minutes
remained at
our new president could
and Mrs. Hayden's lovely refreshments
daughter, Mrs. were served by Mrs. Oneal who introduced Mr.
the meeting Essel Bailey,
was called attorney,
lishing our association
nal Revenue regarding
as tax-exempt in (c) (3). The papers
accordance with the Inter- which he had prepared
Code 501 the "Articles
Mrs. John Alexander, Mrs. Arno
Gramentine, Mrs. Cameron Haight, Hayden, Mrs. Perry
Collins,
Hall,
Robert Oneal, Mrs. James Plumer, Mrs. Amnon
Miss Helen Innes, Mrs.
Rosenthal,
Pearson as guest.
of the Association
minutes. This action was brought to our attention by the
new federal law requiring the withholding of 10 %of our
and these
interest if we were taxable.
Each
that we adopt
papers. Mrs. Mrs. Rosenthal
Innes moved
member received a these articles
seconded
the motion
until the
and
the meeting
officers were
sign them of the Fall meeting were read and
and By-Laws" are attached
Mrs. Scott
it
new officially.
approved. The
was
unani-

 treasurer's report was read by Mrs. Alexander in the absence of Mrs. Wethey who had sent her a complete report which is attached to these minutes. We were pleased to hear that our assets were up from
$54,500.11 to $62,224.61.
amount of
Kirby Hall
Motion carried. Mrs. Westerman then moved that we give the amount of
Mrs. library
motion
$2,500 to the library in July. Seconded by Mrs. Alexander. carried. Our annual dues of 10 cents were then collected.
the
Plumer as chairman slate of officers
Mrs. following
of
the nominating
for 1983-1984:
President
Vice President Treasurer Secretary
Book Chairman Representative
committee
Motion
presented
$2,500 to the seconded the
Wethey suggested this July. Mrs.
that we give the Innes moved and
Mrs. accepted.
Mrs. Mr. Bailey
like
parture
of appreciation.
Miss Collins then mittee which is attached
Marcy Westerman Kirby Hall
Alice Isabel Eleanor Joan
Wethey Haight
Collins Innes
Library that
Advisory the slate
Council be
with would
moved and Mrs. carried.
Westerman then
Bulkley
seconded
Gramentine Motion
who then to contribute
took the departed with
chair and signed the overwhelming
the papers news that he
his Mrs. Westerman
services instructed
to
our association. the secretary
After his de-
that we accept the
treasurer's report.
presented an excellent
report of Thirty titles
to these
minutes.
to write
him a note
the book com- have been

 ·----
received since our last meeting. The expenditure was $1,355.25 with a balance of about $1,400 left in the account. A book on Sir Edwin Landseer was acquired in memory of Emma Mellencamp. Miss Collins
also reported that some the Ann Arbor News about approved.
Kirby The library
shopping
installed.
of Mr. Gene Wilson, the director of the library who is retiring, as we did for Mr. Chance. There was considerable discussion and it
was the general feeling that we did not want to start a precedent
of providing a photograph for all retiring directors. The Friends
of the Library had expressed a desire to do this for Mr. Wilson. It was then moved by Mrs. Innes and seconded by Miss Collins that our President Marcy Westerman talk to Mr. Wilson to see if he would like to suggest a book or books to be given in his honor to the library.
The limit An
to be $500.00. The expression of regret
motion carried.
reported branch in center. The
Advisory now been at the
Council
moved library
meetings.
to Westgate will soon be
Hall
Gramentine who will leave our
association
Prince, The
New Jersey.
meeting adjourned at
4:50 P.
M.
publicity
our art books.
on the Library
been given by Mrs. Stasheff in
Village has proposed computer
Maple
had
She then asked if we would like to provide a photograph
was tendered
Respectfully
Isabel
The report
was unanimously
by all
to take up residence
submitted, Haight, Secretary.
Mrs.
in
members to

  tions's
Fine Arbor
sole purpose
Associa-
shall be to build
for and in the Ann
1.
2.
Ladies' Library name.
This Association's Collection of
April 9, 1983
Association of Ann Arbor is this
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION
Arts
Public Library.
books
is
and
magazines
3. This organization
formed exclusively for this
able and educational
purpose. the benefit
The Association's of any member,
charit- dues and earnings
shall not person. purchases
tive expenses tax exempt money for meaning of
officer,
or private to make
administra-
inure to The dues for the
and net earnings Ann Arbor Public
shall be Library
used and to
incurred purpose.
in the Thus, this charitable
solely pay
the
is limited
purposes within Revenue Code.
propaganda or Association also campaign on behalf of
education, Section
and (3) of the
the
4. This Association wise attempt to influence not in any way participate
carry
on
other- shall
any candidate
5. The Association's
Public
Library, 343 South
mailing address shall be: Ann Arbor
Fifth Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
-20-
for public
501(c)
furtherance
Association
literary
Internal
shall not
legislation. The
in any political office.
of
Association's
to spending
up a

 Association's elected
Book Committee. Committee whenever
7.
or providing for
tion must distribute If the Association
6. The Association's Association's
of in
shall
the
after
the Associa- Public Library.
it must dis- qualify as
the
the
be
Chairman of the
the Vice President,
Association's
Secretary, The President
elected Treasurer
shall
officers and
convene
the
President,
Executive
necessary ever decides
to conduct
to dissolve,
business.
tribute the exempt under corresponding Law.
money Section
to
one or
S0l(c) (3) of the
of any future
BYLAWS
ARTICLE I - MEETINGS
The annual which time annual
meeting reports
with such
Friday writing President
sometime
or by two members
elected desirable.
officers
reports
in as the
meeting President
The Special
second
by the
President meetings of the Executive
call a
in October.
provision
United
Bylaws,
If the Association
the payment
paying
shall
may be called Committee whenever
-21-
Executive Committee shall consist officers. As further delineated
liabilities, the Ann cannot make such a distribution,
all its
assets to
Arbor
which
of all its
more organizations Internal
Revenue Code States Internal
or the Revenue
shall be held
in
April, at by all
may deem
shall other
the last be submitted
necessary.

  ARTICLE II - QUORUM
A quorum shall consist of eight
ARTICLE III - AMENDMENTS
members.
These bylaws may notice of the proposed
meeting.
ARTICLE IV - OFFICERS
be amended at the
The
Secretary, hold office
The dues shall be ten meeting.
ARTICLE VI - MEMBERSHIP Active members shall
shall
for the annual
a
and
year,
proposals
payable
twenty on in
for new
at the
members October.
served
members
annual
resident
prepare
officers shall Treasurer and
consist Chairman
of
meeting. ARTICLE V - DUES
shall pay no dues.
for
term of ballot of
one year. officers
a
changes had
been
the
cents
a
be limited April, voted
to women
to
in Ann Arbor, nominated
membership shall be confined
or more on the Board. A member may become emeritus by her own choice or by vote of the Board. They shall be notified of all meetings and may attend them but shall have no vote. They shall be entitled to all reports or publications of the Board. They
in
Emeritus
ten years
-22-
of
Committee and shall
annual
given at the October
President, Vice President,
the Book
The Nominating Committee
who have
meeting,
provided

 ARTICLE VII - DUTIES
The She shall throughout
appoint tion with
President appoint a
the year. two members
shall preside at all meetings of the Board.
two
tees or representatives
such affairs
other as
commit- she deems except
members
to the Chairman
Book Committee She may appoint
of the Board to civic
and she
with shall
Nominating Committee
of
serve she shall
consulta- appoint
of the to that Committee.
In consultation with the Finance Committee
the Treasurer
desirable.
the Nominating
The Vice
dent in her absence.
The Secretary the minutes of all
The Treasurer of the Association.
Committee and at the end of the fiscal year, obtain an audit of her books.
She shall Committee.
President shall
the
Presi-
keep
shall meetings shall
notify and
all meetings,
serve
on all committees
perform all the
three members to
ex officio
duties of
the members of
maintain the membership roll.
receive,
She shall act as Chairman of the Finance
The Chairman select the books
the status of the
of the books so purchased and deposit the books in the Ann Arbor Public Library.
The Executive Committee shall consist of all elected officers and shall convene on the call of the President to transact any
-23-
of the Book Committee to be purchased during
shall with her Committee
Treasury. She shall
the year, according to keep an up-to-date file
conserve and disburse all funds

  necessary business in the The Finance Committee
the assets of the Association. or sold without the consent
interim shall
of
between meetings.
advise with the Treasurer on
No stocks or bonds may be bought
ARTICLE VIII - DEPOSITORIES
The depositories of the Association
monies, a safety box for securities and legal and
rare documents, records as the
Michigan
may wish to preserve there.
Ladies' Library Association 343 South Fifth Avenue
ATTACP.MENT
of Ann Arbor
1983
Ann Arbor,
Marci tion and
Michigan,
Westerman Bylaws are
48104
states that complete and
the attached
documents she is the authority
[Composed
for the President
to sign
by Mr.
accurate Association
Ladies' Library
of this Association,
Arbor, that
for
Essel
the organization
the Finance
Committee.
shall be a bank for the
Historical Collections for such
A historian
and the
Association
the President for a term of three years shall act as curator of
such records and write a history of the at fitting times.
Association's
activities
April 29,
(signed) Marci Westerman,
W. Bailey, Jr., Attorney-at-Law]
-24-
Articles copies of
and
appointed
by
of
the original
of Ann
that she has the
President.
Associa-

 '-._,/
.!
the entire
The perhaps not curious
community."
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Treasurer's Report January 1 - December 31, 1982
The best news that I have to report is that the rising stock market has brought our assets up from $64,900.11 to $69.974.61.
Further, our dividend and interest, etc. income was $727.94 higher than in 1981. We also did much better in 1982 by the Public Library
naving sent them $2,600.00 during the year as against $1,700.00 in 1981. In 1983 we will do much better than that. I sent them a
check in ledgement Library this
half your benefit
January of from the
$1,800.00 Board of
has been more than
and the Education
a significant 100 years,
last is
paragraph of the acknow- worth quoting: "The Ladies'
Association community for of the library efforts, your
source and your
particular continued
of activities
in
on be-
cause us to generosity,
express and your
appreciation support, which
of
Ann Arbor
thing that
that I failed altogether to balance the account. We had $81.51
more income in 1982 than I can account for. Yet I have gone over every inch of the. reports from the bank and what reports I have from
the companies,
whatever in arithmetic. Since we issued
normal
this past year, it all should My trouble is in our antiquated
very simple.
account sends reports only each check deposited is not ectly to the bank from the
four times
listed separately.
companies. Others
and Many
I deposit
not once
and can locate only three
be
bank accounts.
no mistake checks, as is
The savings those reports checks go dir-
myself. If
but many times,
-1-
has occurred
this year is
a year,
in
support

 \. ,.,
~
more than one come in on a single day the bank lumps them together into a single entry, and occasionally they forget to send me depos- it slips. After three months it is impossible to get any informa- tion out of them as to what actually came in. In the past I have
"-.-I
-2-
even resorted xeroxes of me promptly, Bank, but
at least
for one
husband's
three of us it is easy enough to straighten out.
on certain and
into
occasion dividend
to writing to the companies
asking for
once of the
a
year,and
three accounts in this household,
and
my own, into the wrong one.
my sister's,
Of course, among the
they had what account
is not indicated. sometimes more often,
The bank's deposit a
sent to
Arbor
clerks
check
my
checks, which they indeed been deposited
have always in the Ann
In our checking account they send me
months in which there is any activity. In 1982 I had only six re- ports: Feb. 12, April 14, July 16, October 15, November 16, and December 15. It is all highly unsatisfactory.
When I come back at the end of May or early in June I propose
to consolidate our two accounts into a single NOWaccount. We will have to keep at least $1000.00 on deposit all the time, but that
will be drawing interest. The chief advantage is that the bank
sends reports on NOWaccounts every month, whether there has been any activity or not. And in the reports every transaction is listed separately. If three dividend checks are deposited in a single day each is given a separate entry. And the checks drawn on the account are carefully listed showing the number of the check, whether there is any gap in the sequence of numbers, etc. I think this kind of
reports for only those

 '-'
-3-
an account ought to do away with the sort of impasse in which I have found myself this year.
I have been discussing the question of the impending withhold-
ing from July 1st onward of 10% on all dividends and bank interest,
in connection with the Ladies' Library, with my accountant Mr. Wahl
at the Icerman firm. For the first time this year I am having an accountant figure our my husband's and my income taxes. Oddly enough, Mr. Wahl audits the accounts of the Ann Arbor Public Library so that he is interested in our problem. He doesn't yet know what we Ladies can do to get ourselves declared exempt, and perhaps we cannot.
But we can apply for refunds of a good deal that has been withheld,
by deducting from our income what we give to the Public Library.
Of course we will have to put in reports of some kind. Mr. Wahl does not yet know what such reports should look like. If we saved
only a thousand or so a year the government couldn't take much from us. The tax figure would be 17% on what we retain in savings.
In conclusion I propose that I be empowered to give the Public Library up to $2,500 in July. Our income in 1982 was $5,714.51 and
we simply should be raising the Respectfully
Alice
amount that we give the library. submitted,
Sunderland Wethey, Treasurer.

                '-"
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
TREASURER'S REPORT January 1 - December 31, 1982
PRICE VALUE COMPANY SHARES 12/31/82 DIVIDENDS 12/31/81
EASTMANKODAK 100 COMERICA (DETROITBANK) 186 BEATRICE FOODS 100 HOUSEHOLDINTERNATIONAL 225 CENTRAL AND SOUTH-WEST 100 STANDARDOIL INDIANA ~00 MOBIL 200 SAFEWAY 100
86 350.00 24 3/4 372.00 23 1/2 147.50 23 371.24 17 3/8 168.00 38 3/4 1,120.00 25 1/8 400.00 45 1/4 265.00 75 160.00
1,637.69 5&111.43
Expenses:
Library Revolving Fund Safety Deposit Box Bank Fees
Purchases,
8,600.00 4,611.20 2,350.00 5,175.00 1,737.50
15,500.00 5,025.00 4,525.00 3,750.00 1,793.75
14,661.99
67,729.44
384.32 1,860.85
69,974.61
2,600.00 10.00 9.66
1,637.69 4,257.35
1,860.85 384.32
2,245.17
MIN. MIN. AND MANU. DUPONT
PAINE-WEBBER CASH FUND
Savings Account Checking Account
50
50 35 7/8 120.00
Total
Income:
Dividends Interest Dues
Balance Savings
Assets
Checking
Dues in cash
Income 1982 Onaccounted for
Expenses 1982
1,046.90
198.00 1.60
1,246.50
5,174.51 81.51
6,502.52 4,257.35
2,245.17
Jan.
Cash Dec. 31,1982
Checking statement Savings statement

5,111.43 61.93 1.15
5,174.51
1, 1982 statement
Cash Fund
statement
income
Alice
Sunderland Wethey,
Treasurer

                                      '-......)
30.00 180.00
COMPANY 1st Quar
2nd Quar.
Apr2
75.00
Apr 2
93.00
Apr 1
37.00
Apr 15 92.81
May 28 42.00
Jun 10 280.00
Jun Io
100.00 Apr 1
65.00
Jun 12 40.00
Jun 12 30.00
Feb 28
130.75
Jun 25 142.70
Oct 29
133.53 97.74
INTEREST
Eastman
Comerica
Bea Fds
HousFin CenSoW St O Ind Mobil Safway MM M Du Pont Cash Fd.
Jan 2
125.00
Jan 2
93.00
Jan 2
35.00
Jan 15 92.81
Feb 26 42.00
Mar Io 280.00
Mar Io 100.00
Jan 4
65.00
Mar 12
40.00 Mar 12
30.00 Jan 31
122.22
May 28
145.54
Sep 30 114.42
Jul 2
2
2
Oct2
75.00 75.00
Oct 2
93.00 93.00
Oct 2
37.50 37.50
Oct 15 92.81 92.81
Ann Arbor Bank
Safety Deposit Box 33
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
DIVIDENDS 1982
(Packard and Brockman Branch)
Paid to A.A. Pub. Library, Feb. 2, 1,300; Jul. 9I 1,300.
Dues $1.60
Checking Acc't 20-101380-6; Savings Acc't 00-938522-6 Ann Tazpayer identifying number: 38-6055155
Alice Sunderland Wethey,
3rd Quar 4th Quar
Total 350.00 372.00 147.50 371.24 168.00
1,120.00
400.00 265.00 160.00 120.00
1,637.69
69.93
10.00 2,600.00
Arbor Bank
Treasurer
Jul
Jul
Jul
Aug 31
-Sep 10 Sep Io
Jul
1
Oct 1 Dec 14 Dec 14 Apr 30
15
65.00 Sep 12
40.00
Sep 11 30.00
Mar 26 139.76
65.00
40.00
Jul
30
181.05
Aug 27 132.12
Dec 31 117.62
Nov 26
42.00 280.00
Nov 30
Dec 10 280.00
Dec 10 100.00
100.00
42.00

  ·-....,,.,..
'-....../
REPORTOF THE:SOOKCOMMITTEEL,ADIES' LIJ3RARYASSOCIATION APRIL 29, 1983
Thirty titles have been received at the Library since our last
aeeting in November 1982 totalling an expenditure of $1706.60 list
price. The actual cost was 81355.25, the aTe1'88E' discount being 20.6 %.
At the last aecounting we still have a healthy balance of over $1400.00. Due to our skillful treasurer, Mrs. Wethe;r, the sum of $1800
was sent to the Libra.r,y on January 1st, an increase of $500 over the previous contribution of July 1, 1982.
Newbooks listed herewith range in subject from a history of art collecting to black folk art in America. during this century-. The eatalogue of an exhibition of the painting of Sir F.dwin Landseer was acquired in memory of Dmla Mellencamp. This artist was of special interest to her and before her death she was doing some research
about hill.
In the New:Books in the Library notice in the Sunday editions of the Ann Arbor News I have been pleased to note that the writer, Mrs. Stasheff, has mentioned one or two books provided by this organization.
Respectfully submitted,
Co!llll.ittee •embers
Eleanor Collins, Chairman Helen Hall
Carol Pluaer

     LADIES' LIBRARY.ASSOCIATION
TITLES ORDEREDANDRECEIVEDNOVEMBE1R982 -
APRIL 1983
Abra.ms, Richard I. and Hutchinson, Warner A.
An Illustrated Life of Jesus. Abingdon, 1982
Abrams, R. E. and Canemaker, John. Treasury of Disney Animated Art. Abbeville, 1982
Alsop, Joseph. The Rare Art Traditions: The History of Art Collecting •.• Harper & Row, 1982
List Cost
136.oo
85.00 63.75
5-,.95 51.00
Baur, John. The Inlander: Life cUldWorks of Cnarles
Burchfield 1893;-1967. Cornell Univ. Press, 1982 50.00
Bissell, R. Ward. Orazio Gentilesohi and the Poetic Tradition
in Caravaggesque Painting. Penn State Press, 1982 56.00
50.00
49.20
Christiansen, Keith, Gentile da Fa.briano. Cornell Univ. Press, 1982
Daval, J. L. Photography: History of an Art. Skira-Rizzoli, 1982
De Stijl: 1917-1931 •.. Visions of Utopia. Abbeville, 1982
Descharnes, Robert. Gaudi, the Visionary. Viking, 1982
Gombrich, E. H. The Image and the Eye. Cornell Univ. Press, 1982
Japan Graphic Designers Assn. Graphic Art in Japan. Kodansha, 1982
Jencks, Charles. Architecture Today. Abra.ms, 1982 Goodrich, Lloyd. ThomasEakins. National Gallery of Art/
Harvard, 1982
Jordan, Jim M. The Paintings of Arshile Gorky: A Critical
Catalog. NewYork Univ. Press, 1982
Keller, Horst. Watercolors and Drawings of the French Impressionists and their Parisian Contemporaries.
Abrams, 1982
Kennedy, Roger. American Churches. Stewart, Tat>ori & Chang,
1982
lee, Sherman E. The Genius of Japanese Ilesign. Kodansha, 1982
65.00 57.20
60.00
39.95 29.96 75.00 46.88
33.88
52.00 39.00 65.00 48.75
63.00
66.oo
60.00 45.00
50.00 42.00
37.50 31.50
45.00

  Livingston, Jane. Black Folk Art in .America, 1930-1980. University of Mississippi Press, 1982
Ormond, Richard. Sir F.dwin Landseer. Rizzoli, 1981 Book purchased in memory of ElmnaHirsch Mellencamp
Plummer, John. The Last Flowering: French Painting in Manuscripts, 1420-1530. Oxford Univ. Press, 1982
Ratcliffe, Carter. John Singer Sargent. Abbeville, 1982 Rosand, David. Painting in Cinguecento Venice: Titian,
Veronese, Tintoretto. Yale Univ. Press, 1982
Royal Academy of Arts, London. The Great Japan Exhibition:
Art of the F.do ~riod 1600-1868. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1981 Russian Avant-Garde Art: The George Costa.leis Collection.
Doubleday, 1981
Schnapper, Antoine. David. Alpine Fine Arts, 1982
Taylor, Joshua. Fritz Scholder. Rizzoli, 1982
Tucker, P. H. Monet at Argenteuil. Yale Univ. Press, 1982
Vogel, Susan, ed. For Spirits and Kings: African Art from
the Paul and Ruth Tishman Collection. Metropolitan MuseUDl of Art, 1982
Weedon, Geoff. Fairground Art: Art Forms of Travelling Fairs, Carousels •.• London, White Mouse Fditions, 1981
Zbadova, Iarisa A. Malevich: Supremetism and Revolution in Russian .Art 1910-1930. '!'ha.mes & Hudson, 1982
TOTALS
20.00 45.00
89.00 85.00
50.00
33.25
60.00 75.00 65.00 29.95
35.00
45.00
$1708.60
17.6o
33.75
1a.32
63.75
44.00
33.25
45.00 56.25 40.75 26.96
26.25
33.75 $1355.25
List
Cost

  "'--'
President Vice-President Treasurer
Secretary
Book Chairman Library Advisory
Council Member
Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Miss Mrs.
Scott Westerman Kirby Hall Harold Wethey Cameron Haight Eleanor Collins Perry Innes
Members
Alice
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
1940
1940
1948
1951
1951
1951
1951
1956
1957
1957
1960
Wethey
Stanley
Howard
Charles
Dodge Hayden Hall, Haight Plumer Vibbert Wethey Collins Alexander Keniston Innes
Emeritus (1940-1971)
715 Spring Valley 2105 Devonshire Rd. 1926 Hampton Ct. 1510 Cambridge Rd.
Members
315 New England Ave. Winter Park, Florida,
Innes
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Johnnie Alexander (Mrs.
John) Arno) Jonathan) George)
Cameron)
Joseph) David) Perry) Hayward) Robert) James) Millard) Arnnon) Scott) Harold)
788 Arlington
285 Orchard
1915 Scottwood 1515 Ottawa Dr.
703 South Forest 2222 Fuller Road 2112 Vinewood Blvd.
715 South Forest
12 Geddes Heights
1530 Hill St. 2037 Geddes Ave. 2100 Hill St. 2222 Fuller Rd.
501 Onondaga 1280 Astor Dr.
Maritln Bader Trudy Bulkley
Margaret
Eleanor
Betty
Isabel
Helen
Kirby
Betty
Trudy
Joan
Roberta Keniston Zibby Oneal
Carol Plumer Mary Pryor
Prue Rosenthal Marcy Westerman
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs . (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Blvd. Hills
Dr.
663-5879 663-5898 769-3115 662-9109 663-6255 995-0508 663-4520 668-6331 665--2.800 668-8033 761-8331 662-3902 662-4164 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-9723 668-6225
Cameron Collins
Gosling Haight
Hall
Hall Hayden Huntington
MEMBERSHIP AND OFFICERS Officers
1983-1984
Dodge
Peckham
Vibbert
(Emeritus
32789. 213 London Rd., Hendersonville,
(Emeritus Helen
1971)
1968)
1960 Pryor
1962 Bader
1962 Cameron
1966 Peckham
1970 Huntington 1970 Oneal
1972 Westerman 1976 Hall, Kirby 1982 Bulkley
1982 Gosling 1982 Rosenthal
(1966-1978)
(1951-1968) 5 Roosevelt Place,
North Carolina, 29739. 5
C,
07042.
1978)
Montclair, New Jersey, Year of Election to Membership
(Emeritus

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT October 28, 1983
The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan, held its fall meeting on Friday, October 28, 1983 at the home of Mrs.
John Alexander. Members present Arno Bader, Mrs. Jonathan Bulkley,
were: Mrs. John Alexander,
Mrs.
Eleanor Hall,
Collins, Mrs. Betty Mrs. David Huntington, James Plumer, Mrs.
Westerman, Mrs.
Gosling, Mrs. Mrs. Perry
Haight, Miss Mrs. Hayward
Keniston, Mrs. Scott
the
by
Ann Arbor Public Following very
Library.
our president, ing were read report stating plete report, Mrs. Wethey
nice refreshments Marcy Westerman. approved. Mrs.
minutes gave
was of the
called Spring
and
moved and
Miss
we give the purchase
library books. Motion
between $2,000 Mrs. Alexander
approved.
reported the ac-
quisition
Gaudi, chased Wilson. these
of 26 titles since our last
A
Stieglitz were pur-
$3000
of
and that
our assets to these
The Wethey were now
a than
splendid $78,000.
financial
The com-
approved.
Millard Pryor, Harold Wethey and
Mr. Hernandez
the meeting
the
new director
Mrs.
of
to order meet-
attached
then suggested that
minutes,
more was
the art
meeting.
unanimously
in January for
Mrs. Plumer seconded this motion.
Collins, chairman of the Book Committee,
The Visionary
and another the retiring
entitled
Alfred of the
in
honor of The report
director
was unanimously approved and is attached to
minutes.
-1-
Mrs.
Cameron
Innes,
Mrs.Amnon Rosenthal,
Miss
Helen
George Cameron,
book entitled
library, Mr. Gene

  Joan Innes, our member on the Library AdvisoryCouncil asked Mr. Hernandez to speak about some of the problems confronting the lib- rary at this time. He told in detail about the delays in planning
and
under
tem has been delayed for many reasons
persons installation
but hoped it could be of the computer sys- the changes now
officers ton,
be
committee
the spring: Trudy
names of to replace The
prospective members to our Spring Mrs. Gramentine.
funding the ramp for handicapped construction soon. Also the
being made in that industry. library at Westgate had been it would not be installed.
including
A proposed back door to the branch
from the
other its
tributions and expressed of our finances.
statement of the thanked the Ladies' great admiration
appointed a
library's Library
library. One a Philosophy. He
for Wethey's
their con- handling
Mrs. Westerman then
nominating
to
select Hunting-
to Chairman, A general
elected Margaret discussion
at
Cameron and Mary Pryor.
meeting was then adjourned
at 4:40
our
meeting in
strongly opposed and He passed two typewritten
he
was fairly sure statements
Mission and the
was held about our process of selecting and voting on new members and it was decided that we should bring
for
Mrs.
meeting 1984 in
P.M.
Respectfully
Isabel Haight, Secretary.
order
-2-
submitted,

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, TreasurerJs Report, October 29, 1983.
Things the Ladies' Essel W.
are again Library
looking very Association.
Jr., who last
rosy for the
Our "knight on a
of
Mr.
all
from
distributing copies
the District Director
we are exempt, that donors may deduct contributions
eral Estate and gift taxes, and that we have to report to the Int- ernal Revenue only when our gross receipts each year are normally
more than $25,000. Consequently we will be free from harassment by the Internal Revenue for decades to come. It is true that our in- · come is now larger than our principal was in 1931 when we commenced
to buy books on the fine arts only for the Public Library of Ann Arbor, but it will take a very long time for that income to become
Bailey, of the necessary
legal services has completed his
spring offered to in confirming our
income taxes,
exemption magnificently.
more than five Thanks to
times what it is the booming stock December 31, our
today.
market, our investments continue to
of the report of in Cincinnati.
mission
August 5, 1983 sent
I am to us by
prosper. Last
By September 1, in spite of having given $4,300 to the Public Library,
The
important points
to us from Fed-
financial future
assets stood at approximately $67,000.
our total worth amounted to slightly more than $78,000, the highest point on record.
In conclusion, may I ask someone to make a motion that the treas- urer be empowered to give to the Public Library a sum between the amounts of $2,000 and $3,000 as our half-yearly gift in January?
Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, Treasurer.
white contribute
horse,"
are that

   A HISTORY OF THE "ENDOWMENT"OF THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
--Alice
December 1976.
In 1966 when Michigan, had its
the celebration
Avenue was a
the Association.
the public that
guished guests
that tea from
that in addition to other attractions there was to be a "Roll of Honor, in which all who desire can inscribe their names, which' will be handed down to posterity." Admission was ten cents.
I am sure that none of us, who were on the board of the
Sunderland
the Ladies'
hundredth
Wethey,
Library anniversary, new Public
Treasurer
Association one of
Revised June 1983.
held at the
handbill advertizing the
Library
"Tin Wedding", in 1876,
of
It was a most amusing sheet, which informed General and Lady Washington, with many distin-
in costumes of "Ye Olden Times" would be
Boston Harbor would be sold by Wild Indians, and
Ladies' Library
tion, ever noticed
our astonishment,
sented with a
signatures of
up with paper and sealed with wax, with a superscription
hand of Sarah Caswell Angell (Mrs. James Burrill Angell),
it was not to be opened before April 1976. It was the "Roll of
-1-
in 1966 that
those present
in item.
arranging the celebra-
when, ten volume bound
years
in leather, with
and involved penultimate
Consequently,
1976, we were pre-
at that affair,
messages
the volume
and many all tied
later
in
of
Ann Arbor,
its
on south Fifth
exhibits in
present,
imagine
in the that

 Honor".
In the the "Role of
of Honor" was
as travel,
on the placed
atomic bombs,
actual book the "Roll Immortality", which,
described jet air
walking
were those of the prominent
in our instant television reports moon, and pictures beamed back to earth
day of of men
on Mars, seems a bit superconfident.
the past, and we feel an obligation to attempt to pass on the touch with a message to those who will come after us in 2076.
The signatures
of our predecessors
members as of included
the
girls
girls
tennial,
sity a larger band of girls than we, wiser for all the progress which the world will make in these hundr~d years to come, but still as enthusiastic and earnest as we are, to whom the admis- sion of women to colleges is a new thing and for whom it required some heroism to enter upon a University course. We have faith that our Alma Mater will ever cherish her daughters as her sons,
and that before the year nineteen hundred and seventy-six,
world will know some great or noble work done by a woman at the University of Michigan." Alice Freeman [Palmer], from 1881 to
-2-
of Ann members of the
society and business in that faculty of the University of
day, as well
signatures junior and senior
from of the
young women university.
sent this of 1976:
greeting
classes
down through the century
Arbor
and messages
Michigan belonging
The junior
to the junior year [the cen-
"We hope
of course, of the United States] may find
that the next
centennial
from
But it is a touch from
instruments
in our Univer-
and
to
the

 1887 president of Wellesley College, was among the ladies of the Class of 1876 who signed a poem written by one of their class- mates.
Today we have no such membership as is indicated roster of names. The Association now consists only ty active members of our Board and a few emeritae.
proposal of this President during the Treasurer, to
"endowment funds" the organization,
ship, still exists.
by this
of the twen- It is the
by chance in 1966 and now put down for our successors the history of the
of the Library, which will also explain why which lacks building, books, and reader-member-
member of the Ladies' Library Board,
our own centennial celebration
On April 10, 1871, the secretary, Sarah Welles Hunt [Mrs.
Alfred H. Hunt] had this to say to the Ladies:
"I would earnest- of opening a
which any person or small sums
ly recommend subscription may contribute
for your consideration the propriety
later for the building.
for a permanent endowment from time to time whether
fund, to in large
{let not the smallest be refused) the money to be placed at inter-
est and accumulate till it reaches the sum of at least $1000 and
then only the annual interest to be expended. To this might be
added, if thought advisable, all annual donations which are pledged
by friends of the Library and thus may be laid the foundations of
a fund which shall be an unfailing resource in time to come." How- ever, such a subscription was never set up, although the treasurers' books record lists of donors to special funds, first for the lot and
-3-

 Mrs. Ann Arbor
Martin Luther Ladies' Library
D'Ooge's [Mary Association,
Worcester] published
account of the
igan,
founding
"endowment". In 1872,
ence only six years, a
for relief of Michigan
half, to the amount of
in Mrs. D'Ooge's words, 11$350 were added to the $50 placed at int-
at the
of an independent
erest the year interest,
before, and the whole was reinvested at 10 percent as the nucleus of an endowment fund."
estate of
have stated
is different.
in the same
Ladies as the result
"It was judged that entertainments, etc., a very desirable lot
later Its
commentators
time of the
1876 centennial
America, makes the next
mention when the Ladies' Library had been in
of an exist-
E. C. Seaman of $500, which some
became Mrs.
the "endowment". her secretary's
actual
history printed
of the books. fees,
issue of
the Register,
of this legacy for the
part of D'Ooge, in
report,
the action purchase of
income from
be devoted to
amounted
...
the usual
might
membership
the purchase of
[at J.]
safely 324 East Herdman's
Huron Street] residence, ...
...
lying just
the sum of was in
west of
$1,200, $700
bonds of the
$400 when the bonds were sold on July 6 to D[avid] Henning. But
-4-
Dr. [William being
for bequest
paid down " Leavenworth Gas Co.
The Seaman and actually
to only
described
celebration
surplus remained in the Forest Fire Fund sufferers from the fires of that year. One $505, was given to the Library. Of that,
In 1881 the treasurer's report, printed in full in the issue of April 13 of the Ann Arbor Register, listed a bequest from the
in Adrian, of the
Mich-

 that
the Seaman bequest
was a
the
exhausted. bit from
1882, according to $100 to the Ladies'
secretary's Library,
On April
minutes,
because in 14, 1884,
Mr. Henning contrib-
in
uted
of the bonds had risen.
the
Here I must digress a sad mistake. In 1885
history
was actually
building -- Lloyd.
There are difficult
to
is
a contemporary
tiations over "Mrs. [Thomas]
muddle because our old had been several years
of April 11, 1881 state
records
of nego- that
a library Lloyd the That same
building
which she architect
had obtained
which could be erected
-5-
report, because we have to
in photographic with penitence
that in our Centennial
the design of the long-vanished
explain published
some excuse to interpret. plans. The
Detroit
for this There
minutes
Cooley [Mary
Elizabeth Horton]
a plan [Gordon W.]
of
library suitably,
its architect
of the organization,
of the Ann Arbor Argus had from the inception of the idea of a
drawings
are presented
[Detroit]
month the lot on Huron Street was purchased
for
for $1260.
booklet
in 1966 building
financial building the son
to
being, most
Mrs, Elihu B. Pond, whose husband as editor
public
of the
charming
with this
humility
ascribed
was demolished in 1946 to make way for the Michigan Bell Telephone
library been a most sympathetic chronicler
of the doings Irving K. Pond's
Ann Arbor Ladies' architectural
Library Association.
the interim the minutes
the price record
correct
erected,
of a founding
member
copy and
we
it
architect named Gordon V.
library
from Mr.
presented
$5000."

         LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BUILDING, ANN ARBOR, MICH. IRVING K. POND, Architect, Chicago.

 However, the year dragged
builders until December
high for consideration,
But no progress was made on how to raise the money, and the last mention of the Lloyd project seems to have been in January 1885 when $70 was paid for "plan of building."
April Disbrow building. ter's
a plan of
year made
before?). After
some examination Association erect
of a
the plan a building on its
was
lot to
In
7,
the meantime a different
1884, the President "Mrs.
Mudge] showed the Ladies
She had also the specifications
that
the Library carried, It
on with no specific estimates from
when several had been received "some too the one for $7,000 was the most acceptable."
estimate of the cost which was a little
No action was taken at that time. A year later on May 4, 1885,
~the President [still Mrs. Adams) presented a rough plan and estimate for a building [by the same architect as the one of the
[and)
conform as
with some modifications
June 1, 1885, mention that the plan was presented by Mr. Pond and
was
was understood
nearly as possible to the plan and
is
project [Charles
had been
K.) Adams [Abigail
an inexpensive Library for it and a carpen-
On
by way of decoration."
presented The minutes of
that the estimate was
Argus, Mr~ Elihu Pond,
the Library Board, and
Mr. Pond was not the editor but his son, Irving K, Pond, a Chicago architect. It was decided to add a dressing room in the basement
-6-
$2450, had
frequently
readers
The name figured
of the editor of the in the minutes of to realize that this
later
failed
that the
building estimates
developing.
less than $2000.''
motion

  which would bring the estimate to $2650. This time the Ladies
took action by voting to place a mortgage of $2600 on the property. On July 5 the mortgage was taken by Robert Lilly at 7% interest.
Three months later on October 6,"$25 [was] advanced to Mrs. Adams for plan, to be covered by her note." The very next week on Oct-
ober 14,
ing!
This
our records of the
1885, a public reception
was held in
the completed
build-
investigator
in
his
drawings
in 1968 in
has failed to architect of the
find any building,
further mention
and not until
the Inland Architect
published
and Builder of 1885 did we learn that our architect was Irving K. Pond of Chicago.
were discovered
To return to our financial history, after the Annual Meeting of 1892 a reception and musical were given in the library to cele- brate the final payment on the debt. The library building with
its lot had cost $4568, and in the meantime a collection
thousand volumes had been accumulated. It was in 1889
Association was given the first of the funds that have
ed since as the "endowment funds" -- a gift of $1000 by David Henning in memory of his wife Julia Henning. Former Governor Alpheus Felch, who died in 1896, is credited with the presentation
of $300 as a memorial to his wife, but the only description
in the minutes for The largest gift, bequeathed to the
April usually Ladies'
12, 1897: described Library
-7-
occurs $300.00".
in round numbers
by Mrs. Alonzo B. Palmer [Love
"Estate of Gov.
Felch as
of several that the
been describ-
$3000, was

 Maria Root] and first appears in the account books in 1901, under date of May 14 and 16. It consisted of local mortgages valued
at $1800, Ann Arbor Water Co. bonds to a total of $1000, and the remainder in cash.
For a time these funds, which in all came to $4,300, were kept separate. In 1901-1902 we learn that they were all invested locally, in several mortgages at 5% and in bonds of the Ann Arbor Water Co. and the Michigan Milling Co., and in each case the fund
involved was identified as a later hand). By 1907-1908 a wider circle of businesses:
Henning, Felch, or Palmer [though in the investments had been shifted to bonds of the Lansing Gas Co., the
Portage Railway idual
County Drainage Co., the Monroe Gas Co., the Tri-City
and funds
Light Co., involved
and the Coldwater Gas Co. Again the were cited.
indiv-
And here history:
there
must be another account of the the president,
digression from a Carnegie Library.
simple fin-
ancial
April
Bach]
with
Andrew Carnegie.
an
At the
1902 meeting,
Anna Association
Botsford Bach
Philip
made the the city
prof>Osal that library and Meetings
the
should financial
[Mrs. consider
union Mr.
a
request for
with the Library Committee of the School
Board confirmed
The Ladies' Library Board
chins, Dean of the University Law School, to draw up and send to Mr. Carnegie a request for $20,000, The letter bore the signatures of President James B. Angell of the University of Michigan, of
-8-
the general
favor with which the plan was received.
thereupon asked Professor
Harry B. Hut-
aid from

 Dean Hutchins, of the Mayor of Ann Arbor, of the President of the
Board of Education, and
Association. A second
members of the Ladies'
By January of 1903 an offer had come from Mr. Carnegie to give
$20,000
for a new be provided
condition
agency for its
ally
It
ing
insisted
The Ladies withdrew.
down in January 1904, and
a wing of the new school building. grants of 1905 and 1907 totalling
that $2,000 annu- support.
seemed feasible the offer, but
negotiations building
stalled be placed
when the School the High School School building
that the
on High
note to this outcome. The general public would consider as only a school library.
Ladies were right in thinking any library on the High
that the School square
The
ing was not
resolution
Library the Board
use. a Carnegie
the term "Public part of the Ladies'
overlooked by
in November 1907
of the letter
President
signed by Mrs.
Library
library building on through some municipal
to unite with the Board of Education
in accept- Board square. burned
"Public
It was paid for from Carnegie
$30,000.
As one who passed through the Ann Arbor School system during
the first World War and afterwards down to 1927, I can add a foot-
Then
the old the new
In my youth that institution
ly referred to as the "High School Library", and not until the col-
lection 1957 did
was moved into the new building
on South Fifth Avenue in
build-
Library" come
in obtaining of Education,
of the Ladies' Hutchins
Library and the Carnegie.
Board was sent to Mrs.
Library" was erected as
into universal
which passed acknowledging that "the members of the
-9-
was wide-
a

 Ladies'
Library Association in a beautiful and
initiated the commodious library
sulted
ing the anniversary
Ladies' Library to of the Association,
join
movement which has re- building" and invit-
fortunes.
the offer was accepted.
Inevitably
ed on subscriptions
the fortunes
and annual
of
the Ladies'
Library, which depend-
of a
are
bership is frequently mentioned
income failed to cover expenses
deeded to the Ann Arbor Board of Education.
ciation's
termed, Ladies'
In of the
discovery
"endowment" or "trust
However, the Asso- it was occasionally
expenditures under the Library.
free public particularly
library. From
1916
was reserved to own control for
use for
books learned
for
from the account
1919 it investments of
books that some
moved
shift in transportation
defaulted
trolley
its due date
a victim of the
of a packet that the
of old brokers' bonds of Lansing
receipts
brought the Coldwater Fuel,
ahead, then certainly
1925,
to private cars. With
difficult to
decipher, in the
the declining mem- At the end the building and books were
can be
Tri-City
Railway and 1923, seems
1907-1908
were still
in
the portfolio.
The
precise
dues, 1909
declined
with
the
the competition account books
to
and the
fund", as continuing
information
Monroe Gas came due in 1924-26 and were paid off. The $1000 mort-
gage bond of the
interurban line), due in
Gas,
Light
to have
about
lines
-10-
and
(surely an electric
had
from
such
November 22, 1922 the Ann Arbor Times News reported
slow-moving investments
it is
the Public
though
minutes.
In 1916, the fiftieth
not really strange that on
that the "endow-

  ment funds" still consisted Through the 1920's and
remained very much the same.
of $4,300.
A $1000
S239.60. However, thRt see~s to :"lave been
that the Ladies began shifting
at last moving
took for
to preferred
nearly fifty
stocks main stream
years.
and then
of American finance.
May 15, 1930, it was announced
of Ann Arbor would henceforth books "relating chiefly to the
into the
In the Ann Arbor Daily News of
that the Ladies' Library Association devote its funds to the purchase of
rather
said
general
book donated by the association
titles."
con- money was
the version
fine arts,
It further
tains an engraved
used to buy the book: namely, the
businesses investments
I have
found nota-
than with
non-fiction
or fiction
that "every bookplate
showing
from "Love
which fund the
or
early The
1930's the Ladies still
investment bought
pattern bonds, at
that period mostly of
tions of such diverse
which was called and paid off in full, of $1000 in bonds of the
Stormfeltz-Loveley
and Grand Boulevard,
1947-48 with $955.
called in at its full price. A $1000 bond on the Eaton Tower building in Detroit, purchased in 1928 was liquidated in 1936 in the aftermath of the Great Crash of the Stock Market in 1929 for
commercial foreclosed
of Woodward
paid off in
Furnace was
the last important loss
"Alpheus
of an idea brought up in a meeting of the Ladies' Library Board
-11-
Felch
fund''. This curious
report
in Detroit.
as a $500 bond of Stroh Products,
building at the corner in 1937 and finally
bond of Trumbull
Cliffs
In the to common
1940's they stocks, thus
Maria Palmer"
is a garbled

  of September 26, 1916: "It was suggested that books be
to the different funds as
follows:
credited
Henning,
funds 1930. The
Fiction, ... Palmer,
had long since been merged new turn in the Association's adoption of a new constitutiony
Felch, In actuality
Practical
the separate
Art
...
"
if
not almost
history was marked in 1931 by the
forgotten by
drafted by Mary Campbell Hays which stated that "The purpose of
[Mrs. James Griffith Hays],
this association shall be to build up a Fine Arts Library."
From 1937, when Mrs. John Winter, the Treasurer, reported
that she had been unable to buy some shares of stock in the name of the Association because we were not incorporated, until 1951, after Mrs. Winter had resigned from her office, our investments
were held in her name. In that year we learned that without real
property charitable Ladies'
accumulation of funds wartime shortages.
source of dissatisfaction
exists
Ladies'
that lists the Library only
of the the
we could
body and re-registered our holdings in the name of
Library
During the years of World War II there was an unexpected
place and by insertions
1974 had of material
a typed
It was laid practically
record of all our holdings.
-12-
first
peated
it and now maintain
become
in too small
illegible places. I
with re- discontinued
From
function perfectly
easily as an unincorporated
Association of Ann Arbor.
the
of
for sheer lack of books However, our records will
to buy because continue to be
to later investigators. purchases and sales of
a
A bound volume
from 1952.
the assets
out badly in

  1952,
rent
that
of
nearly
ed the current value to be a little more than $13,000. Four years
immediately
in
a new Public was to revert between the
building,
Ladies' Library
terest
Twelve building erection
Our
tary,
from years to in
such funds had passed
the Michigan
sale of Bell Telephone Co.
the
for
Ladies'
$12,500,
board. Library
and the Avenue.
however, an value of our for the first
annual report might investments, but it
have been made of the cur-
our holdings $10,000.
and
In
their original October of the
cost, which then same year another
amounted to report show-
later in March The next such had skyrocketed
1962 our assets had
statement is dated in July 1965, when our intangibles
expected
The
to more than $27,500. But that was due to an un- development.
accounts
early 1960's.
had contained Library building
our assets
with the
occurred
Board of Education that the Ladies'
happy and for this
bizarre chapter fantastic rise in
in our financial history that
1957 of the agreement had been
new Public
lost among the papers
on
South of a
Fifth former
Mrs. Ida Finney,
papers which were
eventually
secre- deposited in
the
husband, Byron Finney. dent of our organization.
Collections Mrs. Mary
along with the Campbell Hays,
papers
long the
of her presi-
it,
Michigan
Historical
The the
agreement of 1916
was invested
sold and that
realized
were not the in-
time the Treasurer
provision that
in
the event the funds
Library
to the
Library
located the agreement
-13-
and retrieved
was not until
presented a full listing
increased to more than $16.000.
January 1958
in the

 and then tackled the bargain.
the In 1962 School
Board of Education we had the first
Board, actually
to fulfill
of three paid to
their part of yearly $1000
grants
rary
fore
did the rest.
the
For
the rising
Public Lib-
years there-
stock market
Revolving
In
ing our
January
Year by a chart current
felt that
ities.
Three
Fund,
1974 we moved another step toward modernization by chang-
fiscal year of April 1 - March 31 to the calendar year
from the
but the purchases we could conserve
In
those Library
years could
discovery.
supervised our own
we made an buy books
Consequently
by us.
funds and
important
at discounts
in their
those
Public
we could
a great many more books than we could buy on our own. Ever since we have left the purchase of our books to the staff of the library,
achieve.
hands our money bought
subject only
of the Ladies'
ly simplified
~Y issue a check twice a year to the Ann Arbor Public Library
to supervision and additions
Library Association. The arrangement has immense-
our financial records. At the present time we mere-
1 -
year
is
amount and
Mile Island owned by
December 31,
to conform the statement part of the
with modern business
of receipts and expenses,
now,
beyond
as
presented,
permanent equities.
record, of the By 1979 we
value our funds were That year came the
of our invested disaster
various in
to
virtually fail-proof the nuclear power
secur- plant at
which we
General
-14-
Public Utilities, in
The
far below those that
by the Book
Committee
Ann Arbor
practice.

 had invested about $2,400.00. It precipitated our utility stocks whose companies depended plants. We had a loss of more than $7,000.00. 1920's and 1930's the Ladies' losses amounted
the sale of all of in any way on nuclear
However, in the to nearly a third
of their capital.
Our conservative
In 1979 it amounted to one seventh.
portfolio in 1983 consists entirely of highly
rated common stocks, all but one listed on the New York Stock Ex-
change:
and South way Stores,
Eastman Kodak,
West Utilities, Minnesota
Household Standard
Finance, Beatrice Foods, Oil of Indiana, Mobil
Central Oil, Safe- Comerica
Mining and Manufacturing,
only "over-the-counter" holding),
(a Detroit
Paine-Webber
words and we can take pride in the line of investments which our successive treasurers and their committies have chosen.
Our records show that from 1929 to May 1983 we have contribut- ed $32,958.66 worth of books on the fine arts to the Ann Arbor Public Library. In addition, at the end of the Year 1982 the total
Bank, our
Cash Fund. Safety and good return have been our watch-
value of our assets was ly have not done badly.
The endless inflation
a
little more than
$67,774.00.
century out of a
We
compels projected
certain-
us to
of
the twentieth Consequently
keep adding
in 1983 of
on books.
amounts of
later. We hope, that were we able to come back in 2076, we would
-15-
to our capital.
income
something The Ladies money that
more of we
than 1876
control
$5,000.00 would surely
spend
and disburse
more than
a
century
we plan to
be astonished
$4,300.00 at the
Du Pont,
and the

.....__,
·-
 find that the pace, Library.
As
the proceeds of
the Ladies' our present
Treasurer
Library funds are bettering contributions to the Public
a
would like to comment on a affairs of our Association:
year by year,
postscript this
of
special
the dues of ten cents a year paid by each member of the Board who attends the Annual Meeting in the spring. A long commonly-held
view has been that the amount is a quaint legacy from the nineteenth century. A recent theory, that this commentator cannot account for, is that they were payable to the hostess of the day. Our minute
oddity of
the present financial
books
ent.
their
minutes for July 5 record that "It was voted to reduce annual dues
and treasurers'
In 1916, after the Ladies had made building and books to the Ann Arbor
after this year from $1.00
to
ten cents." Since
a small, in 1959,
then each sum labelled
treasurer's report
has listed
variable
the item is at that one
"mem- through It was
reports show that
the facts are quite final arrangements
differ- to give
bers" or "dues".
oversight the dues
the occasion of the adoption of a new constitution
comical that in the minutes for the Annual Meeting,
14th of that year, we can read that "the Board voted that the new
Constitution
Article V of will remain
sake."
be adopted. the By-Laws,
one dime. The
Board
-16-
gladly
were discussed, such as that members' annual dues
endorsed it for tradition's
Once only, were not
missing: meeting.
collected
A few articles which states
and it is quite held on May
Board of Education,
the
annual

 "---'
~
Employer Identification Number:
Accounting Period Ending:
\,.__,I
Based on information supplied, and assuming your operations will be as stated
in your application for recognition of exemption, we have determined you are exempt from Federal income tax under section 50l(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.
Wehave further determined that you are not a private foundation within the meaning of section 509(a) of the Code, because you are an organization described
in section 509(a)(3).
If your sources of support. or your purposes, character, or method of operation change, please let us know so we can consider the effect of the change on your exempt status and fou~dation status. Also, you should inform us of all changes in your name or address.
Generally, you are not liable for social security (FICA) taxes unless you file
a waiver of exemption certificate as provided in the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. If you have paid FICA taxes without filing the waiver, you should contact us. You are not liable for the tax imposed under the Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA).
Since you are not a private foundation, you are not subject to the excise taxes under Chapter 42 of the Code. However, you are not automatically exempt from other Federal excise taxes. If you have any questions about excise, employment. or other Federal taxes. please let us know.
Donors may deduct contributions to you as provided in section 170 of the Code. Bequests, legacies, devises, transfers, or gifts to you or for your use are deductible for Federal estate and gift tax purposes if they meet the applicable provisions of sections 2055, 2106, and 2522 of the Code.
The box checked in the heading of this letter shows whether you must file
Form 990, Return of Organization Exempt from Income tax. If Yes is checked, you are required to file Form 990 only if your gross receipts each year are normally more than $10,000. If a return is required, it must be filed by the 15th day of
of the fifth month after the end of your annual accounting period. The law imposes a penalty of $10 a day, up to a maximum of $5,000, when a return is filed late. unless there is reasonable cause for the delay.
Internal Revenue Service
District Director
Date:
AUG 51983
Ladies' Library
343 S. Fifth Avenue Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Dear Applicant:
Department of the Treasury
P.O.Box2508, Cincinnati,Ohio45201 dlb
(over)
Letter947(D0) (5-77)
Association
of
Ann Arbor
December 31
Form 990 Required:
Person to Contact:
fi Yes
D No
Darlene Keebler Contact Telephone Number:
513-684-2501

   You are not required to file Federal income tax returns unless you are subject to the tax on unrelated business income under section 511 of the Code. If you are subject to this tax, you must file an income tax return on Form 990-T. In this letter, we are not determining whether any of your present or proposed activities
'-' are unrelated trade or business as defined in section 513 of the Code.
You need an employer identification number even if you have no employees.
If an employer identification number was not entered on your application, a number will be assigned to you and you will be advised of it. Please use that number on all returns you file and in all correspondence with the Internal Revenue Service.
Because this letter could help resolve any questions about your exempt status and foundation status. you should keep it in your permanent records.
If you have any questions, please contact the person whose name and telephone number are shown in the heading of this letter.
Sincerely yours,
qv-~
District Director
For tax years ending on or after December 31, 1982, you are required to file Form 990 only if your gross receipts each year are normally more than $25,000, instead of $10,000 as indicated above.
Beginning January 1, 1984, unless specifically the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (social who is paid $100 or more in a calendar year.
cc: Essel W. Bailey, Jr.
300 Federal Center Building 206 South Fifth Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
excepted, you must pay taxes under
security
taxes) for each
employee
Letter 947(00)
(5-77)

    REPORTOF THE BOOKCOMMITTEE,LADIESI LIBRARYASSOCIATION OCTOB2E8R, 1983
A total of twenty-six titles has been acquired since our last meeting in April of this year. These cover a wide variety of subjects from the work of the modern architect, Michael Graves, to a history of wallpapers.
It is worth noting that two of the authors on the list are of local
interest: the work on Augustus Saint-Gaudens was written by a former graduate student at the University of Michigan and the book on the collec- tion of GermanExpressionist paintings in the Detroit Institute of Arts
is by Horst Uhr, a professor of Art History at WayneState University.
At our last meeting it was decided that a special volume or volumes should be acquired by this organization in honor of Mr. Gene Wilson,
the retiring director of the Library. Shortly after that meeting Mrs. Westerman and I met with him to discuss the areas of his special interests. After much persuasion he admitted that photography and the work of the architect, Antonio Gaudi, were two of his hobbies. Fortuitously quite handsome volumes on each of these subjects had just been published:
Gaudi, the Visionary by Robert Descharnes, and Alfred Stieglitz, a representative collection of his photographs, brought out by the National Gallery of Art. These two now have special bookplates telling they
were purchased in his honor.
I should like to have brought these publications to this meeting
but both are in circulation as is true with most of our recent acquisitions. Hence the very few there are here for you to see. It is gratifying indeed to realize the popularity of our contributions to the art collections of the Library.
There is still a healthy balance in our account. Doubtless the usually large number of titles published before the Holidays will take care of much of it.
Respectfully submitted,
Eleanor Collins, Chairman

  REPORTOF THEBOOKCOMMITTEEL,A.DIES'LIBRARYASSOCIATION GCTOBE2R8, 1983
Bishop, Robert & Patricia Coblentz . .American Decorative Arte: 360 year& of creative desi,?1. Abrams, 1982
Ca.randeJtte, Giovanni. Ba.lthus, Drawings and Watercolors. New York Graphic Society, 1982
Daix, Pierre. Cubists and Cubism. Rizzoli, 1982 D:cyfhout, John H. The Work of Augustus Saint-Gaudens.
University Press of New Elil.gland, 1982
Giry, Ma.roel. Fauvism: Origins and DeTeloJ)llle•t. Alpine
Fine Arts, 1982
Goldstein, Ernest. Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream.
Garrud, 1982
Michael Graves: Buildine and Projects, 1966-1981.
Rizzoli, 1983
Gruber, Alain. Silverware. Rizzoli, 1982
Hay-ea, John. The Landscape Rl.inti.nss of Thomas Gainsboroup: A Critical Text and Catalogue RaisonB,. Vol. I & II. Cornell University Preas, 1982
Hoag:xu:a,Yang. The Cla.seioal Ga.rliens of Chin&: History and Desipt Technigues. Van Nostran~ Reinhold, 1982
Hovden.kk, Per. Christo: Complete editions 1964-1982. NewYork University Press, 1982
Laasaigne, Jacques. Rufino Ta.mayo. Rizzoli, 1982
Magnuson, Torg-il. Rome in the Age of :Bemini. Vol. I: From the Election of Sixt\1.e V to tile Death of Urban VIII. Huma.uitiee, 1982
Mutheaius, Stefan. The En&lie.lt Terraeed House. Yale University Presa, 1982
Parks, Stephen. R.C.Go::r.-maAN.ewYorkGrapllictSociety, 1983
Piruzoli-t'Sersteve!UI. The Han Dyna■tz. Rizzoli, 1982
Prea.uci., Tamara &: Serge Gauthier. Ceramiee of the twentieth Century. Rizzoli, 1982
List price $65.00
29.95 65.00
60000
75.00
8.95
45.00 75.00
150.00
29.95
35.00 75.00
45.00
30.00
39.95 50.00
80.00
Coat
$58.50
18.76 58.50
57.00
67.50
8.95
40.50 67.50
150.00
26.96
35.00 67.50
45.00
30.00
72.00
I

   -2-
Reff, Theodo:re. Ma.net and Modern Faria: One Hundred Paintinp, Draw:inp, Prints and. Photog-rapha by
Manet an~ his Contemporaries. University of Cllica.«o Preas, 1983
Richard.eon, Ellca,r & Others. Charles Willaoa ~ale ani his Worli.. Abrams, 1983
40.00
85.00
75.00
50.00

65.00
40.00
64.00
~.GO
$ 1447.75
Strieder, Peter. Albrecht Dtirer: Dra.wing;s. A.baris Books, 1982
Stieglitz, Alfred. Alfred Stie~litz. National Gallery of Art, 1982
Teyn.ao, Fran9oise & Others. Wallpaper: Rizzoli, 1983
The Palaoe Mu..seUlll:Pekin«::Treasures of the :Forbidden City.
Abrams, 1982
Ub.r, Horst. Masterpieces ot German Expreasionism at the
Detroit Inatitut of Arts. Vik~, 1982
The Vatican: Spirit and Art of Christian Rome. New York,
Metropolitan Museum of Art. Abrams, 1982
Weelan, Guy. J. M. W. Tu.mer. Alpine Fi.Ile Arts, 1983
Totals
Paintinp, Prints,
Washing-ton,
A. History.
85.00
46.88
45.00
65.00
36.oo
57.60
54.00 11331.07
List price
Cost

   313-994-2333
Mrs. Scott Westerman 1926 Hampton Court Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Dear Mrs. Westerman:
Ramon R. Hernandez, Director
November 1, 1983
RRH:r
NELLIE S. LOVING BRANCH 3042 Creek Dr.
Ann Arbor. Ml 48104
313-994-2353
NORTHEAST BRANCH
(Plymouth Mall) 2713 Plymouth Rd. Ann Arbor. Ml 48105 313-996-3180
WEST BRANCH
(Westgate Shopping Center) 2503Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor.Ml 48103 313-994-1674
Again,
=ii:-irllJJ
u'7) 1
ANN ARBORPUBLICLIBRARY
343 S. Fifth Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-2293
What a joy it was to attend the Fall meeting of the Ladies' Library Association. Weat the Library are grateful
for all that the Association
over the years. And, what a delight it was for me, personally, to
meet each of you.
It was an enjoyable experience for me, and I would hope that you would pass on both my thanks and my availability at any time to assist the Association in any way.
to each ~d eve~
has done for and meant to the Library
A Community Service of the Ann Arbor Public Schools
Ranhn R. Hernandez
Director

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT April 27, 1984
The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan, held its Spring meeting on Friday, April 27, 1984 at the home of Mrs.
Jonathan Bulkley. Members present Arno Bader, Mrs. Jonathan Bulkley,
were: Mrs.
Mrs. George
John Alexander, Mrs.
Collins, Mrs. Cameron Haight, Mrs. James Plumer, Mrs. Millard Harold Wethey.
Cameron, Miss Hall, Mrs. Hayward
Eleanor Keniston,
Mrs.
composed
raised
own members the fall.
the
but
of our
would be She asked
that $1,800 from our contribution
be last the
sent to year,
amount Miss
library
our income is
After delicious president, Marcy
refreshments
Westerman. Mrs. Wethey
the meeting The minutes
of the report
Fall of
order by meeting were our finances.
our
read and On January re?ort is side auditor
titles
Her
a large surplus are purchased
had report is
to the
to these minutes. Miss
Library's
collection.
approved.
1, 1984
gave a splendid was more than
attached was
of our again in
our balance
to these minutes.
$81,000. The question
of
The complete having an out-
committee will be
discussed and Mrs.
next gift Chairman
this
Miss Helen Pryor, Mrs.
Scott Westerman,
was called to
Wethey felt that best. The question that someone move
July, down somewhat
also down. The financial report and
were unanimously approved.
of the Book
Ann Arbor Public
in the Revolving Fund
and there were various suggestions and queries
Collins,
been added
Committee, reported that 27
attached remains
Collins from which
reported our
that books
whether
-1-
a

 or not some of our money could be used to supply additional
shelving library
the new
especially for large books.
the the hope that
is seriously
book committee appreciation
the Book Committee.
with
solution.
her splendid
Mrs. Arbor
our library,
of Mrs. Committee.
possible legal expense of
every evening
with the help of the Friends of Library Association and public
the absence of Mrs. Huntington, Chair- of officers:
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Chairman of the Book Committee Library Advisory Committee
tight
of $25 might
foremost.
resulting from "street
a positive the Public
support
man,
confident that and the Ladies' looks promising.
budget
with decreasing be in order.
income are Disorders
The Fine Arts overcrowded. She concluded
section of
could provide a to Miss Collins for
The
members expressed work as chairman
their of
the
Keniston gave the report Public Library Advisory
Innes, our
member on concerning Non-resident
Ann
the
fees
people", who have no place to be except in such public buildings as
were discussed along with present additional resulting
actions to be
taken
security
until closing time. The leaking roof will be taken care of by funds of the School Board. The computer system is still undecided on.
Mrs. Keniston added that the new director, Mr. Hernandez, is handling his job very well, is well thought of by his staff, and that he is
and
the guard
thinker, Library future
committee in presented the following slate
Mrs. Scott Westerman ...... Mrs. Kirby Hall ...........
Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal ...... Mrs. Harold Wethey ........ Mrs. Jonathan Bulkley ..... Mrs. Perry Innes ..........
a uniformed from 6 o'clock
the
The nominating
patrolling the building
-2-
Problems

 The slate was unanimously
approved.
new member were presented.
Nominations
for a and
These names are
attached
included in the elected in the
The meeting
according to our until election.
another
was adjourned at 4:45.
tradition
Only one new member
opening.
be
can be
separately
should not
minutes
fall unless there is
Respectfully submitted,
Isabel Haight, Secretary.
P. S. A letter of appreciation from Mr. Hernandez was read and is attached to these minutes.
-3-

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Treasurer's Report January 1 - December 13, 1983
Last year on January 1, 1983 our net worth was almost $68,000
and on January 1, 1984 it stood at more than $81,000, its highest
point ever, but it must be around $75,000 right now in view of
the receding stock market. Our investments continue to be in .
excellent condition. Fortunately,
plant fiasco, we got out of Consumers' Power at the time that we
sold General Public
Utilities exceeds
and Duquesne the shareholders'
long term debt
a billion dollars.
West, which has
remains in very good shape financially
percent. Our current $14,000 investment
Fund is also in a very safe place. Standard and Poor have recent-
ly given public funds. that
treasurer's report.
now
equity Central
by
more than and South
Our one
largely sidestepped
that fund their highest rating,
of investment safety however, our income has
triple A,
in taxable money market
assessment There, received
fallen $300 from in 1982, because of declining interest
the amount
remaining
utility, the atom
we
Now I would like to discuss the matter of the audit of the
constitutions
from 1958 to
until
1963
to
our
surer
that
of her action is that
Bates Van Tyne,
constitution The
trea-
of
year, added it
of the the duties of the treasurer.
irony inept treasurer
rates,
We never had such a provision in any of
1959 when Helen and draughtsman
she was probably the most
-1-
nuclear
Light. Consumers' Power's
in view of the Midland
as a source
and pays a dividend of 9 1/2
in the Paine Webber Cash
in their first
of power,

 that we ever had. She ignored the pattern of
balanced accounts
followed by all our treasurers before
her and a decade.
thereby She
derailed merely listed
our accounting expenditures
system for more than
correctly
out ribbons.
At the bottom of that "Mr. Benz of the
her report of 1960
appeared the
1973, twelve
most
last
who
year hiatus.
and income, and presented
frequently them on
didn't add ephemeral paper,
up
her figures
typed with worn
statement
and I wonder what he could have thought as he looked it over.
it
However, end of bothered was finally
down The
a
to this year,
she never the matter
either.
rectified
bothered again with an audit and that was
the
reinstated
Now, however, that recent constitution year. I managed
item of of 1983, get Mrs.
the
audit
introduced
has
reappeared in while I was away
Manager Bank, to
damage she by Dorothy
balanced
Peckham, form in
else has
of accounting
treasurer
October 1970 after a
to
Sharon the First
Shaw, Assistant of America
of the Packard-Brockman
look over my present account and sign it, but three trips to the bank were necessary to get it done. Twice she was obviously en-
Branch of
Ann Arbor
Bank" had audited
gaged in long negotiations.
not look so formidable, but I still had to wait 15 minutes. That
is just too much effort to make over a non-certified I would like to offer an alternate suggestion.
Historical Society has a constitution which calls
-2-
audit.
The Washtenaw for an auditing
because nobody did to our system
The third time the situation did
from
1969 to
our

 committee
don't have
we could
our board
members
up the
A third
this fashion we finding an outside
the annual audit
of the treasurer's for a special
who are already committee. Since
books. We committee, but
functioning on the two other
to make a big
designate to be
membership
people
enough certain
annual could easily
such an of the treasurer's
auditing committee
have
they would make
president of our
making
group. In effort of
treasurer's member
report,
be the
nothing to do with good auditors.
could manage our affairs without person.
the
Since there
or by whom the audit is to be carried out, it could be informally decided now that this proposed method is acceptable. In the fall
a formal resolution could be offered, and at the next Annual Meet- ing in 1985 it could be made a permanent part of the Constitution.
Are there any comments?
In conclusion I would like someone to move that I be empowered to draw a check in July for $1,800 for the Revolving Fund of the
Ann Arbor Public Library. The total of $4,000 for the year 1984 will be $300 less than our donation in 1983, but our income is down
$300.
Aoril 27, 1984.
Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, treasurer.
-3-
is no provision in our Constitution
about how

                   TREASURER'S REPORT COMPANY
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
January 1 - December 31, 1983
SHARES PRICE DIVIDENDS VALUE
EASTMAN KODAK 100 COMERICA 195 BEATRICE FOODS 100 HOUSEHOLDINTERNAT. 225 CENTRAL and SOUTI~~EST 100 STANDARDOIL INDIANA 400 MOBIL OIL 200 SAFEWAYSTORES 200 MINN. MINING MANUF. so DU PONT 50 PAINE WEBBERCASH FUND
Savings account, December Checking account, II
12/31/83
76 1/8 30 1/2 31 7/8 30 3/4 19 1/2
355.00 411.56 157.50 374.06 178.00
1,120.00 400.00 280.00 165.00 125.00
1,233.92 $ 4,800.04
1983:
$
12/31/83
7,612.50
5,947.50 3,187.50 6,918.75 1,950.00
20,300.00
5,750.00
5,150.00 4,125.00 2,600.00
14,695.91
Total
Income,
Dividends
Unidentfied
January Interest
assets,
1983:
6,
December
31,
1983
$
Dues
Sold - Cash Fund
Balance January 1, 1983
Purchases
Cash Fund
deposit
1983
4,800.04
7.88 81. 24 1. 60
1,200.00 $ 6,090.76
Ann Arbor Library Revolving Fund
Safety Deposit Box Bank fees
2,245.17 Income 6,090.76
Savings Checking
statement
statement
8,335.93 Expenses -5,560.87
/
$ 2,775.06
First
Packard and Brockman
Ann Arbor.
Branch.
of America
31,
$ 78,237.16 832.49
11
1,942.57 81,012.22
4,300.00
11.25
15.70 1,233.92
$ 5,560.87
832.49
1,942.57
$ 2,775.06
Treasurer
Manager,
,
Alice
Sharon Bar.k,
Sunderland
Shaw,
Wethey,
Assistant
50
28
25
82 52
1983
3/4 3/4 3/4 1/2
Expenses,
Cash, December 31, 1983:

                                   '-.../
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION DIVIDENDS 1933
2nd 0uar 3rd ()uar
'---'
Jan 4 Mar 12 Mar 11 Jan
May Sep
First
70.00 41. 25 30.00 92.06 93.51
Apr
Jun
Jun
Feb
70.00
41.25
35.00
-.._/
COMPANY 1st Quar
4th Quar
Total 355.00 411.56 157.50 374.06 178.00
1,120.00 400.00 280.00 165.00 125.00
1,233.92
81. 24 1. 60
11.25
4,300.00 Treasurer
Eastman Comerica Bea Fds Hous Int Cen So W St O Ind Mobil Safeway MM M
Du Pont Cash Fd
Interest Dues Comerica Safeway Accounts Safety
Taxpayer Paid to
Jan 2 Apr 130.00
Jan 6 Apr 97.50
Jan 2 Apr 37.50
Jan 15 Apr 92.81
Feb 28 May
44.50
Mar 10 Jun
280.00
Mar 10 Jun 100.00
2 Jul 1
75.00 75.00
4 Jul 5
97.50 97.50
1 Jul 1
40.00 40.00
15 Jul 15 92.81 92.81
31 Aug 31 44.50 44.50
10 Sep 10 280.00 280.00
10 Sep 12 100.00 100.00
4 Jul 1
7().00 70.00
12 Sep 12 41.25 41.25
11 Sep 12 30.00
Oct Oct Oct Oct Nov Dec Dec Oct Dec Dec Apr Aug Dec
3
3 21.56 97.50
1
15
30
12
280.00
12 100.00
4
12
14
(Detroitbank)
Stores Stock
Stock Split
Dividend 9 100 shares
at
26.25
in Bank: Deposit box No.
20-101380-6;
(Packard
Savings: and Brockman
00-938522-6
Branch)
90.49 108.50 122.23 97.42
Mar Jul Nov
30.00 103.24 106.09
97.10
shares
104.32
95.46 123.50
Jun
Oct
of America Bank
Paid June identifying number: A.A. Pub. Lib., Jan.
1983 38-60555155
$1,800; Jul. Alice
Now:
33
9 /
$2,500. Sunderland
$
Wethey,
75.00
40.00 95.63 44.50

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         I
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THE NEW YORK TIMES, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1984
- .. ...
Ne-wYorkStock Exchange
CONSOLIDATED TRADING/
.-
1.300 ~J~I .,1,250
HIGH rCLOSING LOW
I
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WEEK ENDED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1983
II,
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1,200
1,150
1,100
1.050
1,000
950
900
850
800 180
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I
I

 REPORTOF THEBOOKCOMMI'ITEEL,ADIES'LllffiARYASSOCIATION APRIL27, 198.i
Since our last meet~ in October twenty-seven titles have been added to the art collection of the Public Library. Once a.gain a fairly wide range of subjects is represented - from a volume on that interesting and spectacular-looking sculptor, Louise Nevelson, to two publications
on quite diverse architects, Sir Christopher Wren and H. H. Richardson. Someof these titles are here for the group to see. Webrought along as many as we could carry J
In spite of over eleven hundred dollars having been spent there is at this moment a balance in our funds of more than three thousand dollars. However, Mrs. Chen has just given me a list of a dozen or mo:re titles
that she suggests for purchase.
As I pass on the chairmanship of this committee I should like to ex,:ress m:ygratitude to the other members, Helen Hall and Carol Plumer, . for their kind assistance, and thanks also to the various meobers of the association who, from time to time, have called me with suggestions.
Please also let me record a special thank you to two meobers of the Library Staff, Mrs. Suzy Chen for her willingness to accept our recommendations and for keeping an eagle eye on publication lists
and Mrs. Jeanette Duncan for doing all the clerical work in placing orders and for her very careful book-keeping.
Respectfully submitted,
U~ <£~ Eleanor Collins, Chairman

    REPORTOF THE BOOKCOMMITTEE,LADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATION APRIL27, 1984
.Adams,W. H. Jefferson's Monticello, Abbeville, 1983 .Angulo Iniguez, Diego and others. Bartolone Esteban
List price
35.00
45.00
20.00
40.00
Cost
35.00
41.40
11.11
32.72
29.95
37.50
67.9-4
«.64
32.50
29.96 67.94
32.69
36.00
31.9-4
Murillo, Abram Schram, 1983 Beattie, Susan. The New Sculpture,
Yale
University
Press, 1983
Cole, Bruce. The Renaissance Artist at Work froll
Pisano to Titian, Haxjer & Row, 1983
Darby, Michael and others. The Victoria and Albert MuseUll, England •s Treasury of the World's
Finest Decorative .Arts, Stud.io: Vikinc, 1983
Detroit Institute of .Arts. Quest for Unity:
.Anerican Art between World's Fairs 1876--1893,1983 29.95
Downes, Kerry. Architecture of Wren, Universe Books,
1982
Francia., Peter de. Ferriand Leger, Yale University
Press, 1983 35.00
Girouari, Mark. Robert Smythson anfl the Elizabethan
Country House, Yale University Press, 1983 35.00
Gord.on, Robert and Andrew Forge. Monet, Abrams, 1983 75.00 Hibbard., Howard. Caravaggio: Icon, Harper & Row,
Dube, Wolf-Dieter. Skira/Rizzoli,
Expressi~sts 1983 7 \
and Expressionisl!S,
75.00 Ellery, Marc. :Furniture by Architects, Abra.as, 1983 49.50
1983
Hiessin~r, Kathryn B. and Geor'8 H. Marcus, ecis. Desi&n since 1945, Fhilad.el1hia MueeU11of Art/ Rizzoli, 1983
40.00
40.00
31.85
35.00
Ka.can, Andrew w. Paul Klee/ Cornell University Press,
.Art and. Mo.sic, 1983
Jones, Roger and. Nicholas Fenny. Raphael, Yale University Press, 1983
37.50

      I.ee,Sheman
Japanese
and others.
Art, Cleveland
University Press, 1983
Los AJl«eles County M.1seu. of Art. An Elep.nt Art: Fashion a.no.Fantasy in the Eighteenth Centuxy, Abra.a, 1983
Meyer, Susan B. Treasury of the Great Children •s :Book Illustrators, Abra.as, 1983
Morcan, William. The Almighty Wall: the .Architec- ture of Henry Vaughan, Massa.cli.usetts Institute of Technoloa, 1983
Ochsner, J. F. H. H. Richardson: Coaplete .Architec- tural Works, M3.ssacbusetts Institute of Tech- noloa, 1983
Robertson, M. G. The Sculpture of Palenque, Princeton University Press, 1983
Nevelson•s
World., Hudson Hill,
$55.20
47.32
35.81
40.26
40.50
Li.pr.,.an, Jean.
Lodder, Christina. Russian Construotivisa, Yale
Rosenthal, Michael. Constable: the Painter
his Ie.nQsca;ee, Yale University Press, 1983
Stan«, Rag:na.. F.dvari. Munch: the Man and his Art, Abbeville, 1979
Walker, John. Portraits: 5,000 Years, AbraJ1s, 1983
92.75
26.66
49.50
-2-
Reflections of Reality in Museumof Art, 1983
1983
$60.00
75.00
40.00
45.00
30.00
50.00
92.75
29.95
55.00
55.00
$1251.00 81107.51
and
45.09

   Alice
Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.
1940
1948
1951
1951
1951
1956
1957
1957
1960
1960
Wethey
Stanley Florida,
2105
1926
1510
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Representative, Library
Johnnie Alexander (Mrs.
Advisory
Members
John)
Arno)
Jonathan) 1915 George) 1515
703 2222 Cameron) 2112
Bulkley Innes
663-5879 663-5898 769-3115 662-9109 663-6255 995-0508 663-4520 668-6331 662-2800 668-8033 761-8331 662-3902 662-4164 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-9723 668-6225
Ave., Hendersonville,
Marian Bader Trudy Bulkley
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs. Amnon) (Mrs. Scott) (Mrs. Harold)
and their (1940-1971),
(1966-1978), 28739.
(1951-1968),
788 285
Margaret Eleanor Betty Isabel Helen Kirby Betty Trudy Joan Roberta
Zibby Oneal Carol Plumer Mary Pryor
Prue Rosenthal Marcy Westerman
Cameron Collins
Gosling Haight
Hall
Hall. Hayden Huntington
Innes Keniston
715
12 Geddes Heights
Howard
North Carolina,
Charles New Jersey,
Hayden
Hall, Helen Haight
Plumer Wethey Collins Alexander Keniston
Innes Pryor
Rosevelt Place,
SC, Montclair,
Membership
and Officers Officers
1984-1985
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Chairman of the Book Committee
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs. Jonathan Mrs. Perry
Arlington Orchard Hills Scottwood Ottawa
s. Forest Fuller Rd. Vinewood
s. Forest
Hill St.
Geddes Ave.
Hill St.
Fuller
Onandaga
Astor Dr.
Spring Valley Devonshire Rd Hampton Ct. Cambridge Rd.
Emeritae
Dodge 32789.
years 315
213 5
as active members
Peckham Vibbert
Joseph) 1530 David) 2037 Perry) 2100 Hayward) 2222 Robert) 501 James) 1280 Millard) 715
Rd.
07042.
Year of Election to Membership
Council
New England London Road,
Winter Park,
1962 Bader
1962 Cameron
1970 Huntington 1970 Oneal
1972 Westerman 1976 Hall, Korby 1982 Bulkley
1982 Gosling
1982 Rosenthal
Scott Westerman Kirby Hall Amnon Rosenthal Harold Wethey

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Secretary's Report
October 20, 1984
The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan, held its fall meeting on Friday, October 20, 1984 at the home of Mrs.
Cameron Jonathan Perry Pryor, dent,
Haight.
Bulkley, Mrs. George Cameron,
Mrs. John Alexander, Mrs. Ms. Betty Gosling, Mrs.
Innes, Mrs.
Mrs. Amnon
Harold tasty Marcy
Hayward Rosenthal, Wethey,
refreshments Westerman,
Keniston, Mrs. Secretary,
James Plumer, Mrs. Mrs. Scott Westerman,
Mrs. After
Treasurer. the
meeting minutes
was called
of the Spring
to
Millard Presi-
order
meeting were
Mrs.
assets have increased
another splendid report of our
finances. Our
Wethey gave
Alexander
The complete report is attached
Members present were:
president,
read and
volumes
painstakingly reviewed,
Trudy Bulkley made a motion of deep gratitude
her work in redoing these volumes. This great perpetuates an organization.
approved.
of the Ann Arbor
asked committee.
Bulkley
At
that Ladies'
the Secretary
The time
introduced
Library Association that had been
often retyped and replenished by Mrs. Wethey. to Alice Wethey for dedication is what
$155.23, up slightly
over our Oneal to
January become
balance.
Mrs. Wethey has
of her finance
accounts. Mrs.
our account to be given to the Ann Arbor Public Library in January. The report and the amount of our next gift were unanimously approved.
Mrs.
and
They will also act
seconded a motion
Mrs.
members for our
to these minutes.
-1-
as
to draw $2200-$2500 from
auditors
all the
by our

 The idea books, something
of
providing additional shelving for our extra
large We
Bulkley
Bulkley,
out about it Chairman of
been received The amount
the Book by the
Committee, reported that Library since our last meeting
$3000 at the various magazines
Mrs.
badly
needed by is permissible
the library, came up again.
determined said she
Mrs.
twenty books have
on April 27, 1984.
about
the
priate
icals as The Smithsonian, The New Yorker, and the New York Times Sunday Book Review, among others. Mrs. Cameron asked if we ever replace books that are worn out or lost, and Mrs. Pryor asked if we ever purchased two copies of a book that we knew would be particu-
that would find
in for us.
our By-laws, and Mrs.
this
spent was $1178.84, the balance
moment.
we read to find choices that might be
for the Association to purchase. She suggested such
larly popular. Mrs. Bulkley said she would ask
ence librarian,
Committee Report Mrs. Innes,
who helps us make our purchases.
Mrs. Wethey It is an excellent
handed out
"complete
and read the attached review of our officers
Report.
is attached.
representative
to the Ann Once again
They have from $0.30 to $0.70 and have a non-resident
Arbor the
Public decreasing
Library Ad- budget
visory. Council,gave
was the prime problem discussed.
her report.
and our current
Westerman commended Mrs. Wethey on a job so well done.
-2-
conception
of what the positions
entail." Mrs.
Bulkley encouraged us to
is look in
appro- period-
Suzy Chen the refer- The complete Book
issued new fee of $35.00.
fines,
Historian's
and membership
up

 We then elected Mrs. Haskell Newman to be a member of the Ladies'
Library Association. She will be
Respectfully
Prudence
invited to join by the secretary.
submitted,
L. Rosenthal, Secretary.
-3-

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Report of the
Twenty last meeting
Book Committee
(2) books have been on April 27, 1984.
October 19, 1984
ancient, from fine
arts. Most
to books deal
arts to
and American art,
of the
volume on Chinese
with
art
book
(16)
$1,100. We approach the season of holiday
who board are
scans library and member to look
trade publications for titles. I urge each for appropriate books from whatever sources
European
and another on pre-Columbian.
for the Youth Department,
but there
Once
Realms of
is one again we
Fantasy.
our account.
approximate publications
In July 1984
$1,800
was deposited in
About cost will with a
books are
currently
on order. Their
decorative
received
Titles
by the Library since
our
healthy balance of around
As I assume the chair of the Book Committee I would like to
thank Eleanor Collins for her friendly and invaluable help in pass- ing on the responsibility. I also want to thank Betty Gosling,
Helen Hall and Carol Plumer who will be serving with me on the committee. We are ably assisted by Suzy Chen, Reference Librarian,
available to the Book Committee.
you and please forward Thank you.
Respectfully Trudy Bulkley,
these recommendations to
submitted, Chair
$3,000.
range
from modern art
have obtained
a
sixteen be
very

 Idea of Chicago
Joannides, With a
Modern Press,
Paul, Complete
the
of Raphael: University
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Books received
Alcina Franch, Jose, Abrams, 1983
by the
Pre-Columbian
Library
Art,
May 1984--
August
LIST $125.00
65.00
95.00
29.95
17.95
29.95
42.50
22.50
110.00
90.00
150.00
120.00
40.00
36.50
1984
paid
$107.16
58.50
85.50
14.25
10.25
25.83
43.00
20.25
99.00
90.00
153.75
102.00 55.25
32.85
Adriani, Gotz, Abrams, 1983
Cesanne
Watercolors,
Cahn, Walter, Romanesque
Bible Illustration
1983
Cornel University
Doumas, Christos Ancient Aegean:
Press,
1967-1979. by Norton),
1983
Edwards, Realm of
Foshay, Ella Flowers
and Robert Holdstock,
Guilbaut, Serge,
How New York Stole Art, University
G.,
Thames and Hudson (distr.
M., Reflections in American Art,
of Nature: Knopf, 1984
Ginsburg, Madeleine, Victorian Photographs, Holmes and Meier,
• of California Kapr, Albert,
History of the Roman
King, David J
canum: An Index and Bibliography
Castles of England, Kras International,
Wales and
2 vols., 1983
Studio, Abrams,
The
Metropolitan Museum
Lamps of Tiffapy
Manet Museum
Montias,
in Delft, Princeton
of now
Art, Catalogue Current at
Exhibition
Thera: Excavations
Malcoln
Fantasy, Doubleday, 1983
1983
The D~aw~ngs
Catalogue,
Press, 1983
The Art
Anatomy,
Letter Forms, K. G.
Pompeii of the at Akrotiri
of Lettering: The
Dress: in 1983
and Aesthetics
Saur, 1983
Cathcart, Castellarium
Angli- of the
Islands,
1983 of
this
Artisans
Press, 1982
John Michael,
Artist and
University
of
the
of

   Pereire, Anita,
Gardens of France, Crown, and David Leatherbarrow, eds.,
1983
40.00 45.00
75.00
85.00
19.95
40.00 $1279.30
34.00 40.50
64.65
85.00
21.40
36.00 $1178.84
Powell, Helen Masterpieces
Abbeville,
Praz, Marie, Interior
Nouveau,
Provoyeur, Cha~all:
Alpine
of Architectural 1983
Drawing,
Vidual
Paul, 1983
An Illustrated
Decoration from
Thames and Hudson, 1982
Art
Pierre and Biblical
Marc Chagall, Interpretations,
Fine Arts Collection
Vollmer, John, Silk Roads, China Ships, Royal Ontario Museum, 1983
Wade, Nicholas, The Art and Science
of Kegan
Illusions, Routledge and
October 19, 1984
Report of the Book Committee Trudy Bulkley, Chair
History of Pompeii to

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Books on order for the library, October 1984
Bony, Jean, French Gothic Architecture of the 12th and 13th Centuries, California, 1983. $115.00
Cohan, Arthur ·A.·, Herbert Bayer, The Complete Works (Bauhau_s) , M.I. T.
Press, 198 .
Demos, Otto, The Chicago Press,
Gaugh, Harry F., Haak, Bob, The
de Koening, Abbeville, Dutch Painters
of
Century,
Abrams, 198 . $65.00
Hawthorne, Don and Sam Hunter,
Liang, Ssu-Ch~eng, A Pictorial Study of the Development·of of its Types, M.I.T Press,
George Segal,
History of Chinese Architecture:
$50.00 • Mosaics
Willem Golden Age:
University
1983. $29.95 the Seventeenth
of San Marco in Venice, l98 . $300.00
of
$65.00
A System and the Evolution
McShine, Kynaston, An International Surve Sculpture, Museum of Modern Art, 1984.
Monnier, Genevieve, Pastels: From the 16th Skira/Rizzoli, 198 . $37.50
of Recent 25.00
Paintin and
its Structural 1984. $45.00
Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Histor
and the Collection,
National Gallery of
Newman, Sasha, ed., (Norton, distr.)
Abrams·, 1984. 65.00
Perlman, Robert
Rostov, Charles
Schultz-Hoffmann, Norton Press,
White, Barbara $67.50.
Henri: His Life and Art, $39.50
Prepared for the Report of the Meeting of October 19, 1984
Trudy Bulkley, Chair of
Art, Watteau
Exhibition Catalogue, 1984. $40.00
Bennard: The Late 198 . $40.00
Paintings, Thames and Hudson
I., Chinese Carpets,
1983. $60.00
(100th Anniversar ),
Max Beckmann:
Abrams,
A Retros ective
198 . Ehrlich,
65.00 Renoir:
His Life and
Letters,
Total:
Abrams, 198 •
$1109.45
Book Committee the Book Committee
Rizzoli, 198 .
to the 20th Century,

  TREASURER'S REPORT
A summary of our point in our financial
investments history.
apparently Five of our
October 19, 1984
indicates another high
But we shouldn't our own investments
be too sanguine. A broader view than that of
Sec-
today. Our
vulnerable,
be an isolated
Journal a week
recession is already here
itself shows evidence of being very
of banks in Chicago are proving not to
On the Forum page of the Wall Street the blunt announcement that the next
the third contraction in only five years,
financial system for the troubles
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
stocks are down from their value on January 1st and only four are up, yet our assets have
actually increased
uary. Because
international
million dollar
up off the coast of Normandy, we sold three quarters of our holdings there and put it at a much higher dividend rate in the Paine Webber Cash Fund, a move which probably accounts for the increase. Since the stock market averages show about a 10 point dip since January,
we have had a bit of luck. Our assets now stand at $81,167.45.
slightly, $155.23,
over their Standard Oil
total worth in Jan- of Indiana in an over the multi-
of the
law suit with the French
embroilment of
government cost of the clean-up after one of
their tankers broke
is not at all reassuring that have failed to gain
as to the future. strength with the
tors of the
apparently
industries
from a peak of 2.25 million housing starts in February to 1.5 million
economy improving like steel
economic climate include
and machine tools. Home building has fallen
phenomenon. ago appeared
--
agriculture and basic

  which is hitting an economy that has not satisfactorily recovered from the two previous setbacks.
Now for the question of the annual audit, which was discussed
at the April meeting. It can be resolved, I find, by referring to
our Constitution
of 1983 and to a resolution of the Executive
Committee Officers Treasurer that "The and shall business
of shall
and
Executive Committee shall consist of
a
Committee on and has not
September since
22, 1952, that date been
At
the following resolution
was "That any
cancelled
Committee consisting
stock and securities Arbor."
adopted three
In notarized
tion.
for
duties obviously
with the audit
that the executive
the
lies
the annual
committee
of the books of the Treasurer. This
1952. Article consist of the
IV
of the Constitution President, Vice
states President,
that "The Secretary,
Chairman of the Book Committee~
Article VII specifies all elected officers to transact any
convene on in the interim meeting of
the
the
of
owned by the
or amended:
officers authorized
Library
Treasurer broker
ultimate
of
the Executive
to sell and Association
include settles
sale this
it
or transfer authority
is clear
call of between
Executive
the President meetings."
five are
hereby Ladies'
the to the
assign of Ann
any stock copy of
Consequently Treasury
$2,200 to $2,500 for the Public Library in January. Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, treasurer.
must present a handling the transac-
responsibility
and therefore its
the matter of the audit.
To conclude I would like to be empowered to draw a check of

   .___.President Vice-President
Secretary Treasurer
Book Selection
MembershiQ_and_Officers Officers
Committee Committee
1984-1985
Mrs Scott Westerman
Library
Jc::ihnni Marion TrL1dy Margaret Eleanor Betty
Isabel
Helen
f<i rby
Betty
Trudy
Joan
Roberta
Zibby
Carol
Advisory
Jonathan Perry
Blvd Hills
Bulkley Innes
Dr.
Mary Pryor
-----
Prue Rosenthal Marcy Westerman Alice Wethey
1280 Astor Dr. 715 Spring Valley
--
e Ale}: and er Bader
Bulkley Cameron
Collins Gosling
Haight Hall
Hall Hayden Huntigton
<Mrs. John) <Mrs. Arno) <Mrs. Jonathan) <Mrs. George)
<Mrs. Cameron)
285
Orchard
1915 Scottwood
663-5879 663-5898 769-3115 662-9109 663-6255 995-0508 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 668-8033 761-s:;31 662-3902 662-4164 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-9723 668-6225
Innes Keniston
Oneal Plumer
(Mrs. Joseph)
(Mrs. David)
<Mrs. Perry)
(Mrs. Hayward) 2222 (Mrs. Robert)
Mrs. Stanley Mrs. Howard Mrs. Charles
1940 Dodge 1940 Haydon 1948 Hall,
1951 Haight 1951 Plumer 1951 Vibbert 1<;>51 Wet.hey 1956 Collins 1957 Al e>:ander 1957 Keniston 1960 Innes
LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Dodge Peckham Vibbert
Winter 5C Montclair,
Park, Fla. 32789
(Emeritus H.
1971)
1968)
1960 Pryor
1962 Bader
1962 Cameron
1966 Peckham <Emeritus 1978) 1970 Huntington
1970 Oneal
1972 Westerman 1976 Hall, I<. 1982 Bulkley 1982 Gosling 1982 Rosenthal
<Emeritus
(Mrs. James)
(Mrs. Mi 11 ard)
(Mrs. Amnon)
(Mrs. Scott)
(Mrs. Harold) 1510
Emeritus_Members
315 New England 213 London Rd., 5 Rosevelt Pl.,
Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.
788 Arlington
Kirby Hall Amnon Rosenthal Harold Wethey
Year_of_Election_to_MembershiQ
Ottawa South
Drive Forest
1515
703
2222
2112
715
12 Geddes Heights 1530 Hill St. 2037 Geddes Ave. 2100 Hill St.
Fuller
Rd. Blvd.
Vinewood South Forest
Fuller Rd 501 Onondaga
2105 1926
Devonshire Rd Hampton Ct
Hill St.
Ave., Hendersonville,
N.C. N.J.
28739 07042

  HISTORIAN'S REPORT
Our president,
October 19, 1984
time
and
to properly
Today I will our current
proof-read present
conception distributed
and was founded in
and myself.
The Board of the Ladies'
entire roster of the twenty
them. review
ident has presidents, Association held by
already secretaries
copies treasurers
of
of the Library offices
our
a summary of
members since the procedures
1866, and 1954. This
also a chart needs to be
of the
supplemented by
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Marci Westerman, has shown around the three
loose-leaf binders
tary's records from 1929 to 1983, finished last June.
has been prepared for binding, which will be done as soon as I have
containing my typewritten
of the secre- A duplicate
a
membership Our pres-
of what the
positions entail. my recent lists
since the Ladies'
and
ship as of 1984, a summary worked out jointly by Marci Westerman
copies
of our officers and
customary practices of our member-
Library members of the
Executive
vice-president, should be
Advisory
now elected along with the officers, has never been a member of the Executive Committee.
The Executive Committee carries the ultimate responsibility for the whole organization and its finances. A resolution adopted on
Committee consisting treasurer and
of the five chair?erson
book committee.
It
pointed Council,
of the out here that the representative
to the Library
or Committee, as it is alternately
called, although
-1-
Association comprises the
organization, officers,
with president,
an

  September 22, that any three
papers
sequently
urer's
the treasurer duties lies
committee
to
are transfer
empowered to sign the securities. Con-
had an office urers present
finance
extremely variable longer than other
term, but she customarily remains in
1952 and never members of this
enabling
among its
since then cancelled or amended states
annual books. The President,
have held· treasurer
committee
their
is
she
officers. Since posts from one to
our foundation twenty-four years
our trea- and our
now in her 12th term.
has two members to
venes them to do so. In our one hundred and eighteen years of
existence we have
The Chairperson of
in compiling lists for However, the job is less librarian receives full
had only
the Book Committee
the librarian of
the Ann sounds,
publications
Arbor Public because the from the
Library.
order
major
onerous than
it
notices
of new
-2-
buy or
the obligation
to
audit the treas-
who presides
office varying from one to ten years with the short span of one or
two years predominating forty presidents.
The Secretary, who
correspondance, in earlier longest being twenty-three two secretaries.
recently. Down to the
keeps the minutes and
present
we have had
years years.
often served Since 1866
for long
we have
periods,
had twenty-
the
at the meetings,
has had terms of
The Treasurer, who oversees
cial status depend, and who keeps the books of the board, has always
the investments
on which our finan-
conducts necessary
the
fourteen treasurers.
also has her own assistants
As chairperson of assist her when she con-

 American publishers and
committee may change or
Library does the actual
priated each year for that purpose by the Association. It is the
duty of the chairperson of this committee to compile a list of the purchases each year as part of her yearly report to the board. Since 1954 her term has varied from four to six years.
The representative
to which
liaison with
can help on one or another of the
rela-
of
representative's
from the institution
reports to
we would be which all of
working in our gifts functions
complete isolation are channelled.
only briefly each
a
member important
makes up lists of her own, which the book augment as it sees fit. Further, the Public purchasing of all the books from funds appro-
the Library
has existed only since
tively new
the present
She is not
gives us an
It enables us to make informed decisions as to whether or not we
position, Public
Library building of the executive
on South committee,
Fifth
yet her position
which
The nominating
year, has a key role in that it determines which members are asked
to carry
The membership, inasmuch
committee,
the doings
Library's
of the Public Library.
on these important positions.
as it is limited to twenty women,
needs to consist of truly active
regularly as possible the two meetings a year and to take part in the discussions in a productive way, in other words to conduct busi- ness. The members must also be able, as well as willing, to serve
at various times as officers, or as committee members. In periods
of slowly changing membership it is likely that various individuals
-3-
Advisory Council is a the dedication
Avenue in 1957.
projects. Without our
members, who expect to attend as

  will be asked to do more than one job or repeat an office they have
held previously. However, actually held all four of
occasion during the tea hour held before the board is called to order.
treasurer and
a person's organization, membership
interests,
as possible and likely
the quality
contributions and diversity
but a dence obvious
general interest of suitability
that likeability
in art provides in a prospective
and social
by no member.
chairperson in our entire
and they
are the
only two
It can be seen from the above description
With very few exceptions
for enjoyed whose
nearly
their
one hundred membership in the
twenty years Ladies' Library
them elsewhere
women have Association, have always
thoroughly and those
history.
only two of our present members have
the chief positions,
of the book committee,
president, secretary,
that every meeting
is a business meeting, but it is also an exceedingly pleasant social
husbands'
written very regretful letters of
resignation.
We should have several criteria for choosing new members. We
are not impose
It has been membership No written
organization, selectivity in both considerate
but the small membership does
an exclusive a degree of thought
filling each and good
vacancy as it occurs. policy to make the
discussion
and of these
experiences, in order to enhance
records
We need to be as objective
discussions
matter.
of our
selection
a
private are
and unpublished
kept at any time. about our assessments
to of
means sufficient evi-
It further should be
our It is true that we buy only books on the fine arts for the Public Library,
and to insure the continuity
of the
Association.
-4-
careers took
charm are also
not enough if we
and

  are to survive as an institution. We must have people with the skills to carry out the various jobs, or at least more than one of them,
and also the willingness to undertake them from time to time.
As part of this report I would like to comment on the accom- plishment of our second secretary (or was she really the third? -- I must recheck on that period and her dates), Mrs. Martin Luther D'Ooge, who held her office at least from 1876 to 1886. Mary Wor-
cester
Professor
Michigan
took up the task of
Her report of that year consisted of the history of the organization 's
was born D'Ooge
in
of the classics at the age of
in 1873
twenty-four.
of the Ladies'
Apparently in 1876 she Library Association.
Leicester,
Massachusetts, department
in 1849 and married of the University of
secretary
first ten years and
associations in the
celebrations of the
have already seen, I am now passing around in a xerox copy. It re-
mains a foundation
in 1881, at the age of
report published in the
commemorated the fifteenth
report also Marci Westerman has distributed copy. In 1915 Professor D'Ooge left her
Five years the remarkable
April 13, 1881, Association.
later secretary's
which That
was printed in a volume of histories of similar State of Michigan as part of the Centennial United States. Her essay, which many of you
of all more recent histories. thirty-two, she wrote
Ann.Arbor Register of anniversary of the
She must have continued as a member
haps on the general board, but at present I have no further record
of her. Mary Worcester D'Ooge died in 1946 at the age of ninety-seven in the house on Washtenaw Avenue, which her father had had built for
-5-
to widowed.
all of you
in xerox
of the Association
and per-

  for her as a wedding present. It was sold and demolished after her death and a Lutheran chapel now stands on the site. Her age as our secretary refutes the commonly held belief today that our organiza-
tion has always been one of old ladies.
The dynamic women who
directed
were in
to read in directors
powers
whom shall be that the three
that we should "young" to us
we need maturity.
of us able to acquire many more years of education than were avail- able to Mary D'Ooge and consequently all of us mature considerably later than did our early predecessors.
An account of the circumstances of my own joining of the Ladies' Library Board may not be amiss here. I was forty-one with no record
their
shall
prime and revised
additional members be young ladies." It is something
remember in choosing our new members. Of course means someone in her late thirties or forties, for
the course of
the fled9ling even very
constitution from fifteen
its early It is instructive
years
the was
young women. of 1887, in
which
"The corporate
increased be vested
to eighteen:
eighteen directors, six of
of having son, when
been part of Mrs. Winter
any civic effort. I also had a telephoned me, inviting me to become
library through
in a Board
elected at each annual meeting, it being understood
My initial
response
was incredulous.
":Sut the Ladies'
of
At this distance from frontier life we are all
whatever
year-old
a member.
Library doesn't exist. I had ballet lessons as a child in its build- ing." Mrs. Winter quickly disabused me of that notion and persevered with her invitation. As a neighbor she had known all about me when
I was growing up and perhaps my Ph.D. in history of art made me
-6-
the board of

  me eligible in her eyes.
simply wasn't impressed.
with my rapidly expanding
to take no, and finally I said I would think it over. After I put down the receiver I told my husband what I knew about the Ladies' Library. I said it couldn't be anything but a dying organization
as officers held by
all of us since 1954 shows all of my working
as historian
I joined. As Ladies's Library surprising. Twen-
career
from
surely the
my thirty-two
ty-seven of them have committee, president, historian
as a member,
1967 to the present. I got
most unwilling years on
person board
the been
have been spent as secretary, and treasurer.
rather
As a determined non-joiner of clubs I Further I was very busy with my baby and job as my husband's secretary. She refused
and before I knew it I would be saddled with the treasury. At that
to expire and I wouldn't have the slightest idea funds left behind. A few days later Mrs. Winter
point it was likely
what to do with the
telephoned again and that time captured me. The chart of positions
with the exception of my years interested after
ever to join the
A last
to this report. The D'Ooge
reminiscent of the covers of sarcophagi,
next to my own family plot in Forest Hill Cemetery. So the epitaph of our earliest historian of more than a hundred years ago and that of her successor of today will remain only three or four yards apart until Forest Hill itself disappears.
Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, Historian.
bit of historical
memorabilia can gravestones, two
provide a conclusion
-7-
chairman of the book
great granite
happen to be located right
slabs

                                LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
OFFICE HOLDERS 1954-55
to
1969-70
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN
BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
1954-55
Hays
Frayer
Wethey
Hayden
1955-56
Hays
Frayer
Wethey
Hayden
1956-57
Hays
Frayer Dodge
pro-tern
Hayden
1957-58 Hays
Frayer
Wethey
Hayden
1958-59 Haight Frayer Vibbert
Van Tyne
1959-60
Haight Frayer Vibbert
Van Tyne H. Hall Haight
1967-68 Alexander Keniston
Cameron
1960-61
Frayer Dodge Vibbert
Van Tyne Wethey Alexander
1968-69
Alexander
Keniston
Cameron
1961-.62 Frayer
Dodge
Plumer Van Tyne
Wethey Alexander
1969-70
Bader
Keniston
Cameron
H. Hall or her apEointee 2 from 1978 a separate elective office.
Haight
Position dates from 1959-60; held by president ex-officio
Haight
Haight
Haight
.1962-63 1963-64 1964-65
Frayer Plumer Plumer
Dodge Alexande.r Alexander
Vibbert Youtz Bader pro-tern
Van Tyne Innes Innes Wethey Collins Collins Frayer Plumer Plumer
1965-66
Wethey Alexander
McKevitt
1966-67 Wethey
Alexander McKevitt
))
)
Haight Haight McI<evitt McKevitt Peckham
Collins Collins Bader Bader Collins
Plumer Plumer Keniston Keniston Innes - ---·-----
-1-

                     LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
OFFICE HOLDERS 1970-71 to 1985-86
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
1970-71 Bader Keniston Cameron Peckham Mellencamp Innes
1978-79
Cameron
Collins
Westerman
Wethey Innes
K. Hall
1971-72 H. Hall
Cameron Huntington Peckham
Mellencamp H. Hall
1979-80
Innes
Oneal
Westerman Wethey O'Brien
K.Hall
1972-73 1973-74 H. Hall Hayden
Cameron Mellencamp Huntington Huntington
Peckham Wethey Mellencamp Wunsch
H. Hall H. Hall
1980-81 1981-82
Innes Oneal
Oneal Westerman Gramentine Gramentine
Wethey Wethey
O'Brien Collins I<. Hall K.Hall
-2-
1974-75
Pryor Mellencamp Huntington
Wethey
Wunsch Westerman
1982-83 Oneal Westerman
Haight
Wethey
Collins
K.Hall
1975-76 Pryor Mellencamp Oneal
Wethey Innes
Westerman
1983-84
Westerman
K. Hall Haight Wethey Collins
Innes
1976-77 Keniston Collins
Oneal Wethey
Innes
Westerman
1984-85
Westerman
K. Hall Rosenthal
Wethey
Bulkley Innes
1977-78 Keniston Collins
Oneal Wethey
Innes Westerman
1985-86
)
)
)

 \.._,,
1. Mrs. 2. Mrs. 3. Mrs. 4. Mrs. 5. Mrs. 6. Mrs. 7. Mrs.
8. Miss
9. Mrs.
10. Mrs.
11. Mrs.
12. Mrs.
13. Mrs.
14. Mrs.
15. Mrs.
16. Mrs.
17. Mrs.
18. Mrs. 19. Mrs. 20. Mrs. 21. Mrs. 22. Mrs. 23. Mrs. 24. Mrs. 25. Mrs. 26. Mrs. 27. Mrs. 28. Mrs. 29. Mrs. 30. Mrs.
A. E. Kellogg
Thomas M. Cooley
Charles K. Adams
Alfred H. Hunt .
James B. Angel (Sarah Caswell) . Charles K. Adams
J. M. Wheeler
Kate N. Hale
Alonzo B. Palmer (Love Maria) Wooster w. Beman
Harry B. Hutchins
Philip Bach (Anna
Victor C. Vaughan
\varren P. Lombard
Albert B. Prescott
Warren P. Lombard
Junius E. Beal .
William H. Hobbs
'ivarren P. Lombard
J. F. Lawrence
G. Carl Huber
Philip E. Bursley
G. Carl Huber
Philip E. Bursley
Edward Adams
1866-1870
1870-1871
1871-1873 1973-1875 1875-1878 1878-1886 1886-1891 1891-1894 1894-1895 1895-1897 1897-1902 1902-1906 1906-1908 1908-1909 1909 1909-1910 1910-1913
1913 1913-1923 1923-1928 1928-1932 1932-1936 1936-1944 1944-1948 1948-1951 1951-1958 1958-1960 1960-1963 1963-1965 1965-1967
4
1
2 2 3 8 5 3 1 2 5 4 2 1
1/2 1
3 1/2
10 5
4 4 8 4 3 7 2 3 2 2
PRESIDENTS OF THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Griffith Hays Haight
James
Cameron
William B. Frayer James M. Plumer Harold E. Wethey
Botsford)

   I••
'-/
\........,-
31. Mrs.
32. Mrs.
33. Miss
34. Mrs.
35. Mrs.
36. Mrs.
37. Mrs.
38. Mrs.
39. Mrs.
40. Mrs.
John Alexander Arno Bader
Helen Hall
Joseph Hayden Millard Pryor Hayward Keniston
1967-1969
1969-1971 1971-1973 1973-1974 1974-1976 1976-197 1978-1979 1979-1981 1981-1983 1983-1985
8
2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2
PRESIDENTS OF THE LADIES• LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
George
Perry
Robert
Scott Westerman
Cameron
Innes Oneal

  I<
\._/
TREASURERS OF THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
1. Miss 2. Mrs. 3. Mrs. 4. Mrs. 5. Miss
6. Mrs. 7. Mrs. 8. Mrs. 9. Mrs.
10. Mrs.
11. Mrs.
12. Mrs.
13. Mrs.
14. Mrs.
Kale Hale, 1966-1867 1 Lewis B. Gilmore, 1867-1873 6 Moses Coit Tyler, 1873-1881 8 Celia A. Jaycox, 1881-1895 14 Alice Douglas, 1895-1929 24 Philip Bursley, 1929-1931 2 John Winter, 1931-1950 18 Joseph R. Hayden, 1950-1958 8
5 R,:, Perry Innes, 1963-1965 2 Cameron Haight, 1965-1967 2 John McKevitt, 1967-1969 2 Howard H. Peckham, 1969-1973 4
Josselyn Van Tyne, 1958-1963
Harold E. Wethey
12 +

 '---"'
(Not
1. Mrs.
2. Mrs.
3. Mrs. 4. Mrs. 5·. Mrs.
checked at the Bentley Alfred H. Hunt
Martin Luther D'Ooge Wooster Beman
Anna B. Gelston
Byron Finney
Library for
period
1886-1904)
1866-1873 7 1876-1886 13 1886- ?
? -1904 1904-1927 23
1927-1931 3 1931-1935 4
1938-1945 7
1945-1954 9 1954-1958 4
1958-1961 3 1961-1963 2
1963-1964 1 1964-1965 1 1965-1967 2 1967-1971 4
1971-1975 4 1975-1978 3 1978-1980 2 1980-1982 2 1982-1984 2 1984-
1937-1938 8. Mrs. Theophile
- pro-tern Raphael
SECRETARIES OF THE LADIES~ LlBAA~1 ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, ~ICHIGAN
1908 - pro-tern 1909 - pro-tern 1910 - pro-tern
Mrs.
Mrs. w. H. Wait
Mrs. 6. Mrs. Hugo P. Thieme
7. Mrs. Campbell Bonner
Interregnum
1935-1936 - pro-tern
w. H. Wait
G. Carl Huber
Griffith Hays Mrs. J. Griffith Hays
Mrs. J. minutes are
Mrs. J.
1936-1937 - pro-tern Mrs. Hugo P. Thieme
1940 - pro-tern 1941, 1942, 1943
9. Mrs. Horace Dodge
10. Mrs. Harold Wethey
1956 - pro-tern
11. Mrs. Charles Vibbert
Griffith Hays missing
12. Mrs. James Plumer
1961-1962 - pro-tern Mrs.
13. Mrs. Philip Youtz
14. Mrs. Arno Bader
15. Mrs. John McKevitt
16. Mrs. George Cameron
1969 - spring - pro-tern
Vibbert
17. Mrs.
18. Mrs.
19. Mrs.
20. Mrs.
21. Mrs.
22. Mrs.
David Huntington Robert Oneal
Scott Westerman . James Grarnentine Cameron Haight Amnon Rosenthal
Mrs. Horace
Dodge
Charles
Mrs. Harold
Wethey

       fo.r.resdiog, 'but it may· well be ooiiotedJ wb~ther tbe schools "'.itho_ul tbe bel9 ~ra fondness for 900ks have enr-rafsed :1oy :t><xJioJ-distiocti~o. , The defici-.J1:....;ts-of an ·early educa~n may be repaire~ ~j a good will aod a g.ood library; ,bot the d~: 1
a-~ 1M eolutnN of ui. JU¢ur Grtoptn 1o ficieocies which arise from a distaste· for eOlldM_I_ ,.M!GlioonnaGU8Ulljecoafpuolicin- books·are."irreparabh,. Success.inlife ~e.t. •do""' Mla ownhiu r~!k-/O'I' ony come& through \he u~11 which we.make of
°"""°"'orYWINe:oprt:ut'd" l1ldt communication,. our leisure,· - and oo. leisure, is seld9rn _.; JJ-•~1a.1»110 IIOlkeoi~ eo,,,mu•iM•
,..,,.,_~,,.11a1er~i,inlelldttif01"publCca.lim>m::tsh1rbo•w away ifwe are fond of goo.:!books.
..~.bz,.L'le~<:,nd_sd<f,:.<t,of_:1-.,writ..,.,aaJ',Rowmao·yaboycouldbaY&beensaved g-,omnty ofgoodfail.l'r.,nd r.c:for :irnlfikM<n,.l,.. • • fi bo k
m,U.,oulllof'daireaiu: ,:, 1
.e- .!Uo,,,.,,,..,.lc(..'ioninltenatd
of tMa'pap,rMOIO><l~!d
• _ .:i from wreck","if only :m appet1le or o s for ~ colu;r.r.f could have taken 'the pince of oiber a1lu\-~ IO.tME1>1To.ao-7meats. T.liusgood habits acd good rdorals.
Tml .A.IINAHOJI RNtrrlll\; and eli bu,i,.,,u, GM
in ~co~muoiry !ll"C very lariely fueasu·r~d • •
-4~119 c,u,....,,..caUomI<> 1M A!<!I Allaoa 0
and cooirolled' by ,he use. that is. made 01· AM ;fri>or, .M!chigtlll, '."-.~d-ci- fflOJ!cr.'' • •• ~ed ibe,: WG~t e:.:ist.., H!:o~e_lt"istb~~/!1
PnL,n:<oANI>-POBLla!lI!IG Co»h:NY~ •. .. •
Q- TlBREGIS.ta .(i"tnurMal111,·-~,Oi.,,"ltctit ,thelib~aries:·:,Bu~before,libraries~-anbe
=========:::±====z===
THE ..... U>tE.S'' J;JRR4.1t'r- ,18S•OCIA•''
,: ';.,~ J ,. ""• -s_'l,:_.;; ~ I - 1: ~t-t• 1 ·•rhe,i~cord of the ladies' library ·tluriniz
.. r6"if!rJ city._and -.ill.:.ge of .mG_ralitJ aoo •
the p-n!Jtyi>a7 is-one of w!rich any similar ,he .adies or Ann Arbor are making a 0
11ss9ciali0ll, mlght_.1:-:en be .proud. We, commendable effon to ,up9ly. Tbey
comineou to _cul'.'readers a sympathetic ~hould be regarded ns laboring not for
pero~l c;f t:ie proceeding~ of the nncual Ithe=elves but fo: the pobiic. They :ue 11
meeting to be . fo_~?d elsewbere in this noi on e:'{clu,i'"e corporation. They of'er issoe. ..- the nse of their library, and the nd-.antages Fifteen· years ago this association began of thtir 2..•scci3:ionon the same easy terms
its ,..-erkof ministering to the iotellcetual , 10 all. As they have no established sources wants of this communiiy. It.$ fir~t ex- of income, the library is tlependent for its perience waq that of Jesrniog not to de- enlargement on the trifling fees f•r mem- spise the <lay of small thiag:1. For se·.-eral 1 bersbip and 1:ntert:1i!lmentl. and on the years it beld out but small enticements to ' ,·oluotary gifL, o, members. of ~he com- r1ew members, and gave but small divi- munity.
denda for membership fees. But· the day Duriog the p:;.st two year3 the nssoci- of feeble begin::iings is past; its member- , at:on ~ been in some sense the guesL of
ship bas been very largely increased, its catalogue.<?~"'.:el_he_l~~t!~.~_has been
en!e~, it3 usefuloess -baa been corres-
pondingly extended, and, at length, it is
talking of setting up for itst'lf and estab• • :Bu~,Ule.tb:wkfolguests hu.e been obliged
enterprise a poblic library i5;dee~ed a p•.ili-_
iic necessity. 1... .J.-,:.,
'The want of such means of euues1tioa
the county. Oo th11 completion of the ' 1 courL-house the snpervisors_witb a gallant ,
1
t-0 cli~i;'t~ t~ ;.pper ~tory of "tl;ei~ lofty- Neit to our schools, there is c.o general liod" bamhome abode; anct consequentlyi public ioteresi of greater value to our' the usefuine;,s of the as:1ociation·has been
como:iooity than tbis. Indded there is a- sO~~whaLlimited.' .: • ' .. l l!.! - 1 ·~ i ,•• ••.••.••I
lisbing a home of its owo.
very important @ense io which a good
library is a necessar,1 adjunct, if not a neces• ih1ii:1bej ,are fhinkjng_:of dec!?ri~g tp~id sary part, of good schools. The cramming ,indepeodence and e;t~bl_ishiagn:nfn~.ot
I
0
thei_r.. owo,. . fo ,,heir. :i.e.v,:~1!:o~~}~!JI ·-0ugh~ lo .Teceive, every enC9ll.l"~gemeoti ~We bespealr:.1foribe111I.he h~aftY.-~-o~r~ -atioD-of our pabiio spiriled.c.iu~Rs., :AL.lily
life membershir3: oughi to ·l>e·takeo.-J>;l
our busine~e:men.. Within bot little more 'tbtm'"a' year the:gentle-and ingenionsp11r'. s-,w3ions'of>tlie'.llidies_'have raised' nea,l~ m06tvaluabl&iospira:tionaffordedbythe 'thewho!e-nrnoiintneceli$:il'yT·opajforthe scboota is. l0ot. In Iii.ct,if a ccmmuoi~y lot on which they tiope--tO:t!oild.' Thi;
;vere-to·be.,redu~ed' to the sad necessity of 0
cboosfog_btt WtE!:Il- sch~o1:8w; it~out booka
and books without achools, it would not
be ea8y to determine how wisdom would
decide. It is' certam tha~ many a person
witboot- the adorantageof lhe schools hM Jibrary tbat,will,be an.,M.\ti~'?.al,soa:-c~ 1r 11rise_D,.to, emi~~nce Y1ro~gb ~n, ~fpetjte \ :inspi~t!o~n ~nd profit to 0;ur _<;itiz\!:i!:;..c1.
of le118oosis of ..-erylittle importance com- pared with th·e·eolargjng :md broadening influence of a permanent love of books. If o love-of:reading is not e$tabli.;hed by the, schools, "t;ie_ mission _of the scbool5 is at.
least. a partial failure; and, if such a taste,. when once it" is established; i~ not graLified
and encoa,-aged ·by ~e!s to libraries, the
:ind--wortby"generosity e::itencteo Llie-hoi."
pitahties of their new edifice to·the ladies.
• we are _glad to see from t.beir •.reports
fact indicatM ,an, eoterp•ise-and a public spiri~ 1\\ b~c]lO_\icr.i,lT"~.c\?u?hS,;~ t~fur~ age in th~ }IlOS_~u~stant1n!:~1~.1~2~;1,'~et
,\JS hav& n._lib.~ary~!!!l~_i.~-~-,lh~;';}.)] ~.,.nn additioP.a\ attra~tiOI\,.to_ o~r .sity,J,7~ n ~-

      Il
--.._./
100 00
l~.00
ANN ARBORREGISTER,
Wednesday, April 13, 1881
Tb111Ladle,,i' Llbrnr:,.
During the meeting a sulfrcient·amount'of , money was conlributed to entirely cancel the indebtedneas or the association fo~their lot, nnd to leave a swall surplus foe tbo. proposed library building. •.::::..:.·.•.".:::: •
~~_.-:: ~ .,
• ,
• -~
if we cari see our way clear to going forward, many will ·como alter us who will fiod it in their hearts to bless us. ,
The 15th annual meeting of the Ladiea'
Library ASl!OCiationwas held in the parlors of judgment we have coofidt>nce. They have
the Presl-ylerillo church, on :l;food11y afternoon, April 11th. Mrs. John Maynard, Mrs. &. B.
Pond, Mrs. Pro( Tyler. Mr.i. Dr. Angell and Mrs Prot. Petlee were reelected members of of the board, their ter:ns of office having ex• p,red. Mr&Prof. Adams was reelected presi•
dent; !>Irs.A. Ten Brook, vice•president; Mrs.
M.Ln·ooge,secretary,and.Mrs._C.A.Jay•
cox, trea:111rer. . , , .-.
• • ""'•--'II•
br,,ry is in neea or better a·ccornfnodations 'l;J;::.:.-~··.·.···~·.·.·.:.:..:.............:.~-.. ~~
Wo have had the ad~ice of those in whose encouraged us to go forward, 81!8Uringus that
the public will not be unmindful of the bene• th we are 1-towing upon the COmlllunity; and
I bt!lieve, furthermore, if we are seen to go
rorward relymg upon the public spirit of the
community we shall not be disappointed in our
support. H by our united and untiring ef• forlft we can succeed, and thus erect a monu•
rnent to the niemory of small begioniog3, wo
shallatthePametimeplant118Cwdhich.shall
yield a porennial harvest of flowers and .fruit. I
• TRIW!O'URS RXPORT. _ _ . The folrowing is the. report of the treasurer,
:Mrs. C. A. Jaycox, for the year ending April
11./
Tho Pres.dent, Yrs, Prof.".Aaarrui'.°.'Jelivere<i:neouestfromestate of E.C.Sttman .......S 600·oo
an Rddre$S~s,foUowe: •
.,_ ·,.:,.:,:' •
Entert~h,meull!....................................... Aonua.ltax .............................................. )lember1blp11............................................ Floes.... -................................................ Sil.leof Cat&logi:es............................. ......
-
:.. - :. RECEIPTS.
......, Collecrloosfur p"yweo1 of lot.................
53150 % 78
12~ 00 . 49 00
·S.'l9:t :!60 At tho -.ery beginning or onr meolic1<I: Donation.........................,....................... l 00
IAuies of tho iUaochU!or..
de~ire to ccngratu!ui.e you on the prosrcrity of the a-e~x,,a1ionduring the past year. \Ye 1:a,·oju•t pa~t our fifteenth bmhuay.
I tbi,.k ldllt those whe ba,·e w-utc11cdth~
;:•ow•h <.'f-,~r ltbr:i•y from it3 ~mall ~nJ.
r,ii,;;s t'l t:ie prcs,wt t:mJ. snd h:we lrnd so
many ,;,.,..;::,c~s of the ;;',c•l it ts accompli,h•
w~ in CJ:.:.rc\>,11tnuni:y e:1:rcotbut.kel u jt:st 1
pr«!il in ,,~r,,o;reri1y.
p!\~l. i :-:.:~rt:,sth and i.~-=~~U1H(;S3 h:1\"i, Lc.-enin- crea~.d o:t!y tl11ou6b t:ntiri1.g cf.l'";·ts;nod we l11wo L;; 1....1•00to buppo,e t!Jat in the Jutura it:tpro';..::i,ywillbeEecure<Io'nanyeas:er con<litioc~. f'rO!J.1tile reports of ·t1:o ~erret:iry ::andu·L.hi.:rc:-you will l!~ar of 1!1e r,rcs'ent pro5'pen·; of the lii.>r(!ry. l t!'!iok ,·,"eoust ull lo g·:i~tl<l<lat tl:c ,hY,Yi:i;; thn: \-:-i:l be m,,dr. • •
I311l"'c cannot fail to sec that its \WY pros•
pPrity m~ke;iniiw•.d4¥Jlan:dsu:pon:11.s. '.I'heIi•
Total...................................................$1,359 81 Cash OU h..nd, April10,18611..................... 60 3S No·e...........................................................• ~0000 Inlere,,t OUllOht to !>lay22.1880................ 2l 46 OWib, 0<1-.................................................. 100 00 Iuteres, llllbood to M..y 22,loSO............... 4 CO
V. o kcow tha: in
t!t<f
1;1t;~~..:.~..:~. 1 lloron !t,c-et.......................................... -
To!al ................................................ o:2BUR.'!nJn,:s.-
!!Inv.6, 11181>--paAid. .Onan, for lot on l!urou streer..........................................
$1,M;>-6.'i
M~~~•0
June 9. 168')-p1.idA. Dullll, for lot on
a1..-\ appointments. Io s!lort, to use a figure
wh'ch ladi•&will &ppl'C<)iateit, is in tlrn COD·
ditivnol the child who has cutgro1Vnttsclothcs.
I preaurue th.., none will dcov that ·11ielibta•
ry. i1 more--t1ccess1blen:::d io quarters of,its
own, woulcl be far moro useful thsa it can-be
ut present. It has been wisely &1Jggcstooby
(!De of our number, th"t it seems very des,ra• l b.a h
b e t t t e Msociatio~ shot1ld bo·e:Jt.'\blisb.ed upon a. t:rr.i badis whit.; some of its' founders are still with us.:. It ~bould. have a home. be·
'fore il:3oare:its have pa8se:l away: ·rt is but
natural· 1ha, tho'iO ,who hav'e·uursed it in it1 To the lsdles ol the Ubrary AMoclatlon: ~.:.,~
mfancy, nnd- cared, for ·it. ia .:;tac!..tildb.ood,' I hne the honor to pre11enl the folloi-i~g
should feel for ·j__af ~li~r· interest which repori for the year closicg April 11th, 1881.
those who taka,'·up the work.:1a!e{,o,.ay ~91 As \be lite or an individual pa5808,he is 1
fe('L• ·•~ ""'' "'~•=11 t~iY~·M-;r....:i.:, ,u .pronetonoticeeach periodofflveyeara,and And we :ire frcquectly .remioded-Jtl!nt the· the lifUl, tenth, fifteectb, twentieth aociver• fo1mderaare filat passing away: ~Every yoitr. aaries or an event are of special interesl . It as we come together at the annual gntheriog, • seem11therefore, peculiarly fitting that this,
we are reminded of gome one who was with the fitleenth year of our existence as an &880• u,; ,he y~ar beforp,but. who cann·ot bo ,yi.th;~~ ciat1on, should have been marked by at least
on earth agai11..--,,.:Agaia,and agaiu 'lias the· one transaction of great importance, the pur• l summons come-:•JWo-•aro thus painfully re• chase of a lot. That we might own a lot, I
·minded that if tbo'gcnorarion of the founders and erect thereon a tasteful Rod well arMloged .
of the libniry ar,-to_see,it._permanen.tly..camb• library building. baa long. been desireci b7 l.ishedthjYT.have-no1i~·to 16se.v:.!~":'i,,_ .__ many members of the associntioo. S11ch a
~
.
~~
J'an.17. JU , p&ld A. Dunn, for lot on"
Hurnn St:1let......................................... • • 150 00 Llbrarlr\ll.l,;,,tar,·to Aprll.1880.............. 31~
Llb""-rhm••• .,hu-y to October, 1;,,;.J..... -... 2' 00 I
~~t.~.~:~.:~~.~.~.~~:.'.~::::::.:·:~::.~::I·.:
fne:,•;,.~J.~~~..~.~~~::~::~::!:::":5::'~.:-~i: Te.xea.....................- ..-...... ...................... 10 M
~
,Boxrenl......- ............,.-- ........._._ ...!.. ,.. l. 00
• Total .................................. ,...,....:-,...$1;27914 ,On,b#.nd-2. c.Seama.o'sbequest........._ • :,co00 -COllectlons fortin...................._ "lSt 50
• •rr:-ia•~'l>-"'.;.d reirsons'iiiat-"ib~at'it.Sl)·ar:.
reetou are to' submit to .,you to:d.aYthe quea• reminder to the citizens or .Ann Arbor of our I
tion: Sha\l the.board of directors be authoriz•
cd to tako euch measures as, may eeem to be
wiso in ihe,r judgment rortiie·ultimate ercc• ii owed tts inception and growth. • Greater tion of a now library buildiug 'r, •• . • • interest would thus be awak.ineJ, g~cater nu111-
The re3SODSfor· aod against this question , bere would conncc~ themselves with us, and should bi, fully preseuted, and I am .sure that !n ~V!'! :;...W,"Y.:'.i_pU~u~~oc_ewould. both be i11•
.... -;:aooetptt from llbr&ry ............... :. ~ Tot&l...................................... -:··..;·.::-•1·,9465S
llfDEBTEI>•~. •
To A. Dnno-ror lot.................................t i:to oo
~..~. .~.~'.~.~~
:
s ;oo oo
-lllte1'1!9\..••_ ......... - ...... , -· 20·78 ·, J , , • • ---
· '!ou.2....:........:.........·~:.:..:......'....._.,. 280•78 • TBll Bt:OB.STA.RT·s RZPOB.?. • ;.r--;~
building, it was thought, would be a coosta11t
library ll.Dd its needs; a constant testimonial 1 to the 1.011a1nd e..mest labor or those to whom I

    :l
au<!,hes the a5iioeia!lonbecame a !:Indowner. TL,_~u~h 1!:c l'X;):tiJn, of tho ro:icitiag cm~!lli::~,,.nnd :!,o co,tl' ii rc~po:ise g:ven to
tl: .n. t".c $!,~Gu h-•, l,c'!~ nlr~l'IY n'):irly rai.;eu. a1.d thi~ :3 cert ,i,I,; :1 c 1ute for ;;re'\t rejoicil,i. la one m,ntc:. r.~c.-e,·er.tile l:oor.! 1 ks \,~~o <l1sai;poimcd. O;~·i:;:;to ,.o nn~x• p~cted cbim ait·dust tee Se:iman estate, tl.c c~~h !l"Ct~ were exhnn~ted and spt:<:ificbe• que-.s coulJ l.e p;.iu or.ly i:i Lea•enworch Gas b,ocic:it an op;m,iieJ v.,lce oi finy ccn:.3o:1a c!ol!,1r. A thousand sh 1rcJ o: thi~s,ock came inio 1!,i! 1,JoJ~;oftho trc.1aurer .-.few weeks ogo, nnd j:i•t ho-;vmi:ch reti<!yrnocoy con be real- izad :or it 1~yetqu1te unCi!rtain. Yet. through the 1-!rvrts of tha ladie.•, witbou, the use of
been pertt iuell to do so. Here, ns elsev.,here, she was remarkably faithful in the discha'i!'(l of every duty. In il1ust1alion of thi~, the regularity nf her nttiodaace al the meetia;t, of the board i~ worthy or rema;k. By look- iag over the records, I find that duriog the laet fit\een years up to Ja~t December, 156 meetioge have beeu held, aod Mr,, Douglas had beeo abrent from only J 2 or them. o. once'in 13 ttmM. To her we c,·er looked ror wi•t1 couoS11Ii,n full reliance upon her ex0"1- Jent judgment. For her indeed, Thankegiv,og morn dawned bright aod beautiful in that olher world. where t.here are 00 more t~ra.
Mrs. Dr. Wells waa chosen by lhe board to , ftll the puce le~ nCllnt a.cd has accept:d Iha_ 1
ANNABBORREGISTER, Wednesday, April 13, 1881
•Would lhat our report" might close nere. !crea..-edand more fully recognized. We ,bould and ll>atthere were need to record only growth I also hue then a hall of our own, where such and prosperit,:, but agai11 has de.ath come in
entertainmentll could be given as are not our midst. M'anyheart-IIwere sad in this city adapted to a private parlor. This hall migM nt thanksgiving time, when wo f~l that all
occasio11al1ybe rented to suitable persons and
lhus becomea soun:e of income. It was with
the bODeor ~ring aucb a building, uiat
money waa long ago set aside ae a nucl~us _lor the full vigor of his manhood. had been cnt a building fund; and when, at tbe begu1n1ng off, before accomplishing for science tha half of tha rear just cloted. information was re- of what he had hoped. Bi:t how greatly was
ceived that the leitaCYof $500 bt>queathedthe association by Mr. Seaman would, without doubt, speedily be«>meavailable. it waa judged
I that with this ~uest to draw from for the purchue of new books, the ~sual ioc~me rrom me111bersb1pfeea, entertainmente, etc., might safely be de•oted to the purchase or • very desirable· lot, which just at tbii time waa offered the ladies at a low pnce.
lhe gloom occasioned by h~ death deepened, when early on that mornin6, word was circu• lated tbat anotber well-known in our midst h\y dead. Not her's renown in scleotiflc cir• ctes, nor in the world et large._but she wu mother, wife, friend. Her home, her church, the public work carried oo in the city by womeo, there was her sphere, aod there no
, duty w.ui ever neglected. So quiet, so Ullll• At a meeting or the association held oo I11uming,to retiring wBs she, that one must
May 17th, the board was nulhorized to pur-
cha..oethis lot, lying just west of Dr. Herd-
man',. ra&ideoce,and to contract for this object
ei:ch deb, as was nec~!ary. A. committee
was appointed to aolicit contribul!ons to be
applied to the purchaeo. On the ~2d day of
Ma... a~ a speelal bolU'd meettog, 1c w:is re•
~olred ,o purchase tho lo;. three and o h.1lf niog Mrs. Douglas w:i.~ deeply interested i:i rod~ i::l width, for the suro of $1,260, 8700 the library, and was chosen a 111emberor iUI bein::,cp1ill down, aud the remainder wit~ in, first board. Although she had once or twice tc~t a: sud1 time ns should he convenient. sought to retire, so etlicieot and wise a mem, Tho nec,muu-ypai,er~ wer'3 1mmedia1elysi;:ne<! ber was she 1.'<'nsideredt,hat she had ne.-er
should be brigbt and happy, lor on that doy waa to pe brought here the body of one of whom Ann Arbor was j:mly proud, who, in
1hi~ m.;oeJ upon which -.,e deflnitaly co_unted •i>poin~nt.=--=-·,..-:---:- - ~ ..;,"-'• ,..... ,..., twr:1ve-montbs·:igo, ,to'have nearly psid for ,,.,In the death of llr. Rojers alao we have our lot aod ho.ve bought \luring the yesr a lost a. moat booored friend, who waa en,r l!'codi.,'numter of books. Our iocome has reAdy to u11iat ua by valuable couosel, ud been 'constantly increased by the parlor co• who always mani!e!ted beart1 intereat IA all t\}rt.:uumeots,_whichharebeencontinuedourundertaking.HowmanytimeshaYewe through the year, nnd, as heretofore, have gathered io his perlore foeour entertainmente beeo enremoly enjoyable nod proOtnble. The and how cordial hu bia welcome e-rer. ban, assodatioo ia nnder great obhgatioos to the We ahall not soon forget the uening of Qe.. gentiemen who b~ve so _generouslr lectured cember 9th, 187S, whea we aNllmbled at hia for their 00neilt. The series of musical e•ea- house to liateo to a paper from btmeelf. • 0.17 ings, wl:.en tlie works of the d1~eroot com-. • few bad beard the eeccet whispered that
posers will ·be' studied, are pecuh_arlyattrnc• thia wu lhe firuelh anoi,eraary of bis mar• tiva, • To arrange for lheai requires a great ried life, and thus, though all anticipated
amounL-of labor from tb.o!<Iwho have tbo
aometbing full or iotereat and eparkliog with wit, not 111anysllllpected that a eketch orhit own life wonld be re•¢ We are gnterul that
know her well, to right 1y appreciate the forca oi uer charact:ir, or to re:ilize in bow large a sense she was the support of her husband, and the ce1me of her home. We scarcely knew of her 11loeaewhen she bad gone, and we 'lfere left Cjneryiog why s/ie should be tuken, how she could be s;,ared. From the very begin-
matter in charge, an_dalso from the musicians,
, and those P,re.•eot .never fall to. wish tbat a
Imuch Jargernui:iber would nvn!I theinselv~s' the clo:iing yeare or 11ncha. life were pa.ad
i of thi~ opportunuy to hear <lehghtfu).muiuo .in our city, and that hie ge0erou1 spmpa&;by
was ii-ren in eo larg19me.uure to our library anociation. • • • ,- ·, , As we eat.er now upon our eixteenth ,ar,
Tweor:y--flven!1mbers~f periodic~!• ba'.e be~n I forward we can tako. By having aome clell-
. bouiui The··Adant:c. Harpers, Scn~oer ~-< nlte aim in view, we aball ~ far more aunror I
a:id W!i,i the library. • - .
The librarian's ror,orL shows ahat su,ca b3t
lApril eighty books ba-,,e beeo .atlded I!) the.:
ilibrary, four of which"numbcr were presented.} it ia well for us t.oconsider wb11tdecided ai.pe
Eclect.ic.;Po~11lar;sc,en~- ?itoutbly,L1~llij•.Iprogreas._Ifafterthe!apeeorliveyeara,we
and tl\'O copies of St. .~1chola_s are takeu. may look upon. a0uild1og of our own erocted
\ T!:.e:-o:i.~ 2,J80 l5ook3te !~O •l:brn~;v·~Ir~. , and at least in great part paid for, we ahall It
, iog the yoar 3,45~ books and 1,04S mag:l•, have reaaon to be aatufied wilh the worltof Izioea have be4:n_circulated. _F~rty-five•n_ew twenty yeara. . . .. : .
1 memben bave Joined the ai50C1at10D: . • Reepec1.fullysubmittlld, • . "I > .... • :
I 'al-~ .. l < -lliar w..D'.Ooos,Secretary.
1 ;,C2[;-l11,~,,---------t:ictc., ~ I

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Secretary's Report April 26, 1985
The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan, held its spring meeting on Friday, April 26, 1985 at the home of Mrs.
Perry Arno nor Mrs. Mrs. Amnon Mrs.
Members present were: Mrs. Jonathan Bulkl~y,
Mrs. John
Alexander, Mrs.
man were
the
rary
called read
Mrs. Wester- meeting
Innes. Bader, Collins,
Mrs. Miss
Innes,
Oneal,
George Cameron, Helen Hall, Ms.
David Haskell
Mrs. Cameron Haight, Huntington, Mrs. Perry
Newman, Mrs. Robert
Mrs. Hayward Mrs. Millard
Miss Elea- Kirby Hall,
Keniston, Pryor, Mrs.
Rosenthal, secretary, Harold Wethey, treasurer.
Mrs.
Scott Westerman,
served by Mrs.
president, and
After delicious
refreshments to order.
Innes, the fall
for the
Since 1985 is
100th anniversary
building, the Ladies voted to give the Ann Arbor Public Library
the meeting and approved
of $0.10 The treasurer's
The minutes
of
Dues
by Mrs. Innes report was read and accepted.
treasurer.
as amended. were collected
of the opening of the original Ladies' Lib-
$2800 in July to make a year's total of $5000, about $700 more than has ever been given in one year.
The Nominating Committee's report was made by
the Chairman presented the approved by
the nominating committee,
Mrs. Robert Oneal. She which was unanimously
of same
the
Fifty-
slate members
as that of last year, present.
Mrs. Jonathan Bulkley
reported
-1-
for the Book
Committee.
.

 ,...__,,
six new books
were purchased, five of which
she brought although
along not all,
for were
us to about

enjoy. western
Most of this year's art, from mosaics
purchases, to interior

design.
Duplicate
and three
copies
copies
of Janson's Nineteenth Century
can be Library staff
the moment.
Painting. extendP.d to
Miss Collins report as read.
the Book Conunittee's
LRi~d
Brehell's
were bought of A Day in the Country (on Impressionism)
.A
Library contributions and Westgate. The
this way the
libraries, arrange-
through
or film
Ladies'
Loving
ments are
the Book
collection, ideas
the
the shelving
satisfactory for
says
Suggestions came
Committee
for possibly
starting
that were rejected
made a motion to accept
Passed.
of the activities of the
The report
made by Mrs. Innes. The library is going to request an increase of
.3 mills in June this would coast the owner of a $60,000 house
about $6.00 more a year, from $63 to $69 a year. The income is
needed because tax revenue has not kept pace with inflation. The Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library made a gift this year of $61,000, collected from 705 Friends and their book sale, which goes
on every week-end, with a big one in the fall and spring. Jan Newman
and Kirby Hall volunteered
ing the monthly meetings of
New Business: October
ing of the original Ladies'
should plan some kind of celebration.
-2-
at
In
a slide collection this point.
branch
Library Advisory Council was
to be alternates for Mrs. Innes in attend- the Advisory Council.
brings
the 100th anniversary of the open- building on Huron Street and we
Library
Mrs. Cameron volunteered
to

 try to find exists.
Mrs. instructed
old photographs
Hayden has become
of the original building,
which no longer
her as result member. should tary
an of
member Hayden's decided nominations
of the Ladies'
Library we
It bring
was
Library the fall meeting,
to active
Mrs.
write a letter
enjoyed Association.
would
The Fall meeting will
on be
her postcard held at Mrs.
submitted,
L. Rosenthal,
fall meet- probably
remind everyone
ing.
at the end of October.
Respectfully
Prudence
change that
to
in status, the Ladies
should elect Association
and that the announcing the
Oneal's _house,
Secretary
a
an emerita telling
member. The her how much we
secretary
was having
As a new
members secre-
-3-

  Treasurer's Report
LADIES'S LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
January 1 - December 1, 1984
From the look of this financial report and a comparison with my first report of 1973, it could be made to appear that I am an
astonishing
sort. Our
$46,560.00.
of it is the result of inflation, but I believe we have stayed a bit ahead of inflation in the buying power of our gifts to the library. Books today are vastly more expensive than they used to be, but they
are also
-white
plates, and almost
with more and number of
Most
more black-and additional color
presenting in which we live.
most gifts
important printed for the ages,
on acid-free paper. We not just for the generation
are now
financial
total assets in 1973 amounted to slightly less than
Today they come to
slightly more than
$85,160.00.
Houdini,
and of course I am nothing of the
vastly handsomer, embellished
illustrations,
often an incredible
One of my auditors
behind the sale of 300 shares of Standard Oil of Indiana, and of
500 units of the Cashfund. Standard Oil of Indiana is being sued
by the French government for fouling the famous beaches of Normandy with oil from a tanker than went aground and broke up there some years ago. It could mean a major set-back for one of our greatest
oil companies. The sale of the Cashfund is merely a matter of mov-
ing assets out of what amounts to a Savings account so that we can spend it on the contribution to the Library Revolving Fund. But since the Cashfund is really an investment, the amount has to be
-1-
said she would be interested
in the reasons

 listed in the column of Income. Under Expenses, as well as Income, had to be listed the amount that we received for the sale of Stand-
ard Oil of Indiana,
since it smaller
for the
was
amount year,
moved directly
of Cashfund
since it is automatically
Cashfund records the
credit-
by our
interest
ed to the Fund.
into the purchase
broker. The we received
The modern computer age
ancing my accounts. The bank doesn't chose in the case of the NOW account to give me the exact figure that was in the account on Decem- ber 31. They merely give me the figure on the date when the month- ly statement is sent, which happens to be the middle of the month. Finally I realized that the few dollars that were missing to balance the account had to represent the last of the interest for the month
of December, and presto, the job was done.
Also the wonders of the computer age seem to make it impossible to close out an account. Last July 10, 1984, I withdrew all the funds out of our old savings account to the amount of $60·2. 37, and
informed the bank that I wanted the account
who send our checks of account number.
directly Does that
make any difference to
after that discontinued account
number has languished unused for an
nearly
tripped me up this year in bal-
the companies
of the change
the clerks who record our incoming checks? Not by a long shot. That account rolls merrily along and by January 1, 1985, exactly $266.45 had been deposited in it. It looks as though the only step I can
take now is to have all of our checks sent to me for a while, and
-2-
closed permanently. Also to the bank were informed

  indefinite treasurer
nne is our Comerica holding. I can no longer keep track of it in any way. It appears less and less often in the listings of Over- the-Counter stocks, and I have to call my broker to get a quotation
on it. Bank stocks make me particularly
such a system is a wholly unsatisfactory
thing. The other is Safeway Stores.
investment except for the fact that
close to the end of the year. In past years I have had to deal with the situation that its dividend oscillates between late December and early January. I am finally tired of dealing with it in my accounts.
period certainly
of time, has her
it might be eliminated altogether. Your reasons for not being wholly enchanted
to the Board that I propose to sell two of our stocks this summer, when I get back from France in July.
with the
It might be interesting
computer
age.
It
The year 1985 marks the 100th anniversary
little
This
mark
We gave $2,200.00 in January. I propose that we send a check for
$2,800.00 in July, to round out a gift of $5,000.00 for our anniver-
building year is
on Huron Street. Last an occasion for celebration,
year our which
I think the Public
we should Library.
by giving
an exceptionally large
check to
sary year. Thus I Board that it approve
report of
Trudy
Alice
with a $2800.00
Bulkley,
recommendation
to the Library. and
conclude my the amount 'l'he account was audited by
for
the Public Prue Rosenthal,
Marci Westerman.
it
is a perfectly reasonable declares it,dividend too
nervous these days and way to keep track of any-
of the opening of our income was $5,808.00.
Sunderland Wethey, Treasurer

               LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
TREASURER'S REPORT January 1 - December 31, 1984
PRICE VALUE COMPANY SHARES 12/31/84 DIVIDENDS 12/31/84
EASTMANKODAK 100 COMERICA 195 BEATRICE FOODS 100
HOUSEHOLDFINANCE 225 CENTRAL SOUTHWESTCORP. 100 STANDARDOIL INDIANA 100 MOBIL OIL 200 SAFEWAY 200 MINN. MINING MANUF.
DUPONT
PAINE WEBBERCASHFUND
71 5/8 355.00 32 408.00 28 7/8 167.50
32 1/8 385.33 22 1/~ 190.00 52 750.00 28 1/2 440.00 27 1/2 305.00
7,162.50
6,240.00 2,887.75
7,228.13 2.225.00 5,200.00 5,700.00 5,500.00 3,950.00 2,550.00
33,818.10 82,461.48 2,700.06 85,161.54
12.00 4,000.00 17,129.42 2,492.77
23,634.19
1984
255.45
2,395.01
7.10 42.50
2,700.06 Treasurer
Total
NOW Acc't
Sale of 300 sh.
St.Oil Ind. Sale of 500
units Cashfd. Dues
1984 during 1984
during 1984
Income:
Assets
2,492.77 3,315.83
16.33 103.24
17,129.42 500.00
1. 60 23,559.19
Expenses:
Safety
Dividends Cash Fund Other
Interest Savings
Deposit Box Fund A.A.
Library
Balance Jan. 1, Income
Cash,
December
Expenses
of
December deposit
Bank Deposits
50 79 so 51
170.00
145.00 2,492.77
5,808.60
Revolving
Cash Fund purchases Cash Fund purchases
2,775.06 23,559.19
26,334.25
-23,634.19
2,700.06 Alice
31, Savings Account
NOW Account Inte:i:est for
end
Late
Sunderland
Wethey,

                  COMPANY Kodak 100 CMCA 195 Beatr 100 Housh 225 CenSo 100
1st Quar 2nd quar
3rd Quar 4th Quar
Total 355.00 408.00 167.50 385.33 190.00 750.00 440.00
305.00
170.00 145.00
2,492.77
119.57
160.00
CashFund
Open. Bal.
May 108.61
Jun 293.98
Jy3Al 130.00
Jy3 Al
2
75.00
2 102.00
2Or 75.00
Jy
Jy
Fy
Mh
40.00 15 95.63 29 47.50 12
300.00
14,695.91
Clos. B~l.
33,818,10 273.15 270.00
Late Deposit of
MMM
box, no. 1984,
$42.50
Safety Paid
Revolving
Deposit April 4,
Fund,
33 (Packard and $12.00
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION DIVIDENDS 1984
102.00 2Al2
2 102.00
2 42.00 14 95.63 31 47.50 12 75.00 12
110.00
Or
Sr
42.50 Al 14
95.63 My 31
47.50 Je 12
300.00 Je 12
110.00
Al 2 75.00
Je 12 42.50
Je 14 35.00
Feb
97.64
Oct
Interest, First of America Bank Dues
Or
Nr
Dr
Dr
98.44 30 47.50 12 75.00 12
StOin
Mobil
Sfwy
MMM
DuPon
4 00 100
200
200
50 50
Mh 12
110.00 Jy 2
80.00 Mh 12
42.50
Mh 14 35.00
Jan
101. 70
Sep
110.00 Or4
75.00 Dr 12
42.50 Dr 14
37.50 Apr
104.39
Aug 331.82
Dec 213.04
Branch)
Jan. $2,200.00; July
Brockman $1,800.00
Accounts in Bank of America, Ann Arbor: NOW Account 20-101380-6
Savings Account 00-938522-6
Taxpayer identifying number: 38-6055155
Jy Jy Jy Jy At Sr
Sr
Jy 2 75.00
Sr 12 42.50
Sr 14 37.50
Mar 124.48
Jul 258.38
Nov 315.38
1 75.00 3
102.00
17
42.50
Alice Sunderland Wethey,
Treas.

  ......__,,,
...___,,

 of San Marco
Venice. There are also Among ~hese fifty-six
Brehell's A Day in of Jansen's Nineteenth
and Asian copies of and three way the libraries,
In
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Report of the Book Committee
April 26,
the Ladies' Library
Since
our last meeting in October,
1984, new
Association_has
The bulk of
through modern,
ing, manuscript
design. Of special note is the very
for the ancient sculpture,
art. Richard copies
Ladies'
there are duplicate
January, forty-five
1985, $2,200 was deposited
be extended to
on order,
Around
on a variety of subjects. We nevertheless maintain
art close
are currently Their cost will
these
in
and concern architecture, illumination, mosaics,
painting,
photography
and interior
acquired fifty-six
books deal with western
Library contributions Loving and Westgate.
can
In this branch
account. again touching
a books
putting
damage
shelving
the Book
collection.
County Library provides films.
The oversize them as
healthy in the
balance Library
from falling. arrangements Committee
to the ground The Library satisfactory.
staff
at this Suggestions
reducing finds the
Both
(45) books
for
ideas were
through collection
possibly
a slide
-1-
_(56)
titles
art, from
Library. times
draw-
titles
the Country (Impressionism)
beautiful, several
four-volume
books on Byzantine
C~ntury Painting.
as possible,
thereby
point
starting
rejected at this point. The
in the book
be approximately
of around $1,000. have been reshelved,
$2,500.
As to slides, there is no
came
the
or film
Washtenaw sense of
1985
Mosaics

 a demand. The Library and its public are genuinely delighted to be receiving the many art books that do come in each year, thanks
to the I
Library would· like to Hall, and Carol
Association.
thank the people on my committee,
Ladies'
Helen
and likewise do thank recommendations. Your enthusiasms are welcomed recommendations for Library
for board
the many
members for their
Betty
they particular
Gosling, submitted book
Plumer, other
suggestions
art
interests,
the Book acquisition.
you art tastes,
and your art the form of book
by
in
Respectfully submitted,
Trudy Bulkley, Chair
-2-
Committee
Thank you very much.

 LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Books Received by the
Bony, Jean, French Gothic 12th and 13th Centuries,
Bernard, Bruce, The Bible Macmillan, 1984
Library September, 1984
Architecture of the
-
April,
List
$115.00
24.95
35.00
70.00
17.95
50.00 10.25
300.00
145.00
20.00 37.50
40.00
100.00
60.00
45.00 29.95
1985
Paid $104.21
Borcoman, James, University of
Brehell, Richard, Abrams, 1984
Eugene Chicago
et a.,
Atget, Press,
A Day
1857-1927,
1984
14.50
32.10
72.32
16.26
45.70 10.25
275.40
130.62
20.11 22.90
36.77
90.45
59.27
27.01
25.71
Chernow,
Taplinger, 1984
of
University
of Chicago Press, 1984 Robert, Dali: The Work,
Descharnes, Abrams,
Edwards,
Eggum, and
1984
The Field of Stones,
Freer, Paintings,
The Man,
1962 (?)
Enyeart, James Landscapes,
Burt,
The Drawings
Cohen, Arthur
Works (Bauhaus), M.I.T.
Cooper, Graham, Painting 1979
Bayer, The Complete Press, 1984
the Town, Oxford
A., Herbert
Demus, Otto, The Mosaics of San Marco in Venice,
Anne, Edvard.Munch: Studies, Clarkson
N.
Sketches Potter, 1984
Elliott,
a King, Yale University Press, 1980
Folda, Jaroslav, ination at St.
Franz, E. and B. Drawings, Little
Gaugh, Harry F., 1983
Crusader
Jean
Growe,
Brown, 19
?
California,
and its Painters,
i983
Palace for
L., Edward Weston's California Little Brown, 1984
John and Jonathan
Brown, A
d'Acre,
Princeton,
Seurat,
Manuscripts:
Illum- 1976
Georges
Willem de Kooning, Abbeville,
-3-
in the Country,
Milton Avery,
(2)

 Goguel, Catherine Monbeig and Fran~oise
Viatte, Roman Drawings of the 16th Century
11.95 10.00
25.51 20.00
53.55 53.55
59.50 53.65
45.00 40.60
45.00 32.10
65.00 58.63
50.00 34.50
40.00 36.50
65.00 58.61
30.00 26.70
50.00 30.10 135.00 121.83 (3)
34.52 28.00
35.00 18.00
55.00 49.50
from the Musee of Chicago Press,
du Louvre, Paris, 1979
University
Grabar, Oleg a~d Sheila Blair, Epic Images in Contemporary History, University of Chicago Press, 1980
Graphic Design in Japan, Vol. 2, Kodansha International Ltd., 1982
Graphia Annual, 1984-1985, Pellegrini and Cudahy
Grand Hotel: The Golden Age of Palace Hotels, Vendome, 1984
Greenberg, Gorrnan's
1984
Haak, the
Harries,
Between Faith and Asceticism, Yale University Press, 1983
Haworth-Booth,
Photography,
Mark, The Golden Age of British 1839-1900, Aperture, 1984
Henry and Georgia
World, Univ. of New Mexico Press,
The Golden Age: Dutch Painters Abrams, 1984
of
Bob,
Seventeenth Century,
Karsten, The Bavarian
Rococo Church:
Hawthorne, Don and Sam Hunter, Rizzoli, 198
George
Abrams,
Knopf, 1984
Art, Abrams, 1984 Folds Mccullagh,
Hills, Hockney, Janson, Joachim,
Patricia, David,
H. w.,
Alice Neal,
Cameraworks,
1983
Italian Chicago,
Art Institute
of
1979 Inner
Kass,
Eye,
Ray, Braziller,
Graves: l983
Press, of the
Norman,
ed., The Collected
Letters
of
Morris
19th
Century
Harold
Drawings in the
and University of
Susanne
Chicago Vision
Kelvin,
William Morris, Vol. I, Princeton, 1984
-4-
Greenberg, Carl
Segal,

 Lane, Mills, Beehive
Leymarie, Balthus,
Architecture of Press, 1984.
Jean, Watercolour: Rozzoli, 1984
the Old South,
From Durer to
75.00
35.00
45.00
25.98 25.00
60.00
37.50
24.95
19.98
45.00
40.00
40.00
30.00
75.00
39.95
60.00
75.12
31.36
27.70
26.43 23.85
54.45
31.97
22.46
20.43
27.01
36.67
36.02
27.60
67.95
36.41
54.48
Liang, Ssu-ch'eng, A Pictorial
the Masini,
Evolution Lara-Vinca,
Art Nouveau, An International
and Sculpture,
Art of Illustration,
Pastels: From
Skira-Rozzoli,
1984 1984
Chinese Architecture:
History o~ A Study of the
Development of
its
of its
Structure Types,
System and M.I.T. Press,
Chartwell,
Survey Museum
McShine, Recent
Kynaston, Painting
Art, 1984.
of of
Modern Melot, Michel,
The Rozzoli, 1984
Monnier, Genevieve, the 20th Century,
the 16th 1984
to
Monod-Fontaine, Henri Matisse,
Isabelle, Thames
The Sculpture of
Montgomery-Massingberd,
of Europe, Vendome, 1983
Murphy, Brown,
National Catalogue,
Newman, Sasha, Thames and
Noble, Allen
North American Settlement Landscape, Vol.
A., Jean-Frangois Millet, 198
Little
Exhibition,
Gallery of Art, Watteau 1984
ed.,
Hudson, 1984
and Hudson,
1984 Palaces
Hugh, Royal
Bennard: The Late Paintings,
G., Wood, Brick and Stone, The
2: Barns and Farm Structures, of Massachusetts Press, 1984
University
Norwich,
tecture,
Rosenblum, graphy,
Rostov, 1983
John Julius,
G. K.
Naomi, Abbeville,
Charles I.,
The World Hall, 1984
Atlas
of
of Archi-
Photo-
Abrams,
A
world History 1984
Chinese Carpets,
-5-

   Schneider, Pierre, Matisse, Rizzoli, 198
95.00 65.00
29.95
60.00
100.00
49.50
20.00
67.50
$3,014.91
85.64 59.21
30.10
81.83
60.00
30.07
23.26
67.62
2,707.47
Schultz-Hoffmann,
spective (100th Anniversary), Press, 198
Seidel, M., and R. H. Marijnissen, Harrison House, 1984
A Retro-
Norton
Bruegel,
Cyclades in the Third
Millenium B. Press, 1977
C.,
University Thornton, Peter,
of Chicago Authentic
Domestic Penguin,
Tunnicliffe, Little
Interior
1984
Decor: The 1620-1920, Viking
White, and
Barbara Letters,
Press
Renoir: 1984
His Life
Max Beckman:
Thimme, Jurgen, Art and Culture of the
C. L., Tunnicliffe's Birds, Brown, 1984
Weitzmann, Kurt, Studies in Classical and
Byzantine University
Manuscript
of Chicago
Ehrlich, Abrams,
Illumination,
April 26, 1985
Report of the Book Committee Trudy Bulkley, Chair
meeting,
-6-

 ANNARBORPUBLICLIBRARY ANNUARLEPORTFOR 1984-85
INTRODUCTION
that 1984-85 marked the second of a three-year period of the
for the near-to-mid future. The previous year, 1983-84, saw
Negotiations and contract signing for the Library's automated circulation system;
Financial retrenchment; and
c.
These activities began a period preparing the Library financially and tech-
nologically for the remainder of this decade and into the early 1990s. Thus, 1984-85 saw the following:
a. The beginning of the year-and-one-half process of implementing the automated circulation system;
b. Recommending to the Board of Education and citizens improvements in the financial base of the Library's millage income (approved by the voters on June iO);
c. Implementation of several major policies (mostly fiscal);
d. And, amid these and a continuation of financial retrenchment, kept operations at the normal level of service.
PROGRESSANDACCOMPLISHMENTS
1. In June, 1984, just before the year began, the Board of Education signed the contract with CL Systems of West Newton, Massachusetts, for a $263,000 automated circulation system. The following progress was made during 1984-85:
a. CL Systems ordered components from its suppliers;
b. Initial staff training, on-going in nature, began with the
orientation of staff to the new system: what it can and cannot do;
c. By November, all components arrived, except the OCLC(i;e., catalog-
ing system to circulation system) interface. CL Systems was developing a new one, and there was a delay in channeling new OCLCcataloging
It can be said Library's preparation
the following:
a.
b.
A review of several policies (mostly financial).

 d.
e.
information to the circulation system's data base until March, when the new interface finished alpha and beta testing and was installed
in the Ann Arbor Public Library system;
By late January, the magnetic tapes containing almost all of our back OCLCcataloging information began to be loaded into the new circulation system's data base.
In May, a problem arose with the MARCedit terminal, when the Apple microcomputer blew-out a board. This entailed a three-week delay, but once corrected, all glitches seemed to end.
f. By late May, the bar coding process began. This seemingly unending task consists of affixing a bar code label on each library item (book, record, cassette, etc.), and entering the information in
the data base. Some 370,000 items need to be bar-coded, and the project is anticipated to continue through September, 1985.
g. l~roughout the year, periodic questions arose in our contractual relationships with CL Systems, and thus in consultation with Ann Arbor Public Schools' Department of Legal Services, the Library kept on top of its legal obligations, testing schedule, and payment schedule.
h. The go~l remains to be up and running in January, 1986.
i. Special commendation should go to the members of the Automation Committee (which the Library Director chairs): Mrs. Betsy Lawrence, Project Manager; Richard Lesueur, Assistant Project Manager and Bar-Coding Supervisor; and Glen Modell, Computer Operator.
2. Progress and accomplishments were also seen in finances. Midway through the 1983-84 year, it became clear that because of the flattening-out of the Standard Equalized Value of property, Library income by 1990 would be signif- icantly less than contractual obligations, and the Library would be facing significant deficits. Thus, budget reductions were undertaken in non-con- tractual areas (such as hourly employees and books/periodicals/a-v) in the last half of 1983-84 and throughout the entire year of 1984-85.
a. With the endorsement of the Advisory Committee the previous
year, the Library upgraded some of its income-producing items
to accurately reflect costs, specifically library fines and room rentals. Those policies were implemented on September 1, 1985. Fine income rose about SO%for the year: from $62,572 in 1983-84 to $98,515 for 1984-85.
b. In the Fall of 1983, the Michigan Attorney General ruled that a reasonable non-resident fee was permissible in order for non- residents to share in the costs as well as the benefits of the Library. In July, 1984, the Board of Education approved a non- resident fee, and it took effect on September 1. The fee realized $13,225 in revenue for the year, with 431 individuals and 69 families
Page 2.

 being registered. The fee was set at $25.00 for an individual and $35.00 for a family. It should be noted that for every individual or family who so registered, about seven-eight
chose not to purchase a non-resident card.
c. Although increases were made in several revenue categories, total
revenues remained insufficient
in revenue from tax collections
all revenue). After years of double-digit percent increases
each year in tax collections in the late 1970s and early 1980s, 1982-83; was only 4.4% greater than 1981-82; 1983-84 only 3%
greater than 1982-83; 1984-85 was only 1.5% greater than 1983-84; 1985-86 is projected to be only 3%greater than 1984-85; and the remainder of the decade is projected at only 4%annual increases. Library expenses, particularly contractual items (such as total employment costs at 7%) are projected at a greater level. Thus,
it became clear that to operate at its usual contractual level,
to restore budget cuts during the last 11⁄2years; to absorb expenses formerly borne by the school district (bookmobile and security);
and to project an increase in branch hours, an increase in the
millage would be needed. The Advisory Committee recommended and
the Board of Education placed before the voters a .3 increase in the millage rate for five years. Through the efforts of an effective educational campaign by the Friends, the voters, on June 10, approved the .3.millage increase by a 3-1 margin, with all 63 precincts approving.
3. In spite of the number of non-residents who decided not to purchase a non- resident card, the circulation of the library materials remaint!d near the 1,000,000 mark. By year's end, the number of registered borrowers dropped from 85,475 to 76,988 (about 10%). At the same time, circulation dipped less than 7%from 1,036,255 to 964,389. An interesting observation is that the loss was almost entirely at the Main Library. The three branches and the Outreach department either held steady or increased in circulation.
4. During 1984-85, 17,400 books were selected, cataloged, and made available to library users. Allowing for volumes which were lost or were withdrawn because
of wear or obsolescence, the total library collection now stands at about 375,000 fully cataloged books. In addition, there are over 9,300 phonograph albums,
420 cassette albums, and 460 youth multi-media kits.
5. Booked-For-Lunch had another successful year. It continues to be broadcast
live over cable television, as well as rebroadcast at various later times. It included the following programs:
October - Floaters by Tish O'Dowd Ezekiel, discussed by the author. November - Trying Freedom: The Case for Liberating Education
by Richard Meisler, discussed by the author.
December - "Investment Trends in the 1980s" by Paul McIntyre, an investment
analyst and account executive with Prudential-Bache Securities.
to deal with the slow annual rise (which accounts for about 85%of
Page 3.

 January February
March
April
May
- The Bohemians by Alan Cheuse, discussed by the author. - "Writing Romance Fiction for Pleasure and Profit" by
romance writer Carol Katz.
- The Peter Pan Syndrome: Men \VhoHave Never Grown Up and
111e Wendy Dilemma: When WomenStop Mothering Their Men by Dan Kiley, discussed by Marie Richmond-Abbott, Professor of Sociology at Eastern Michigan University.
- 111e,Second Self: Computers and the HumanSpirit by Sherry Turkle, discussed by Martin Piszczalski, Computer/Video Columnist and Computer Consultant.
- Illiterate America by Jonathan Kozol, discussed by Pat Frey, Tutor-Trainer and Board of Directors member of the lfash ten aw Literacy Council.
6. The Library's sponsorship of community-access cable-channel television programs continued for its fifth straight year. The Library's programs are aired twice daily on weekdays throughout the year and include material provided free by UM's Michigan Media and rebroadcasts of Library programs such as Booked-For- Lunch. Many of the Library's programs are broadcast live over the same station by a technical crew from Community High School.
7. As mentioned earlier, the branch libraries continued at the same level of circulation of materials in spite of the impact of the non-resident fee. For the third consecutive year, circulation at the branches was almost equal among each branch 1 indicating that the spacing of the branches in the city were correctly planned.
8. In November, 1984, the Board of Education approved a Policy of Behavior in
the Public Library that received international attention in th~ media and library publications. Editorials of support for the policy were published in the Ann Arbor News, Michigan Daily, Toledo Blade, and American Libraries (the official journal of the American Library Association). Requests for copies of the policy, administrative rules, and staff procedures in implementation were received from over 250 libraries in the U.S.A. and foreign countries.
9. The wide variety of Youth and Young Adult Programming continues at the Main and branch libraries:
a. Almost 2,000 independent readers and almost 1,000 read-to-me children participated in the 1984 summer reading program at Main and the branches. In addition, there was a book club for 5th and 6th graders; movies based on well-known children's books; and daytime story times.
b. Also in the summer, Junior High and Senior High youth participated in a writing workshop and book discussion group.
c. The Main Youth Department presented a series of cable televised, early evening storytimes for the family featuring guest storytellers from far and near, also during the summer.
d. In the Fall of 1984, the Youth Department staff visited faculty of seven AAPSschools to acquaint staff with Public Library services.
Page 4.

 10.
..__,,
11.
12.
13.
14.
e. Children's Book Week was celebrated during the month of November with a bookmark contest open to all children in the area. The bookmarks were published and each winner received a book.
f. Story hours for 3-6 year-olds occurred during three seven-week sessions at Main and the branches; also a toddler storytime occurred at Main.
g. In the Fall, at Main, there was a "Stories in the Dark", a monthly evening storytime for elementary ~ge children.
h. During winter break, movies were shown to school age children, as well as on AAPS 'reporting days'.
i. In last Spring, youth and branch staff visited all of the AAPSelementary schools to promote the summer program.
j. The Youth Department co-sponsored with the Washtenaw Reading Council a lecture for adults by Nancy Willard, a Newberry winner and writer and poet.
k. TI1eYouth Department also hosted the annual national meeting of the Children's Literature Association.
1. All funds needed for Youth Department programming are made available from grants from the Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library.
The Library"continued its involvement in the use of computer data bases for reference service. Through the use of the Dialog Information Retrieval Service the Reference Department has access to over 200 data bases. Reference staff
is trained periodically every year in the use of the upgrades in the data bases. Funding for the use of these data bases is made possible from a grant from the Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library.
The Library received a federal grant for upgrading its special collections:
from easy readers in the Youth Department to Black Studies, small press, adult basic reading, and large-print in the Adult/Reference Department.
TI1e Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library, with a current paid membership of about 700 raised more than $60,000 during the last year through memberships,
book sales and other activities. The Friends are a steady source of support for a wide variety of Library projects and services. Two special projects this year were its heavy involvement in the millage education ca~paign and a special grant of $10,000 to supplement the book budget.
1985 was the centennial year of the building of the former Ladies Library Asso- ciation building. In honor of that event, the Association raised its annual contribution for art and art history books to $5,000, and also publicly endorsed the millage request.
The collection of the Library continues to be singled out for praise. Not only the well-selected, broad collection, but special features such as business and finance collection, clipping and newspaper file, and books on cassette are in high demand.
Page 5.

___________.___
 ---
1. To complete the task of putting the Library's finances in order through 1990, a renewal of the 1. 0 mill for four years wil 1 be placed before the voters in 1985. Essentially, then, both millages would expire at the same time.
2. There is still much work to be done with the automated circulation system implementation:
a. The first run-through of bar-coding needs to be done by October 1.
b. It will be followed by a second run-through.
c. When space is made available around November, the final OCLC cataloging tapes will be loaded into the system.
d. • At the same time, new bar-coded library cards will be issued to all patrons beginning September 9.
e. Staff training and internal assignment procedures will be developed prior to our being up and running in January, 1986.
3. The expansion of hours at the branches was planned in the millage election, and plans call for the branches to be open a sixth day, probably beginning in January, 198,6. In addition, the rapid growth of the Northeast Branch wil 1
result in a recommendation from the Director for an increase in space of a
size about equal to the West Branch.
4. The Library has received a federal grant and a special grant fr~m the Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library for the establishment of an audio compact disc collection. It is planned that the collection will be available to the public by t-larch, 1986.
S. The placement of microcomputers in the administrative offices of each MPS building, which will be used in-house and eventually hooked-up to central services of MPS is one more step in the Library's use of computer technology. It is planned to eventually have microcomputers in each department of the Library. The Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library are making a grant Possible for the purchase of one complete microcomputer system each year.
6. The Main facility• is both aging and becoming increasingly crowded. In almost every segment of the Library books are now jammed from end-to-end in the stacks. Additions to the stacks have crowded the tables together and in some areas tables and chairs have had to be removed. Simply, there is insufficient space for the collection, reading services for the public and work area for the staff for what has been for the past five years the busiest public library facility in the
State of Michigan. The construction of the computer room and the overwhelming growth of the Friends' bookshop areas have completely filled-up the storage and expansion areas of the Library. In addition, the physical condition of the Main building and its furnishings have deteriorated by heavy use. Thus, a Main facility
PROBLEMASNDPLANS
Page 6.

   study committee consisting of staff and Advisory Committee representation will
be finishing its report by September, and a full recommendation from the Director will be submitted regarding improvements to the Main facility.
7. The Library, as it plans for and moves toward the 21st century, will continue to support the basic strength of its work: an outstanding collection; a competent and friendly staff; and fine facilities.
August, 1985
RamonR. Hernandez Director
Page 7.

  Concerning of the
the procedures Ladies' Library
of the Ladies'
the twenty members of
The
roster
tive vice-president, committee.
Association
the five
comprises It
The pondence, earlier being 23
necessary
Board of
Library
committee
consisting secretary,
of the treasurer
Association.
major officers,
president,
of the book
The executive organization
are empowered treasurer to duties to audit
The years, the
the president, who
and, in the
presides at the
meetings, now has been the
and conducts
normally serves
vice-president
two for
two previous secretary,
who keeps the minutes
corres- although in
treasurer committee
them to do so.
also years
years,
customarily
she often
though
remains for served for much
pro-tern secretaries
a
second
longer filled
year, periods,
in
committee and its
carries finances.
constitution
the
Any to
ultimate three
responsibility for the members of this committee
by the buy and
sell securities. treasurer's books.
sion the papers Consequently
it
enabling the
is one of its
last years.
half-decade,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION of Ann Arbor, Michigan
and customary practices of the membership
Association of Ann Arbor,
A. D.,
the has an
1984.
entire execu-
The treasurer,
status depend, and who keeps the books of the board, has always had
on
of the finance when she convenes
The chairperson of the book committee also appoints
tee to assist her in compiling lists for the librarian of the Ann
who oversees the investments
which
our financial
an extremely
treasurers have remained in office
in 1866 our Our present
variable term. Since we were founded
for 1 to 24 years.
is in her 12th year.
and appoints two members to assist her
and chairperson
She is chairperson
the longest for 3 of them.
her own commit-

 Arbor Public Library. However, the job is sounds, because the order librarian receives lications from the major AI!lerican publishers her own that the book committee may change Further the Public Library does the actual from funds appropriated each year for that Since 1954 her term has varied from 4 to 2
less full
onerous than it
notices of new pub-
The representative new position.
Public
to the Library
It has existed only
Council is a relatively
of the new
committee
members. In that various
periods of slowly
Library gives Library.
building on South us a very important
Fifth Avenue liaison with
in
1957.,
the doings of the decisions as to whe-
position
Public
ther or not we can help on one or another of the Library's projects.
It enables us to make informed
Without our representative's isolation from the institution ed.
The nominating committee,
an important role in that it decides which members to ask to carry on these important jobs.
The membership, inasmuch as it is limited to 20 women, needs to con- sists of truly active members, who expect to attend as regularly as possible the 2 meetings a year and to take part in the discussions
in a productive way, in other words to conduct business. They must also be able and willing to serve at various times as officers, or
and
or augment as it sees fit. purchasing of the books purpose by the Association. years.
Advisory
since the dedication
reports we to which
would
all of our gifts
which functions
only briefly
each year, has
as
is very likely
than one job
only 2 of our present members have actually held all four of the chief offices, president, secretary, treasurer, and chairperson of the book committee, and they are the only two in our entire history.
It can be seen from the above description that every meeting is a business meeting, but it is also an exceedingly pleasant social
individuals
or repeat an office they have held previously.
However,
makes up lists
of
yet this
be working in complete are channel-
changing membership it will be asked to do more

  ,-
occasion during the tea hour held before the board is called to order.
With very few
exceptions
membership
for nearly 120 years women have thoroughly
enjoyed whose regretful
their husband's
in the Ladies' Library Association,
them elsewhere have always written
and those very
Criteria
for choosing new members:
We are not an exclusive organization, but the ·small membership
does occurs. make the ed matter. time.
of selectivity in filling
each and
vacancy as it good policy
of our our
a
person's organization, membership
interests,
in order to enhance the quality
contributions to
careers took letters of resignation.
impose a degree It has been
membership
No written
We need to be as objective as possible about our assessments
thought discussion and
both considerate selection
a
to unpublish-
private and
records of these discussions are kept at any
experiences, and likely
and to assure the continuity
It is true that we buy only books on the fine arts for the Public Library, but a general interest in art provides by no means suffi- cient evidence of suitability in a prospective member. We must have people with the skills to do the various jobs as well as the willing- ness to undertake them from time to time.
of
and diversity the organization.
of

                                (
(
(
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
OFFICE HOLDERS 1954-55 to 1969-70
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER CHAIRMAN
BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER CHAIRMAN
BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COUN.
1954-55 1955-56 1956-57 Hays Hays Hays Frayer Frayer Frayer Wethey Wethey Dodge
pro-tern Hayden Hayden Hayden
1957-58
Hays
Frayer
Wethey
Hayden
Haight
president elective
196,5-66
Wethey
Alexander McKevitt
Haight Collins Plumer
1958-59
Haight
Frayer
Vibbert
Van Tyne H. Hall
ex-officio office.
1966-67
Wethey
Alexander
McKevitt Haight
Collins
Plumer
1959-60 Haight Frayer Vibbert
Van Tyne H. Hall Haight
1967-68
Alexander Keniston Cameron McKevitt
Bader
Keniston
1960-61
Frayer
Dodge
Vibbert Van Tyne Wethey
Alexander
1968-69 Alexander Keniston
Cameron
McKevitt Bader Keniston
1961-62
Frayer
Dodge
Plumer Van Tyne
Wethey Alexander
1969-70
Bader
Keniston Cameron Peckham Collins
Innes
Haight Haight
Position dates from
Haight
or her
1962-63
Frayer
Dodge
Vibbert pro-tern
Van Tyne Wethey Frayer
1959-60; held from
appointee;
1963-64 Plumer Alexander
Youtz
Innes
Collins Plumer
by 1978 a separate
1964-65 Plumer Alexander
Bader
Innes Collins Plumer
-1-

                   (
(
(
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
OFFICE HOLDERS 1970-71 to 1985-86
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN
BOOK COM.
REPRESEN.
LIB.COON.
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRES
SECRETARY
TREASURER
CHAIRMAN BOOK COM. REPRESEN. LIB.COON.
1970-71
Bader
Keniston
Cameron
Peckham
Mellencamp Innes
1978-79
Cameron
Collins
Westerman Wethey Innes
K. Hall
1971-72
H. Hall
Cameron Huntington
Peckham
Mellencamp H. Hall
1979-80
Innes Oneal
Westerman
Wethey O'Brien
K.Hall
1972-73 H. Hall
Cameron
Huntington Peckham Mellencamp
H. Hall
1980-81 Innes Oneal Gramentine
Wethey O'Brien K. Hall
1973-74
Hayden
Mellencamp
Huntington
Wethey Wunsch
H. Hall
1981-82 Oneal
Westerman Gramentine
Wethey
Collins K.Hall
1974-75
Pryor Mellencamp
Huntington
Wethey
Wunsch
Westerman
1982-83 Oneal
Westerman Haight
Wethey Collins K.Hall
1975-76 Pryor Mellencamp Oneal
Wethey Innes
Westerman
1983-84 Westerman K. Hall
Haight Wethey Collins
Innes.
1976-77 Keniston Collins
Oneal
Wethey Innes
Westerman
1984-85
Westerman
K. Hall
Rosenthal Wethey Bulkley
Innes
1977-78 Keniston Collins
Oneal Wethey
Innes Westerman
1985-86
Westennan K. Hall
Rosenthal Wethey Bulkley
Innes
-2-

  I -
.Mrs. Warren
P. Lombard E. Beal . H. Hobbs P. Lombard
'-,,I 16.
17. Mrs.
18. Mrs.
19. Mrs.
20. Mrs.
21. Mrs.
22. Mrs.
23. Mrs.
24. Mrs.
25. Mrs.
26. Mrs.
27. Mrs.
28. Mrs.
29. Mrs.
30. Mrs.
1. Mrs. 2. Mrs. 3. Mrs. 4. Mrs. 5. Mrs. 6. Mrs. 7. Mrs. 8. Miss 9. Mrs.
A. E. Kellogg
Thomas M. Cooley
Charles K. Adams
Alfred H. Hunt .
James B. Angel (Sarah Caswell) . Charles K. Adams
J. M. Wheeler
Kate N. Hale
Alonzo B. Palmer (Love Maria) Wooster W. Beman
1866-1870 1870-1871 1871-1873 1973-1875 1875-1878 1878-1886 1886-1891 1891-1894 1894-1895 1895-1897 1897-1902 1902-1906 1906-1908 1908-1909 1909 1909-1910 1910-1913 1913 1913-1923 1923-1928 1928-1932 1932-193i 193J-1944 1944-1948 1948-1951
1951-1958 1958-1960 1960-1963 1963-1965 1965-1967
  4
  1
  2
  2
  3
  8
  5
  3
  1
  2
  5
  4
2
1
1/2
1
3
1/2
10
5
4 4 8 4 3 7 2 3
2 2
12. Mrs. Philip
13. Mrs. Victor
14. Mrs. Warren
15. Mrs. Albert
Bach (Anna Botsford) C. Vaughan
P. Lombard
B. Prescott
PRESIDENTS OF THE LADIES' LIBR..l\RY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
10. Mrs.
11. Mrs. Harry B. Hutchins
Junius
William
Warren
J. F. Lawrence
G. Carl Huber
Philip E. Bursley
G. Carl Huber
Philip E. Bursley Edward 'Adams
James Griffith Hays Cameron Haight
William B. Frayer James M. Plumer Harold E. Wethey
a. 10

 1-
'---"
31. Mrs.
32. Mrs.
33. Miss
34. Mrs.
35. Mrs.
36. Mrs.
37. Mrs.
38. Mrs.
39. Mrs.
40. Mrs.
John Alexander Arno Bader
Helen Hall
Joseph Hayden Millard Pryor Hayward Keniston George Cameron Perry Innes Robert Oneal Scott Westerman
1967-1969
1969-1971 1971-1973 1973-1974 1974-1976 1976-197 1978-1979 1979-1981 1981-1983 1983-1985
2 2 2 1 2
8 2 1 2 2 2
PRESIDENTS OF THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

   I•
'---'
TREASURERS OF THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
1. Miss 2. Mrs. 3. Mrs. 4. Mrs. 5. Miss
6. Mrs.
7. Mrs.
8. Mrs.
9. Mrs.
10. Mrs.
11. Mrs.
12. Mrs.
13. Mrs.
14. Mrs.
15. Mrs.
Kale Hale, 1966-1867
Lewis B. Gilmore, 1867-1873 6 Moses Coit Tyler, 1873-1881 8
R.
Haight, John McKevitt,
5 2 2
Cameron
1965-1967
1967-1969 2
1
14
24
1931-1950 18 Hayden, 1950-1958 8
Celia A. Jaycox, 1881-1895
Alice Douglas, 1895-1929
Philip Bursley, 1929-1931 2
John Winter,
Joseph
Josselyn
R,;: Perry
Van Tyne, 1958-1963
Innes,
1963-1965
Howard H. Peckham, 1969-1973 4 Harold E. Wethey, 1973-1986 12
Jonathan Bulkley, _J.986-1988
2

   (Not
checked at the Bentley Alfred H. Hunt
D'Ooge
Library
for
period
1886-1904)
1866-1873
1876-1886
1886-
? -1904 1904-1927
1927-1931
1931-1935
1938-1945
1945-1954 1954-1958
1958-1961 1961-1963
1963-1964 1964-1965 1965-1967 1967-1971
1971-1975 1975-1978 1978-1980 1980-1982 1982-1984 1984-
SECRETARIES OF THE LADIES 1- LI.BR,AR):ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
1. Mrs.
2. Mrs.
3. Mrs.
4 . Mrs. Anna B. Gelston
7
13
?
23
3
4
7
9
4
3
2
1 1 2 4
4
3
2 2 2
5·. Mrs.
Byron Finney
Martin Luther Wooster Beman
1908 - pro-tern 1909 - pro-tern 1910 - pro-tern
Mrs. W. H. Wait Mrs. W. H. Wait
Mrs. 6. Mrs. Hugo P. Thieme
G.
Carl
Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.
Huber
7. Mrs. Campbell Bonner Interregnum
1935-1936 1936-1937 1937-1938
- pro-tern - pro-tern - pro-tern
Hays Hays
8. Mrs. Theophile Raphael
1940 - pro-tern 1941, 1942, 1943
9. Mrs. Horace Dodge
10. Mrs. Harold Wethey
1956 - pro-tern
11. Mrs. Charles Vibbert
12. Mrs. James Plumer
1
Griffith
13. Mrs. r4. Mrs.
15. Mrs.
16. Mrs.
Philip Youtz Arno Bader
John McKevitt George Cameron
!11. Mrs.
18. Mrs.
19. Mrs.
20. Mrs.
21. Mrs.
1
22. Mrs.
James
Cameron
Arn.non Rosenthal
1961-1962 - pro-tern
Vibbert
pro-tern Mrs. David Huntington
Robert Oneal
Scott Westerman .
Harold
Wethey
1969 - spring -
Gramentine Haight
Mrs. minutes
Mrs.
Horace
Mrs.
Dodge
Charles
J.
Hays missing
are
J. Griffith
Hugo P. Thieme
J.
Griffith

       r'
issne. •,,,-..• .... Fifteen years ago this-association began its ,T('rk of ministering to tbe intelleetual w11ntsof th.ts community. Its fin:t ex- perience waq that of lesrning not to de- spise the I.layof small things. For several years i~held out but small enticements to
1the-useoftheirlibrary,:indth.eadvantages I of their i!."SOCiation the Sllmeeasy 'terms , to all. As lhey have uo est11blishedsource~
oJ income, the library is dependent for its enlirrge~ent oo the trifling fees C..rmern- bersbip and entertainment.a aml on foe voluntary gil1s oi members of the com-
for-·readio·g, but it ma.7' w,ell be doub!ed_I
whether the scbooh w1tboul the help of a
fondoes& fo~ eooks baYtl e,e;.rafsed .any il nn<arb~r:~llfgistl{
r•, "i. l
.' Wl<D~E8DfY, APR!L 13::_18S1. .,.1(
bod.7 .~•distinctilfn .. ~he defi&.:11drrof' an 'early education may be repaire~ •!>ia good will aod a g,ood library; ,but n~e de. ficiencies which arise ftom a distaste for books are "irreparable. Success, ip life
~ on c>;>ffl 1o ea,odld -~ "" all ,ubjecu of public,,._
AJrJDIU 111uoltfflfflf of 111e
:ere,,,-. do not ""'4 o,onm,u rup,mr..l)i.-for011Y- • cornea through the·u~e which we.make of
o;n"'°"o'r ffllM e:,:prUl(d ;,. ft<cAco,nmunicoti<>llf, • le' I
#dr lol.~la.titnoJIOtluof°""""""" GOMrr.,..,,:.,o. our leisure;' and our JSure•is se d9m
t-.oru. .;,;;fichtlla•if;;intmdtd'/orp,wfica.111r.1aud b~ a-~bl/ t,vr;amc~IU!~r,.u.,qf_~".e""1"i.!:--r1~~
t,UtJ,ron/y of !JOOdfoii'r,mv! r.c: far ;nib,i,;IUU)II .,,,._ JfnlMa14LN.Jt'derirtJli&J.,'1~u.~)◄, l!J: ,,
tllrow away if we are fond of good books.
How Ttlt\DJ a boy could bani been-saved
from wreck,· if. only-an :!l"peti'tefor books ~ r
~AUQmrmunlca.'wnl~d
of fMa pape,IMUld 1>,add--1 TlD ..l.:n< illlOll RllGIIITU;
~"9• COJl~Uon,
for th, coiuinm
lo.the E-orroaOY· ments. Tlius good habits'and ·goou morals.
could'ha~e jnken the place of other ~]lure':, in~ cocii:riu;ity a;everj Jar,::e]yme~ore~•
and controlled by :he use' tfiat is. made'or "'
the Jib~:iries.•':13utbefore, libraries-~an fie 1 A.;,,. bbor, .lli<higan'. .,,. __.cl'TM~~ ' ",• • usld theJ mu"e.;s;;tist... H~o~ _\t'i$ihi.~..i~
PnD~O•:<l)..l'OBJ..l3Bl.!IQCOlfti!iY.
q-nn :Ritomia u "t11t,;red a! Ult Po,t~~ctt
·.ra.E l,.UHJ!S' .LIP.R,nti: ""'~CIA-
' . ... •,, ...,.,.eTlOi.~~ , .• 1 ~ ,~.,., -:· .,
•• ,every, citJ ,.,auJ vi~ge ~r.mor~li~y- ~ad .enterprise a public library is.dee~ed.a,pμ,b-.
· •· • ,..( ~.,.+-r •,..-·: u ~r ., ,. ·l'he recotd of the ladies'' libra•y..duric2
1ic necessity. J::,;..J:;..,~~ 'The want of such means· or edue>llioo
ana 0 " o,on-OM'
to, IAf .A:<!i Az.:soa
1
_: ., • ,' ·•e
t:::epist year is-one of" which any ~imilar
associatiou~'.~ghl_ ·,-vei'Lb,peroud. . We
commend' to ronc..readers a ..sympathetic
perusal i:f'tlie proceedfogs of the annual themselves but for the public. They are meeting tp.,be ·,fpu·~u. els~w.her!' in thi~ , no~ an exclusi.-e corporation. Tbc1yoffer '
H:e bdie;i of .Aon .~rbor are making a commendable effor\ to supply. ·-They shouio be regarded as laborini not for
new members, and gave bnt small diTi• munity_ ·-·· .~..., .
deoda for membership fees. But the day During the p:i.st two years the llS3ocj-
of feeble begionin~ is past; its member-. ation has been in some sense-the guest of
ship baa been very largely increased, its the county. On the complitioo of ilie
catalogue C?~el_helected ~ks hilS been court house the snpenisors wjtb a gallaat, I
eniarged, its· 118efulness-h•as been corres- i and- worthy geiierosily utenueu tht,,bo:r'. I
poodingly extended, 11,nda,t length, it is i pitabtiei of their new edifice totbe lad-. 1
talking of setting up for itself and estab- • :Bu~.ilie..~.kJ·':l gRe~,t~,ha.'!~--~.~!1.,,~~,liged- lisbiog a home of ita own. to climQ to ti>e upper story of their loftyi
Nex~ to our schools; there ia r.o general: .:lnd"lSandsome'abode·; and,.,telise,11n~Llf. public interesl of great.er· nlue to our •• the usefulne~ of the associatfo'xr-lias"beeij commuoi\y than this. Indeed 'there is 'i', 'io~~~liaL limited.'': ' ui 1~ Cl1)1;.:;;!.!-,J ,·ery important !ense in which & good. ••'w{a;e_glad~'ie~ fri>J'i"iberif!';f~ot
library isa oeces!ary, adjunct, ifoot a oec_es:•;}iia\)~~i,~:iehi'nkj~g P,cif:~,i~~f~~i~ sary part, of good schools. The crammmg ,jndep~d~~ ,.:i_n~ed.~t2:bl_ish~a~?Ri~~1:,.of
of le880D9is o~_verylittle importance co_m~.. thei_r.,ow11,~;:~~-.~~\~:-~,e°~Yc'..e,J!:o;t:i:~~~}l
pared wilh t~'e enlargjng and bro~d;01og_ ·ough, ..lO .receive;, el'~ry_,!'nco~ge_~~tl
influence of a permanent love of b6o.s. It -~Webesp,;ak:~forihem i,be•h41af.l.)l,~-<>~r~ alo•e-o~'readi~g!snotestablishedb~the•,atioool<ow-pn_blics:p,jri'4!d..c.i~un,s.~~
schools, qie.•~~011 ,of t~~ ~c~oob 1s:~~; least. a pa!tial. (a1lure;- and', 1£s,uch a;tast~: ;whenl>?ceit:(sesta?~~hed;i~~oi·~tified
-nfe.memberships': ough·t, to-:b&·takeD,bJ '~\Ir b'i!siilewmen.r,•4.Witllie::bot.-litt~mar, •tbat~)eilr t~e:gentle.and io~~niou.spP.rf
and enconng~ b!.,~ess ~ohbm,es, the__I_s~n3io~s•~~t~-~ Jiid_~~~•-~~~t_ea_,s,en/lela,l~ most.valuable1Dsp1rat10n~:ord~d _byt~e, \lie wlioleamountnece~sary,'llipliyfdr~ht
seboola is· lost.;; ·In tact:, if a community lot on which th~y_fiSpftcf'B11ild-.' Thii
were to.~~•.r~duceo.~o_tb!~ad ~eces.fity~t' fact indicateyoau➔ente•pr~se..and a public cbooaiDg,between.sc!i.oola.w'ithontboobspiritwhichourcitizens9ughtti)encour(
11nd boo~·without !~boo~ h. would not. 'ag~ i~, th;13~s~·~•!bsf;jt~?l ·;~'!fo~~t;~.Jtef be ~a&y to ~e,termi.~e~w yrisdom would_ ·\18hav1>a._lib£ary~~μ_d_u~~~;,t';li1~~l.\..a.?
decide. lL :IS certam tliaa many a person addi~ioqal attrnct10!].,,l~ ,,o~r i51ty,1~~ n whhoat- Ulfl advantage of \he scb-Ools~a.~ ,libtary; that.w_il):be an.11Jid.~ti~1?._~}:~_qd~r ame.n,~:;eD;in~.uc.~_-tb;o~g? ~~ ~p~etJ:!' inspiration ~nd pro6~-to,<;>,uc)rliJleDfJ:t~ J
...... ,-......;
_____
._. .
.
._

   I-
Heron 8\rttt.:c......................:................;" • lOO00 Nov.6. 1!'30-p&ld A. Dunn, for lot ou
ANNARBORREGISTER, Wednesday, April 13, 1881
~. 1⁄2-:"-..---:,-"· ~,,..;_. <>•-·~~~::3 if::·~:~nilee-ou~~wiy-clear ~ goiiigwrward;- • , .. !!Tbe .La<:11.,.; Llbrar7 .. ~3?~.·:,~.. ma~y _wilr'co'lle•after.us who will ~d it in
- ..,.. •• .•-- .--~.,"~.:-,;J>.Vt➔••.,,~. thetrheartstoblessua.•• -.·">·<~.!-~~
• The 15th· annuaf meeting of the L:idies'. •!We hsve had ,tb.e advice or those iu whose
Library All&OCiatiownaa held iu the parlors of
the Preal>yterian church 011Mondsy afternoon . ' . ' Apnl 11th. lira. John Mayn!"~d,~ra.:_"E.B. Pond, Mrs.. Pro( Tyler. Mn. Dr. _-\.ngelland Mra Prot. Peuee were reelected members of of the board,\beitJer.m. of. office.having ex-
During UUJ ineeting a'°'a·umcient•;~~;fo{
mone7 wae oootributed ·to-entirely cancel-the
indebtedneu of· the•alllQCiat~n !or-\iheir'.:fot,
jud"gscQnt··wo have .confidence.-:.'!hey have
enC?iirat:ed ~s to go torwar~ aaaurmg us that the pubhc,w1!1not be unmmdful of the Ilene• fl.1.wearel>est.owingupou thecon110unity; and I believe, furthermore, if WQare seen to go forward relymg npon the public spirit or the community w_eshall not bedisappowted in our
ted . suppo~ If...by' our united aud untiring ef• • ._ : .ms"".aaree~ pretn• for11w1ecansucceed,andthuserectamonu• dent;Mra.A:'.!'enBrook,v_1ce•pres1dentM;rs. meet.tothememoryofsma.Ubeginnings,we M. L D·Ooge, secretary, and Yrs. c.·.AJ.ay• shall at the eame time plant seed wlllch shall cox, treaa 11rer: ' • ~~~:-1-~i ~ :•'_;, i:,.,.---,,.yield a poronoial harve_stor ll.owera and fruit.
p red. llra. Pro( Ada 11
• I __. and to lea;9 •·~~•Jl'l?1~!..~;~~;P~ librarw..'l'u,iJdiug:.;.·•-·--· • ,.._, '::'.. ~
Mn.- C. A. Jaycox, for the year,ending April 11 / ... '\, ....\.•~•~•if'!. I 4,,
J-~ • ••·"'; --::-~--:-=-~·:'4 • T~e!Jres~;- ~-rs•.1'._ro!A:aa~Jer,vere
.~ n ,it...,_ '11.KOEIPTS- , ->!~."4 ·.y..t Be(luestfromestate·ofE.C.Seaman.::':-:'.-..s•:-50000 Collecdonsforpaymento!lot...••·-···-•.: 55150 Enwtal•lt•meuta_.......................................- \l5 78 Annu tax...........- .....................-.......... 12'100 Membenhll>f.l....._................................... 49 00
P.naddre!s ~~fol!OWl!:. :--,-:,:·:, ...~~-- ••• .J"ltl!8m&NT'9ADDRESS;-,,1 • • • ' t
, - ~--- TRUSUCZR'S Jl&POR~ ...... _ -· .'-
~ The followin.gis the. report of ,the trea~~.rer,
Ls.diet of U.-Aaociatlon. • .;: ' ·,." ~ • Fines...- ............._.._....-......................... , a3 9~ S&leoc catal~es ·······-···· ................_... :? 60.
Donat.Ion......................_.......................... • 1 00 of the •a;;eoua\ion during t.hepast year. We • Total...............,.-......................:......~..St,~O81
At· the w,ry beginning or our meetin!l"I d~ire to cnngratulate you on the pro!perity
~~~~.~.~~.~.~:.:~·11.:~.•.:~:·.:::::::::'.::::.: - {~ ~ Inter.;scon no1e10 May 2?.ISSO................ il 46· Gaab, nd ......- ...................................._.._ 10000 lll~,;es; on boc<!'.°M&;z.:,I~ ....:......--: ·• •4 00
,.-· Tot&.l......- .........................- ..........51>15 6:i
1Uf: i~ our community, cannot. \)u~tee~a jn~t
pr:cleiu •tr'l)rosr.eri~y- We kaow thawn;um"'. Mi~·?!. J~pa!d-.:..A:':o{;nn, for'tot on
p:1:1itll.Is.ranglh..a.ud.usefuh,i\ss b.llveb*t\ in•
creased ouly. thipug.h i.miirir.g efforts);' :i.)ld ·~e
liavo. no reason.to.su1>po~e t!:lat·.·,ut·he fu·t•1ro _ . ,
i1,1 prosptrit,i wi!J bo secured en any eas:cr
,4:i_,ejust p,sst our fifteenth b1nliday. • L,tiliuk,taat tholl8 whe i.have w11ti:hedt>lia
'1"rowrlr-of·onr hbl'll-,Y from itll smalH>eg;n.1. ,,,ugs to :::u pra.a11t t1ma,and have uad so mnny evic!enclc'oSf tile good it 19 accomplish•
conditions. Froru the.reporta 01 tl:o secret:ary Jan. li. ISi\ , paid ·A. Dnnn, for lot on~: •
,,nJ lrca~ucec·y.ou.'will.·hear of 11,eprese t Hu?<'nSi:eet....·-··-····.............-.:•••:..••:'• i:!O"oo
11 Librarian·,. ;alary to Aprll.1880..r._....... Sl 33" pwspenty or the. rnm,ry. 1 thin"l-"°rnnsr -Ubnvtw·s.: :,,lary to October, vso ..... ...:;... 2Soo
:i~ ..i appoiatments..o In..s!iort, to use a 6guro j!oxrent. .... .,...-- ... .,..--·-.....,.-.~~-·?
wh-:ch ladi~ttwill eppreciate, it is in, the· coi;;. . • •.
di1ivnoLthe child who has outgrown 1taclothes. ' '·· Tlxal ·;;;·-· .......,.....,..-· ...-:""•-'-'~~~, . _t.h On,band-- C.Sf&mt.na bequeaL·-····-·
I presume th al none w11den_?'that e libt:i.• 1 • -'Collections for fot...........--··-
~1.00
-'----
.&O oo -1s1 50 ry. !t•ffl0\'8"11~1ble and -iir qu11nersot its c.,; ~ -:_:aucelpt~am. Llbra.ry_...............••μ 01
own, ,vould be fat mo,-e.u,ef111!t.h~1qni:11t·be • - T0l&l • .. -· ·---
at presen~ ~:u.b·aa lieeiiw.i/1!111,.&.IJg&l!Stel{bj., ·:·:·-·:..:;;;;~~-;;,:1cEtl',IMS~
ooeof wr 111M11betrh,a, ir-seems·very dt>Str&- T .J-D . ri 1L. • ,. , ..,1 0
blo. that the·wociatiOll',sh'oitld;®:~t?-J?lished' upon.a.ti_nu bu~;,vhilt1 -aomeo&.Jta;,lou'll.lla!'3. are still WlUl\UIJ,,U,~It11bould1hav.ea.home:·bti·
fornl!:' parent3 hat&'P3!1ied":!11vay+!.It·is but·
natural that .th~ ..who·ha'.vifours'&r.it in it 1.
mfimcy-; &OQ-cared,'ifor i~ in .:;ts~ch{ldhoo<C
ghou!d-'feeI..,f?r;.'J..fa~liar· inrer~~t·~~ich< repori for ~e year cloei.c~.April 11th, lS8l. thOie,,.,;.ho,{!~·9p!.~e;'.i!?~J~J~U\lU S!>t, A■theh!eoranmdiv1du11lpa!l&88h,eie feel.-·•·":~-"""-'""' m -·• ~•">?,...........".l ,.. , prone to nouce each penod of llve yeara, and
And we ore frequently,.rllminded'.}1\nt the I the fif\.h, tenth, fifteenth, tirentieth anniver• foundel'8111'8fut passing aw.a_y..'E-,ver.fycaT. aarieeof an event are of special interest. . It as we come together .at the..annual galhering; ' tteemKtherefore, peculiarly fitting that this,
we are·remioM of some one who was with
llil th!I}par~(ofp,~u~w;~~«;'a,n;i"o~t/l~tl{t,1~
on eanh, again,.-,,'A gam,. and, ~a.in, 'Ila,,J,)le·
summons ·come-.:;;w&-·are thus painfully re•
·.min&edthat if the'gcneratfori df •the'·found!lr9
of·tb~ibrary ue..io.see;it_perm:inGiiily;e:itab· library building. he.a long. been de3ired by l.ish~-thma'-le:-110.tim,:to l<1se:~~!s.~;1 many members or the association. S11cha • 'Ifil-,.,,...:.a iei;;oiia-'tiri.V"Ehetio'ariYotJ•dj;. building, it WM thought, would be a constaRt rectors aril,tD'eubmit to,yo1(1:b-da; the qu!l-'l• . rerninder to the citizens or A.on Arbor of our tion.:•Shnll the board:or directors be'autllotiZ• library 11ngits Deeds; a coostant testimooial ed to takl! such measurea as may seem to be to the zeal and e..mest labor of those to whom wise in.l.heir·jaogment fortbe·ultimate ercc• "it,owed 1ta lnceptioo· and growth. • Greater tion of' a new library building"?. •,,;-,rj ;;,.: ')nterest would thus be awa~eq\!(l,great~r num•
Tbe ~sons for aod against lhis qu-i9t\on ~ere would .c.onnc~~themselves-with us, ·and should be fu\ly preseutod, and I a1D.aurethat !~-~!?J'}\L~u.:.~~u2!1co woul~. both I>?ilf
.\, ,d • _....,-.,n • 1:-:t'f,,;B ~ .'
·-~.._,, • DT!!BIJRSOIESIS.'-" - • ••
Huronmeet.............................-...........$ ,0000 June 9. 18Sn-p&id A. Dun.n, for lot on
lluron streeL................ ........................ .100,00
all be gra:iflod :i.t tho sho:\"in;; th~.tv;-iil.be m.idc-. -
But we CallnOtfail to seo th3t its ,cry pros-
perity mllk.eiinew demaods, upon us. The Ii•
brnry ia in· need of, _better accomfnodalions -~of:;::-.:....:I.~I:~:.:.::::."E..~:.i~:·.::.:.::~:;.:;:.:.:,
Llbra.'1an's, ialary to April,H,ll,...-.7....:...!. •::2:8'oo
lr°lcT...~.d...b:···d..l.iiooi.'.i........_...
66 00
1n8s':ranJ.~.~...:...!.......:..~..:::::::l:t:l:!::;:a Taxeo............... ----·- ...-.................. _ 10 M
• •
• ,:~
........_.......·-······ .....- ..........k ... , • 221708, 'tl!B 6".,CJHT.&.RY·IsW'ORT. •... :;~
==~~.::=::::::.-=:-.:::·.~:- ~, .·, .n, .............. ,t. 3 , ---.
• - - ,
Tc,the ladles ot the IJbrary ~latlon: :·j::
I hue the hooor to present the follo;i.ing
the ll.t\eenth year or our ei:istence as an &880• ciat1001shouldhavebee~markedbyatleast one transaction or great importance, the pur• chase of a lot. That we might own a lot, and erect thereon 11,tasteful and well &l'Tallged
14

             I-
of e\·ery duty. In illust,alion of thi~, thu rrgularit; of her n:t•ndaoce nt the meetini;:s of the boRrd is worthy of ri!ma:k. By look- 10,:; over the recor<!s,I find thnt during the la~t filt~n years up to last December, 15G meetings have been held, aod Mrs. Douglas had been 11b~entfrom only 12 of them, or once'in 13 umes. To her we C\'er looked for wi-tecounsel in full rcli11nceupon her -excel• lent judgme~L For her indeed, Thankegivmg
'--"
Would lhat our report' might close, nere. Icretsed and more fiilly recognized. We should and that there were oood to record only growth nlso hue tbeo a hall or our Qwn, where such ond prosperitY.,but again has death come in
ANN ARBOR REGISTER, 1·lednesday, April 13, 1881
1
entertainment.a could be given u are not our midat. M'anyhearts were .!!adin this city adapted to a private parlor. This hall might at thanksgiving time, when wo f~l I.hat all occasiooally be rented to suitable per50os end •hould be bright and happy, !or on that doy thus become a source of incomo. It was with • waa to be brought hore the body of one of the hope of eec:uring euch a buildiog, Lhat whom Ann Arbor was justly proud, who, in money wae long~ eet aside Ha nucl~us _for the full vigor of his manhood. had been cut a building fund; and when, at the beginning off, before accocnplishing for science ilia half of the .,-ear jnai cloeed. information was re- of what be had hoped. But how greatly was
ceived that the leiracy or ~oo bf,queathed lhe
nsaociation by Mr., Seaman would, without
doubt., speedily become available, it wu judged
that witb tba be:tueat to draw from for the lay dead. Not hcr's renown in scientific cir- purchase of ne• books, the usutl income cles, nor in the world at large. but she was from membership fees, entertaiomeots, etc::, mother, v.-ife,friend. Her home, her church, might aafely bednoted to the purcllaee of a ilia public work carried on in the city by very desi..-bi.-lot, which juat at thia time wa1 women, there was h~ sphere, and there uo offered the liul.ieaat a low pnce. duty was ever neglected. So quiet, so unas-
.At a meeting of the aasoclation held OD sumiog, ro retiring wa8 she, that one muat
I
May 17th, the board was :iulhorized to pur-
cbai!8 this. lac, lying just west or D~-H~nl• I oi her character, or to rcslize in bow large a man'iJ,rtiidence, and to contract for this obsect sense sbe was tbesupport ot ber husband, and
, ~ucb debl .aa was nece11sary. .A.committee the centro of ber home. We scorcely knew was appointed to solicit contributions to be of her 1llneMwhen sho had f(One,and we were applied to the purcb~e. On •be 2'.!dd3y or left querying why $/1t should be token, bow May, at a special boRrd meeuog, it w3s re• ~ltt could be spared. From the very begin- mired 10 purclJase tho lot, three and a half ning .Mr,. Douglas w:is deeply interested i:i rods in width, for tllo R~m or $1,260, $700 the libr:ir;, nnd was chosen a r:i:emberof iu l.,ein;i:psid down, aud the remnineer wit~ io, first board. .A.libou!(hsbe bad once or twice
wrest at such rime n~ qhould be conveoPnt. sou.,.ht to retire. so efficient and wise a mem- 0
Thc n~•s ,ry;, 1i;crswcro 1mr:1di11tels:i~e<l ber w:is she Cl>nsidered,that she h:id oevar an,:!thu; t,.-1....,o,,,:J:Jc.n~cn;;ce ,, land 1>wucr. beeo ~m: itled to do so. Here, as etse..·berc
'fhr_ou:!1 1;.c i,xorthm~ of the to:i~it'.J;, Ishe \Y8ij romnrkably raithrul io the discbarg~
c;,1:miit:.,,',~.ndth::i cordi::I rc;r,onse 1;:,·eoto
th!'m. tho S ! ~G•Jh~, b~~:i aire.,•ly n°~>l;
r~ii;ed, a· d ti. , is cerui:il7 :i cr:sc 10~ ;!~ ,:
rejoici,,g. lu c,ne m~tter. ho,:ae\ r, the lo • \
hns \,{,to disa,poinllid. n_,·:,:,;; tu nu uo,x•
p'.lcted claim ,,;i:,10s, tl:c ::ic:u:ia:1 cst~te, tl:o
ca~h ns.,ct~ ~:ere exh~,:~tcd and ~pccific be•
4ue-ts coi:!J be~ ,:J only i:\ L~a-erl\..orth Gas
t.toc::Rt al4 a"r.r~i~ v.,lueof t1:tyccn~son 3
dollar. A th~1::t!ndPl:krC3of lhi.-1stoc!, C:J!J~
intoth;ih.m;.I❖>fth'ltrcn,urerafewwePl-s»go, morn dawned bright aod beautiful in tht1t and jn~t ho:v much rendy moocy can be real• other world. where there are oo more tears. izad!'orit1syetqu11eunceruiin.Yet.through_ M1'1!D.r.Wells~asch~nbythej)oar,1to
the gloom occasioned by hiJ death deepened, when early on that morning, word was circu- lated that another well-known in our midat
know her well, to rightly appreciate the-fo~co
the etfort.s of the l~d,eio,without the. usa ol :m~b.t 1~.ce lei\ vscont aod bas a~ted the. 1bi$ mooe; upon which ~-cde5na31f co_u:ited eppoiotmeoL
twolrn months a;;o, wo hal'O nearly pa:d for ,, fa the death of Mr. Rogers also we have our lot, nnd have bou;::ht during_tbe :rear a lo~t a most honored friend, who wu ever goodly number of books. Our income ha, re11dyto aiiiat u11 by nluable couosel, and been coo,t:iody increosed by the parlo: c:i· who always manifested hearty intereat 10 all tertainmcnts, which ha,e heen continued our undertaking. How many limee haYe we 1
Uirou:;h the year, and, n~ h~retoforc, ha,·e
been e:i:treme1yanjoyAblenod proOtablc. The
association ia under great obluiatioos lo the
geutlemen who bavo so _generouslr lectured
for their benefit. Tho oones of t:nl.181C3! even-
ings, when the works of the d1~eroot com- • f11w had besrd the seccet whiepered that po:;ers will be studied, are pecuh_arl; attrnc• this WIUI the fiftieth onoive~ry of his mar- tive. 'l'o arr3oge for them requires a·great, ried life, and thus, thoul(h all anticipated amount of laboc from tho11&who ba~·a.t.bo.: eomethiog full of interef!t and eperl<ling whh
matter in cbiuxe, an,d also from I.be!Dus;c,ao!, wtl, not many euspected that a alretch of hia and those p~eot never fail to wish tbat a. own life woold be reacj, We are gn.teful that
I much largernur:iber would ova!l the:nselv~! of this opportu_n1tyto hear dehghtfu~ ,mnsio
Iand agsist the library. .
Tbe librarian's report sl1ows that s111.clea~t
April eighty book.~ b_a·,9 been nddeJ to \he ,
the closing yeara of eoch a life were paaaed in our city, and that hia generous apmp&thy was 1ti-renin !IO large meaa11reto our library anociatioa.
AA we eat.er now upon our aixteenth year, it is well for us to coosider what decided 1lep1 forward we can take. By haYing eome def!•
gathered ill hie parlors for our entertainmenUI and how cordial ha1 bis welcome ever bei!o. We shall not soon forget the eveoiog of 0&- cember 9th, 1875, whe11we usembled at Jiie hou98 to lieten tu a paper from bimeelt: Ooly
library, four of which numb!!r were preser.ted.
Twenry-ftve nnmbers ?f pcriodicol~ ba:e Meo , bouml The1•Atlantic. Harper'e, Scnboer'~.
Eclectic,. Pop11l,ar;&:ience Mo.nthly, Littell'~• progreaa. If af\~r the lapee of !Iveyears, we
and two, copi·es ol SL Nicholas. Me token. may look 11po.·a buildirig or·our own erected
, The:-e-n:i !!,Jal) oooka ia:: tho -Hb:~:,7,- •D~. , and at least in great part paid for, we aball _. • iog the 'year 3,45~ books ond 1,048 cnagn• have reason to be !8tlsfied whh the work of
zines have ~n. circulated .• _F~rty-five•n:ew twenty years. • •
1 members bave J01oedthe a~rauoo: . Respectfully submitted, , .. • .MART W. D'Ooos, Secretary.
\
1
1 nite aim in view we ahall ~ far more sur9'of
1

         LADIES'
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION,
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 1985-1986
Mrs. Scott Westerman Mrs. Kirby Hall
Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal Mrs. Harold Wethey
Zibby Oneal Carol Plumer Mary Pryor
Prue Rosenthal Marci Westerman
Robert)
James)
Millard)
Amnon) 2105 Devonshire Rd. 665-0941
Alice
Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.
Wethey Emeritae
and their (1940-1971), (1940-1985),
:t:ears 315
1926 Hampton Ct. 1510 Cambridge Rd.
as active members
Stanley
Florida, Joseph
48104.
Howard
Dodge
32789. Hayden
Peckham
Ave.,
Winter Park,
Collins
Gosling Haight
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs. Scott) (Mrs. Harold)
Hall Hall
715 s. Forest.
Geddes Heights
North Carolina, Charles Vibbert
5 Roosevelt
Pl.,
5 C,
Montclair,
Membership
and Officers Officers
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Chairman of the Book Committee Representative, Library Advisory
Council
Mr$. Mrs.
Jonathan Perry
Hills
Rd.
Bulkley
Innes
663-5879 663-5898 769-3115 662-9109 663-6255 995-0508 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 761-8331
662-4164
Johnnie Alexander (Mrs. Marian Bader (Mrs. Trudy Bulkley (Mrs. Margaret Cameron (Mrs.
Members
John)
Arno)
Jonathan) George)
Cameron)
788 Arlington
285 Orchard 1915 Scottwood 1515 Ottawa
703 s. Forest 2222 Fuller 2112 Vinewood
Eleanor
Betty
Isabel
Helen
Kirby
Trudy Huntington
Joan Innes
Roberta Keniston
Jan Barney Newman (Mrs.
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
David)
Hayward) 2222 Fuller
(1966-1978),
28739. (1951-1968),
213 London Rd.,
Hendersonville,
New Jersey, 07042.
Year of Election to Membership
1948 - Hall, Helen 1951 - Haight
1951 - Plumer
1951 - Wethey
1956 - Collins 1957 - Alexander 1957 - Keniston 1960 - Innes 1960 - ·Pryor 1962 -· Bader
1962 - Cameron "1970 - Huntington
12 2037
Geddes Ave. Perry) 2100 Hill St.
Haskell) 931
662-4164 Oakdale 761-9574
Rd.
Onandaga 769-0238
501
1280 Astor Dr.
662-1230 751 Spring Valley 662-2118
662-9723 668-6225
New England
1530 Hill St., Ann Arbor, Michigan,
1970 - Oneal
1972 - Westerman 1976 - Hall, Kirby 1982 - Bulkley
1982 - Gosling
1982 - Rosenthal 1985 - Newman

     Mrs.
and Mrs. and Mrs.
Scott Absent
Westerman, were Miss
a listing the future Miss
in both of lists will
two columns. Everyone up accordingly.
that
agreed and
Eleanor Col- while walk-
Since 1975 our Mrs. Wethey,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
SECRETARY'S REPORT
The Ladies' Library
Association Members
held present
its Fall were:
October 25, 1985
meeting at the Mrs. John Alex-
home
ander, Mrs. Mrs. Betty Kirby Hall, Keniston,
Robert Oneal.
of Mrs.
Arno Gosling, Mrs.
Mrs. Jonathan Cameron Haight, Huntington, Mrs. Oneal, Mrs. James
Secretary, Mrs.
Treasurer.
David Mrs. Robert
Mrs. Mrs. Millard
Amnon Rosenthal, Harold Wethey,
Haskell Newman. refreshments
Bader, Mrs.
Cameron, Mrs.
Hayward Pryor,
President, Eleanor Collins
After
erman called the meeting to order.
ing were read and accepted as amended. Mrs. Alexander asked
the form of the membership list be changed so that all members have
Helen Hall lins accident. She ing near the campus.
upon to report on Miss fell and broke her arm and shoulder
assets moved January
Ladies'
report was read and accepted. Considering this the treasurer,
The Treasurer's have doubled!!
that $2500.00 be 1986 to celebrate Library Association,
beautifully
the first be drawn was called
served
The minutes of the spring
given the
to the Ann Arbor Public
Bulkley, Mrs. Miss Helen Perry Innes,
Plumer,
George Hall,
by Mrs. Oneal, Mrs. West- meet-
Library in of the existence of the
120 years
and our flush treasury. The complete
-1-

   report is Mrs.
attached
to these minutes.
Jonathan was able to bring
Bulkley only three
read the Book Committee report. She new books for our inspection because
almost all the books we have purchased in the last six months had
been
made
Library
art books on tape
report is attached. of the Book Committee
Mrs. Bulkley that the Ladies'
checked out. a suggestion
on behalf embark
Association
upon a new project-helping
blind and otherwise physically
to
record handicapped.
The complete
for the
In order to volunteer your time you must be able to set aside three
hours a week for Library Association
approximately ten will be mininal,
weeks. possibly
The cost to the the cost of
Ladies' obtain-
ing the
cost at all. A motion was made by Mrs. Bulkley for the Ladies'
Library Association to sponsor the recording of
only about The
one hour and report of the by Mrs. Perry
a half activities Innes.
before their voices
of the Library Advisory Council
copyright for certain
books,
possibly
no additional
extra
The
Mrs.
more
she was on the board of the Friends of the Library. Mrs. Millard Pryor said many readers would be needed as most people can read for
motion
Bader suggested that
readers, and Mrs. Bulkley responded that she would do that as
was seconded
by Mrs. Arno Bader, and we contact the Friends
was made
library
increase of .3 mill in June. The Director of the Ann Arbor Public Library, Mr. Hernandez, would like to publicly thank the Ladies' Library Association for their hundred years of support for the
card has been produced.
A different, more permanent type of The voters approved the millage
-2-
art books onto tape. unanimously approved. of the Library for
give out.

    --
library. The complete report is attached.
Mrs. Hayward
ary Board reported
Keniston, on the
representing
penal fines.
the local courts.
the Ann Arbor Public Libr-
that
is assessed
gets $95,000 a
Library of what
year in penal fines. other 80% goes to
That represents the Washtenaw
Court ages
is taken system. An
so that they
in-the effort
is now being made
percent-
had compli- art
Mrs. Keniston mented the Ladies
books available
Mrs. Westerman suggested
election of our of the spring,
officers, because
and payment of
dues in the fall are less well
the instead
attended.
that the
meeting at the house of
reading meeting must
take place
that the Mrs.
secretary will Westerman told
to each
in time for the a long letter,
October meeting. Only Mrs. Peckham which made all of us hope to visit
responded with Hendersonville,
North
Carolina,
soon. The secretary
was instructed to answer her
through
1
on all of Ann Arbor.
that we have our
the excellent
are also
to change these to the library.
More favorable
reported that the Loving Branch
Library Association
to the citizens
the spring
meetings decide
Mrs.
date
became apparent
Friday of April. To that end we agreed not to change the annual business meeting. We set the date of April 25, 1986 for the next
that
and spring
we after
the it
last
agreed
of time.
us that she had written a postcard
of the emeritus members asking them to send any news they might have
Kirby Hall suggested of the next meeting,
at the previous through the
meeting by-laws on the
Penal
fines are The Ann Arbor
the amount
Public
20% County
Mrs. George Cameron.
send a reminder three weeks ahead
-3-
annual report,
It was also

    letter with a note of appreciation from all the members.
After an extended discussion we decided to submit our nomin-
ations for the current vacancy at this time and vote in April for our favorite candidate.
Because we postpone
of the late hour Mrs. Westerman then recommended
that
Ladies' Library Mrs. Bulkley
Association until moved that the
Mrs. James Plumer's
report on the past the spring.
meeting be adjourned.
submitted,
years
of the
Respectfully
Prudence L. Rosenthal, Secretary.
-4-

    Treasurer's Report
October 25, 1985
Library and through
Association up
to
date, and I can have contributed
report that just under
holdings
risen to almost $86,000. find that on December 31,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
In May our shares of both Comerica (formerly the Detroit Bank) and Safeway Stores were sold, for the reason that the first had be- come too hard to keep track of as an Over-The-Counter stock and the second with its payment date just at the turn of the year constant-
ly made trouble in the A stock distribution
accounts.
in July
Standard Oil of Indiana, now Minerals, which
known as Amoco, consisted
seem to be worth altogether
in no dividend and it is too much trouble to take care of such a
small
investment. have been
Therefore they bringing our 1976
will be sold history of the
I
soon. endowment
1985 the
Ladies
was a little more than $85,160, On looking back
records I worth just under
$70,000.
back I find that since 1975 they have doubled.
rise in the stock market is to me quite frightening
Thus in three
years they
22.8%.
Such a persistent
the horrendous debt of the United States Treasury
in view of and the endless
of ten about
$130.
Thus far they have brought
Ladies'
1930
worth of books on the fine arts to the Ann Arbor Public Library. In addition, at the end of the year 1984 the total value of our
1982 our assets
from
shares of Cyprus
deficit in our trade balance.
However, right now it is clear that our income will be at least
were had risen
of the since
$44,460
which by October 1985 had
through our
Looking farther

   $5,440.
in special
our library
spend in a single year. At present writing it looks as though we can sustain this level of spending next year. 1986 is another
special year, being the 120th anniversary of our founding in 1866. I move that we send a check for $2,500 to the Public Library next January.
Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, Treasurer.
Consequently celebration
o~r $5,000 contribution
of the 100th anniversary
to the Public Library of the opening of
building
on Huron Street is within
what we can safely

     the pages unfold
Turner
of their
are well worK
by the Yale
two handsome University Press.
In Our booK twenty-nine
May, 1985, committee
$2,800
met and came up with
The cost of current balance
Suzy
will
book
project
new titles, $1,500.
the
books
the Physically
Washington,
Library
tape.
recordings
will become
of
tapes tapes
the
thank proposed discovered 1 ife-long
Through throughout
these Library
Ladies onto
booksa for
National
Service (NLS)
the of
81 ind and Congress,
are
Locally, 1 ike
the
for
to
can Bl ind
from the
the Handicapped. research she
Association has Ann Arbor Public
obtained
new booKs
art to modern. and American
Library.
The majority
range relate
from
to
with others
cost to the Ladies
wishes Association
this enjoyment The monetary
this undertaking
is minimal. What readers, reading
Library by the Ladies
to
supply supplied
by titles
world
as diverse as INDIAN CARPETS, ART OF
(29)
Chen, the reference
was deposited including
a 1 ist of suggestions
made by these booKs
be approximately account is around
1 ibrarian. The
in the recommend a new
The
book committee
$2,800.
would
1 iKe to Association.
sponsor
to
the Ladies
from
REPORT OF THE BOOK COMMITTEE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
served
two volume editions
in the book account.
OCTOBER 25,
1985
Since our spring meeting
Library
for the
ancient
European
represented
THE INCAS, TANG AND LIAO CERAMICS and GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN BYZANTINE ART. THE SKETCHBOOKS OF HIROSHIGE are
particularly lovely in that they are a facsimile edition,
Library Association
These "talKing I
Library
Handicapped of the Library
We propose
that art
part of
D.C .. distributed
be obtained and Physically
the Library
the
of country.
Pryor for
a new avenue
on this read, she has
Mary
project. No
has done
interest in who are also
through and
we hope from books
volunteer
longer
able to which
art
Library
Library
to share handicapped.
for
will be
to the Ann Arbor Public
visually
in
April, 1985, forty-one (41) Topics covered
the
Ladies
of booKs art, but the rest of the
is
accordian style. Lovers of Constable and
Washtenaw
Association.
Congress,
County We would
to pursue her

        ;;.
dorno,
1983
Theodor.
AESTHETIC THEORY.
Routledge,
LI ST $ 49.95
45.00
29.95 75.00
37.50
24.95
67.50
50.00
195.00
25.00
35.00
50.00 45.00
40.00
37.50
85.00
150.45
85.00
PAID
$ 45.94
27 .13
27.30 69.49
34. 09
20. 03
61 . 10
45.90
177.03
26.69
21 .42
30.00
40.85
36.35
34.43
76.63
150.45
ndo, Hiroshige.THE HIROSHIGE. Braziller,
SKETCHBOOKS OF 1984
LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BOOKS RECEIVED BY THE LIBRARY 4/85-10/85
eardsley, John. EARTHWORKSAND BEYOND: CONTEMPORARYART IN THE LANDSCAPE. Abbevi11e, 1984
orsi, Franco. BERNINI. Rizzol i, rettell, R.R. & McCullagh, S.F ..
1984
DEGAS IN THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. Abrams, 1984
rooKe, Christopher. MONASTERIES OF THE WORLD. Omega, 1982
runner, Felix. A HANDBOOKOF GRAPHIC REPRODUCTION PROCESSES. Hastings, 1984
urckhardt. THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE ITALIAI\I RENAISSANCE. Univ. of Chicago Press, 1985
utl in, Martin & Joll, Evelyn. THE PAINTINGS OF J.M.W. TURNER. 2 vols.Yale Univ.
Press, 1984
ye. A.E .. ART INTO LANDSCAPE/LANDSCAPE
INTO ART. PDA Publishers, hicago, Judy. THE BIRTH
Doubleday, 1985
1983 PROJECT.
urry, David Park. JAMES McNEILL WHISTLER: AT THE FREER GALLERY OF ART. Norton, 1984
oty, Robert. WILL BARNET.
Abrams, Georges,
1984
GLASS BY
uncan, Alastair GALLE. Abrams,
& de Bartha, 1984
tl in, Richard.
THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE CEMETARY
THE ARCHITECTURE OF DEATH: IN EIGTHEENTH CENTURY PARIS. M.I.T.
Press,
ans-Ruedin,
1984
1984
Erwin. INDIAN CARPETS. Rizzol i,
arstang, Donald. DIACOMO SERPOTTA; AND THE STUCCATORI OF PALMERO 1560-
1790. A.Zwemmer, 1984
erdts, William. AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM. Abbe v i 1l e , 1984
76.63

      ogh, Vincent Van. VAN GOGH IN ARLES. Abrams, 1984
RAPHIC DESIGN IN JAPAN, Vols.3,4. Kodan sh a, 1982
RAPHIS ANNUAL 1982-1983.
Hastings
ray, Basil. SUNG PORCELAIN AND STONEWARE.
regori, M. & K. Christiansen. THE AGE OF CARAVAGGIO. Rizzol i, 1985
askell ,Barbara. BLAM! THE EXPLOSION OF POP, MINIHALISH AND PERFORMANCE 1958-1964. Whitney Museum. 1984
nnes, George. GEORGE INNES. Harper & Row, 1985
obe, Brock.NEW ENGLAND FURNITURE; THE COLONIAL ERA. Houghton Mifflin, 1984
ange, Dorothea. DOROTHEA LANGE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF A LIFETIME. Aperture, 1982
adice, Barbara. MEMPHIS:RESEARCH, EXPERIENCE. Rizzoli, 1984
ewald, John. PAUL CEZANNE: THE WATERCOLORS; A CATALOGUERAISONNE. Little Brown, 1983
eynolds, Graham. THE LATER PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS OF JOHN CONSTABLE 2 vol .. Yale Univ. Press, 1984
ubin, William, ed .. •PRIMITIVISM• IN 20TH CENTURY ART. Little Brown, 1984
ato, Shozo. THE ART OF SUMI-E: APPRECIATION, TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATION. Kodansha, 1984
cavullo, Francesco. SCAVULLO. Harper and Row, 1984
hiff, Richard. CEZANNE AND THE END OF IMPRESSIONISM. Univ. of Chicago Press, 1984
tierl in,Henri. ART OF THE INCAS. Rizzoli, 1984
35.00
139.90
59.50
65.00
50.00
27.50
40.00
40.00
25.00
35.00
150.00
195.00
80.00
34.95
60.00
29.95
50.00
40.00
85.00
31 .95
121 . 28
59.50
58.85
42.53
16.62
34.96
23.36
29. 15
31. 63
130.05
177.03
69.36
30.42
36.35
27.49
45.45
36.99
atrous, James. 1880-1980.
A CENTURY OF AMERICAN PRINTMAKING, U. of Wisconsin Press, 1984
atson, William. Rizzoli, 1984
TANG AND LIAO CERAMICS.
76.62

     eber, Nicholas Fox. THE DRAWINGSOF JOSEF ALBERS. Yale Univ. Press, 1984
35.00
95.00
22.95
$ 2520.55
33. 03
87.21
23. 12
$ 2224.71
eitzman, Kurt.
Princeton,
GREEKMYTHOLOGYIN BYZANTINEART. 1984
igoder, Geoffrey, ed .. JEWISH ART AND CIVILIZATION. Chartwel 1,
1972
0 to r 25, 1985 Meeting
R port of the BooK Committee T ud BulKley, Chair

   Secretary's
Report
Ladies' Library Association
April 25, 1986
Newman, Mrs.
Robert Rosenthal,
Wethey, delicious
Mrs. James
Mrs.
Plumer, Scott
Pryor,
Mrs. Mrs.
Amnon Harold After
THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
The
home of Mrs. George
held its present
at the Mrs. John Alexan-
George Cameron, Helen Hall, Mrs. Innes, Mrs. Haskell
Mrs. Millard Westerman, President,
der, Mrs. Arno Bader,
Miss Eleanor
Kirby Hall, Mrs. David
Members Jonathan Bulkley, Cameron Haight,
were Mrs.
called
the meeting to Before Mrs.
order. Wethey read
Collins,
Miss Perry
Cameron. Mrs. Mrs.
Huntington, Oneal, Mrs.
Secretary, Treasurer.
refreshments
her with
a beautiful for a
azalea plant of thirteen that our
on behalf
of
Association The treasurer
job announced
years done assets have
Spring meeting
served by Mrs. Cameron, Mrs. West-
erman
and accepted.
Westerman presented
the Ladies' Library
very well indeed.
tripled since 1974-from $32,000 to almost $96,000 in 1986. A motion was then made by Mrs. Wethey and seconded by Mrs. Innes to donate $2500
to the Ann Arbor Public Library. The complete report is attached.
Mrs. Innes reported for the Public Library that the new computer
system is in place there and working ve~y well. We should all be sure to get our new cards if we haven't already. The passage of the new millage increase, and the tax increase have been good for the lib- rary. Mrs. Innes also reported that Mr. Hernandez has been ill recent- ly.
-1-
The secretary's
her treasurer's
report was read report Mrs.

   Mrs. Library
Bulkley Association
reported for the Book Committee that the Ladies'
has obtained forty-four new books for the Library.
Studies of Nestern dominate, but old also represented. begun.
Winifred
aunt, Betty Hayden. The Library was not able
it already had copies, and the books were sold by the Friends of the Library. Mrs. Bulkley suggested that we honor Mrs. Hayden with a
book and bookplate as one of our next purchases. She also suggested
that we honor the late Harold Wethey, husband of Alice, with a book- plate placed in his final volume on Titian, dealing with the drawings, which his wife has seen through the press, when the volume is pub- lished and can be purchased. Mrs. Bulkley thanked her book committee, Helen Hall and Carol Plumer, for their help and interest over the past
two years.
We elected
Nesta Spink. Nominations
two new members
at this time-Frances McSparran
Roberta Keniston, President, Kirby Prue Rosenthal; Westerman.
Committee. Huntington;
are:
secretary Carol
on behalf of the Associated Plumer then read aloud
members.
to us from the old historical reports
-2-
modern and contemporary
art and
Poussin and art books for
pre- Rembrandt are the blind has
masters
The project of
Holbein, taping
Favreau donated three
of her
were presented Chairman of the
Hall; Vice-President,
and
of
They Secretary,
Bulkley;
and one vote was cast by the
Treasurer, Trudy There were no objections
Book Committee,
Marcy
such as
art books from the
to use them because
by Zibby Oneal Nominating
in the absence
Trudy
architecture
library

    starting with esting report, constitutions,
the Constitution
of for
1866. instance, 1959 and
It was that
a lively there
and inter- have been five
reads
This
as follows: The Treasurer
to sell and the absence
of the Ladies'
assign
Library
the name of the any one of the
executive
motion was
Mrs. Bulkley moved
to cary by Mrs. Alexander
that the meeting be
Respectfully
Prudence
out
and unanimously passed.
informing
us,
1966, 1887,
Mrs. Westerman then brought up the problem
of the comnittee
members of the such transactions.
seconded
1931,
of the signatures needed by the Treasurer to buy and sell stock. At this time it is
necessary for the Treasurer to obtain four signatures other than her own in order to carry out her job. Mrs. Newman made a motion that
stocks in Treasurer
is empowered
Association is authorized association. In
-3-
1983.
adjourned.
submitted,
Rosenthal, Secretary.

     LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
REASURER'S REPORT
April 25, 1986
This is my thirteenth treasurer's report for the Ladies'
ibrary Association. Since it is also my last, for me it is a
appy accident that in the past year we have lived through the most
I.h' .
stonis ing surge in the stock market ever known. In fact just a
ew weeks ago the market reached the dizzy height of 1800 on the
ow scale before
alling interest
oney market fund,
984 and we were well able to take care of our $5,000 commitment
retreating slightly. In rates and the consequent
of relentlessly
hundredth anniversary of
our revenues were only
spite lower some
returns from our $63 less than in
o the Public Library in honor of the one
he opening of our little
since when I took over the treasury in 1973 our assets were approx- lmately $45,000 and then fell precipitously in 1974 to only $32,000. kven by 1977 they had recovered only to $44,700. Then again in Q981 25% of our net worth was suddenly drained away by a dramatic drop on Wall Street.
It is to be hoped that my successor doesn't have to repeat my
ncome
unnoticeable
has been made almost arket which added more than
to
$10,500
·n 1985. On December 31st our holdings
of our $95,578.46.
experience and of superheated quick survey of our stocks had
find that all our air, which dissipates
outward with
opulence is just a welter
market quotations shared in the upward
on
dismaying rapidity.
April 13 showed that most of
library building.
Our by the
the value
slightly
soaring
lower stock
assets It
totaled
[ertainly could be said that I am departing in a blaze of glory,
-1-
climb into the
first quarter
A

     f 1986, but it is far from certain that the market will continue
n up to the 2000 mark on the Dow scale, as many optimistic brokers redict. However, since half of our assets are now in a money
funds are not subject to the vagaries of Wall Street, but they also
in the tock market than we were when I took over the treasury. Such
arket fund, we are better cushioned against steep declines
do not share in ~hat have been
I have had
this year. When the third broker who was in charge of the Ladies' Library account at Paine-Webber departed for greener pastures, and Paine-Webber made no move to replace any of them, I decided that it was time that we moved too. The last two of the three had both gone
over also office slowly peared
to my
Merrill-Lynch, so personal account
I took
there. Many
but
the dramatic increases occuring in recent years to make various changes
in the value of equities
on Wall Street.
in our financial arrangements
not only the Ladies' account
years ago I nation-wide
went right on putting checks into it at odd moments, and I had to reclose it in May and again in October. Reluctantly I arranged to have all the dividend checks sent to me personally instead of to
the bank. All the happy ease that I had envisioned in turning the
of Hornblower and Weeks, once
fade away
a
house,
altogether The computer
scene.
through
from the national
age continued to trip me through
like attrition.
Now that
1985. After hav- ing closed our savings account twice in 1984, I found that the bank
treasury over to pre-computer time when I took over
a successor vanished and our account is as far as our dividends are concerned.
back in Just as
over the treasury
from Dorothy
Peckham, letters
-2-
watched the brokerage
firm has disap-
Detroit

      ave had to be sent to all the companies in which we are invested, lhangin•g the name and address of the treasurer.
To return to the strict contents of my financial report, for he second time in my thirteen years as treasurer I have had to
list under income an amount that I cannot account for. As in 1983 lany hours of checking the dividends reported by the companies
lgainst the deposits listed in the bank statements faile~ to locate
he source of error.
As I reported at our last meeting, we sold our shares of Safeway
tores and Comerica, the first because the dividend kept shifting
Icross the end of the year and it was difficult to keep track of, the jecond because it wasn't listed at that time in the Value Line Survey
nd I couldn't follow it. Since our sale Comerica has been added
o the Value Line, but it isn't doing very well and I am pleased that
e no longer own it.
Two sales of securities have
I
Foods
binally
I rder
ad acquired over these negotiations
also been made in 1986. Beatrice
had been flirting seemed to be
for months overdoing its
with various coyness with the
to take advantage
of the large
that its stock we had to sell our 100 shares
in a considerable hurry a few weeks ago. We had bought into the company in 1978 for $2,632.90 and received $4,444.35 when we sold out. Our profit was $1,811.45. We also got rid of the little block
of 10 shares of Cyprus Minerals, which came as a distribution Amoco last summer at $13,08 a share. It paid no dividends, cient reason for turning our small stake back to the company
from a suffi-
for redemption when Cyprus Minerals made an effort to close out all its
-3-
gain in value
take-over offers and last one. In

   ccounts of fewer than 25 shares. We were paid $186.25--a gain of 55.45.
My accounts were audited by the president, secretary and chair- ,an of the book Committee. One of the auditors did not understand
jhe term Revolving Fund for the account into which our contributions
jo the Public Library are paid. Such a fund does not have to be
,losed and balanced ibrarian.
each year.
It is always available to the order
This year of 1986 is the
ur association. In celebration
o the Public Library and it is clear that we can afford to give the ame amount in July. Whether this can be repeated next year remains o be seen. I make a motion that the treasurer be empowered to
ssue a check to the Public Library for $2,500 as our second half- early contribution for 1986.
Respectfully submitted,
Alice Sunderland Wethey, Treasurer.
120th anniversary of the founding we have already contributed
of $2,500
-4-

     book our
as a Public would when was
of
It is to be doubted that any of you realize how radically our
organization tance of our
began 'With
has been transformed various officers has only books on the fine
and how much the relative impor-
buying
the constitution of
1931
from the
meetings
Library
a revolving
Public purpose
Library.
the pres-
ident
presiding
the agreement with the Public
tributions each half year in
can draw as needed for its purchases of books on the fine arts. The Ladies no longer do any of the actual ordering and purchasing. It was a logical move. The discounts available to the Library, but
not to us, mean that our money goes very much farther in their
was abruptly reduced officer of our two
to merely
Then in 1964 came
hands.
-it
to be
far
ly
no book committee at all.
eliminate our book
the Public Library, order librarian has
on--following
a
with the
the office of
The Ladies'
That change didn't completely
committee which seem access to
would go
sure-if we had
still makes scrupulously
recommendations to
more publisheis'
honored. lists
But the than we do
different
and purchasing pattern to be
serene-
In contrast
committee
organization. conduit for
Library. bring our
near atrophy treasurer
of the presidency and the has become the linch-pin
her office
hedged in by new rules
so much
that much increased
somewhat
channeling
Lack of Association acquired
a treasurer to a
is complete
functions account of circumstance
Yet in the
the
her burden.
chiefly the
that years herself
Library funds into
currently
the bank the one
halt.
shifted arts
in the for the this one
years since we
specifying policy-maker
importance,
treasurer
-1-
a
by
year.
which we deposit our con-
fund from which the Library
the

    tion
In 1952 the executive committee passed a resolution stating
of the Ladies Library
Associa-
consisting securi-
"That any three officers of the
of five are hereby authori7ed to sell and
ties
Committee,
owned by the Ladies' Library
In 1952 it wasn't very important that this
was a remarkably cumbersome way to do business. There was no great amount of buying
and Sl=?lling on the part of the Ladies and their funds were far more
limited than today.
cial climate of the
have passed, been changing.
however, the finan-
conf.1:onted with an
stock market that
tions. Our portfolio
volatile financial
is subject to wilder and more has always been conservative
and
a
collecting
People
signatures
constantly in touch
projects
little
as
affairs
before she prove to be
can sell
out-of-town
is a dangerous or extremely
to
volunteer represent
officers financial
get
with, because
of their
with
the other
associa- enough
comments. It all can
As the years
world has ever· more
is now
yet even wJth such investments, situations too frequently now arise
in which the treasurer needs to make a quick decision to sell some
I
holdJng
the 1.rnmcls of three of the four other members of the executive com-
Executive
Association
to avoid a conspicuous loss. The requirement that she make
mittee
hobble.
diffic11lt
other
hand,
tions's
with
cause many days delay at moments when speed is essential. With such a shackle the treasurer is scarcely in a position to carry out her duty of "conserving" our funds.
in
more than a rubber-stamp
involvement signatures, on
Ann Arbor. The
well as its members are to make even pertinent
because the rarely conversant
-2-
assign
of
stock and Ann Arbor."
The treasurer environment
frequent
in the extreme,
oscilla-

    The last up-swing of the stock market that brought our assets
close to their all-time high of $100,000
any easier to hand on to a successor.
with managing that much money. A line
for the job! It needs to be said that no real business could sur-
vive if its
every time
a financial
trust in our treasurers
about their duties, we better just close up shop and hand over our endowment to the public library.
all we are
If
them so
The resolution offered in place of the one
"'l'hat the treasurer stock and securities
Ann Arbor."
A formal signed
is hereby owned by the
authorized to Ladies' Library
sell and Association
assign
of
treasurer had he did anything,
to go
and today
agent of the
Public
and unshackl~
statement by
passage of .this resolution and to the fact that Jane Doe is the
through
of this essentially we can't
rigamarole
a business,
Library.
show more can get
treasurer as of such and such a date would be the only paper nec-
essary to present to a broker. One
signature in place
The treasurer's own signature Today, beyond discussion
goes
with for advice.
on the
of four! being sold.
committee,
very reliable· up-
are available· for con- being the Value Line
subscribes to the Value
always a
to-date
sultation,
Investment Survey.
broker available
Further, of companies
reports on the most
a
wide range usable and The out-going
Line and
No one needs to 'fly blind'in the
only investment
stocks reviewed world today.
there.
has considered for purchase
hasn't made the treasury Few women are comfortable never forms on the right
the secretary
attesting
best probably treasurer
-3-
the certificates
finance
there is
that they
we have would read:
to the

                                                                   I
1 "OMPANY I
odak 150 -omer 204
L
~eatr 100
I
~oush 225 I
,,enSW 100
I
I
unoco 100
hobil 200
I
Safwy 200
I
1MM so DPont 50
I
I
1pen.bal.
B3,818.10
I
ll:nterest,
I
Dues
3rd Quar
Jul 1 82.50
42.50 45.00 45.00 Jan 14 Apr 15 Jul 15
98.44 98.44 98.44 Feb 28 May 31 Aug 30
so.so so.so 50.50 Mar 10 Jun 10 Sep 10
82.50 82.50 82.50 Mar 10 Jun 10 Sep 10
110.00 110.00 110.00
Jan 2
80.00 sold $5,865.80
Mar 12 Jun 12 Sep 12 43.75 43.75 43.75
Mar 13 Jun 12 Sep 12 37.50 37.50 37.50
4th Quar
Oct 1 82.50
$7,570.74
Total
380.00
214.20
177.50 397.13 202.00 330.00 440.00
80.00 175.00 150.00
2,545.83
3,204.27 5,750.10
114.21 2.00
10 :ash Fund
no
dividends,
distributed by Amoco Feb Mar
207.32 266.47 Jun Jul
263.63 258.69 Oct Nov
265.31 334.43
Bank
273.75
Jul
1, Apr
at 13.08
typrus
h
Jan 245.14
May 290.00
Sep 262.34
215.77
Aug 325.37
Dec 269.70
.,los.bal. 7,958.91
1,..,ate deposits: Amoco $82.50 Mobil $110.00 Du Pont $37.50 MMM$43.75
afety i Paid
Revolving Eastman
Deposit box, April 1, 1985,
fund, Jan.
no. 33 $12.00
Branch) May 20, $2,800.00
Accounts
of 20-101380-6
First
of
America
Total:
Kodak,
May 17,
stock
in Bank NOW account:
Savings account:
~axpayer identifying number:
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION DIVIDENDS 1985
1st Quar 2nd Quar
Jan 2 Apr 2 135.00 80.00
Apr 2 107.00 107.00
Jan 2
Jan4 Apr2 Jul2
25, 1985: 1985, 50
America, Ann 00-938522-6:
(Packard and Brockman
$2,200.00; shares,
Arbor:
closed
now changed to:
split
during the year 38-2461596.
sold
twice
Alice Sunderland Wethey,
Treasurer
Oct 2 45.00
Oct 15 101.81
Nov 29 50.50
Dec 10 82.50
Dec 10 110.00
Dec 12 43.75
Dec 12 37.50

                    CYPRUS MINERALS PAINE-WEBBER CASHFUND
10
Income:
Dividends Interest
Sale,
Sale,
Sale, 2500 Dues
Expenses:
Safety
Bank fees
Library Revolving
box
Balance Jan.
2,700.06 21,802.85
72.90 24,575.81
-21,655.81
2,920.00
December
Income Unaccounted
Expenses
Bank account
Total
assets
200 204
- bank Sfwy
Corner. Chfd.
Fund
5,750.10 114.21
5,865.80
7,570.74
2,500,00 2.00
21,802.85
1, 1985 1985
for income
during 1985
deposit
during
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
January 1 - December 31, 1985
SHARES PRICE DIVIDENDS VALUE
TREASURER'S REPORT
COMPANY
EASTMAN KODAK COMERICA
BEATRICE FOODS HOUSEHOLDFINANCE CENTRAL-SOUTHWEST AMOCO
MOBIL
MMM
DUPONT
SAFEWAY 200 (sold) 80.00
12/31/85 7,593.75
4,600.00 9,506.25 2,750.00 6,187.50 6,050.00 4,487.50 3,393.75
130.80 47,958.9I
92.658.46 2,920.00
95,578.46
12.00 3.00
5,000.00
5,865.80
7,570.74 3,204.27
21,655.81
1985
2,646.25 273.75
2,920.00
12/31/85
50 5/8 380.00 (sold) 214.20 46 177.50 42 1/4 397.13 27 1/2 202.00 61 7/8 330.00 30 1/4 440.00 50 89 3/4 175.00 50 67 7/8 150.00
150
204
100
225
100
100
200
Cash fund
Proceeds, Proceeds, Dividends,
purchases: Safeway Comerica
Alice
Sunderland
Wethey,
Treasurer
Cashfund
Cash,
NOW Account Late deposits
31,
3,204.27 5,750.10

     Since Association
Arbor Public
APRIL 25, 1986
our fall meeting in October, has obtained forty-four (44)
1985, the new books
Ladies Library
Board
Martha
fall,
reading and
as book committee,
VanGogh
artists. and
and Gardens
and as art are recognized
20th century books about
at the Agnew, Williams
1985, meeting, has begun. Five
Bulkley, Karen O;Neal, Marcy
taped their voices for approval by the Library
Library.
Studies predominate,
are Matisse
of Western but old
for· the Ann modern and contemporary
Capability
Brown. Titles on the
Middle Ages are THE
REPO~T OF-THE BOOK COMMITTEE LADIES; LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
art and
Poussin
Seurat,
Western
Versailles
ROMANESQUESCULPTURE OF MOISSAC and THE BAYEUXTAPESTRY. Lovers of Italian art will enjoy THE TREASURES OF SAN MARCO and DYNASTY AND DESTINY IN MEDICI ART: PONTORMO, LEO X, AND THE TWO COSIMOS.
There is a bool< on the ancient art of the American Woodland Indian, and more recent American history is recalled in DEMOCRATICVISTAS: POST OFFICES AND PUBLIC ART. Finally, there are several volume':. on Asian art: Indian, Southeast Asian, JAPANESE LACQUERART, and the PALACES OF THE FORBIDDEN CITY.
architecture
and Rembrandt
masters
Turner,
early in
also represented. represent 19th
such as Holbein, Rousseau,
The pr·oject of taping art books for the bl ind, endor·sed by our·
Trudy have
volunteers: Westerman, and
Nancy
for the Bl ind in Lansing. After a workshop in the fa 11 of 1986, we
hope to begin A-=-I retire
recording art committee chair·
Helen Hall and
books.
I would like
to thank
for their Library, we i an, for her
members help and are very
watchful
meticulous
all members of the ideas and suggestions
Carol
Plumer,
At the 1 i brar
of my
interest over
these past
years. reference
much indebted eye and ar-t
two to Suzy Chen,
ordering
books, because th•Y already prohibited the inclusion of
knowledge and and bookkeeping
to
skills. Thank you,
for· her
as well, to
Ladies Library for books.
Association
who have contributed
Finally, Winifred Favreau, donated three
1ibrary of her aunt, Betty Hayden, member emeritus and now deceased
member of this association, to the Ann Ar-bor Public Library. The books were: THE HORIZ(:1\1BOOK OF THE ELIZABETHIAN WORLD, THE HORI2(1\1 BOOK OF THE RENAISSANCE, and THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF PARIS AND THE PARISIANS. The Library was not able to use the
had copies, and space 1 imitations
volum•s. The books were
to be sold. I would 1 ike to suggest that we honor B•tty Hayd•n with a book and bookplate as
additional
th• Library
th•n glv•n to the Friends of
on• of our next purchases. I would also 1ik• to recommend that we
honor the lat• Harold Weth•Y,
husband of Alic•,
with a bookplate which his wife
be purchased for
plac•d
in his fin~l volum• on wh•n said volume is
Titian;•s· published
drawings and can
compl•t•d,
the Ann Arbor Public Libr&ry.
Jeannette Duncan
art books
fr-om the

       LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BOOKS RECEIVED BY THE LIBRARY 10/85-4/86
artlett, Jennifer. RHAPSODY OF JENNIFER BARTLETT. Abrams, 1985
ernard, Bruce, ed .. VINCENT BY HIMSELF.
LIST PAID
Brown & Co., 1985 <2 copies ea,)
ernstein,
SCULPTURES 1954-1974: THE CHANGING FOCUS OF THE EYE. UMI Research Pr·ess, 1985
$35.00
80.00
39.95
50.00
35.00
75. 00
25.00
34.95
39.95
65.00
85.00
70.00
45.00
34.95
50.00
$32. 03
71 .92
40.08
45.53
31 .95
54.45
30.65
38. 07
45.50
65 .16
76.50
63.35
41 .03
35.11
45.00
Little,
at $40.00
onafoux,Pascal. Rizzol i ,1985
REMBRANDTSELF PORTRAIT.
Roberta. JASPER JOHNS; PAINTINGS AND
rose, David S. ANCIENT ART OF THE AMERICAN
WOODLANDINDIANS. CATALOGUE OF A EXHIBITION. Abrams/Detroit Institute
TRAVELING
of ~rt,
1985
ucKton, David, Metropolitan
ed .. THE TREASURES OF SAN MARCO. Museum of Art, 1985
ush, Martin H. SCULPTURES BY DUANE HANSON. Wichita •State Univ., 1985
Calas, Nicolas. TRANSFIGURATIONS: ART CRITICAL ESSAYS ON THE MODERN PERIOD. UMI Research Press, 1985
Cohn, Sherrye. UMI Research
orK, Richard.
CENTURY ENGLAND. Yale Univ.
ARTHUR DOVE: NATURE AS SYMBOL. Press,1985
ART BEYOND THE
GALLERY IN Press, 1985
EARLY
20TH
ox-RearicK, Janet. DYNASTY AND DESTINY IN
MEDICI ART, PO\ITORMO, LEO X, AND THE TWO COSIMOS. Princeton Univ. Press, 1984
aval, Jean-Luc. OIL PAINTING: FRCl'1 VANEYCHTO ROTHKO. Rizzol i, 1985 <2 copies/$35
ea.>
Fine, Ruth. GEMINI G.E.L.: ART AND COLLABORATION. Abbeville, 1984
Foster,
Pr-ess,
Girard,
Stephen
1985
C. DADA/DIMENSICl',IS, U1I
Research
Jacques.
VERSAILLES GARDENS: SCULPTURE AND MYTHOLOGY. Rizzol i, 1985

   lenn, Constance. 1985
oldman Judith I•.
JIM DINE DRAWINGS. Abrams,
FROM THE DETROIT Hudson Hills,1985
olly, Michael Ann. OF ART HISTORY.
INSTITUTE OF ARTS.
JAMES ROSENQUIST. ViKing,
1985
60.00
45.00
24.95
24.95
40.00
55.00
45.00
40.00
35.00
150.00
27.50
no 1ist
60.00
50.00
40.00
54.86
26.41
40.69
22.45
36.25
50. 03
40.50
36. 10
31 .75
135.00
22. 16
34. 15
55,08
44. 10
36.45
enshaw, Jul ,a, ed .. 101 MASTERWORKS
PANOFSKY AND THE FOU~DATIONS Cornell Univ. Press, 1984
unter, Sam. MODERNART, 2nd ed .. Abrams, 1985
lotz,Heinrich.POSTMODERN VISIONS, DRAWINGS PAINTINGS. Abbeville, 1985
ostof, Spiro. SETTINGS
1985
A HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE: AND RITUALS. Oxford Univ, Pr·ess,
erner, Martin. THE FLAME AND THE LOTUS:
INDIAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART FROM THE KRONOS COLLECTIONS.Metropolitan Museum of Art/Abrams, 1985
ucie-Smith, Edward. OF ANXIETY. Rizzol
ART OF THE 1$'30'S: i, 1985
THE AGE
asami, Shiraichi. JAPANESE Whea therh i l 1 , 1981
LACQUER ART.
eyers, Diana.TEMPLE,HOUSEHOLD, HORSEBACK: RUGS OF THE TIBETAN PLATEAU.The Tex ti le Museum, 1984
arK,Marlene.DEMOCRATIC AND PUBLIC ART.Temple
1984
VISTAS: POST OFFICES Univ. Press,
feiffer, Bruce B .. TREASURES OF TALIESIN:
76 LNBUILT DESIGNS OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT. South•rn 111 inois Univ. Press, 1985
·eed, Sue Welsh & Barbara Stern Shapiro. EDGARDEGAS: THE PAINTER AS PRINTMAKER.
New YorK Graphic
ousseau, H•nri. Society, 1985
Society, 1985
HENRI ROUSSEAU. New
YorK
Graphic
01.,tJJ&nds,John. HOLBEIN, THE PAINTINGS OF HANS HOLBEIN. Harper Row, 1985
75.00
68. 03

     udenstine, Angelica Sander. PEGGY GUGGENHEIM COLLECTION, VENICE. Abrams, 1985
85.00
35.00
119. 85
40. 00 .
55.00
no list
19.95
39.95
45.00
75.00
35.00
right,Christopher.
CATALOGUE RAIS~E.
1985 60.00
76.50
21 . 09
111.09
24.41
50.49
72.00
18. 12 36.51
37.96
44.63
31. 68
54. 12
43.77
$2018,59
chapiro, Meyer. THE ROMANESQUE SCULPTURE MOISSAC. Braziller, 1985
chulze,Franz. MIES VAN DER ROHE: A CRITICAL BIOGRAPHY.Univ. of Chicago,
OF
1985 (3 copies/39,95 tainton, Lindsay.
1985
ea.)
TURNER/S
VENICE.
Braziller,
MIES VAN DER ROHE: Pres<;:., 1985
egethoff,Wolf.
THE VILLAS AND COUNTRY HOUSES.
M. I .T. homson,
urner,
elch, Stuart 1300-1900.
ilson, David 1985
. SEURAT.
. CAPABILITY BROWNAND THE 18TH CENTURY.
198
atKins, Nicholas. MATISSE. Oxford Univ., 1985
Rizzoli,
ilson,Richard.MCKIM,MEAD Rizzoli, 1983
Cary. INDIA: ART AND CULTURE,
Metropolitan Museum of
Art, 1985
Knopf,
M. THE
BAYEUX TAPESTRY.
&WHITE.
u, Zhouyun, PALACES OF THE FOBIDDEN CITY. Paragon Book Gallery, 1984
A ril 2~, 1986 Me•ting
R pot of the BooK Corrwnittee T ud Bulkley, Chair
75.00
$2221 .95
POUSSIN PAINTINGS: A
Hippocrene,

           av daon, Marshall & E. Stillinger
THEAMERICANWINGIN THEMETROPOLITA...N Random
od rey, Tony
ie rangeli, & others
ew ld, John
ow and, John
pr gg, June
te , Susan A.
as ri, Giorgio
ar ol, Andy
& • Feldman
ei zenhoffer,
THE NEWIMAGE;PAINTINGSIN Abbeville
THE 1980'S
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION BOOKSORDEREDANDRECEIVEDBY THE LIBRARY10/86
-
4/87
Carlo
Frances
THESISTINE CHAPEL;THEART, THEHISTORY ANDTHE RESTORATION
Crown
CEZANNE;A BIOGRAPHY
Abrams
HOLBEIN;THEPAINTSOFHANSHOLBEIN THE YOUNGER
60.00
67.50
75.00
40.00
60.00
60.00
95.99
35.00
37.5o
Godine SHAKERDESIGN
Whitney
Museum of
American Art
VANGOGH;A RETROSPECTIVE Macmillan
THEGREATMASTERS Macmillan
CLASSIC CHINESEFURNITURE China Books
ANDYWARHOPLRINTS Abbeville
36.14
36.11
85.68
32.84
42.70
THE HA VEMEYERSIM; PRESSIONISMCOMES TO•••
Abrams
1
List
50.00
39.95
Paid 30.99
36.12
37.29

     1 ' -6 '---' 1' 7
1 l0 1
Callins
A.l eJ.;and er l<eni ston
InnE--~s Pr·yo;-- Bader
P1~esident Vice-President Secretary TreasLwer
Book Selection
Mr-s. f:..irby Ha 11 Mrs David Huntington Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal
Library
Jc nnie
Advisory
Alexander
Committee Committee
(Mrs. ,John)
Mrs. Jonathan Mrs. Scott Mrs. Per-ry
Bulkley
Westerman Innes
M,: Lon Bader
Tr 1dy Bulkley
l'I: gat-et Cameron El ~anc>r Collins
I bel Hai glit H en Hall
by Hall
T _1dy Huntington Jc n Innes Rc-erta ~eniston
<Mrs.
<Mrs.
(Mr-~~- Gem-ge) (Miss
<Mrs. Cameron) (Miss Helen) (Mrs.
<Mrs. David) (Mrs. PerryJ (Mrs.
(Miss Frances) (Mrs. Haskell) (Mr-s.
<Mr-s. James) (Mrs. Millard) <Mt-s. Amnan) (Mrs.
<Mrs.
(Mrs. Harolci)
788 285
Arlington Blvd
Hills Dr.
663-5879 663-5898 769-3115 662--9109 66:3-6255 663-4520 668-6331 665-'.,2800 761-8331 662-::wo2 662-4164 994-:_::;537 761-9574
769-c>2-:m
662-1230
t:>62-211 B
665-0941 662-1178 66:~-072:-; 668-6225
F nces
Jc, Barney Newman
Plumer Pryor
1280
Astor Spt- i ng
Dr.
McSparran
Place Onondaga
Onec:11
9-.51 Oakdale 501
Zi. ;by
c-~01
M_-y
p.,. _te
Ne: ,ta
11c cy Wes:,terman {U·_ce Wethey
M1 M1 . Mrs.
0 l -0 l. 8 1 ·1 l -1 1 ·1
Rosenthal Sp1 nk
Valley Devonshire Rd
Stanley
Hm•;at-d Peckham
Emeritus_Members
315 New England 213 London Rd., 5 Rosevelt Pl.~
Charles
07042
Dodge Haydon Hall, H. Haight Plumer Vibbert
1 1 l,,Jethey
LADI~S LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN ~~m~gC§Q~p_and_Officers_1986-1987
Dodge Vibbert
Winter 5C Montclair,
32789
1978)
(Emer-itus (Emeritus
1971) 1985)
1968) 1976
1982 Bulkley
1'::;>82 Gosling 1982 Rosenthal
1985 Newman
1986 McE=JaprT an
1986 Spink
(Emer·itus
Hall, ~<.
Arno) Jonathan)
Orchard Scottwood Ottawa
Eleanor)
Kirbv)
Hayward)
Robet-U
Drive Forest
Walter) Scott>
Heights
Officers
Year_of_Election_to_Membershi~
1915
1515
703
2112
715
12 Geddes
2037 Geddes Ave. 2100 Hill St. 2222 Fuller Rd
1 Harvard
715
2105
2 Geddes
1926 1510
Hampton Cambridge
Ct
St.
F'ark~ N.C.
N.J.
(emet"-i tus
South
\ji newood Blvd.
South
Forest Heights
Ave., Hendersonville,
Fla. 28739
1962 Cameron 1966 Peckham 1970 Huntington 1970 Oneal
1972 l,,Jesterman

    ments order.
served by Mrs.
The secretary's The treasurer,
meeting to
in the ber and a smaller amount records
her committee, had purchased
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Secretary's Report October
The Ladies' Library Association held its fall meeting
31, 1986
home of Alexander,
Mrs.
Miss
Mrs.
Mrs.
Amnon
man, Book Chairman,
at the were Mrs. John
George Helen Perry Haskell
Hall, Mrs.
Innes, Mrs. Hayward
Treasurer, Cameron Haight, Mrs. David Huntington
Mrs. David Huntington.
Members Jonathan
Collins,
President,
Rosenthal,
Mrs. Arno Cameron,
Bader, Miss
Mrs. Eleanor Hall,
present Bulkley,
Mrs.
Miss Frances
Newman, Secretary,
to be decided by the
are in. The
The Book Committee Chairman,
full report is Mrs. Westerman,
attached. reported
Kirby
James Mrs.
Harold Huntington,
Plumer, Mrs. Walter Spink,
Millard Mrs.
Pryor, Scott
Mrs.
Wester- refresh-
Mrs.
Mrs.
Wethey. Mrs.
After Hall called
delicious the
report Mrs.
was read and Bulkley, announced
accepted that
as the
corrected. Library
recently
given for books on the Fine Arts, and has a surplus of $2,656.80
found it
difficult
it
purchased
Revolving Fund. Most of the books are
in Decem- give
July. Mrs. amount than
Inness usual,
made a motion that the
Ladies $2,000,
treasurer's
Keniston,
McSparran,
to spend all the funds
between
treasurer in January
$1,000 and
the exact when the final
Mrs. Keniston, Mrs.
thirteen new books this fall as advised by Susie
-1-
Plumer, and
Mrs. Rosenthal,
has has been
that

    ..__,,
Chgn, thg order librarian. John Russell's book, Paris, was bought in memory of Betty Hayden. The idea of having Susie Chen come
to one of our meetings and tell us more about how she chooses art
books for the library plete report of the
was welcomed Book Committee then reported
by the Association. The com- is attached.
Mrs.
is only slowly moving ahead. The project had grown out of a sug-
gestion year started found thought. ested
Mrs. for ~ore
Bulkley proposed space for books
we investigate Public Library.
the possible need To that end Mrs.
by Mrs. ago when
Pryor. Although others
had expressed interest a
Westerman
range Planning everyone agreed.
write a
Long- and
mittee police of the
reported that and security
the Loving agents have
branch
had to
are underwriting
.
Westerman
that taping books for the blind
the project was work, Mrs. Westerman
initiated, only and Mrs. Bulkley.
two had actually However they
that they had considerably
Our new member Miss McSparran said she might be _in±er-
in joining the effort
.
that in the
suggested that Committee
Mrs. Inness, our representative
Ann Arbor A mural
produced
Public Library
a
T-shirt of the
for Library
we
asking what
letter their
to the needs
$2,800.
is being
direction of Alice
It is sponsored by the City of Ann Arbor and the Michigan Council
painting
by pupils
at
the northeast branch at Angell Elementary
Crawford,
less time for
it than they had
on the
had had
be more
School
an art teacher at Huron High School.
-2-
Library's might be,
alert. The Friends
Library
some vandalism, and
Advisory
Com-
under the

    for the Arts.
At the end of the business meeting we were all treated to a
reading by Mrs. Plumer from
the volumes of typed minutes that go
back only stitutions
in 1966. and Mrs. The Ladies'
to 1930, but include
copies of all our report on our Centennial
successive con- Celebration
and Miss
Pryor Library
the complete Hall, Mrs.
Haight, Mrs. Alexander,
Mrs. Keniston, own recollections.
March 19, 1866
_contributed
comments was
from their organized on There is a
one hundred
Association shortly thereafter.
and
devotion that runs of our existence
use of
captures
Mrs. Pryor
new ideas and organization
A motion that we ask the Ann Arbor Observer to write an art-
incorporated
single and twenty
thread of years
through all the - the providing
of really tape made
good books for
the
the community. A casette
by Mrs. report.
Huntington
In conclusion to initiate that the
icle on
by Mrs.
pursue the project
Mrs. Spink and consult
seconded with
official
historian.
the full flavor
said
the programs and to "carry
members torch" so
the history Bulkley.
of the Association
and its members, was made the motion, and offered to
Alice Wethey, who is our
of the she encouraged
wonderful
younger the
will continue to "grow, has in the past.
expand and flourish" as it
Respectfully
submitted,
r(I~ t.'lo~~
Prudence
-3-
L. Rosenthal, Secretary

    Treasurer's Report
October 31, 1986
LADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOFANNARBORM,ICHIGAN
This Treasurer's Report is jointly written. I think you will be able to recognize the contributions of the two authors: Trudy Bulkley, current Treasurer, and Alice Wethey, member of the Treasurer's Committee and former Treasurer of the Ladies· Library for an unprecedented thirteen years. At this time of transition between Treasurers, I am happy to report that the only debt we have incurred is one of gratitude. Alice Wethey, through her meticulous record keeping and careful transfer of name changeson our various stocks and accounts, has made assuming the Treasurer's job a pleasure. Shehas generously shared her considerable knowledge of the stock market and finances in general with me and with the other members of the Treasurer's Committee: Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal. She has turned a weighty responsibllity into an opportunity for education. I am enormously indebted to her for her gifts of time, energy and insight. The Ladies· Library Association is equally in her debt.
Before sharing that portion of the report authored by Alice, I'd like to remind you that the Ladies· Library Association currently owns shares in seven companies, has funds in a Merrill Lynch ReadyAssets Trust and a checking account.
Youmay be aware that during the first two weeks of September the Stock Market took the longest and steepest dive since the Great Crash of
1929. Millions andmillions of dollars were squeezedout of the sale values of common stocks. It was undoubtedly a long over-due correction. Wall Street had been behaving for an extraordinarily long time as though there were no direction but up!
However, our pol icy of investing only in stocks with the highest ratings for financial safety has proved to be a good buffer for the holdings of the Ladies· Library. Curiously, since the debacle in September the market has

   partially recovered, at least temporarily, and another upward climb has begun.However,manyNewYorkeconomywatchers feel that another recession is looming, to begin even as early as the first quarter of 1987. We can't afford to be too sanguine about the state of our finances.
In the meantime, even after the sale of Beatrice Foods for the sum of $4,444.15, and Cyprus Minerals for $186.25, our investments, which were worth $41,975.25 on December31, 1985,today are worth $46,713.50. The money market funds, of which our ReadyAssets is one, have been producing increasingly lower returns becauseof relentlessly falling interest rates. However, even there we haven't done too badly. From the $47,958.91, which was the opening balance on January I, 1986, even after paying out $5,000 to the Public Library, our assets have risen to the sum of $52,983.85.
Adding the current balance in our checking account of $1,922.22, to the present total value of our investments, $46,713.50, and the amount now in the ReadyAssets fund, $52,983.85, brings our net worth as of the middle of October 1986 to $1O1,619.57.
For the past two years the amounts of the gifts of the Ladies· to the Public Library have skirted too closely the total of our actual income. In
1985 we gave $5,000 to the Library in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the opening of our little building on Huron Street in 1885. In 1986 we duplicated that gift in honor of the I 20th year since our founding in 1866. Another circumstance also indicates the advisability of a smaller gift for 1987. The Library recently has found it difficult to spendall the funds it hasbeengiven for bookson the Fine Arts. In late October, the Chair of the Book Committee, Marcy Westerman, reported a surplus of $2,656.80 in the Revolving Fund. The Treasurer can better decide in January, when the final records are in, what the exact amount should be, and asks that a sum between $1,000 and $2,000 be voted by the

    Ladies· Library Association for the semi-annual gift in January. Will someoneplease make a motion?
Respectfully submitted,
Trudy Bulkley, Treasurer

       ~-
up on
ar
la zu
c. Edson
g, Michael ia, Duccio
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION BOOKSORDEREDBY THE LIBRARY4/86 - 10/86
MASONSANDSCULPTORSIN ROMANESQUBEURGUNDY2v. Penn State Pr. 1984
CLEMENTE Abrams MURALPAINTINGIN ANCIENTPERU
Indiana Univ. Pr. 1985
Henri PHOTOPORTRAITS Thames &Hudson
CHRISTIE'S PICTORIALHISTORYOF ENGLISHAND AMERICANSILVER Phaidon 1986
KUSHANSCULPTURE:IMAGESFROMEARLYINDIA Indiana Univ. Pr.
List 75.00
35.00
57.50
50.00
45.00
55.00
45.00
39.95
70.00
80.00
75.00
85.00
75.00
7 75.00
48.oo 75.00
30.00
125.00
65.00 37.50 37.50
235.00
40.00
75.00
rm
t
ier-Bresson, ton, Michael
a, Stanislaw J.
ul on, Pontus ,,___..un ington, Susan
OF EDO
1986
1985
HISTORYOF MEDIEVALART, 980-1440 Skira/Rizzoli 1986
ROYLICTENSTEIN: LANDSCAPSEKETCHES GRAPHICDESIGNIN JAPAN Vol.5
Kodansha 1985 GRAPHICDESIGNIN JAPAN Vol.6
Kodansha 1986
HIROSHIGE: ONEHUNDREDFAMOUSVIEWS
Met. Museum of Art FUTURISMANDFUTURISMS Abbeville ARTOFANCIENTINDIA Weatherhill
Abrams
ea , Linda York INDIANMINIATUREPAINTINGSANDDRAWINGS IN THECLEVELANMDUSEUM
ow~, Bates
ar ling, Karal
Cleveland Museum of Art BUILDINGA NATIONALIMAGE
Ann TOMBENTON& HIS DRAWINGS Univ. of Missouri Pr. 1985
Walker
1986
at Pierre-Louis GUSTAVEMOREAUT:HEWATERCOLORS Hudson Hills Pr. 1985
or Giorgio
ep er, D. Stephen
FLOWERSBY GIORGIOMORANDI Rizzoli GUIDORENI: A COMPLETECATALOGUOEF HIS WORKS
N.Y. Univ. Pr. 1985 PIRANESI: EARLYARCHITECTURAFLANTASIES
Nat. Gallery of Arts 1985 STUDIESIN IMPRESSIONISM Abrams
1
ew ld,
ew lld,
John
John
STUDIESIN POST-IMPRESSIONISM Abrams Princeton Univ. Pr. 1985
er a, Richard (Rosalind Krauss, ed) RICHARDSERRA/SCULPTURE Museum of Modern Art 1986
'-_,/Sten, Susan R. THE ARCHITECTUROEF RICHARDMORRISHUNT Univ. of Chicago Pr.
ob rtson, Merie Greene THESCULPTUREOF PALENQUE Vol.2

      '-'
'Tu er,
Nicholas
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION BOOKSORDEREDBY THE LIBRARY4/86 - 10/86
FLORENTINEDRAWINGOSF THE 16TH CENTURY Cambridge Univ. Pr. 1986
List
39.50
75.00
Vo Erffa, Helmut &Allen Stanley PAINTINGSOFBENJAMINWEST Yale Pr.

        ...___,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN May .l,
Th~ h
Ladies
of Mrs. Eleanor
Library Kirby
Collins, President,
Association held its Hall. Members present
Mrs Cameron Haight,
spring meeting were Mrs John
by Hall, Hayward
Mrs. David
Miss Helen
Mrs. Perry Innes.
Keniston,
M - Millard Pryor, Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal, Secretary, Mrs. Scott
W -terman, invited
Arbor
Book Committee guests, Ms.
Public Library,
Chairman. Susie Chen,
and Annette
was read of the
Mrs. Harold Reference
Churchill
and accepted. historical
At I At-bor Observer . ..__.,
The Secretary's report
m e
t _ aeked
0 tober
The t asurer
treasurer's Trudy
stock for the
report who
calendar year, This reflects
lue
a ount)
of
money January
a the
in
market
1
funds, December increase
and
that the tape recording October 1986 meeting
to
have meeting.
this
would done, and
be bring
transcribed.
twelve copies
e $105,040.96. vious year. roximately
Interestingly, $10,000 increase
$9,462.50
first quarter of our total assets
D cember 31, 1986 figure.
Bulkley
market shares,
Dur total
assets
checking
Mrs. Haskell
was read was not
by Jan present.
Newman, for the
at the
Alexander, Hall, Mrs.
Huntington,
Newman, Mrs. James Plumer,
-
31~ 1986
over the
1987 shows an over the
Wethey.
librarian from the
a writer from the
A decision was readings done at
Prue Rosenthal was to the next
We had

       t
we not surplus.
ey remain treasurer
make a Trudy
in our write
second Bulkley
account
contribution made a where
to the support
at motion,
of
In 1986 to mark the ociatian, we contributed
120th anniversary 55,000 to the
of the
founding of the Fund of the
1 Arbor Public Library
ks. We usually make two contributions
Revolving
art and
to the Library during a
c- endar Li[rary, and
s [11 1n the
$1,000 to the ■3,289.29 is
ressing our rn.<ing a further
financial Treasureer's
and explain contribution this
not This motion
passed.
The
full
report is
The Book committee,
Committee Roberta and selected
Chairman, Keniston,
thirteen of the
Marcy Carol
Westerman Plumer.
met twice with and Prue
year. Thus far as of April
contributed
hE
R enthal, t art
si ice the or11;:i1n,,1l printing
new
Ann Arbor
to be Library.
added to
The m the
supply of bookplates for
books was
puchased almost
with depleted
the funds and we
s- -retary's
A project As ·ociation,
files.
considered
and
history books onto tapes for the
Revolving
Fund. The Finance
Committee
this time because
book collection
book titles Public
Ladies Library another 2100 plates
Association made. The
to read Mi higan Library for
art
a letter continuing
it will Director
Library we are
for
in 1987 we have
24, 1987, a surplus of
purchase of
art history
in earn
materials.
in 1979, will now be kept ~--iith the
investigated by the Ladies Library
the
cc ne to a !:;t,:1.ndsti 11. There vii 11 be a copy of the 1 nfcn-mat i or1
Blind and Physically
Handicapped, has
kept by
Alice Wethey
recommended
her report, that interest, and that
of the
why
year. attached.
the

    sh •et 2,nd an application form on file with the Book Committee
Ch irperson should anyone want to pursue this further. Mary Prvor to d us that if a person who uses this service wants a book read
on -o tape they can
r-equest it. Mary suggested that tr,e book
co mittee th~y be
The fc- her
look for taped. The
Nominating committee,
slate of President
and she report
Isabel Carol
l<i rby Hall
Trudy Huntington F'rue F:osenthal
f
lowing
for
and 1987-1988:
'v'i ce-Pr-esi dent Secretary
Treasurer
Book Chairman Library Advisory
Committee Rep
Trudy Joan
Jan
Bulkley Innes
Newman
appropriate books Book Committee's full
will request that
Committee Eleanor Officers
Chairman, Collins,
is
Haight, Plumer,
attached.
reported the
Susie
Li~rary spoke to us about the Library. She told us that she had
r~_ently and
,plain
t other
been to Art History
a
workshop at books. She
about the about
the
was the only cost of these
Institute person
Chen, Reference
Librarian
Public
of Art on who did not
strenuously participants
When she told she
the Ladies of enormous
Library envy.
books. Association
w - immediately the
tt -t she often heard young boys on the landing of the library say
,1s is a LADIES library, we can't go up there••~ in reference to t• - plaque on the wall. A lack of really first class books and a l ·-1: of space combine to cause the entir-e:• Libra1~y under-sr:iend the m1 nies that they have. There is a complete reassment being done
suject
She also told
us
at the Ann Arbor
Detroit

       "----'
hly used, Ur versity
including students.
books. Huntington,
often
an
before we could
of the building, arging the
and building.
they are seriously She also told
the more esoteric and even Professor
us
looking that
the
into the idea of books are
Prue History
Rosenthal video tape
suggested that we library. Ms. Chen
might start
Art and Art
told us that
de this the library needed to decide if they were going to have
vi.eo
C~2n to encourage
Mary Prvor
to institute
The motion
moved a
was
order first,
that we ask Susie
vi eo
tapes for
circulation.
informal]y to
He
We decided
·e the business
have tea or Alexander·s,
part of sherry at
change the the meeting 5:00pm. The
tapes 1n the library.
the Library
policy seconded
of future starting
of acquiring and passed.
meetings. at 3:00pm
.
li tle more history
where Carol for us.
next Plumer has
meeting been asked
Respectfully
will be at to do a
Subm1tted
Prudence Rosenthal, Secretary
by the
on occasion.
1

    '-..--
The Ladies· Library Association currently owns stock in seven companies and has money invested in a Merrill Lynch ReadyAssets Trust. We also have funds in a checking account. This report will look at the ca1endar year, January 1 - December 3 t , t 986.
In the first quarter of 1986 we shifted funds from a Paine-Weber Cash Fundto the Merrill Lynch ReadyAssets Trust. Our 100 shares of Beatrice Foods stock was sold and the proceeds deposited in the Merrill Lynch Ready Assets Trust. Tenshares of CyprusMinerals was redeemedandthe funds were deposited in our checking account. The rationale and figures for
these transactions have already been documented in the Treasurer's Report of the last annual meeting on April 25, 1986.
Since that first quarter of 1986 there has been no selling of stock or shifting of funds. Rather we have watched the stock market rise to unprecedented heights, take startling drops, and then begin its precarious climb again. Manywonder if we are witnessing a mountain built on quicksand, given our nation's equally unprecedented deficit. Our investment strategy has been to sit tight and keep a watchful eye on the companies in which we own stock. We also have about half our assets invested in the moneymarket fund (Merrill Lynch) as a prudent investment choice given the uncertain economic times in which we live.
Our total assets (value of stock market shares, money market fund, and checking account) as of December 31, 1986 were $105,040,96. This amount reflects a $9,462.50 increase over the previous year. Interestingly enough,the first quarter of 1987 shows an approximately $10,000 increase in our total assets over the December31, 1986 figure. It is anybody's guess whether or not that phenomenal increase will be sustained.
LADIES'L!BRAAYASSOCIATIONOFANNARBORM,ICHIGAN
TREASURER'RSEPORT
MAY1, 1987

    ._,
The treasurer's accounts for January 1 - December31, 1986 have been audited by the three finance committee members: Jan Newman, Zibby Oneal,andAlice Wethey.
In 1986, to mark the 120th anniversary of the founding of our association, we contributed $5,000 to the Revolving Fundof the Ann Arbor Public Library for purchaseof art andart history books. Wemaketwo contributions to the Library during a calendar year. Thus far in 1987 we have contributed $1,000 to the Library. The Library has, as o( April 24,
1987, a surplus of $3,289.29 in the Revolving Fund. The Finance Committee recommends that we not make a second contribution to the Library thls year, rather the treasurer would send a letter to the Director of the Library explaining that we are not making a contribution at this
time becauseof the surplus in the Revolving Fund. It makes more sense to keep the money in our accounts, where it would be earning money, rather than to have it remain unspent at the Library. There are ample funds on hand for any book purchases for the remainder of the year. I make a motion that the treasurer write a letter to the Director of the Library expressing our continuing support and explaining why we are not making a further financial contribution this year.
Respectfully submitted,
Trudy Bulkley Treasurer
.,___,.

            '--"
MMM
DUPONT CYPRUSMINERALS
PAINE-WEBERCASHFUND
MERRILLLYNCHREADY ASSETSTRUST
Bank Account Tota 1 Assets
50 116 5/8 so 84
10 18 5/8
LADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATION--TREASURER'SREPORT
1/1/86-12/31/86
COMPANY SHARES
EASTMANKODAK 150 BEATRICEFOODS 100
HOUSEHOLFDI NANCE 225 CENTRALSOUTHWEST 100 AMOCO 100 MOBIL 200
PRICE
12/31/86 68 5/8
DIVIDENDS
391. 50
VALUE
12/31/86 10,293.75
10,743.75 3,425.00 6,525.00 8,025.00
5,831.25 4,200.00
(SOLD--- 45.00 2/14/86)
47 3/4 34 1/4 65 1/-1 40 1/8
410.06 214.00 330.00 4-10.00
180.00
152.50
(NONE--
REDEEMED
2/2/86)
405.88 (SHIFTED/ML 2/86)
2,817.58
5,386.52
53,526.72 102,570.47
2,470.49
105,040.96

           INCOME:
Dividends
Interest - bank
Sale Cyprus Minerals Sale Beatrice Foods Sale Merrill Lynch Dues
EXPENSES:
Safety deposit box Library Revolving fund Cash fund purchases:
Dividends
Ready Assets purchases:
Proceeds/Bea Fds Dividends/Ready Ass.
Balance Jan. 1, 1986 Income during 1986
Expenses during 1986
5,386.52 113.18 186.25
4,1-14.35
21 100.00 1. 70
12,232.00
12.00
5,000.00
405.88
4,444.35 2,817.58
12,679.81
2,920.00 12,232.00
15I 152,00 -12,679.81
2,472.19
* dividends * dues
*total
Cash 12/31/86
NOW acct.
1ate depos.*
277.50 1. 70
279.20
2, 192.99 279.20 2,472.19
LADIES'
LIBRARY ASSOCIA T ION--TREASURER'SREPORT

                                                                                                        LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN INCOME 19?6
I
COMPANY ! 1st quar
2nd quar Apr 01
82.50
sold
Apr 1101.81 May 30
q r:..n Jun 10
8? C::,() Jun 10
1l O ()() Jun 12
45.00 Jun 12
37.50
redeemed Feb
3rd quar Jul 01
94.50
Feb. 14, '86 Jul 1\01. 81
4th
Oct 02
Oct 15 Nov 28 Dec 10 Dec 10 Dec 12 Dec 12
quar 94. 50
i
total
391.50 45.00 104.63 410.06
Jan 02
l ?fl
EASTMAN150 BEA FDS 100 HOUSHLD225 CEN S-W 100
AMQCQ ]QQ MOBU 200
MM M 50 DUPONT 50 CYP MIN 10 CASH FUND READYASS.
Oct 264. 96
it was shifted to Merrill Lynch Ready Assets.
Jan 02
!.,_c; ()()
Jan 1101. 81 Feb 28
Aug 29
Sep 10 Sep 10
c;, c;n Mar 10
A? ',()
Mar 10
11n 00
Mar 12 Mar 11
c;< c;n
8? ',_()_
51 r:..n
82 r:..n 110. 00
45.00
40.00
288.87
317.59
214.0()
<10.00
440.00 180.00 152.50
405. 88
no dividends Jan
338.25
67.63 170.28
May 297. 96 Sep 202.94
Jun 252.78
Jul
289.60
•264. 47 Aug
4S.00
37.50
()()
Nov
The Paine-Webber Cash Fund had an opening balance in January
Dec
Feb
Mar Apr
Beatrice Foods was sold Feb. 14, 1986 at 45 3/8. Net $4,444,35. Deposited in ML.
Cyprus Minerals was issued in 1985 by AMOCOto its stockholders of record at $13.08. When it was redeemed it was selling for S18.625. Net $186.25. Deposited in bank acct.
Interest.
!Dues
January
Taxpayer
of America Bank
Checks to Library
113 .18 1. 70
-- First
21, $1,500;
identification
February 25,
number
$1,000; June 26,
38- 2461596
$2,500
Safety deposit box 33 (Packard and Brockman Branch) Fee pd. April 4, 1986
NOW account in First of America Bank: 20-101380-6
110 00 45.00
Sep 12
37. 50
Feb. 2 '86 transferred
Sep 12
216.06
252.07
of $47,958.91. In February
$12.00.
2,817.58

   REPOROTF THEBOOKCOMMITTEE LADIESLIBRARAYSSOCIATION
ANNARBORM,ICH. MAY1, 1987
Since our last meeting in October, 1986, the BookCommitteeselected 13 new book titles to be added to the art book collection of the AnnArbor Public Library. Eleven previously ordered books have been received, and seven of them are here today for membersto see. Weconsidered suggestions
of members, including references in 1-r~~~YB'o)o.~kSiellers (London}, and will continue to receive that catalog thanks to Carol Plumer and Mary Pryor.
The committee met twice and did other business by phone and mail. As always, Suzy Chen of the Reference Department, and Jeannette Duncan, catalog clerk, were very helpful
Wewere told that the supply of bookplates for books purchased with the funds from Ladies Library Association was almost depleted, so 2100 more were printed and given to Jeannette Duncan. Wewere fortunate that Alice Wethey, who made arrangements for the initial printing, in March, 1979, had kept all necessary materials to be used for this reprinting. It is interesting that the price for original layout and printing (2500 plates) was $126.33. This year's printing (2100 plates} cost $100.20. It is difficult to comprehend that numberof books having been purchased, but the supply of plates gives that impression.
A project considered and investigated by the Ladies Library Association, to read art history or art books onto tapes for the Michigan Library for the Blind and Physcially Handicapped,has cometo a standstill. Twomembersof our group prepared audition tapes, and recruited three communitymembersto do the same. Three of us attended the training session, and tnen found our schedules wouldnot permit reading the numbersof hours each weekand month
I which this project requires. There will be a copy of the information sheet and an application form on file with the BookCommitteechairperson should any individual wish to pursue this turther.
This year's committee members, Roberta Keniston, Carol Rosenthal and MarcyWestermanhave enjoyed working together. a very interesting assignment.
I RespectfullyAsubmitted, '-/}"\'YL~.-.<.,u,,7~ ~
MarcyWesterman,Chairperson
Plumer, Prue This is always

          --
i, Giorgio
Shixiang
1, Andy
• Feldman
enhoffer,
60.00
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av son, Marshall 1
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THEAMERICANWINGIN THEMETROPOLITA...N Random
THENEWIMAGE;PAINTINGSIN THE19801s
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Carlo
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LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION BOOKSORDEREDANDRECEIVEDBY THE LIBRARY10/86
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THE SISTINE CHAPEL;THE ART, THE HISTORY ANDTHE RESTORATION
Crown CEZANNE;A BIOGRAPHY
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VANGOGH;A RETROSPECTIVE Macmillan
THEGREATMASTERS Macmillan
CLASSIC CHINESEFURNITURE China Books
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    TO:
FROM:
DATE:
RE:
Dr. Richard Benjamin Dr. Wiley Brownlee
Ramon R. Hernandezf~~l~~
April 15, 1987
Progress Report on the Committees - 2
Public
Library's
Three
Planning
This progress report
on the Library's
my memorandum of June 16, 1986
committees
sent by you to tion.
the
its charge,
Board of Education for each member's
THE MAIN FACILITY STUDY COMMITTEE
informa-
February, arrange-
assessment The Main
following 1.
of
Library
three
Building
a. Reports of the
and architectural b. Questionnaire
2.
3.
a. Alternatives
b. Implications
for, expansion
construction.
present building.
to (1)
chartge and make-up by position
of'August
describing the
In March, 1987,
the Public Library
ment with the Osler-Milling
I.
by
action entered
of the Board of into a consultant's
architectural
Assessment
structural, state
Education in contract
the Main library. Facilities
components:
Report shall
electrical,
of the building.
include the
Assessment
MEMORANDUM
is pursuant
genesis,
memorandum
Range Planning Committee and restating
memorandum of December 3, 1986, which was my first progress
report. It is my understanding that each of these memoranda were
13, 1986 namtng
(2) my and (3) my
for staff, Directors, Library
mechanical, Friends of the Library
Board of
members,
therefrom.
AAPS administrators.
c. Present standards and formulae needs.
Options and Opportunities
Advisory
Committee sample
Plans
a. Floor plans
Space utilize
to Maximize
or any combination of Also included will
selected
be selected
for each
Existing to better
or new option ..
three planning
of each the members
committee,
of the Long
firm to do a space-planning
to determine
space

   Memo to:
Dr. Richard Benjamin Dr. Wiley Brownlee
School Libraries,
UM Graduate School
and representatives
and President of
the taking of two
get a reasonably
community perceives
survey to get a reasonably
(4)
the Chamber surveys:
survey to perspective of how the
that
Committee will Statements.
The Third
meeting
is
will
appropriate for see our adopting
we will deal
of the
and approve
to the staff, time solicit-
should with report.
assume, items of
At the ch~rges
meeting
of Phase III for the task
would
At its second
the Philosophy
formally adopt them drafting the report. recently-developed Association's
roles we
Committee Statements
will finalize and as is or
Following that, Friends' Board ing volunteers
June
we will
report again at the same
users see The surveys
Institute
of a sample
perspective for
were about get.
Studies,
relate to the review the
of
the report. Philosophy
the
Public believe it
and action
fourth
and work rules
meeting, the
its review as altered
forces
then be using the
of
of
and
Mission for use
The planning
Library
the
library services were done in
library, and a second,
a user
on how
objective
for Social Research, and as one could possible
as random
Phase II has just ended, and all of the vast amount of input is
being
on the
Library
the Committee
by Prof. Joan Durrance, of the UM Graduate School
who is our program leader between late April and early
Public Library Specialist
synthesized faculty
for
Information and
for four meetings of June.
Phase III. The third phase is a series of four meetings of LRPC. They will be held between April 27 and June 4. The first will consist of an interpretive report of the two surveys by
Dr. Robert Quinn of the Institute for Social Research,
the results of which will be sent to you as soon as we have them.
Also at the first meeting, Dr. Durrance will share with the group her synthesis of the vast amount of input data and how it can be
used in the drafting of the report.
The Committee will also
discuss its reactions to
Phase II drafting
Library's
and identify
salient
Finally,
and Mission
by the task Committee will
from
that will make
-3-
April 15, 1987
from the
Studies
Planner
as well as representatives
of Information and Library
from the community (City
of Commerce). one, a community
objective
and potential cooperation
which
process of the American Library
Division,
and begin with AAPL to assume.
the
up the substance
we will discuss forces.
in early
and Advisory
from each to serve on the task forces.
a review
them develop
task
forces which
Phase IV. During the summer and early fall, the task meet: do the work to which they have been assigned;
forces will draft
Committee,
change. with the UM
roles we believe
points
will be

   Memo to: Dr. Richard Benjamin Dr. Wiley Brownlee
-5- April 15, 1987
the announcement to us from Connie Dimond of the Downtown Plan Project, is enclosed. If we cannot attend it, we are encouraged to attend one of the other meetings.
I expect another detailed report from me to you at the end of
Phase
should
prior to mid-June,
hesitate
or
the Board
Members
to contact me at
believe an update is needed of Education.
RRH:bc
xc: Advisory
Friends'
Committee
Board Heads
III. However, do not you have any questions
any time
Department
Three Committees' Members
for
(for all staff)

       t------..--
-·----..---···------- ..... ..-.---·-~-
...,................
-.
,.
,,
,•
f;
i.

      Planning Department
TO: Ray·Hernandez Ann Arbor Public
CITYOF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
100 North Fifth Avenue, P.O. Box 8647, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48107 Phone (313) 994-2800
MEMORANDUM
Library FROM: Connie DimondCl)
DowntownPlan Project Manager SUBJECT: DowntownPlan Concepts
Review Workshops
DATE: April 1, 1987
Since January, the DowntownPlan Steering Committee and a volunteer group of local design professionals have been working to formulate a statement of preliminary objectives for the future of downtown and to transl ate these objectives into implementation strategies and physical plan recommendations. During the month of April, this set of objectives and preliminary policy and plan concepts will be presented and discussed in a series of public workshops. The goals of these public review sessions are to Cl) reach agreement on the basic direction of the plan and (2) establish a foundation for refining plan and policy strategies by involving as manypeople as possible in the planning process.
In the Fall of 1986, you provided valuable early input in defining the issues and objectives which the DowntownPl an should address. We hope that you will continue to help shape the plan for downtownby participating in this phase of the planning process.
A meeting for downtown"service providers" and representatives of the Downtown Merchants' Associations has been scheduled for:
In addition,
Wednesday, April 22, 1987 Godfrey Building (Kerrytown)
<Third Floor) 8:30 a.m.
a Public Forum has been scheduled for:
Wednesday, April 29, 1987 Campus Inn Terrace Ballroom 615 East Huron Street
7 :30 p.m.
Wehope to see you, or your representative, at these meetings. CD/Jsj/m
\

     resident
'ice-President
·ecretary
reasurer
hairrnan,
Mrs. Kirby Hall
1
Bulkley Innes
Newman
lepresentative,
Advisory
I
1
1
I
1915 Scotwood
1515 Ottawa Drive 1200 Earhart No.428
769-3115 662-9109 663-6255 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 761-8331 662-3902 662-4164 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-1178 662-9723 668-6225
    32789
    28739
    07042
ohnnie Alexander arian Bader
rudy Bulkley argaret Cameron leanor Collins sabel Haight
elen Hall
irby Hall
rudy Hun ting ton oan Innes
oberta Keniston ranees McSparran an Barney Newman ibby Oneal
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Miss (Mrs. (Miss (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
315 213
5
YEAR OF ELECTION TO MEMBERSHIP
663-5879
1 arol Plumer I
ary Pryor
rue Rosenthal esta Spink
arcy Westerman lice Wethey
1280 Astor Drive 715 Spring Valley
2105 Devonshire Road 2 Geddes Heights
1926 Hampton Court 1510 Cambridge Road
rs. Stanley ._rs. Howard rs. Charles
Dodge, Peckham, Vibbert,
EMERITAE MEMBERS
New England Ave., Winter London Road, Hendersonville,
Park,
Florida
N. Carolina
New Jersey
940 Dodge 948 Hall,
951 Haight 951 Plumer 951 Vibbert 951 Wethey 956 Collins 957 Alexander 957 Keniston 960 Innes
960 Pryor 962 Bader
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN MEMBERSAND OFFICERS 1987-1988
OFFICERS
Committee MEMBERS
John) Arno) Jonathan) George) Eleanor) Cameron) Helen) Kirby) David) Perry) Hayward)
Book
Committee Library
(Emerita 1971) H.
(Ernerita 1968)
1962 Cameron
1966 Peckham (Emerita 1978) 1970 Huntington
1970 Oneal
1972 Westerman
1976 Hall, K.
1982 Bulkley
1982 Rosenthal
1985 Newman
1986 McSpar ran
1986 Spink
Ernst Haskell) Robert) James) Millard) Arnnon) Walter) Scott) Harold)
Pulgram)
1 Harvard 931 Oakdale 501 Onondaga
Place
Roosevelt Pl, SC, Montclair,
2112 Vinewood 1200 Earhart 12 Geddes
Blvd. No.358
Heights 2037 Geddes Avenue
2100 Hill Street 2222 Fuller Road
Mrs. David
Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal
Mrs. JGnathan Mrs. Perry
Mrs. Haskell
788 Arlington
285 Orchard Hills 663-5898
Huntington

     ecretary's The
May 1, 1987 spring meeting at the
Mrs. John Alexander,
. iss 'irby erry
cott
ere ·an
joined by two invited guests, Mrs. Susie Chen, Reference
Librar-
a writer
from rom The The ade that
the Ann Arbor Public Ann Arbor Observer.
Library,
was read of the
and Annette
and accepted.
Churchill,
The ho could
report was read by Jan Newman for Trudy Bulkeley,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Report Ladies'
of Eleanor
Library Hall.
Association Members
held its present were
Mrs.
Kirby
Collins, Mrs. Cameron
Hall, Mrs. Mrs.
Mrs. Haskell Newman, Mrs. James Ilumer, Mrs. Millard Pryor, Mrs. Ainnon Rosenthal, Secretary, Mrs.
Secretary's the tape
report recording
A decision was readings done at the
Haight, Miss Helen Huntington, Vice-President,
Mrs. David Keniston,
Westerman,Chai.rman of the Book Committee, Mrs. Harold Wethey. We
Hall,
Innes, Mrs. Hayward
President,
historical
Prue Rosenthal was asked
Treasurer's
not be present. Our total assets (value of shares of stock,
October
ave this done, and
be transcribed. bring twelve
1986 meeting
to copies to the next October meeting.
.oney market funds, and checking account
balance) for $105,040.96.
the calendar
This shows a the first
$10,000.
of the
in the in 1987
year January $9,462.50
quarter
In Association,
1 to December
over the indicates a
31, 1986, Previous further
were
year.
In
addition of nearly
increase of 1987 1986 to
mark the 120th
increment anniversary of
the Public
founding Library Thus far
we gave usual two installments
$5,000 to during
the Ann Arbor the calendar
year.
we have presented only $1,000 to the Library, and as of April 24,
-1-

     .....__,...
I987 a surplus of $3,289.29 remained in the Revolving Fund. conse- ,uently the Finance Committee recommended that we not make a second ,ift in July. Trudy Bulkley made a motion in her report that the
oney stay in our account where it will earn interest, and that the
reasurer write ing support and
to the Director of the
Library expressing our contin- not making a further financial
ontribution eport is
he Ann Arbor
why we are The motion was
The lith her
Book Committee,
Marcy Westerman, met twice
this attached.
Chairman
passed. The Treasurer's
full
explaining year.
of the
(Roberta Keniston, Carol Plumer, and Prue Rosenthal)
committee
nd selected thirteen new titles to be added to the books on art of
Since rom the
Public Library. The
Committee's for books depleted,the
report is attached.
the
Ladies' ordered
The project undertaken by the r,adies' Library Association for aping books on the history of art for the Michigan Library for the
supply Library
of
bookplates was almost
purchased with
funds
the Book the
ommittee
irst printing in 1979 and preserved by Alice Wethey will now be kept ith the Secretary's files for tuture use.
llind and the Physically ample of the information
Handicapped, has come to a standstill. A
n file with
the Book
it. Mary Pryor
records told us suggested
in case that people
anyone using
n
an
or
continuing
request new titles.
Mary and she
report
that the book
appropriate books
will request is attached
-2-
that
I ...
ook Committee's full
.
another
2100. The
original
"plate".made
Committee
is interested this service
committee look they be taped. The
sheet and an application
form will be kept
chairman
of for

    Isabel Haight, or her committee,
Chairman consisting
of of
slate
the Nominating Committee, Eleanor Collins and Carol
reported Plumer,
ecommending
the following President
bout
etroit Ihere
iation
lo spend
eally ointing
a
Our guest,
the Library.
Librarian
Susie Chen, attended
books on
then spoke
conference art and art
to us at the history,
in remarking
are even
of
that our books,
used, frequently by students
Huntington on occasion.
that we start
-3-
the more esoteric items,
Institute
she was the cost. Her
of Art
dealing with
made her all our
first-class out that
only person description
the object contributed
books and the Library
who did not of the role
of enormous money on two
a lack of
complain of the envy.
strenuously Ladies' Library She laid the
about Asso-
failure of
reassessment is seriously
of
Reference
She had recently
Officers:
Vice-President Secretary
Treasurer
Book Chairman Library Committee
Huntington Rosenthal
has is being considering
been underspending
made of the building and the admin-
complete ·stration
landing of the library stairs say, "This is a LADIES library, we can't go up there," in reference to the plaque on the wall. She concluded
an enlargement.
In a humorous aside she said she often heard young boys on the
not excepting
from the University,
a video tape library art and art history. However, Mrs. Chen commented that the
and
of
heavily
Professor
Prue Rosenthal suggested
Kirby
Trudy
Prue
Trudy
Joan Innes Jan Newman
Hall
Bulkley
factors, space for
a shortage expansion,
further
in all
fields.

   ibrary has not yet decided to offer video tapes. Mrs. Pryor moved hat we ask Susie Chen to encourage the Library to set up a collec- ion of video tapes for circulation. The motion was seconded and assed.
We decided informally to change the order of future meetings, he business meeting to come first, starting at 3:00 P. M. and tea Ir sherry to follow at 5:00 P.M. The next meeting will be at Mrs.
lexander's, where Carol Plumer has been asked to read a little more istory for us.
Respectfully submitted,
Prudence
Rosenthal, Secretary
-4-

     Dear Trudy:
I finally worked out.how to shift things around a bit so that the information ~asn't all wrong, and I got in every name that had been mentioned. I don't see how Prue can· take umbrage.
Kirby's
years
stantly
to the date of the meeting. We have had this latest one only four years, which sets the meeting date on the last Friday of April. Well, here we go again!
house. ago with
That does make me laugh.
I gave a
that the Ladies
failed
up to the
provisions
in the constitution
as
a lot of
to live
statistics showing
report several con-
Anyway, I hope you will be back to attend to the matter of getting the tape transcribed. You will observe the new wording, which does not say the tape is attached but that you made it.
Marcy will attend to the tapes for the blind project which is defunct. Nobody can be found who is willing to do any reading. Marcy is on the School Board and Trudy has a full time job, not to mention that she is treasurer.
I hate to mention the party at your house last night.
As it all worked out I was very relieved not to be fetched -- I was dead tired last night. The office sent me a regular invitation,
and David had previously invited me by phone. He had said he would arrange for me to be picked up. Well, my feelings were not in the least ruffled that he forgot, but I am afraid that you or he might notice that I wasn't there and wonder why.
Affectionately,
1510 Cambridge, A2 April 3, 1987.
You have the card setting the meeting for May 1 at

    Secretary's
The the home
Report
were Margaret Cameron,
of to the hostess Haight, Helen
Eleanor Collins, Isabel
LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN
our money
balance of
This amount is $15,377.91 $105,040.96 at the end
October 30, 1987
Association held its fall meeting at Mrs. John Alexander. Those present, in addition
Ladies Library
Hall, Kirby Hall,
Jan Newman, Zibby
Secretary,
and Alice Wethey.
The secretary's report was read and
were made concerning the tape that had been made a year ago of
Vice-President,
Pryor, Prue Rosenthal,
President, Oneal,
Nesta
Trudy Carol
Spink,
Huntington, Plumer, Mary Marcy Wester-
man,
Carol Plumer, old minutes. cribed because speaking over said she would could be erased
Zibby Oneal who could not
remain unchanged October 16 our
market $3,159.12
$56,068.00.
to
Adding amounts gives
our us
Johnny Alexander,
and others possible to
reading from the have them trans-
It
it the
take so
be
had not been
stock fund
December 31, market shares
1986.
were
As worth
was
noise of
it
hard to understand
the
person
read present. since
for the
Trudy
too
the
and see if the
Mary peripheral
Pryor noise
Bulkley,
the tape
could be transcribed.
the Treasurer's report
others present.
The holdings
of
Association
of the close of $61,191.75 and checking account
$120,418.87. assets of
these
more than our total
of 1986. They gave
$1,000 to the Ann
accepted.
Suggestions

    Arbor Public Library's revolving fund in April, 1987. This
was the only payment so far this year, since the library had a
surplus of several thousand dollars in the
revolving fund.
Assuming that the Treasurer between $1,000 amount to be
the surplus is recommended that
no
longer there the Association
in
January,
vote a sum
1988,
chair
made and passed.
Carol Plumer
committee,
Innes, (Johnny
who could Alexander,
report for The committee met
of the book
& $2,000 for decided by the
our semi-annual
Treasurer in consultation
in January 1988. This
the exact
with the
motion was
Joan
twice, group of
Director suggestion to
Arbor art
Public video
soon on an addition, that would alleviate
Carol Plumer
proposed that
of 350
lishers
directly
exchange.
are NOT published
we spend about the equivalent
buy books directly from English pub-
the idea is
but
maybe as large as three additional floors the space problems.
English
that are
to
available here. We would
send for them the currency
be sure they available
because Concern
library
has trouble with over the need to
read the Book Committee
not be present.
and Carol Plumer) and selected a
titles
nandez,
to our
He thinks
about duplicating the
Library. Both he and Susie Chen said they were going to start
to be purchased.
A letter
also came from Ramon Her-
of the introduce
pounds not
the
was voiced
Ann
Library,
tapes to the library.
good,
role of the Washtenaw
is concerned
in principle,
in this country, and therefore
gift,
County
Video
responding

    with
Mary
mittee Association.
library discount.
Carol assured suggesting we
would check.
the Book Com- of the whole
Committee. She
met
the
He hundredth by helping
Mr.
read her Hernandez
the
problem to them.
one
in 1988
tectural reality
There Ann Arbor
meeting. what our
plans for the new addition, which for a few years.
has been no follow-up by Annette
probably won't be a
Churchill of the us at our last up and find out
the Pryor
made a
buy books without
us she empower consent
to
the passed
previous unanimously.
Jan Newman
report this
on the Library summer and discussed
with library
has not spending
all the money help celebrate
allocated
the upcoming
suggested
that anniversary
we could
of the
with a
purpose,
Observer Zibby
prospects
since her
Oneal said she would follow
are for an article.
proposal
The motion
publication speakers in on
Public Library of the history a quarterly
beginning
of the Library,
or by
general
original
No resolution was
specific information
ing Osler/Milling Architects presented several possible archi-
bringing concern
voiced over deviating too
and the legality of it in our constitution. made, Jan Newman said she would get more
from Mr. Hernandez. At the Library meet-
interview with
basis. There was
much away from
our

    '---'.
The date of the next meeting was set for 3 p.m. April 29th at Jan Newman's house.
Respectfully Submitted,
Prudence L. Rosenthal Secretary

   Secretary's
The the home
Report
Ladies Library
of to the hostess Haight, Helen
Mrs. John
were Margaret Cameron,
man,
and Alice Wethey.
The secretary's report was read and
LADIES LIBRARY
ASSOCIATION
Association Alexander.
OF ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN October 30, 1987
held its fall meeting at Those present, in addition
Eleanor Collins, Isabel
Vice-President,
Pryor, Prue Rosenthal,
ing over would take erased so
Zibby who could
remain unchanged October 16 our
speak- said she
could be
the
noise
the tape could
others
and see if the
Pryor
it
Oneal not be
be transcribed.
the Treasurer's
report of
Hall, Kirby Hall,
Jan Newman, Zibby
Secretary,
President, Oneal,
Nesta
Trudy Carol
Spink,
Huntington, Plumer, Mary Marcy Wester-
accepted.
were made concerning the tape that had been made a year ago of
Carol Plumer,
old minutes. It cribed because it
Alexander, been
and others possible to
reading from the
Johnny
had not
have the
Mary noise
for Trudy
the Association
As of the close of
was too of the
hard to
understand present.
peripheral
them trans- person
read present. since
Bulkley,
stock fund
December 31, market shares
1986. were
worth our
us
$1,000 to the Ann
The holdings
our money
balance of
This amount
$105,040.96
Arbor Public
was the only payment so far this year, since the library had a
market $3,159.12
$56,068.00.
Adding amounts gives
to is $15,377.91
these
more than our total
$120,418.87. assets of
at the end Library's
of 1986. They gave
revolving
fund in April, 1987.
This
Suggestions
$61,191.75 and checking account

   surplus of several thousand dollars in the
revolving fund.
Assuming that the surplus is no
longer there the Association
in
January,
vote a sum
1988,
the Treasurer between $1,000 amount to be
recommended that & $2,000 for our
decided by
the exact
with the
motion was
Joan
twice, group of
chair
made and passed.
Carol Plumer
committee, in January 1988. This
of the book
Innes, (Johnny
titles
dez,
our
thinks
duplicating the
Both he and Susie Chen said an addition, maybe as large
for met
who could Alexander,
not be present.
and Carol Plumer)
to be Director
purchased.
of the Ann
A letter Arbor
The
also Public
a
Ramon Hernan-
suggestion
the idea is good, in
to principle, but is
would alleviate Carol Plumer
the space proposed
as three additional problems.
floors that
the equivalent from English pub-
to introduce
role of the
about Video Library.
semi-annual
the Treasurer in consultation
read the Book Committee
Library, art video tapes
to
He
Washtenaw County
they were going to start soon on
that we spend about buy books directly
of 350 English
lishers that are not available here. Wewould send for them
directly because exchange. Concern
the library has was voiced over
country, Carol
trouble with the need to
the currency
be sure they
are
with
Mary
mittee
Association. The motion
and assured
therefore
us she
available
would check.
the Book Com- of the whole
NOT published
the library Pryor made a
in this discount.
pounds to
proposal to buy books without
suggesting
the previous
we
empower consent
passed unanimously.
gift,
report committee
and selected came from
responding
the library. concerned

   Jan Newman read her report
on the Library Committee. She
met
the
He hundredth by helping
Mr.
Hernandez this
summer and discussed
the
problem to them.
one
in 1988
with library
has not
spending could
all the money help celebrate
allocated
the upcoming
beginning of the
suggested
that anniversary
we
with a bringing speakers
specific information
ing Osler/Milling Architects
tectural reality
There Ann Arbor
plans for the new addition, which for a few years.
has been no follow-up by Annette
probably won't
be a
meeting.
what our prospects
Observer Zibby
since her Oneal said
interview with she would follow an article.
Churchill of the us at our last up and find out
of the publication
Public Library of the history a quarterly
Library, There was
our
or by
general
original
No resolution was made, Jan Newman said she would get more
concern voiced purpose, and
much
in our constitution.
in over
the
on
deviating too
basis.
legality of it
from Mr. Hernandez. At the Library meet- presented several possible archi-
are for
The date of the next meeting was set for 3 p.rn. April 29th
at Jan Newman's house.
away from
Respectfully Submitted,
Prudence L. Rosenthal Secretary

        Jan
• adies Library Association ook Connnittee Report ctober 30, 1987
nes, Carol Plumer, Johnny Alexander
he committee met to consider recommendations for new books to purchase for the
nn Arbor Public Library with funds given by the Ladies Library Association. l List of titles sent by the reference librarian Suzy Chen and accepted.
rowart, Jack, et al. Georgia O'Keefe: art and letters. Little, Brown. 1987. $50.00 enton, Tim. The Villas of Le Corbusier.Yale U.P. 1987 $50.00
ampert, Catherine. Rodin: Sculpture and Drawings.Arts Council of Great Britain.
1987, $45.00
arris, Mary. The Arts at Black Mountain College.MIT Press, 1987. $50.00
~
The committee made the following selection from recommendations by members of the Ladies Library Association.
Hartt, Frederick. Art: A History of Painting, Sculpture, Architecture. 2nd Ed.,~ vols. Abrams, 1985.
Vol. l--0-8109-1824-2, $45.00
Vol.2 -- 0-13-047382-0 $21.95
Stich. Sidra. Made in USA: an Americanization in mondern art, the '50s and '60s.
eohen, Joan. The New Chinese Painting, 1949-1986.Abrams, 1987. $35.00
l~ose, Bernice. The Drawings of Roy Lichtenstein. MOMA,1987. $37.50
,Gustav Klimt: Women. Rizzoli, 1987. $50.00
tuspoli, Mario. The Cave of Lascaux: the final photographs. Abrams, 1987. $45.00
California Univ. Press,
Agnelli, Marella. Gardens
Stuckey, Charles F. Berthe
Callaway, Nicholas. Georgia O'Keefe: One Hundred Flowers.Knopf, 1987. $100.00 Flanigan, J. Michal. American Furniture: from the Kaufman Collection.
National Gallery of Art,1987. $45.00
Gage, John. JMWTurner. Yale Univ. Press. 1987. $39.95
Saslow, James M. Ganymede in the Renaissance: Homosexuality in Art and Society.
Yale University Press, 1986. $30.00
Brumfield, William C. Gold in Azure: 1000 years of Russian Architecture.
Godine, 1983. $60.00
Chastel, Andre. A Chronicle of Italian Renaissance Painting. Cornell U.P. 1984 $99.50 Monnier, Genevieve. Drawing: History of Art.Rizzoli, 1979. $35.00
Clark, Kenneth. The Nude: A Study in Ideal Form. Princeton, 1972. $73.50
A letter from Ramon Hernandez is enclosed responding to our suggestion that we introduce art video tapes to the library. He will explore this with department heads and the Long Range Planning Committee. It may be as long as nine months before they move in this area because they have to work it into the greater plan first.
Carol Plumer will discuss our ideas about ordering books from other sources, such as Borders, or foreign book stores.
Since we have a balance of $2,588.28 we decided to withhold another payment to the Ann Arbor Public Library until such a need arises.
1987. $60.00
of the Italian Villas.Rizzoli, 1987. $50.00
Morisot: Impressionist.Hudson Hill, 1987. $45.00

   LADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
TREASURER'SREPORT
OCTOBER30, l987
The holdings of the Ladies· Library Association have remained unchangedsince December31, 1986. Wecontinue to own stock in the same seven companies (two of which have had stock splits), we still have a large investment in the Merrill Lynch Ready Assets Trust, <1ndwe have funds in a checking account. The news this month (as of October 18, 1987) is the steep dive of the stock market on Wednesday,Thursday and Friday, October 14 to 16, which was a major set back to the five-year-old bull market. Further drops should certainlty not be unexpected.
Experts have long been pointing to the long-term and always increasing federal deficit, the continuing deficit in exports, the large and uncertain loans to Latin America, the hugeamounts of private debt, the vast foreign investment, especially by the Japanese, in our stock market, and the still falling dollar, as factors making the financial structure of Wall Street look more and more like a house of cards ready to be blown down by any ill-wind. What goes up must eventually come down, and the middle days of October may be the beginning of the inevitable drop.
The Ladies· Library funds, however, are far from any kind of danger yet. We long since got ourselves hedged as well as possible against just this kind of trouble. Our stocks are blue chips that will eventually recover from any financial storm, our Ready Assets Trust and bank account are insured by the Federal government. At the close of October 16 our stock market shares were still worth $61, 191.75 and our money market fund $56,068.00. Adding our checking account balance of $3, 159.12 to these amounts gives us $120,418.87. This amount is $15,377.91 more than our total assets of $105,040.96 at the end of 1986.

    We paid $1,000 to the Ann Arbor Public Library's revolving fund for the
purchase of art and art history books in April, 1987. This payment is our
only one for this year, since the Library had a surplus of several thousand
dollars in the revolving fund. Assuming that the surplus is no longer there
in January, 1988, the treasurer recommends that the Ladies· Library
Association vote a sum between $1,000 and $2,000 for our semi-annual
gift, the exact amount to be decided by the treasurer in consultation with
the chair of the book committee, in January, 1988. Wi11someoneplease make a motion?
Respectfully submitted,
Trudy Bulkley
Treasurer

   P esident
v ce-President S cretary
T easurer
J hnnie Alexander M rgaret Cameron El anor Collins
I bel Haight
H len Hall
K by Hall
T udy Huntington
J an Innes 1
OFFICERS Mrs. David Huntington
Mrs .Walter Spink
Miss Franees McSparran Mrs. HaskelI Newman/ Mrs. Robert OneaI
BookSelection Committee Mrs.John Alexander
Mrs. Hayward Keniston Mrs. James Plumer Mrs. Amnon RosenthaI
Library Advisory CounciI Mrs. Hayward Keniston
Mrs. HaskelI Newman
LADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATION,ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN MEMBERSHIPANDOFFICERS1988-89
R berta Keniston
F nces McSparran (Miss Frances) J nBarneyNewman(Mrs.Haske11)
Zi byOneal
C rol Plumer
M ry Pryor
P e Rosentha1 N sta Spink
M rcy Westerman A •ce Wethey
(Mrs.Robert) (Mrs. James) (Mrs. Mi11ard) (Mrs. Amnon) (Mrs. Walter) (Mrs. Scott) (Mrs Harold)
Mrs. Stanley Dodge Mrs. Howard Peckham
EMERITUMSEMBERS
315 New England Ave., Winter Park,Fl. 32789 213 LondonRoad,Hendersonsville, N.C.28739
1948 Hall, H. 1951 Haight 1951 Plumer 1951 Wethey 1956 Coll1ns 1957 Alexander 1957 Keniston 1960 Innes 1960 Pryor
YEAROFELECTIOTNOMEMBERSHIP 1962 Cameron
(Mrs. John) (Mrs. George) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Cameron) (Miss Helen) (Mrs. Kirby) (Mrs. David) (Mrs. Perry) (Mrs. Hayward)
MEMBERS
788 Arlington Blvd.(48104) 1515 Ottawa Road (48105) 1200 Earhart #358 (48105)
21 12 Vinewood Blvd. (48104) 1200 Earhart #428 (48105) 12 GeddesHeights (48104)
2037 GeddesAvenue(48104) 2100 Hill Street (48104) 2222 Fuller Road (48105)
1 Harvard Place (48104) 931 Oakdale (48108) 501 Onondaga (48104)
1931 Jackson Road (48103) 715 Spring Valley (48105) 2105 Devonshire Road (48104) 2 GeddesHeights (48104)
1926 Hampton Court (48103) 151OCambridge Street (48104)
663-5879
662-9109
663-6255 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 761-8331 662-3902 662-4164 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-1178 662-9723 668-6225
1966
1970 1970 1972 1976 1982 1985 1986 1986
Peckham (Emeritus
Huntington Oneal Westerman Hall, K. RosenthaI Newman McSparran Spink
1978)

    Secretary's The
home of Margaret
Report
Ladies' Library Association
Mrs. Haskell Newman. Those
Eleanor Collins,
held present
April 29, 1988 its spring meeting at the
were Johnny Alexander, Haight, Helen Hall, Kirby
Roberta Keniston, Plumer, Mary Pryor,
usually donate.
has been that to $108,670.90
our total as against
assets as $105,040.96
of on year
consequence amounted 31, 1986, in other
December December earlier.
Unfortunately from the
her from
information was sternation as no Her resignation
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Cameron, President,
Is~bel Vice-President,
Hall,
Frances
Prue Rosenthal,
The secretary's
us that she had had the peripheral noise erased as well as Possible from the "Ladies' Library Reminiscences" _tape, and Trudy Huntington said she would take it home and see if it could be transcribed.
Zibby Oneal read the treasurer's report for Trudy Bulkley, who could not be present. The over-crowded condition of the Library has meant that we gave them only $1,000 this year, half of the amount we
McSparran,
Trudy Jan
Huntington, Newman,
Zibby One.al, Carol Spink, Alice Wethey.
The 31, 1987,
words The complete treasurer's
exactly report
$3,630.00
is attached.
has been forced to
for all of Ladies' Library
Bulkley
Nesta
secretary,
report was read and accepted. Mary Pryor told
us Trudy
Association. Her
our meetings and she felt she should
resign
prevent
make room for someone who is able to take a more active role. This
ever attending
received with one has ever
was accepted,
regret, resigned and the
and a certain amount of con- from the Association before.
decision made to accept nominations
more than a
work commitments

    -·
for a new member in the spring of 1989.
[The rest of this report is missing. The second page clipped onto the beginning sheet proved to be the end of the minutes for the meeting of October 1987.]

   TheLadies·Ubrary Association.,AnnArbor.,Michigan Secretary·s Report October 28., 1938
The Ladies· Library Association held its fall m~ting at the home of Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal on Friday, October 28, 1989. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: JohnnieAlexander,EleanorCollins,lsebel Haight,HelenHall, Kirby Hall, TrudyHuntington,JoanInnes,FrancesMcSparranZ,1bbyOneal,CarolPlumer,
MaryPryor, PrueRosenthal,NestaSpink,MarcyWesterman.
The Secretary·sreport was read andapproved,endwas followed bye
surveyof pasttimes asCarolPlumercontinuedherreview of thehistory of the Ladies·Library Association. Todayshecoveredthe periodfrom 1930-62, using excerpts from the minutes for those years andseveral xeroxedhandouts.She reportedthat duringthis periodthe archivesof the Associationwere assembledanddepositedin the Bentley Library.
ZibbyOnealreadtheTreasurers·report,jointly submittedbyherandby JanNewman,whocouldnotbepresent.Thereportincludedabrief andbracing review by Alice Wetheyof the uncertain state of the national economy,anda moreoptimistic reportonthehealthoftheholdingsoftheLadies·Library Association. Ourstocks havemadeanexcellent recoveryfrom the traumaof
the October,1987market collapse. Wehave,however,nowreducedthe number of securities we hold, andincreasedour cashbalance,andhavea total of $117,966.31,only $3000.00short of our worth two daysbefore the market slump. ThecompleteTreasurers·report is attached.
JanNewman'sreport onthe last meetingof the Library Ad\lisoryCouncil was readby ZibbyOneal;the information it containedwas later supplemented byanotefromRobertaKeniston.Themeetingof theCouncilfocusedonthe plansfor remodellingandenlargingthe Library. RobertaKeniston,who attendedit, stressed to the architect the desirab11ityof providing special storage for the Ladies·Library Collection. The report is attached.
PrudenceRosenthalpresentedthe BookCommitteereport. Forty-five newbookshavebeenpurchasedsincethelastreport,andapreliminarylist of
19booksfor futureacquisitionhasbeencompiledbytheBookCommittee.Some of thenewbookswereondisplayat ourmeeting. CarolPlumeris trying to establish if Zwemmer'sin Londonremainsa reliable sourcefor bookpurchase., andif delay on delivery of booksorderedlast spring was solely a conseQuence of the British postal strike. TheLibrary haso\ler$2000.00of unspentmoney fromourAssociationandwedecidednottotransfer anadditional$1000.00,
1

   sincebookstorageproblemstntheLibrarymakeit unlikelythattheywill spendit at the moment.TheBookCommitteehasbeentrying to get inf ormatton aboutour earlier purchasesfor the Library, andthe usemadeof them. Susie Chenwill compilea list. In discussion,IsabelHaightsaid that the Library has a ceirdcatalogueof all the bookswe havebought,but betweenlosses, and replacementsit is notupto date. It wasagreedthat theBookCommittee shouldurgethe Library to keepit upto date. NestaSpink,commentingonthe purchaseof asoft-boundcopyof onart catalogue,recommendedthat henceforthonly hard-boundcopiesshouldbebought.TheBookCommittee report wasmovedandaccepted.
2
TrudyHuntington(President)raisedseveralfurther matters of business.We shouldmoveto fill thevacancyin ourmembership.Nominetionsshouldbemade et our April, 1969meeting,andvotedonin October.Severalmembersremarked that in filling the vacancy.weshouldtry to seasonourmaturewisdomwith youth. The Association discusseda matter left undecidedlast year, the issue
of a former memberwhoexpectsto return to AnnArbor,andis interested in rejoiningtheAssoc1at1onT.rudyHuntingtonclar1f1edthedistinctionbetween Emeritusmembers,whohaveservedfor tenyearsbeforeleavingAnnArbor,and whoretain the right to cometo meetings,but without votfngprtvileges,and formermembers,wholosetheirmembershipif theymovefromAnnArbor before serving for the requ1s1teperiod. It was agreedthat Trudy Huntington will write to the former member,to establish if shets indeedreturning to Ann Arbor in January, 1969,so that the matter ts clarified before our April meeting.Ifshewill returninJanuary,andwishestorejointheAssociation, then we w111offer her the existing vacancy;if not we must moveaheadwith nominationsfor the April meeting.
JoanInnesvolunteeredto hostournextmeetingonFriday,April 28,at 3 p.m.
Sincetherewasnootherbusinessthemeetingwasadjourned. Respectful1y submitted,
FrancesMcSparran(Secretary)

     THELADIES'LlBRARYASSOCIATIONOFANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
Treasurer's Report
April 29, 1986
This is my last trt?asurer's report for the Ladies· Library Association.
The documentation of the financial activity for 1987 that is attached is my
work. i am indebted to Alice Wethey for the narrative below concerning
financial market activitv and its impact on the holdinqs of the Ladies· ,-
LiDrary Association:
1·rn not =-ure that I can give a proper summary of happenings in the financial markets this past year, but I can rnention some of them. The Regan administration has ::ontinued its wild care,enIngmore andmore deeply into debt ·Nitri ::s astronomically :ncreasing scale of deficit 'inancinq . .,/'lecontinue to pile up negative billions in our trade balances. The dollar continues to fall, even as the leading financial nations of the world have been attempting to stab1 l ize It. Dornestical ly our savings level remains the lowest anywhere in the industrialized world. In the srnck market the prices of stocks for years have been considerably higher than the book value of the companies thernseIves, ana even the great ·correct ion,' as one might ::all it ..)· last October didn·t drop prices that far .
.Just :1 rew 1jays ago anomer •:orrect ion· occurred whenthe-:t:oc1<m.arketjroppedmorethanahundredpoints :n a few hours. it 1Na·3 termed the fifth largest drop in
nIstory. This time, considerably co my surprise, the f inaneial experts said that the rnar·ket was st i 11basically unhealthy because or the absence, since October, or the individual investor That may very we!I be the case. :=ertainly tr,e Ladies· Library has been ·sitting on its hands· for the last several years as the market has been moving steadily uoward. When a tak.e-over threatened any investment, we quietly sold it and put the proceeds into a cash fund. We are sti 11doing that. Just a few weeks ago bad news, though not take-over news, from Eastman Kodak resulted in our sale of our modest stake there and again the proceeds went into a money fund.
We happen to have spent very little this past year. The over-crowded condition of the library has meant that they have made only token calls on our funds. The

    consequence has been that our total assets as of December 31, 1987. amounted to $108,670.90 as against $ I 05,040.96 on Decemoer 3 ! . 1986, in other words a!most exactly $3,630.00 more than a year earlier.
Finally, I would like to thank all my finance committee rnernber·sfor their heIp and support over the past two years: Al ice Wethey, especially, for her insights and instructions; Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal for their willinqness to be called upon as needsarose.
Respectfully submitted,
J/1,U-"/:7hllL~
Trudy Bulkley ~reasurer

           EASTMANKODAK
12/31/87 225 $49.000
LADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATION--TREASURER'SREPORT
1/1/87-12/31/87
COMPANY SHARES
PRICE
DIVIDENDS
$378.00 $426.39 $228.00 $330.00 $440.00 $186.00 $165.00
$3,373.85
$5,527.24
VALUE
12/31/87
$11,025.00 $8,971.88 $2,950.00 $6,900.00 $7,825.00 $6,437.50 $4,368.75
$56,900.43
$105,378.56
_ $3,292.34 $108,670.90
HOUSEHOLFDINANCE 225 CENTRALSOUTH\A/EST 100
$39.875
$29.500
AMOCO
100 $69.000
1'"1OBIL 200
Ml'"lM 100
DUPONT so
1'"1ERRILLYNCHREADY ASSETSTRUST
Subtotal
BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ASSETS
$39. 125 $64.375 $87.375

           INCOME:
Dividends
!nterest--bank Dues
EXPENSES:
Sefetv Deposit Box
Librarv Revolving
~'..olossos Printina-oookDlates Ready Assets Purcnases:
Dividends
Balance Jan. I' 1987 Income during 1987
~xoenses durin9 1987
$5,527.24 $115.76 $1. 70
$5,644.70
$12.00
t I. 000. 00 $100.20
$3,373.85 $4,486.05
$2,472.19 $5,644.70
t8.116.89
$4,486.05 $3,630.84
LADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATION--TREASURER'RSEPORT
f una
Cash
12/31/87
NOW acct. latedep.*
-+:dividends
$3,292.34 $338.50
$3,630.84

    LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN TREASURERS'REPORT
OCTOBER 28, 1988
New brooms are credited with marvelous efficiency, but with not much else. '
Wisdom and judgment belong to experience. Realizing this, the two new brooms who now occupy the position of Treasurer of the Ladies' Library Association have decided to turn for a perspective on the state of our economy to that most experienced treasurer of all, Alice Wethey. The comments that follow are hers:
"Earlier this year in the closed world of investment advisors appeared a cloud on the horizon 'no bigger than a man's hand'. In all the years that I have been subscribing to the Value Line Investment Survey. through all the ups and downs of the stock
market, the advice remains the same: keep 100% invested in common stocks with top ratings for timeliness and safety. In late May or early June this year there was a shift downward: keep 80% in common stocks, the rest in cash. August brought further
change of gears: keep 65% in stocks, the rest in case. (Ladies' Library funds happen to be between 40% and 45% invested in stocks, with the rest in cash.)
The reasons behind this decline are not difficult to find. The deficit remains intractable, for want of any will, at the top of the government that has produced it, to do anything about it. Atomic plants everywhere we now discover have been operating dangerously for years with government connivance. The deterioration of the environment accelerates--possibly our world is already past the point of no return for our form of life. All this with total indifference from the Reagan administration. The rolls of the homeless continue to swell geometrically. And just now, to put the finishing touch on the picture of the ruler who fiddles while Rome burns, we learn that Nancy
Reagan, for all her posturing about 'saying no', has continued to 'borrow' designer

    clothes and jewels to the tune of more than a million dollars without a word of disclosure to anybody. In breaking her •tittle promise' of 1982 to White House lawyers
to stop her practice and disclose every detail, she falls back on •a woman's prerogative to change her mind'!"
Yet, despite the uncertain state of our economy, the Ladies' Library holdings continue strong. With only two exceptions, our stocks show considerable gains over their
'•
December 31, 1987 prices. They have weathered the_beating of last October and are coming back with energy. Our portfolio value as of October 26, 1988 was $43,946.88 and our Ready Assets Fund contained $69,623.21. Adding om checking account balance of $4,396.22 to these amounts gives us a total of $117,966.3 l - -only a little more than $3,000 short of our total assets on October 16, 1987, two days before the market plunge.
Because of the DuPont Company's involvement in the Savannah River nuclear facility and the probably effect these problems will have on the price of its stock, we have decided to sell DuPont and purchase additional shares of MMM. This will leave us with only five securities in our portfolio and a considerable cash balance, but given the climate of the times and the uncertainty in the market, such a position does not seem undesirable.
We gave $1,000 to the Ann Arbor Public Library's revolving fund in September 1988. We recommend that the Ladies' Library Association vote an additional $1,000 at this meeting for our semi-annual gift.
Respectfully submitted,
J&A,_~
b~G>~
Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

    Report
of the Book
Since our last forty-five
Committee
meeting the Ann Arbor
October
28, 1988
have $2,000
storage problems, I in the spring if
recommend
they have used Sincerely yours,
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
chased
6 the
and Carol Plumer, met without Johnny and selected a list of 19 new books we would like to order. Thirteen of these are from Zwemmer's in London. Carol ordered books from them last spring and has not heard from them again. We are assuming that this is because of the
postal before
Chen:
which
it is
strike in Britain, and we will wait until we hear from them sending in a new order.
new books, Book Cornmittee,consisting.of
some of Johnny
Our
committee has
some new
questions which I addressed to Suzy
categories of books are strong and
books circulate the most? Yes, but
1. Can you find out which
are
2.
weak? No.
Can you find out which
a
3. Can you make up a list of all the books the Ladies' Library
lengthy process.
Association has given to the Library? Yes, and she will do that for the spring meeting.
The Library has$2,045.00 left at this point. Since they still
Prudence
Rosenthall, Chairperson Book Committee
which
Public you
Library has pur-
see here. On October Alexander, Eleanor Collins,
we give them $1,000 now and another
up
the first $1,000.

    Ladies on the
Library
Library
Representative report Advisory Committee.
Since
the money
was passed,
Library Advisory
Bond Issue library
September
on which expansion
and will The Board
of $1000
~:~mitted
continue accepted
from the
for library
the
and the
library
operation
of
the
School
plans
the
The
whether or not headquarters.
the staff and the are considerations.
Roberta Keniston they plan adequate of art books that
administration
of the it should
is considering temporary
construction on
to the public
board that collection
has provided
the contribution Association.
Jan Newman
October 28, 1988
for
the
depended
the
meeting centered
of the
on the
Committee expansion
during it.
to the
to the for
with gratitude Ladies Library
The stress inconvenience
stressed
storage
the Ladies to provide.
the Library
move of

         Books ordered for the_Ladies Library Collection February, 1988
It.Crone, Rainer. Andy Warhol. Rizzoli, 1987. $50.00
2. Rambach, Pierre¢ Suzanne. Gardens of Longevity in China, Japan. 1.--·
Skira/Rizzoli, 1987. $85.00
3. Rodimzeva, Irina. The Kremlin: and its Treasures. Rizzoli, 1987.$75.00 4.Noguchi, Isamu. The Isamu Noguchi Garden Museum. Abrams, 1987. $35.00
✓ S.American Paradise: the world of the Hudson River School. Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1987. $49.50.
6.Khan-Magomedov, Selim 0 .. Rodchenko: The Complete \Vork. MIT Press, 1987. $50.00 7.\Vollheim, Richard. Painting as an art: the A.IV.Mellon lectures, 1984. ,_-
Princeton Univ. Press, 1987. $45.00
v8.Proddow, Penny. American Jewebly: glamour and tradition. Rizzoli, 1987. $65.00
9. Matter, Herbert. Alberto Giacometti. Abrams. 1987. $60.00 i--- 10. Nordland,, Gerald. Richard Diebenkorn. Rizzoli, 1987. $60.00 t--·
✓'

         Ann Arbor Public Libra.ry
343 South Fifth Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-2293 313/994-2333 Ramon R. Hernandez, Director
Dec. 9, 1987
Books ordered for the Ladies Library Association
Wilton, Andrew. Turner in his time. Abrams, 1987. J49.50.
Smith, Roberta et al. CyTrombly. Frestel-Verlag, 1987. $60.00
Miro, /i#J/ JM.tt tliro. Yale U.P., 1987 ~50.00.
Gowing, Sir Lawrence. Paintings in the Louvre. Stewart, Tabori &Chang, 1987. $85.00 Upright, Diane. Ells•,iorth Kelly : works on paper. Abrams, 1987 $65.00
Frank, Peter. New,used and Improved, art for the Bos.Abbeville, 1987. S35.00
Henry, gerrit. Janet Fish. Burton Skira, 1987. $50.00
White, Christopher. Peter Faul Rubens: man and Artist. Yale U.P. 1987 $65.00 Holtzman, Harry, eJ. The New Art, the new life:'fhe collected writings of
Piet Mondrian. G.K. Hall, 1987. t.60.00
A Community Service of the Ann Arbor Public Schools

          "The Scholar's Bookshelf" Fall Sale
"Rembrandt: His Life, His Paintings" Gary Schwartz 10999 $29.95 $10.00 "Odilon Redon: Pastels", Roseline Bacou 14339 $65.00
"The Cross: Its History and Symbolism: George Willard Benson $18.95 12609 "pe~s: The Complete Etchings, Litho~hs, and Monotypea!Ll-0019
-lean- A.dhemar and-Franc-o-ise-Gaeh-in $ 75. 00 $29 . 95
Princeton Press
'.lrl. (..' l-Si?ltv "Vision of Landscape in Renaissance Italy" A.Richard Turner $48 .SO 0{9') I O ~ & -l't 'f.
"Illustrated Bible from Tours" $61.00 rO C: I'S5 rv o- iv'1I -o :>'7..~.3-do. "Illustrations in Roll and Kodex: A Study of Origin and Method of Text
Illustration" $61. 00 II c, 1~ f':if0
Cambridge University ,)'. "British Landscape W'ate'rcolors" $34.00
2~stable: H1⁄4s Life-, His Work" $3~.6"0
H.P.Kraus
·/1."The St. Blasien Psalter" Harry Baker
o •ti'iI Press
$75.00
_ 0
3.S&s--1
Jl."The
Borders
Hebrew Bible in Medieval Illuminated
$85.00
Manuscripts"
Gabrielle
Sed-Rajna

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numental (upwards of 40' high),
s sense of rhythm and form is
ngly evident. Of particular inter-
o viewers is her two-handed,
orm drawing technique, which
ncourages others to practice by
s of an instruction sheet includ-
ith the tape. Technicall-y, the
is well produced: color balance I cellenl, and the sound quality is
However, the accompanying
)an ing Hands: Vis_hiArts ofRita llliH
vi bocassette. color. 25 min. Crystal
Pr <.Is.1987. $89.50. ART-GENERAL In ti is fascinating study of an artist's ere· ive processes, Blitt carries the vie er through the genesis and birth ofh r paintings and, in particular, her scul lures in plexiglass. From small
Andrew ·wycth: the Helga Pictures videocassette. color. 36 ~1in. Videodisc Pub. 1987. $39.95. ART-GENERAL
Painted and drawn in secrecy by An- drew Wyeth for 15 years, the pic- tures of his neighbor and model, Helga Testorf, have ignited the curi- osity of people well past the art world. And it is no wonder; romantic yet realistic, mysterious, natural, and allegorical, the Helga pictures work on a multitu<le of levels. Host Charlton Heston helps sort through these levels of meaning starting with an overview of the artist's major works and influences. He explains
how the Helga pictures are linked to each other, previous works of the artist, and classic paintings. Filme<l in Chadds Ford, Pa., at the Kuerncr farm and Wyeth's home, the pro-
mu c is at times far too loud and in- trus ve: one wishes for a bit of silence in ich to consider both the artist's wor sand her works.-Terry Skeats,
isl I p's University Library, Lennox- ville Quebec, Canada
~ gram takes in many or the locations where the pictures were paintc<l. One thing could have made the film even better: seeing the artist talk about his own work. Beautifully and sensitively done, this leaves the viewer with a greater un<lerstanding and appreciation of these remarkable paintings. Very highly rccommend- e<l.-Arth.ur Bargar, Milford PL, Ct.
26-1236 C \')(J°1 c~-
la Collecting America: folk art and the Shelburne Museum. Director: Rick Harper. Producer: National Gallery of Art. (Dist. by Home Vision, 5547 N. Ravenswood, Chicago, IL 60640) 1988. Videocassette $29.95 28 min.
A beautifully produced introduction to the Shelburne Museum in Vermont, with hundreds of images that are fascinating and well orga- nized. Ann Southcm's narration lends warmth to the story of Electra Havemeyer Webb's lifelong fascination with Americana. Brief appear- ances by art historian John Wilmerding attempt to introduce a scholarly note, but teachers may find it awkward and frustratingly short. The title
is inaccurate; many of the objects shown are not folk art ("ordinary ob- jects made by ordinary people"), but mass-produced popular culture (cast-iron mechanical banks), high-style imported pieces (the furnish- ings in a sea captain's house), or the large-scale products of American
industry (the 900-ton sidewhcelcr, the Ticonderoga). This is not really a major criticism, just a warning to those hoping for a discussion of folk art. As an introduction to American material culture, this video would work well for college survey courses in American Studies.-J. B. Paoletti, University of Maryland at College Park
10-1ro
[Video]

      Th Architecture of Frank Lloyd
Wr •ht. l'rodu<:ers: Barbara anJ Murray
Gri or for A.ll.C. Video Enterprises and Arts Cm H:il of Great Britain. Dircc;tor: Murray
Gri or. l lome Vision, .5547 N. Havenswood Ave , Chicago, IL fi0G40. 1983; released Hl88. 7511 n. Video, $39.US. Ppblic performanc;e,
Frank WclJh: Contcmporury Wutcrcolor Muster
videocassette. color. 30 min. Artists' Vid- eo Productions. 1987. $69.95.
ART-GENERAL W~tercolor is considered by many artists to be one of the most difficult media to master. ln this film, Webb
takes the viewer step-by-step through the creation of two works, narrating and explaining as each pic- ture t~kes form from initial drawing to fimshed work. Webb's obvious
,.~ L , -, !5-C'"occ I.lord II Archilcl·ts-U.S. [BKLI
.$5~)).5. #wn101.
720.! \Vri):ht. Frank
l11cllilging Wright
sev ·al of his private l1omcs and commcr<:ial cdif ·cs, this leisurely tribute homes in 011 the
urns ·r architect's trademark details as well as his f ,,rcsiglited dcsig11 <:onccpts. Backing these seq1 ·11<:csis an ad111iring and intelligent script, whi I incorporates Wright's recorded com- rnen s ancl is gracefully acccntccl with music. Ard val fi>olagc and stills place Wright's liuild-
n the era of their construction, and con- orary views offer evidence of their attrac- nd visionary plans. This popularly priced pro am can be compared to PBS Video's more
tigh y composed U11co111111Polnaces:The Archi-
tect, e of Fro11kUuyd Wright [BKL Mr 158fij. Age. 16-adult. EM.
fans wit It lingering perusals of
*The Making of Liberty. A Fillll by Charles Guggenheim. Guggenheim
Productions, 3121 South St. NW,
Washington, DC 20007. 1986; released Hl88. 57:43111in. Video, $W.U5.
!117.471 ~talue of Lil,~:'l National Mo11u111l'11I (Nnv York, N.Y.)IBK1.1 {)cow"I.Sl "3--1·-'2'--l Establishing an almost reverential moot! with riveting openin~ music accompanying stu11ni11g views of the Statue of Liberty, this 111:1gnil1- cc11tly shot program cclchrates Miss Liberty's design, construdion, and recent restoration. Dizzying views from an en<.:0111passi11sgcalfold spy seemingly learlcss workers whose restor- ative c11deavors make way for celebration of nineteenth-century French sculptor Frederic- Auguste Bartholdi's 20-year involvc111e11t with the monument. Historical art prints, docu- ments, and period footage of Paris are intercut with modern .scenes recording the combined elforts of French and American architects, en- gineers, an<l skilled workers. The program suc- cessfully evokes both patriotism and an appre- ciation for the statue's creator an<l tl1osc wlio helped restore its regal luster. This tribute is in the sainc league as Direct Cinema's acclai111<'d Statue of Liberty [BKL Ap l Hli]. For pulilic library an<l school audiences. Ages 14-aclult. -Sue-Ellen Beauregard •
- skill makes the process look decep- ti~ely simple, but his paintings belie this ease: they arc well crafted, acs- tl_1etically satisfying, and carry con- siderable depth. The tape has been
l
·'1
tive nor the background music de- tracts from the activity of painting demonstrated in the film. Recom- mended, particularly for those who enjoy seeing craftspeople at work.- Terry Skeats, Bishop's University Li-
brary, Lennoxville, Quebec, Canada
1
carefully produced to maintain good color balance, and neither the narra-

          62 TheAm
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These ,hrcc ,aa1ples fi:eM e IeJ!JarotericJ aJc s111ooddyedftect pot tfUiiS of Nancy Zieman's 1V programs to illustrate various machine-sewing meth-
"Castle.
with prior sewing knowledge.
646.2"04 Machine sewing YA
Video workshop series. Taunton Press. 1986. 60-11 0min. ea. ( 5 parts) The editors of Fine Woodworking magazine bring their expertise to video in these excellent programs designed for intermediate to advanced wood-
workers. Subjects range from wood finishing to carving. Titles include Router jigs and techniques; Dovetail a drawer, Wood finishing; Ca,ve a ball-and-claw; Bowl turning; Turning wood; Making mortise-and-tenon joints; Small shop tips and techniques; Radial-ami saw joinery and Carv- ing techniques and p1·ojects.
726.6 C>th<dnl.s
These two programs, based on the books b:· David Macaulay, combine
colorful animation with li\"e-action documentary sequences to depict the monumental tasks of building a 13th century Welsh castle and a Gothic cathedral. Medieval culture and sociery as well as architectural design are ~~~- n
Cowboy art. Home Vision. 1986. 55min. S39.95. (public performance rights available)
Focusing on the inspiration and creations of three American artists, this tape considers the contemporary expressions of the genre of western art. Works by Gordon Snidow, Gary Niblett and Joe Beeler a.rejuxtaposed against location footage and commentary about life on the range.
709.73 Cowboys//Thc \rest in ut
A day in the country. Finley Holiday. 1984. 27min. S39.95.
Forry important works by artists of the Impressionist period such as Monet,
Sisley, Pissa.rro, Van Gogh and Cezanne are briefly discussed and shown, as undertones of Debussy's music provide the atmosphere. For serious a.rt collections.
759.054 Impressionism (Ari)
The Hudson River and its painters. Home Vision. 1987. 57min. S27.95. (public performance rights available)
759.1 liud>on River School//P2in<ing-t.:.S.
20th century art at the Metropolitan Museum. Home Vision. 1987. 60min. S27.95. (public performance rights a,·ailablc)
7S9.06 Art. Modem- 20th century
68-1.08 WOOdworl<.ing
700
V\d THEARTS
I
Art and Architecture
Q _ C_
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\merica and Lewis Hine. Cinema Guild. 1984. 56min. S850.
Industrial phocographer Lewis Hine's provocative works chronicling past njustices to child, immigrant and women laborers provide the main visual mpact in this unforgettable, ambitiously produced examination of the ac-
h·ist photographer and the repercussions of the industrial revolution. -0.92 Hlnc:.Lcwbt IPhOlO~hcrs-U.S.
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\nsel Adams, photographer.
An absorbing, warmhearted portrait of one of this century's greatest pho-
Pacific Arts Video. 1986. 60min. S29.95. ographers, this video captures Ada.ms'spirit and artistry with candid com-
These two programs art. The first program graphs of artists from Bierstadt and Frederic Metropolitan Museum Matisse, and de Kooning.
1ents about his life and work, highlighted with photographs. •o ?l Adams. An>el//Photo!V"phcr>
he Brooklyn Bridge. Direct Cinema. 1982. 58min. S250.
A stimulating documentary about a true American landmark and engi-
eering achievement, featuring archival material that weaves the intricate :o.ry of its construction.
S98 :,.:~ York. N.Y.-lirid~c.s
present the worlds of mid-19th century and modern shows more than 200 paintings, prints and photo- the Hudson River School like Thomas Cole, Albert Church. In the second. the curator of the New York
'Ublic performance
rii:J,<5 included
in price.
the collections are shown, and the contributions of the monarchs through- out history are discussed.
708.4 Louvre MUSC'Um(Pans)f/Pari.s ( fr-2ncc)-Muscums
PBS Video. 728.81 C..tlcs
1983. 55min.
SI 25.
hosts a tour showing works by Klee, O'Keeffe. Picasso,
The Louvre. Warner Home Video. 1978. 53min. S29.98.
Charles Boyer discusses the history of the famous museum, linking 900 years of French history with the various collections. Masterpieces from all
The Arrs 6J

    64 The Arrs
v·\dv_c) fG1/
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The Arrs 6:
"Made in Mississippi: black folk art and crafts. Center for Southern Folk- lore. 1975. 20min. S120.
Seven folk artists, including a quilt maker and clay sculptor, show and tell about their creations.
74$,09762 Folk ar1-MiJ.sissippillAfro-Amerian art
M.inggarden. Home Vision. 1987. 28min. 529.95. (public performance rights available)
Documenting the 5-month installation of the Chinese Ming-style garden courtyard built in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980, this video shows artisans from Suzhou, China, and Americans working side by side, piecing together _elegant and decorative structures with unusual rock sculpture. Traditional Chinese music enhances the program.
722. I I Garden.,, Chlnc,c
Museum without walls series. Kartes Video. 1986. S14.95. Goya.
7$9.6 Goya y Luden,c,. Francisco J= det ,r.,nccr,
Picasso-war, peace, love
759.6 Pica.sso.Pablo/IP.iinrC"rs
Similar in intent, content and format co the Portrait of an artist series,
these faster-paced programs present the life and works of two renowned artists. The first program faithfully captures Goya's most prominent works, including etchings, tapestries, portraits, frescoes and the famous "black paint- ings." 1l1e second program covers Picasso's life beginning with Guemica, painted in response ro the bloody Spanish Civil War. Scenes in various museums show a montage of his works including painting, lithography and sculpture. This program has broad appeal and appropriate for smaller col- lections. (See also Picasso: the man and bis work, below.)
New World vision: American art and the Metropolitan Museum. Home Vision. 1983.116min. S79.90. (2 parts; public performance rights available) Narrated by Vincent Scully, this program interweaves uniquely American examples of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture to provide
an excellent introduction co the art of the United States. i09. 73 Art. American
Norman Rockwell's world ... an American dream. Home Vision. 1987. 30min. 524.95. (public performance rights available)
Narrated by the artist, this fine biography is a montage of Stockbridge sreμes-and-tQW-OSl)eop.Jc-arnibta<Hn•r~st;s..memoE,ab-)e.pai:R:ti0gHap1➔+Ei•a-g--we
essence of America. Showcases the energy and humor of Rockwell and his
.a.i:.t revealinhgisuseofvibranctolors 74 l.6 Rocn·ell. :'\:orm1n/llllustr:uon 7S9.S \'a:t1c2n City. Sistine:Ch:apclll~tn:hc:h..n,:c.:loUuon:trrmi
Picasso: the man and his work. V.I.E.W.Video, 1986. 180min. S69.95. (2 parts)
Over 600 of Picasso's works are included in this comprehensive program which links the evolution of the artist's distinct stylistic periods with events in his life. Edward Quinn, a long-time associate of Picasso, leads the viewer to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the artist's work.
759.6 Pic:a.s..wP.2.blo//P2intc-rs
Portrait of an artist series. Home Vision. 1986 S39.95 ea. (public per- formance rights available)
Cezanne: the man and the mountain. 60min.
759.4 Cezanne. Paul//Pa.imcrs
In a brilliant light: Van Gogh in Aries. 57min. 7S9.4 Gogh. Vinccn, van/ IP:tin1crs
Georgia O'Keeffe 59min.
7S9.13 O'Kecdc. GcorgJ2//P>intcr,
Sampled from a continuing series, these programs intenveave each artist's works with his or her life to depict the personality, career, relationships, inspiration, sources and struggles. 1l1e first program on French Impressionist Paul Cezanne examines the painter through his works, enhanced by airy music of Debussy. The second video, on the 444 days Van Gogh spent in the south of France, combines location phocography, excerpts from letters and samples of his greatest paintings and drawings to reveal the mind of a troubled genius. The program on Georgia O'Keeffe presents a rare interview with the artist along with e..xamples of her work and recollections by her friends.
"The pride of place. Films for the Humanities. 1987. 58min. ea. S179 ea. (8 parts)
Subtitled "Building the American Dream," this view of American history through various architectural styles seen in homes and other buildings is hosted by Robert A. M. Stern. The first program, A search for a usable past, is an overview of American architecture including many historic buildings. 720.973 Architcccurc-l!.S.
Return to glory: Michelangelo revealed. Crown Video. 1986. 52min. S39.95.
Hosted by Edwin Newman, this program documents the monumental first phase of the 12-year endeavor to clean the accumulated 500 years of grime
1dpollutantS-.from •.the..Michelan~elo---fa:escoesdodl1e,....Sjst,in{k(;ha.1tekE;ls cinating to watch, the cleaning process redefines Michelangelo's technique,

    66 TheAn, \) 1clQ_()
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•Toe stone carvers. Direct Cinema. I985, 28min. SI50.
Captures the work and infectious spirit of a small group of Italian-American artisans who have spent their li\'es carving for the Washington Cathedral, a gothic monument begun in I907 and still under construction. Through a reunion of retired stone carvers, viewers listen to memories of appren- ticeships enhanced by striking visuals of carvings that serv~ to personify
the world in the 60s. Included is early and rare footage of the Beatles Rolling Stones, Herman's Hermits and the Animals, among other rock pi oneers.
78•t~4 Rock mus1c-Gri:-2t Briu.in
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Canyon consort: the Paul Winter Consort in the Grand Canyon. A&M Video. 1985. 57min. SI9.98. (public performance rights available, Bullfrog Films, S60)
This trip througl1 the Grand Canyon with the Paul Winter Consort offer~ a magical and mystkal experience. The musicians include Paul Winter, sopranosax;EugeneFriesin,cello;GlenValez,percussion;StevenSilverstein, woodwinds; and Paul Halley, keyboards.
785.067'2 J:w: music
YA
The compleat Beatles. MGM/UA. 1982. 120min. S69.95.
A lively "rockumentary" of the group that changed modern music. In- cludes rare footage of the "Fab Four," as well as excerpts from films, per-
the timeless dignity, humor and strength of good craftsmanship. 726.6 Sconecarvmg/1\ll"ashingcon Olhcdr:i.l (O.C.)
YA
Tradesmen and treasures: Gothic and Renaissance Nuremberg. Home Vision. I987. 60min. S39.95. (public performance rights available)
The flowering of art and culture in Nuremberg during the 14th to 16th centuries is highlighted here in a documentary that includes works by Viet Stoss, Adam Kraft and Albrecht Durer. Period music and location footage highlight architectural achievements and the works of various artisans of the period. Excellent addition to Cathedral and Castle.
i09.43 An:-Gctmany//Nurcmbcrg in art
•uncommon places: the architecture offranklloyd Wright. PBSVideo. 1986. 58min. S200.
Presents dozens of examples of Wright's best-known buildings, including Falling Water, the Dana house and Unity Temple, intercut with interviews with family and friends.
720.92 Wright, Fn.n.kUoydllArch1tccu-C.S.
•Toe Wyeths: a futher and his family. WETA-TV. 1987. 58min. S34.95. FamousillustratorandrobustpersonalityN.C.Wyethisrespectfullyand
lovingly remembered by his children. one of whom is the American painter Andrew Wyeth. Painter Jamie Wyeth is his grandson.
7',9. t Wyeth, N.C.I /Jllusu2,ors
Music
•Aaron Copland: a sell-portrait. Films for the Humanities. 1986. 58min. SI 79.
This laudat0ry tribute recounts the musical influences of the composer's youth and recapitulates his impressive career using family photographs, performance footage of bis works for ballets and movies and live interYiews with critics and composers.
';'RO?l Cupl~rhJ. A;uunt l(".Q.ffi~
British rock: the first wave. RCA/Columbia. 1985. 60min. S29.95. /ci11c1icau tock ru1J toll led to a IC<Ol□tidii iii BfiliSti MuS1c that s~vepc
formances and tours.
784.H Balles (Music group)I/Rock musicians
YA
Dick Clark's Best of Bandstand. Vestron Video. 1986. 47min. S29.98. This program presents a montage of classic performances from some of the biggest artists and groups in popular music from I 958 and I 959. Some
of the stars include Bill Haley and the Comets, Jerry Lee Lewis, Dion and the Belmonts, the Everly Brothers, Chubby Checker and Buddy Hol.lyand the Crickets.
784.S◄Music.Popul.ar(Songs,ctc.)//Tclcvision da.nccpanics YA
•Discovering the orchestra. SIRS,Inc. 1986. 24-26 min. ea. S395. (5 parts) Introducing individual instruments, sampling ensemble music and savor- ing the entire Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in performance, this is a well-
tuned overview of orchestral instruments and sounds. 785.066" I Orclicscn
Dizzy Gillespie's dreamband. Sony Video. 1981. 16min. S25.
The master jazz trumpeter jams tvith Max Roach. MiltJackson, Grady Tate,
Joe Louis, Gerry Mulligan and others. 785.067"2 Gillespie. Oizzy//J:u, music
•Toe EAV history of jazz. Educational Audio Visual. l 986. 50min. s 197. A comprehensive overview of the history_and principal artists of jazz from its beginnings in spirituals and gospel up through ragtime, blues. swing, prebop and bebop, Afro-Cuban, funl-..Ja·nd free jazz. Documentary footage,
ongmal recordings and photographic stills are intercut co give an authentic feel to the narration.
78I.S7 J:u2 music-Iii.story
The Am 6:

   TheKremlin. (The Jarvis Collection)
5* NBC 1963 (1987) 60min. color $24.95 (FE222-21.90)
The Louvre. (The Jarvis Colleclion)
5* NBC 1978 (1988) 60min. color $24.95 (FE223-2l.90)
These Lwoprograms are reprcscnlalive of a series from noled filmmaker Lucy Jarvis. Bolh programs mark Lhefirst time an American film crew has ever been allowed to film on location in those areas - they are indeed classic documentaries. Introductions about the produclion of the films arc provided in a 3-4 minute interview segment at the beginning of ·each program conducted by Edwin Newman. Resolution, color, and sound quality are very good; content and pacing rue exquisite!
The first program, fc;iluring a Soviet offical as a guide, shows the Kremlin and ils history. Viewers see a complex of builclinw: filled with magnificent paintings and spectacular jewels. Stories of the Czars emphasizing their contributions, eccentricities and follies to Russian history are related in anecdotal fashion. Changes brought about by the Marxist Revolution are highlighted as the austere lifestyle of Lenin, the tempestuous Stalin years, and the Kruschev regimin are brought to life. The significance of the Kremlin as the heart of modem Russian government is emphasized. Even though this
film was produced 26 years ago, it still provides a viable and intriguing look into the past of one of the world's leading nations and government buildings. Highly recommended for all types of libraries. (RW) ••
Narrated by noted actor Charles Boyer, "The Louvre" is one of the most exquisite combinations of arl/information-documentary ever produced. ActuaJly entitled "A Golden Prison - the Louvre," the film provides a fascinating and comprehensive, panoramic history of the Louvre. Moving chronologically, Boyer's lilting commentary focuses on historical events to depict an evolving Louve. He also highlights many art works to illustrate each evolutionary period and monarch's reign. Models are used to depict the various architectual additions. Boyer said tJ1athe would not make this
film unless the script was written "like he was making love.to a beautiful French woman" - and that's exactly how it sounds - enchanting, informative, entrancing. Starting with the architecture of the Louvre itself, mainly tJ1eroof, Boyer shows the Louvre as a work of art and the center of Paris since ~he year 1190 A.D. Backgrounded by period music, images of dungeons, monarchs, sculptures like Michelangelo's Diana and portraits by Ruben float by. If you buy only one
documentary this year - this should be it!! - a ~ust purchase.
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1is exquisitely produced program documents the unique c nstruction and installation of a Ming-style garden in the etropolitan Museum of Art in 1980. The photography and
p cing arc excellent. Highly recommendedfor all collections.*
rtrait of An Artist: Georgia 0' Keeffe. Home Vision. 197760min. $39.95 (HVOKE0l-38.50)
is television documentary, originally produced by WNET a PBS series,is especially timely in view of the recent dcalll Georgia O'Keeffe. The film is a wonderful portrait of this st prominent and most original American female artjst of
1 iis secondvolume, which covers lhe life and work of Ludwig n Beethoven, features the powerful 5th Symphony and cerpts from the 7th, building on the dramatic opening of the 1 (often referred to as 'fatc knockjng on the door', Previn
to draw them in segments, pointing out areas of emphasis. Palazzo is likeable on-camera; his explanations arc clear and his demonslrations arc full of helpful Lips on proportion and shading. This reviewer followed along and was able to produce a fairly decenteye on Ille first try. This well- produced video is highly recommended for beginning artists and as supplementary material for Lhe intermediate studcnL (RW)
The Magic of Animal Painting with Sue Scheewe:
Puppy/Kitten.(The Video Art
InsLructor series) Dcmovision. s•198360111i11P.ub.Perr.$f,9.95(DO99I-59.95) Ilaveyoueverwantedtopaintasweet,cutltlly puppyorkitten? If so,this is thevideo for you! Artist SueScheewe suggestsusing a photo of your pet as a sketch pattcm ralller than using a freehand sketch. Then beginning with the b.ickground, she proceedsto paint in a step-by-step foshion an oil painting of bot11apuppyandkiuen.Sheillustrateshowtomakenuffy fur, sparkling eyes, add highlights and shadows, paint t11emuzzle and paws, and finally, how to add the finishing touches. Schccwe's clear demonstrations, bubbly personality and emphasis on having fun add up to an engaging presentation. This program should be especially popular with young people.
It may be too "cute" for some, however. Highly recommended. (RW)
Watercolor:lntroduction. Demers.
3* 198330min.$15.00Pub.Perr.(Pl2999-13.50)
Professional artist and teacher Dolores Demers Kurily paints a landscape- an ocean scene with trees in the foreground - lo illustrate the use and control of watercolors. Ilcforc beginning to paint she discussesvarious materials selections such as tube watercolors. palate knife, colorwhecl chart (concept of primary and secondary colors not illustrated) and paper. Excellent illustrations of wet on wet, wet on dry, and dry on dry paint/brush techniques arc shown and discussed with t11eir various usesand pros and cons. Also, special hints such as using permanentwhileasacolor,usingsaltforeffectssuch_assnow, and using masking fluid arc shown. As she pamts, she constantly refers to her "painting light to dark" t11cory.She advocates the use of some different techniques tJian other painters, but they work well just the same. There is some information on this tape that is not found on other -watercolor
instruction videos, however, the video rcsolulion is only average.If you're looking for a complete line of arLinstruction with a limited budget, consider this series. . Acrylics:AnIntroduction(Pl 2627-13.50)
Acrylics: On Location(Pl2619-13.50) Acrylics:A Portrait(Pl2620-I 3.50) Acrylics: Modeling Paste (P 12621-13.50) Acrylics:TransparentTech. (Pl2622-13.50) Oils: An Introduction (Pl 2628-13.50)
Oils: Landscape (Pl2623-13.50)
Oils: Portrait (Pl 2624-13.50)
Oils: Seascape(Pl2625-13.50)
Oils: Still Life (Pl2626-13.50)
Pastels: Introduction (Pl2669-13.50) Pastels:Portrait(Pl2670- l3.50)
Pastels: Character Study (P 12671-13.50) Pastels: Floral (P 12672-13.50)
Pastels: Animals (Pl2673-13.50) Watercolors:Landscape(Pl 2675-13.50) Watercolors:Floral (Pl2676- l 3.50) Watercolors:CharacterStudy (P 12677-13.50) Watercolors:On Location (P12678-13.50)
monstrates how Beellloven namisrnto the symphony.
ing Garden. Home Vision.
5 20min.$39.95(HV863-38.50)
brought an
unprecedented
ti
v luablc addition to women's studies collections as well as art c llcctions. Highly recommendedfor high school and public Ii raries.*
P olileofaWriter:Mailer.Home Vision.
4
197960min. $39.95 (HV857-38.50)
60 minute on camera interview. Simultaneously interesting
20th century. This is an excellent film that would be a
d boring because of the presentation style, yet the i1 ormation presented is both interesting and ti ught-provoking. College American literature classes may fi d these programs useful. Recommended, where large Ii rature collections would make this useful.*
T adesmen and Treasures: Gothic and Renaissance N remberg.HomeVision.
4I1987 60min. $39.95 (HV862-38.50) This program d uments Ille flowering of art and culture in Nuremburg d ring t11c 14th through t11e 16th centuries. An excellent a ition.*
N rmanRockwell'sWorld...AmericanDream. Home Vision. 5 198730min. $24.95 (HV854-23.50)
A must for any video collection on American art. Old pl otographs, old film footage, and montage of his painting d picting facesof common people- a vision of an ageof belief
tl pride. Highly recommended.*
eth. (Portrait of an Artist) Home Vision. 198060min. #39.95 (HV933-38.50)
5
Inerweavcs _Andrew Wyelll's life, career, sources of in piration, and struggle. Excellent for art classesand public Ii raries - upper high school to adults.*
T INSTRUCTION
II nds: The Eyesllave It. Demovision.
4 19836()min. Pub.Perf.$69.95 (DO992-59.90)
Ti le on container: "Drawing and Painting Hands and Eyes." Tl ·s video is composedof two half-hour segments- one on dr wing hands,the oilier on the analomy of the hand and eye.
U iversity of Michigan art instructor Guy Palazzolastartswith 1
a rieflessonont11eanatomyofIllehandandeye,showinghow
LVR 38

                        G
• • •
PORTRAIT OF A EUROPEAN ARTISTSERIES
• SEURAT: POINT COUNTERPOINT 71 mins. • TINTOltE'ITO 52 111111.(




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                   :so $39.95 I paintings before lhe camera.
~al euolution ... a passionate -Los Angeles Times
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REAS Y OF MASTERPIECES
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5 \lolumeSet Ench: $29.95 56 mins. each Set Pun:hase-Save: $15.00 Someor France'sbest known curators. architects and arl e.xpertsguide the viewer through an exciting and inrormalive cultural tour of this richly endowed country.
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1i11Iiin,eporlrait oflhe20thCentury'smost nifican painter.
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lion of the Sisline Chapel. Presentedby man. 52 mins.
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son W
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THE BIG BANOS Volume I $19.95 Count Basie,Lionel Hampton and Duke Ellington strut their stuH 10the music that made them ramous. 46mins.
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iscolle lion isa glillcring musicalshowcase,
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David Howard. 10 mirrs.
BALLET CLASS FOR INTERMEDIATE-ADVANCED David Howard. .56mins.
BALLROOM DANCING FOR BEGINNERS TeresaMason.57mirrs.
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THE STORY OF THE SYMPHONY
6 \lolumeSet 90 mins. each
AndrePrevinconductsTheRoyalPhilharmonic HenryLeTat1R3,1mins. Orc.:heslrain some of lhc mosl popul,,r ond imporlanl
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111-'.AYllllO'JTI
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$ l!l.!IS
LJ

          c
chairs after Ralph compares a
vi s
c
. Oddities of a Victorian place ing are explained. Ironstone
na is identified by shape and de- n. A brief history of ladder back
irs is included. (60 minutes) ues
ctors and collecting
ctoria "Noddcrs" ys, More Chair finishing,
th Century Porcelain
pressed glass. In addition, they briefly discuss porcelain marks. (60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting
790.1
Victorian Picture Frames, Art Gloss, Staffordshire Transfer Patterns
&
Art Nouveau
KYAQ-104L $69.95 Ralph and Terry discuss Victorian picture frames and Ralph explains how to ·soak" a picture frame in the first hall of this video. Art glass and Staffordshire transfer patterns are also discussed in this program.
Art Nouveau is the topic for the second part of the program. Ralph and Terry discuss and show examples of Rookwood, Weller Sicardo, Zsolnay Pees, Van Bri- eggle, Lalique and French Cameo glass, as well as Martele silver by Gorham, a handle lamp and Kay- sorzimm pewter. (60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting 790.1
from Campaigns
OWTO
I NOW YOUR ANTIQUES
S ries
F r yoars, the husband and wife team of Ralph and Terry Koval have
e tained the value and history of antiques. They have shared I.heirlove
Bottles, Mason Jc,rs and Carnival Glass &
Windsor Choirs cmd Worcester Porcelain
Tel~plionc lnsulotors and Slcvcngrophs
f!t
~otsumo Poltcry and Toys
knowledge of fine collectibles through a nationally-syndicated spaper column, magazine articles, television and radio. With each
a
n
3
to and the casual viewer gain an insight into this interesting and profit- a e pastime. Producad by WVIZ-TV, 1978.
KYAQ-105 $69.95 KYAQ-107 $69.95
minute program in I.hisPBS series hosted by the Kovels, the collec-
Bottles and Mason jars attract many o collector. Ralph and Torry show how to dato bolllos nnd Ma- son jors by the lip, mold marks, the closure and by the base. They also discuss the categories of bot- des for the collector and the fact that the sun can chango U1ecolor of glass. Carnival glass is another collector"s item. In the second hall of this video tape, Ralph and terry discuss the designs and the facto- ries that produced this unique col- lectable. Ralph also traces the history and identification of Wind- sor chairs and Terry traces the history of Worcester porcelain.
(60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting 790.1
Early Laundry Equipment,
American Fabrics and How to Clean Oil Paintings
&
Antiques
Political
KYAO-106 $69.95 There were many laundry prob-
lems in the days before the wash- ing machine. Ralph and Terry display many of the iloms related to the chore of laundry such as soap, starch, washboards, and tubs. The discussion includes American fabrics and a brief his- tory of American textiles. In addi- tion, Ralph begins to clean an oil painting. In the last low minutes the hosts introduce a mystery: the missing antique, the Mt. Vernon sideboard.
Campaigns and political races have provided many collectable items, induding the campaign torch. In the second half of this video. the Kovels display and dis- cuss this memorabilia. Ralph continues cleaning an oil painting by using a surprising solution: wa- ter. Continuing the series of mys- terious antiques: Ulster County Gasette of January 8, 1800. (60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting 790.1
Thirty telephone insulators of all doscriptions, including somo gront mritios. mo fonturod. A history of Stovongrnphs is given and somo line examples dating back to 1854 are shown. Then. the beauty and value of Satsuma pottery from Ja- pan is examined. Twelve great ex- amples of Satsuma ero displayed and dated. An unusual collection of toys is shown, including a Ger- man windup open car of 1903; a
1915 iron bank; and a 1913 Lionel track car. GO-minutes.
Antiques
Collectors and collecting
790.1
To.br,cco-Smoldng 0eviccs
~.
I 876 Ccnlenniol
Mr.mrntos
KYAQ-108 $69.95
"Ye old smoke shop," is the topic of
this program. The history of to-
bacco and of all the fancy devices that accompany smoking is traced. The second half of this video cov- ers centennial celebrations. Me- mentos of I.he 1876 first national fair held in this country are exam- ined. Torry begins to trace tho his• tory of 19th century Worcester vases and explains how to date and recognize various pieces of Worcester by marks. (60 minutes) Antiquos
Collectors and ccllecting 790.1
P.cmovin~ Point from /\ntiqucs· cmd 19th Ccnlur y Majolica
I!.
J\mcricon Victorian
Silver, /\rt Glass and
19th and 20th Century Trndinq Cords
KYAO-109 $69.95 The main discussion concerns 19th century Mnjorlica pottery which has a very distinctive opaque glaze. Ralph also shows that a little work will remove many layers of paint on antiques. A variety of American Victorian silver is displayed and dated. Art glass such as Mt. Wash- ington, Nash, Tiffany and Cameo is also highlighted. The hosts discuss trends in advertising by observing trading cards of the 19th and 20th conturios. (60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting 790.1
Continued on next page
r,.,) _l_>HV~11.1!./. ~
re Signs,
hographs, ver Spoons,
1erican Choirs
P essed and Cut Glass, I nstone China,
C ,1air Refinishing
K AQ•101L
In he first half of this video, Ralph a Terry discuss collectable store si ns and lithographs. They give a b el history of the style of Ameri-
Chiependalc
Doting, English Silver Marks and Teapots
&
Enameled Ironware
and Pressed Glass KYAQ-103L $69.95 How can a collector date furniture by construction? The first part of this program shows slides of pe- riod rooms, paying particular atten- tion to Chippendale, the man and his designs. Terry continues to ex- plain English silver marks and traces the development of the tea- pot.
ly refinished chair to one he is ng to strip. Terry ends the pro-
chanical and Still n nks, Coin Glass,
ore Chair Refinishing K AQ-102L $69.95
In
h
a
to s. Ralph continues to refinish a c ir, brushing on lacquer. Terry tr ·es the development of 18th
C tury porcelain from Elers to W rcester. Ralph and Terry show ex mples of mechanical and still
b
e first part of the video. the ts discuss Victoria ·nodders·
turn-of-the-century children's
ks and give tips on comparing production with an antique in second half of the program.
a
th
T
pl lns English silver marks. Ralph m ~es the special formula of boiled lin eed oil and applies it to the
ry discusses coin glass and ex-
ch ir he has been refinishing. (60 mi utes)
A ·ques
C ectors and collecting 79 .1
$69.95
n
g
gr m by discussing silver spoons
a their construction. The quality
a identification marks of pressed
gl ss and cut glass is the center of
di cussion in the second part of the terns and give a general history of
Enameled-ironware is the main topic of the second part of this video. The hosts also show examples of pressed glass pat-
Furniture

           OW
linve
hli,
OUR ANTIQUES,.
Americon
pc1,
A ,cri fill B skc s
&
cal
I
lh:cr Steins
12-Part Series TBMR-000L
Ocvicc5,
Hoynl
ou en l'orc.duin, Indian
G ant plioncs-
PI ono rophs,
11 w I Clcun Pewter,
i 1h ci 1J l lllli Ccnlu1y
S mp! rs
K Q-11
Ea ly ligh Ing devices like blubber an grea bdeveloped to gas and el tricity ft the end of the 19th
Early American tools are the topic of the first half of this video, includ- ing a genuine conostoga wagon jack. The Kovels also discuss a fabulous collection of beer steins. They go into detail on how to tell an authentic military stein from one of the numerous types of re-
productions made through the years. The second half of the video considers the 550 varieties of barbed wire and the rare pieces in collection the Kovels exhibil
The hosts then discuss a new technological tool for the treasure hunter: an electronic metal detec- tor. The Kovel's then consider the many historical types of postcards that are a new ·collectible." In- cluded in this sections are exam- ples of hand-woven coverlets of
the 18th and 19th centuries. As a special feature, Ralph and Terry display samples of the Spode fac- tory wares, showing the six-stage process that a bone china plate goos through before emerging as coveted dinnerware. (60 minutes) Anliques
Collectors and collecting
790.1
The Basics of
Model Railroading TBMR•101 $69.95 Combining humor and expertise, skilled modeler Wayne Wesolow- ski, offers advice on all the basic techniquos you need to build and enjoy your first model railroad. This program includes such skills
as planning a pike, choosing a particular era, constructing a simple lightweight benchwork, ways to avoid problems when lay- ing track, wiring a model railroad for multi-train operation, creating realistic scenery and trou- bleshooting tips that help keep the
trains rolling smoothly. (60 min-
utes)
Railroads-Models
625.1
Model Railroader
Model Railroader
cc1tury. of quip thr ugh ti tia s, Gr cia s to
In this program, viewers visit the Now York Society of Model Engi- neers to see the Union, Hoboken & Overland railroad and the Rens- solaer Modol Railroad Club's New England, Berkshire & Western. In addition, there is a tour of the per• sonal systems of Eart Smallshaw·s Middletown & Mystic
Mines: Al Kalbfleisch's Rio Grande and Don Clarke's Boston & Maine Mashapaug & Wiscas- set. (60 minutes) Railroads-Models
625.1
Model Railroader Video Layout
$69.95
pese important pieces nt are explored
ages-from the Egyp- o-Romans and Phoeni-
orica in the early ext, Ralph shows the
Video Layout Tour #3
TBMR-104
$69.95
16 O's.
be t way prepair broken china or gla s. In ddition, a beautiful col-
lee on of
ba kets i
ha en po
merican Indian woven
shown Royal Copen- lain is examined.
Th n a n mber of gramaphones
' I
an phon graphs dating from
18 5 to a
ine . Ral
cle n pe jer, and then the Kovels tur thoir ttention to 17th and
ut 1920 are exam- demonstrates how to
181 cent rIYsamplers. (60 min- ute )
Video Layout Tour #1
TBMR-102
Tour #4
TBMR-105
Six spectacular model railroad layouts are featured in this pro-
An ques Co ector 79 1
I
$69.95
nd collecting
1str11mcnts,
cor1 Pri11ts, staft Export
$69.95
orlc Toys Q-11 L
clc
In t e first
all of this video, the
at a collection of medi- bnts and present a brief
e development of medi- then offers some hints old reproductions of
ce colloctors are told to
Is lo stru hist ry of
cin Ralp on eanin prin s. No
Ko
$69.95
[m ly
oml
e.
l1arbcd Wire, Postcards and Spoue China
KYAQ-112L
Tools
$69.95
ll/.\lLROADH\JG
Serles price $550
Model Railroading is one of the fastest growing hobbi~s.in the world.
con idor s ning with pieces of por- sources provide unique opportuni-
Video Layout
I
cel n ma in occupied Japan. Un ual c lector's items include the etsuk , a toggle at the end of
ties and problems that are care- lully outlined. They also visit an official antique show in Detroit where collec;torsfind very high quality, high priced items. The final stop is a once-in-a-lifetime auction in a 1787 house in Limington, Maine. (60 minutes)
Antiques
Collectors and collecting 790.1
Tour #2 TBMR-103
the
a v
Tho
dev ted to
ject cloc
cars drum
gra opho
cfea ing th
prev us s
cus the L
port creel ins. (60 minutes)
Anti ues
Coll ctors nd collecling 790.
Ch k i Ottt!
$69.95 Viewers tour these remarkable
ord at mon mad ts of
ched to a bag used to or tobacco. The Japa- netsuke into sculptured
layouts: David Barrow's Cat Mountain Santa Fe: Don and John Santel's Ohio-Michigan & South Shore: Herb and Mike Danneman·s HOn3 Denver & Rio Grande Western; Allen McClelland's Virginian & Ohio: Doug Taylor's East Broad Top and Chuck Hitchcock·s Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. (60 minutes)
Railroads-Models
625.1
rl and the Kovels show ioty o theso exquisite objects.
625.1
econ
pan of the program is alph's favorite sub- ork toys, airplanes,
er boys and toy s. Ralph finishes
print he started in the w and the Kovols dis- estaft or Chinese ex-
-..
HOW TO
I
N\ODF.t
This series of 12 one-hour programs offers an entertaining approach to practical tips on creating the basic elemen!s of ~ model !ailroad. Profes- sional expertise in a wide variety of modeling skills and in-depth tours of track layouts from all over the U.S. provide_th~ viewer with new ideas and inspiration. Produced by GN Communicat1ons,Ltd., 1986.
Viewers visit live superb model
I low and Where to Buy railroads including, Bruco Chubb's lantic & Wostcrn: Rick and Linda
Antiques
&
HO scale of Sunsot Valloy; the HO scale the Denver & Rio Grande Western of Brian Holtz; Malcolm Furlow's HOn3 San Juan Central; Lorell Joiner's O scale Great Southern and the N scale Cumberland Valley System of Bill and Wayne Reid. You'll tour each pike and learn scores of modeling ideas. (60 minutes)
Railroads-Models
gram. including: Rich Shoup·s At- Spano·s Scenic & Undecided:
Gordon North's Denver & West- ern; John Armstrong's Canan- daigua Southern; Sam and Elaine Powell's Penn Creek Valley and the Severna Park Model Railroad Club's Chesapeake & Allegheny. (60 minutes)
Railroads-Models
625.1
First Generation Diesels: A Search
for the Survivors TBMR-106 $69.95 Modeling experts attempt to track down the aged EMO. ALCO, Baldwin, Lima and F-M diesels that remain in service today. (60 minutos)
R;iilroads-Models
More How and
to Buy Antiques
KYAQ•113L
Shot on location, both parts of this video provide hints on how to buy antiques at the many places they are sold. The Kovels visit a garage sale, a Ilea market, a house sale and a Saturday night auction. They visit very high quality antique
shops, middle quality, and junk
shops. Each of these different
Where
$69.95
625.1 Model
Railroader
Conlinued on nexl poge 21

    President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
OFFICERS
Mrs. David Huntington Mrs .Walter Spink
Miss Frances McSparran Mrs. Haskell Newman I Mrs. Robert Onea1
BookSelection Committee Mrs.John Alexander
Mrs. Hayward Kenist.on Mrs. James Plumer Mrs. Amnon Rosentha1
Library Advisory Counci1 Mrs. Hayward Keniston
Mrs. Haske11Newman
Zibby Onea1 Carol Plumer Mary Pryor
Prue Rosenthal Nesta Spink Marcy Westerman Alice Wethey
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Mrs Harold)
LADIES" LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN MEMBERSHIPANDOFFICERS 1988-89
Alexander
(Mrs. John) (Mrs. George) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Cameron) (Miss Helen) (Mrs. Kirby) (Mrs. David) (Mrs. Perry) (Mrs. Hayward) (Miss Frances)
MEMBERS
788 Arltngton Blvd.(48104) 1515 Ottawa Road (4B 105) 1200 Earhart 6 358 (48105)
2112 Vinewood Blvd. (48104) 1200 Earhart 6 428 (48105) 12 GeddesHeights (48104)
2037 GeddesAvenue(48104) 2100 Hill Street {48104) 2222 Fuller Road (48105)
1 Harvard Place (48104) 931 Oakdale (48108) 501 Onondaga (48104)
1931 Jackson Road (481 03) 715 Spring Valley (48105) 2105 Devonshire Road (48104) 2 Geddes Heights (48104)
1926 Hampton Court (46103) 151oCambridge Street (48104)
Johnnie
Margaret Cameron
Eleanor Collins
Isabel Haight
Helen Hall
Kirby Hall
Trudy Huntington
Joan Innes
Roberta Keniston
Frances McSparran
Jan Barney Newman(Mrs. Haskell)
663-5879 662-9109 663-6255 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 761-8331 662-3902 662-4164 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-1178 662-9723 668-6225
Mrs. Stanley Dodge Mrs. Howard Peckham
EMERITUMSEMBERS
315 New England Ave., Winter Park,Fl. 32789 213 London Road, Hendersonsville, N.C.28739
1948 Hall, H. 1951 Haight 1951 Plumer 1951 Wethey 1956 Collins 1957 Alexander 1957 Keniston 1960 Innes 1960 Pryor
VEAROf ELECTIOTNOMEMBERSHIP 1962 Cameron
1966 Peckham (Emeritus 1970 Huntington
1970 Oneal
1972 Westerman
1976 Hall, K. 1982 Rosenthal 1985 Newman 1986 McSparran 1986 Spink
1978)
Robert)
James) Mi11ard) Amnon) Walter) Scott)

   ...
1
Ladies·Library Association.,AnnArbor.,Michigan Secretary·sReport April 28.,1989
The Ladies·LibraryAssociationheld its springm~ting at the homeof Mrs.Perry InnesonFriday,April28, 1989.Thosepresent,in additionto the hostess,were: JohnnieAlexander,EleanorCollins, IsabelHaight,HelenHall, Kirby Hall, Trudy Huntington,Joan Innes,RobertaKeniston,FrancesMcSparranJ,anNewman,Zibby Oneal,CarolPlumer,MaryPryor,PrueRosenthal,NestaSpink.ThePresident,Trudy Huntington,thankedJoanInnesfor herhospitality today,congrotulatedseveral membersontheir long membershipof the Association, andcalled the meetingto order. Sheproposedshifting the order of the various reports so that the Book Committeereportwouldimmediatelyprecedethearrival ofJaneSheen,whois replacingSusieChen,andwhowill reportontheLibrary.
TheSecretary·sreport wasreadandafter somediscussionwasacceptedas corrected.. TrudyHuntingdonreportedthat shehadheardfrom the former member, whomwe hadinvited to fill a vacantposition onthe Association,providedshewas inresidenceinAnnArborbeforeourAprilmeeting,whennominationswill be made.Herplansto return havebeendelayed,andshewill not bereturning in time, which meanswe must proceedwith nominationsfor the position.
ThePresidentreportedwith pleasurethat Alice Wetheyhasagreedto continueasHistorian for anotherthree years. Next,HelenHall, Chairmanof the NominatingCommittee,presentedthe following slate of officers for 1989-90: President:Mrs.DavidHuntington,Vice-President:Mrs.Walter Spink,Secretary: Ms. FrancesMcSparranT,reasurer:Mrs.HaskellNewman,ChairmanoftheBook Committee: Mrs.AmnonRosenthal.This slote was proposed,mdaccepted.
TheAssociationrecordedwith sadnessthedeathofMarionBadersinceour last meeting. TheBookCommitteehasdiscussedthe purchaseof a bookto commemorateher,andTrudyHuntingtonsuggestedthat their choiceshould,H possible,reflect MarionBader·sspeciol interest in the history of jewelry-making.
ThePresidentsaid that we hadtwo vacanciesonthe Association,and invited nominationsfor membership,to bevotedonat ourOctobermeeting;seven nameswere proposedfor considerationby four members(Allee Wethey,Johnnie Alexander,FroncesMcSparronandJoan Innes).
Jan Newmanreadthe Treasurers·report, preparedby her andby ZibbyOneal. Thereport includeda review by Alice Wetheyof the generalunresolvedfinancial problemsfacing the country. The holdingsof the Ladies·Library Association have,
however,prospered,andour assets haveincreasedin value by almost $10,000

   since their low point following the t 987 market collapse. The report was accepted,andis attached. At this point the dueswere collected.
Jan Newmonreported on the last meeting of the Library Advisory Council which discussedthe remodellingandenlargingof the Library. Memberswere asked to keepthe content of that Council meeting confidential, but she was able to tell
us that they hopeto breakgroundin July, andintend to stay openduring construction. Shewill hovemoredetoils for our foll meeting. Shetold us thot the MacArthurFoundation.byoffering matchingfunds,hadmadeH possiblefor civic andpubliclibraries toacquirecertainseriesofPBSvideotapesonscience,art andthe theater. Thecost to the AnnArbor Library was $1o,000, which was paid by the Friendsof the Librery.
PrudenceRosentha1, reporting for the BookCommt1tee, askedthe Associationfor somefurther guidanceonbookpurchase.Shouldwe,for example, buyexpensivebooksonsomewhatrarefied topics? Howbroadlyshouldwe construe·art'? Memberssaidthatourintentionwostobuyhighqualityand expensivebooks,on a wide rangeof art, art history anddecorative arts subjects, broadly defined. Weshouldnot worry if someof the specialised topics dealt with areofrestricted appeal.Revertingtoasubjectraisedatanearlier meeting,
TrudyHuntingtonsuggestedthat if certainert cataloguescanonlybebought unbound,weshouldbuythemandpayfor the necessarybtnding.
At this point JaneSheen,from the AnnArbor Public Library, was introduced, and reportedondevelopmentsthere. Thevideocollection hasbeenvery successful, ondthe public is particularly eagerfor educationalfilms. The stote has madea grant of $8000 for the purchaseof materials, to be spent by August. Tapescostfrom$30-$100, andareavailableonawiderangeofsubjects. Subjectsthatmightinterestusincludebiographiesandstudiesofartists and architects, anddemonstretionsof ert techniquesfor amateurs,suchas 'how to paint watercolors·, etc. Shecirculated materials onrecent andpossiblebook purchases,andgaveus somefurther information about building plans for the Library,whichwill includevideoandcomputerrooms.
JohnnieAlexandervolunteeredto host our next meetingonFriday, October27, at 3 p.m.
Since businesswas now concluded,the meeting was adjourned. Respectfully subm1tted,
FrancesMcSparran(Secretary)
2

    THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Treasurers' Report
April 28, 1989
Again this spring, in compiling our treasurers' report for the Ladies' Library Association, we have turned to Alice Wethey for her invaluable views on the national and international economic scene. The following observations are hers.
"The individual financial situation of the Ladies' Library Association remains outwardly healthy. Interest rates have been going up and in consequence ·our income f;;m the Merrill Lynch Assets fund is higher than last year. But the general financial situation around us is quite a different matter. The staggeringly high debt of the United States is still with us, with no solution in sight. Then there is the matter of third world loans which the Administration has been urging or even forcing on our banks for years. It is always within the realm of possibility that the debtor countries will simply
repudiate their debt, which would be catastrophic to the United States. It looks as
though some means must be found to scale down the amount of indebtedness, so that Latin America in particular can go on carrying the burden and ensuring that our largest banks are not forced into bankruptcy.
Domestically there is still a third cause for alarm--the crumbling of the Savings (;(._I ""'f"'V
and Loan institutions everywhere in the country and on ~cale in Texas and California. The Bush scheme for bailing them out will eventually transfer the cost, to the tune of many billions, to the ordinary taxpayer. The Reagan administration removed all safeguards and restraints from the whole industry and it is the citizenry that will eventually shoulder the cost."

    .....__,.·
Treasurers' Report Page 2.
Certainly it is a distressing picture that Mrs. Wethey describes, and how all this will affect the economy in the future is far from certain. However, as you will see from the attached documentation of our financia1 activities, The Ladies' Library Association has, for the past year, continued to prosper. The value of our assets has increased as have the funds in our Merrill Lynch Ready Assets account. Our total assets exhibit a
gain of nearly $ I 0,000 over their value at the end of
I 987.
l~~
~~O~ogO
Jan Newman Zibby Oneal Treasurers

                    '--.
1'REASURER'S REPORT COMPANY
LADIES' Lia~~y ASSOCIATION
January 1 - December 31, 1988
SHARES PRICE 15./31/88
225 $56.875 100 32.00
Household Central Amoco Mobil Minnesota Eastman
DuPont Merrill
Income:
Dividends Interest Dues
Sale 225
Kodak Sale 50 Dupont
Sale Ready Assets
Balance Jan.
Bank
Income 1988
Expenses 1988
DIVIDENDS
457.88 12,796.87
3,200.00 7,500.00 9,100.00
12,400.00
68,688.63
Inter. Southwest
Mining
244.00 75.00 350.00
Kodak
Lynch
Ready
200
Assets
470.00 62.00 212.00 sold 202.50
sold 137.50 4,580.20
6,654.08 174.36
2.00
9,483.59
3,984.16
2,275.39 22,573.58
1,1988
3,292,34 22,573.58
25,865.92
-21,334.70
4,531.22
Expenses:
Safety Library Ready Purchase,
Dep. Box Revolving Fund
100
200 45.50
Zibby
Oneal, Jan
Newman, Treasurers
SUBTOTAL 6,654.08 113,685.50
BANK TOTAL TOTAL ASSETS
4,531.22 118,231.08
12.00 1,000.00 14,063.20 6,259.50
21,334.70
4,531.22
4,531.22
Assets, purchases IOO sh. MMM
Cash, Dec. 31, 1988
VALUE 12/31/88

   Ladle, Ll•rar7 .l11olla&loa loot ltpor&
April 28.1989
This year's Ladies Library BookCommittee consists of the following members;
Johnny Alexander Eleanor Collins
Carol Plumer
Prue Rosenthal. Chairman
We met three times, once in December,once in January and once in April. Each time we looked at various book catalogues and had a wonderful time choosing expensive beautiful books for the library to buy. This has to be the best volunteer job in the world.
We met with Susie Chen at our January meeting, and she introduced usto Jane Sheen, who will be taking Susie's place as Reference Librarian for ayear while Susie is on sabatical working at her clothes shop, Ultima. Jane is
coming later today to introduce herself to us and she will bring some new books with her. She is also very well versed in videotapes for library use
and will tell us about them.
QUESTIONSD:owe have guidelines for the BookCommitte to use when purchasing books? A financial guideline? An Interest Guide?? How specific should the interest of the books be? In other words-- do we want to spend money for a book like-----Tattoo: Pigments of Imagination. ??? Art of the Northern Tlingit-- inhabitants of Southern Alaska--lf not, Why not?? If yes Why????Conversely How many books of general interest do we want or need? How many books "encyclopedia"Janson History of Art types 77?I
)'\
I think it is crucial for the LLAto have a print out of the Art books ~he Library-- We should not have 10 books on a type of art that is not interesting to the public---
Respectfully Subnutted,
Prue Rosenthal,
Chairman

  L1~l11Ll~rarJ !11e1l11lea
loot LIii
April 28,1989
Adriani,Gotz.ToulouseLeutrec.TheCompleteGraphicWorts. 436pp. 421 illustrations, 78 in color.L35.Z Andres,Glen,Hunisak,JohnandTurnerRichard.TheRrtofFlorenceN.ew
York.2 vols. l,348pp. 1.SS0illustrations, 701 in color. L230. Z Ba1anda1lM,ichael.PatternsofIntention.208pp.62b/w&4color
illustrations. YaleUniversityPress Y
Beckett,Wendy. ContemporaryWomenArtists.Oxford 1988. 1l 2pp, 60
illustrations, 50 in color.L25. Z
Blume,Dieter.TheSculptureof AnthonyCero1942-1980.Catalogue Raisonne. Cologne1981.4 volumes. over 1000 b/w photographs. 1288 pieces listed & illustrated. 4 vols cased. L48.--z
Bullin,Martin & Joli,Evelyn.ThePaintingsof J. M. W.TurnerY. aleUniv. Press 1984. 2 vols. 993 pp total. 243 b/w illustrations. & 320 colorplates. HB S180.--Y
Cahill,James.C.C.WongL:andscapePaintings9.6pp.,43illustrations. Cloth$40.00--WUJames Cahillreceived his PhD.from the Universityof Michigan.
Coe,RalphT. LostendFoundTraditions--Native American Art 1965- 1985. Published in association with the American Federation of Arts. 288pp.
403 illustrations. 48 in color. $35.00--WU
Conn, Richard. APersistentIJlslon--Art of the Reservation Days. Distr.ibured for the DenverArt Museum. l90pp., 251 illustrations,65 in color. $35.00 --WU
Demus,Otto.TheMosaicsofNormanStelly.498pp., 120colorplates.New York ( 1949) 1988. $80.00 --H

   ..
Dorment. RJchard.anushPaintingin the Philadelphia Museum or Art. from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. 1986.463pp. 286 b/w and 42 colorillustrations. $14.95--Z
Finch,Christopher.Twentieth-CenturyWatercoloursN.ewYork1988. 312pp, 368 illustrations, 303 in color.LSO.--Z
Fine,Ruth.DrawingNear.WhistlerEtchingsfromthe ZelmanCollection. Distributedfor the LACountyMuseum.$24.95--WU
Fishof,Iris.FromtheSeculartotheSacred.--EverydayObjectsinJewish Ritual Use.Distributed for the Israel Museum 108pp.,83 illustrations, 9 in color. $12.95--WU
Garrould,Ann.HenryMooreDrawings1988. 276pp. 336 illustrations, 168 in color.L45.--z
Gordon,Robert,andForge,Andrew.Degas.1988.288pp. 324 illustrations, I21 in colorand 2 foldouts. L40.--z
HenryMoore,CompleteSculpture6. volumes.Vol.1EditedbyDavid Sylvester. Othervolumes edited by Alan Bownes.Intro to vols. 1,2,& 3 by Sir Herbert Rhead. each volume L30--Z (no publisher???)
Hubert, ReneeRiese.SurrealismandTheBook.Berkeley, 1988. 358pp., l20b/w and38colorillustrations.$75.00--H
Humphrey,John. RomonClrcuses.--C
Hunter, Sam.Noguchil,samu.334pp. 195 b&willustrations and 113colour
illustrations. L65--Z.(pl5)
Jackson.Davidand Janice.TibetanThangkaPaintingM. ethods and
Materials.202pp,profuselyillustrated.IthacaN.Y.1984.$24.95--H Jansen,H.W..NineteenthCenturySculpture.1985.288pp.240b/w &2
color illustrations. --H
Kleiner,RobertE.L. ChineseSnuffBottlesfromthe Collectionof Mary andGeorgeBlochE.xhibitionCatalogue1988.237pp,31Ocolor illustrations.-H

  J
Lane, Richard.Hokusai.1988 300pp 200 b/w and 90 color illustrations. L40.-H
Lowry,GlennD.with Susan Namazee.AJeweler'sEye.IslamicArt of the Boolef,rom the Vever Collection.240pp, 100 colorplates. Washington,D.C.
1988.--H
MacQuoidP.ercy.HistoryofEnglishFurniture.1988.4l6pp,900b/wand 60 colorillustrations.-
McDannellC,olleen&Lang,Bernhard.Heauen:8History.YaleUniversity Press 41Opp.$29.95--Y
Me1tzoffS,tanley.Botticelli,SignorelliandSeuonarola':Theologlca PoetlcaandPaintingfrom BoccaccioandPolizlano• published by LeoS. Olschki,in Florence.--NYTarticle
Metzger,Mendeland Therese. JewishLife In the MiddleAges.316pp., 188 b/w and 209 colorillustrations. $49.95 H
Mezzatesta,MichaelP. HenriMatisse:SculptorlPatnterlfl formal analysisof selectedworks. KimbellArt Museum.144 pp., 167 illustrations, 17in color.Oothbound.$38.00--WU
Milburn.Robert.Early ChristianHrtandArchitecture. Moscati,Sabatinoeditor.ThePhoenicians1.988.768pp.,illustratedincolor.
L60.--z
Nash,Steven, A & Merkert, Jorn, eds. Naum6abo.SIHtyyearsof Constructlulsm.Distributed for the DallasMuseum.272pp., 270 illustrations, 18 in color. $35.00--WU
Ostergard.DerekE.BentwoodandMetal Furniture.Publishedin associationwiththe AmericanFederationofArts.384pp.527blackand
Pisano,RonaldG.8LeedlngSpiritInAmericanArt.,WllllemMerritt Chase, 1849-1916. 204pp., 135 illustrations, 69 in color. $49.95--H
Pisano. RonaldG.Idie Hours.AmericanLeisureRctlultles.1865-1914. 176pp, 40 b/w and 85 color illustrations. L35--Z.

  I.
Pope-Hennessy,john. Introductionto ltellan sculpture.3 volumes. 3rd. OxfordEdition. 1986. 3 volumes.each paperback L20.--Z.
Ru, Martin and Stearn WilliamT. Redoute'sFairestFlowen. (FromMet. Museuaol Art cataloguep.59) 312pp. 144full color plates. $37.SO
Rontgen,Robert.TheBookof Mel11en.1001 B & W illustrations, 282 color illustrations, 9 I 12. $95.00--H
Rosenblum.Robert& Janson,H.W.19thCenturyArt.PrenticeHall& Harry Abrams, 1984.--H.
Rudenstine, AngelicaZander.ModemPainting,DrawingandSculpture Collectedby Emily& JosephPulitzerJr. Catalogue.Published by Harvard Art Museums.--WU
Rudnitsky, Konstantin.RussianandSouletTheatre. 1905-1932.320pp. 457 illustrations in b &wand color.$7.5.00--H
Sarianidi,Victor.The6oldenHonrdofBactrin2S8pp. 254 b/w and 122 colorillustrations. $39.95--H
Schiffer,Herbert F.TheMirrorBooleP.ennsylvania 1983.256pp. 16color and 660 b/w photographs.L35.--Z
Schimmel.Paul.FlemishEHpresslonlsmR:epresentationaplaintingInthe twentiethcentury.Distributedfor the NewportHarbor Art Museum.238 pp., 84 color plates pb.$37.00--WU
Schnabel,Julian. Jullen Schnabel. C.U.J.Nicknames of Maltre D'st Other EHcerptsfromlife. 222pp,127colorillustrations,67incolor.Paintings. collagesand anecdotaltexts by the contemporary Americanartist, Julian Schnabel.L55.--z
TheShogunAgeEHhlbltlonf.rom the TokugawaArt Museum,Japan. Distributed for the Shogun AgeExhibitionExecutiveCommittee.280pp., 273 colorillustrations. $50.00--WU
ToyRutos1890-1939:ThePeterOttenhelmerCollectionM.anycolor illustrations. 168pp.(noauthor,noed.nopub.)L14.50--2
Tsujimoto,Karen.WayneThlebaudP.ublishedfortheSanFrancisco Museum of Modern ARt.208pp.,124illustrations, 68 in color. $40.00--H

   •
J
Tutag, NolaHusewithLucyHamilton.DlscouertnSgtained&lessInDetroit 1987. 166pp,61 colorillustrations. L34--Z.
Vallier,Dora.Braque:TheGraphicWort.NewYork1988.320pp.,profusely illustrated in colorand b/w. --H
Vernedoe,rirk.GustaueCalllebotteY,aleUniversityPress.1987.216pp. 200 b/w & 72 colorillustrations. $39.95.--Y
Waldman,Diane. AnthonyCaro.232pp, 298 illustrations. 95 in color. Oxford 1982. LSO--Z.
Weber,NicholasFox,Harris,Mary Emmaet al. JosefAlbers:fl Retro1pecth.13e0.4pp, 122colorand I59b/w illustrations.NewYork,
I 988. $65.00--H
Westwood,JO.,TheArt of the IlluminatedManuscript.1988 340pp., 50
color plates. $29.95--H
Wheat,EllenHarkins.JacobLawrence,AmericanPainter.Pub. in Cooperationwith the Seattle Art Museum.272 pp. 1SOillustrations.75in color.$40.00--WU
white illustrations.Clothbound$50.00--WU Wigoder,Geoffrey.TbeStoryoftheSynagogue2.08pp.,profusely
illustrated with b/w and color illustrations. London 1986 $22.95--H
Wittkower,Rudolf. &IanLorenzoBerninit:he sculptorof the Roman Baroque3,rd edition,revised by HowardHibbard,ThomasMartinand MargotWittkower.Ithaca, CornellUniversityPress-Phaidon, 1981.290pp.
122 illustrations. $75.00--Shamansky --

  '-
1
Ladies· library Association. Ann Arbor. Michigan Seeretary·sReport October27. 1939
TheLadies·Library Associationheld its fall mootingat the homeof Mrs.John AlexenderonFriday,O<:tooo2r7,1989.Thosepresent,in additiontothe hos~. were: EleanorCollins, lsebel Haight, HelenHall, Kirby Hall, Joan Innes,RobertaKeniston,FrancesMcSperranJ,anNewman,CarolPlumer, MaryPryor, PrueRosenthal,NestaSpink,Alice Wethey.TheVice-President, NesteSpink,officieted ,sinceTrudyHuntingdonis eweyfor the fall semester,andPrudenceRosenthaldeputizedfor the Secretary,whowas teachingoncampus,andhenceunaYoidablylate. NestaSpinkthanked JohnnieAlexanderfor her hospitality today, endcalled the meeting to order.
The Secretery·sreport was reed endacceptedes corrected. NesteSpink reportedthat HelenHall hasageinagreedto heedanominatingcommitteeto nominateofficers for nextyear;nominationswill bebroughttothespring meeting. JenNewmanreadtheTreasurers·report, preparedbyherandby ZibbyOneel,which is attached. Despitethe dismayingtumble of the stock market, our current assets as of October 18, 1989. are $127,389.64,an increaseof$9,t58.56oYerDecemberofthepreYiousyear. InApri1,1989.
theTreasurersconYeyed$1000.00tothelibrary ReYolYingFund,and recommendedthat the Ladies·Library Association agreeto give on additional $1000.for 1989. RobertaKenistonmoYedthat the Reportbe be acceptedas read.
PrudenceRosenthalreported for the BookCommittee,which met in late September.It is not so easy,it turns out, to get o list of the art books we haYeg1vento the LadiesLibrary Association, sineeJaneSheenpotnts out that a print out of all the art bookcollection would form a mountain5-6 feet high, which might be more than we care to handle,and there seemsto be no woy to get o selective list, confined to our contributions. Shedid, however,th1nkthat byusinganothermethod,shecouldg1veussome1deas of the numberandcategoriesinYolYed,andpromisedto doso. TheLibrary 1ntendsto acquire videos,andJaneSheenrecommendsthat we too should considerchoosingsuitable videos. Theyore anxiousto arrive et e rotionol policyfortheselectionofvideos,sincetheLibrarydoesnotseettself as setting out to off er video store services. The Library is working to create in its new quarters a comfortable well-lit area for looking at art books,
which will display their collection, including our gifts, to odvontoge.

   Turning to book orders, Prudence Rosenthal reported that Jane Sheen can order books for us through a USvendor, which may save a little money over ordering through Zwemmers. In the ensuing discussion, Nesta Spink questioned the efficiency of ordering books from sales catalogues. They may turn out not to be available, as many are remainders, available in limited numbers. There was renewed, but inconclusive, discussion of the possibility of getting a list of our gifts of books to the Library, and of various ways of going about this. It was proposed that we give $2000.00 to the Library novv,and, if needed, another $1000.00 in January. This was agreed to .
.Jan Newman reported on the 1ast meeting of the Library Advisory Council. Last spring the Library faced a financial crisis, since it seemed there would not be enoughmoney to cover the costs of the new building and furnishings. But bids came in lower than expected, and it seems that all is well. She explained the ramifications of two millage proposals which would affect.Library finances. It was pointed out that the branch libraries get a lot of use during periods that the central Library is closed. Thinking about the branch libraries further suggests that we might want to consider furnishing them with books. Some concern was expressed about the increasing use of videos, lest this encourage the declining use of books.
The Vice-President next read a regretful letter of resignation from Marcy Westerman, effective from October, 1989, and suggested that we bring nominations to our spnng meeting.
Weelectedtwonewmembers(PeggyJensenandPamelaTabMa)at tr1is meet i ng,.and hope to be joined by them in spring, 1990.
Frances McSparran volunteered to host our next meeting on Friday, May l 1, 1990, at 3 p.m.
Since business was now concluded, the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
Frances McSparran (Secretary)
2

    Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan
Treasurers' Report October 27, 1989
October appears to be an unlucky month for the stock market. Io October, 1987, on the now-infamous Black Monday, stock prices took a dizzying tumble after having reached all-time highs. In the two years following the crash stocks recovered their losses to a remarkable extent, only to fall dramatically again on October 13 of this year.
Lacking Mrs. Wethy's gifts for analysis and prognostication, we hesitate to predict where the economy is headed now. However, the budget deficit remains enormous, the balance of trade continues as a large problem, savings and loan institutions are in a shambles and it is not clear that Congress and the present Administration are able or willing to make significant headway in solving these problems.
Turbulent waters certainly, but nevertheless the finances of The Ladies' Library Association contiotue, so far, to sail serenely on. With a single exception our stocks, even after the October 13 downturn, show gains over their December 31, 1988 prices. Our portfolio value as of October 18, 1989was $46,986 and our Ready Assets Fund contained $75,824.55. Adding our checking account balance of $4,578.84 to these amounts, we have a total of $127,389.64, which is $9,158.56 more than on December 31 of last year.
Your present treasurers take no credit for this very respectable total. Rather, we would like to give credit to Mrs. Wethey for her shrewd investments over the years and for the good advice she has given us since we took office.
Io April, 1989 we gave $1,000.00 to the Ann Arbor Public Library's revolving fund. We recommend that the Ladies' Library Association vote an additional $1,000 at this
meeting for our semi-annual gift.
Respectfully submitted,
Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

  .,
lLOIDa~O1Jlil1IIIII
-
TheBookCommittee,Johnny Alexander,EleanorCollins,CarolPlumer and Prue Rosenthal met in late September to choose new books for the Library. I spoke with Jane Sheen who told me that the print out for all the art books in the library, not just LLAwould be available, but would create a pile of paper between five and six feet highll This printout would not include just the titles, but alot of other information, as well. They do not seem to be able to pull just the titles. She thought that she would be able to work out a way to give me the number of boo.ksin some catagories. Before she orders books, she checks the computer to see if the book is in the library and how many there are in that catagory. She'll make note of this number. it might help.
They have decided that they do want to start ordering video tapes, and hope to have the videos available to the public by January 1, 1990. We should now begin to order them, too.
They have been working with an interior decorator to create an ambiance in the area on the third floor where the art books will be kept. They hope to have comfortable chairs and good lighting for people to sit and browse!! Because this addition won't be finished untH 1992 we discussed whether we should continue to order as many books as usual and she said we should, as they are in demand all the time, and people are constantly amazed and delighted with the extent of the Library's collection of art books.
Prue Rosenthal. Chairman
~llatlaDIJ
H,,1111,11.11111
Bl1IJ)GUQ
1

  Ladies Library Association Book list
October 27,1989
YALECENTEFRORBRITISHART-
Buttin,Martin,YUP,1981.,TIie P■i■t1■9s I' Dr■mla9I af ■llllaa
llate S3SO.
Vaughn.William,YUP.1979. &ert11a■ ■•••■tlclI• a■II E■1llIll lrt
$70.
Sewter. Charles A. YuP 1974 TIie Stal■ell Iii••• ef ■ IHI•• Merri• ••II lis Circle S150.
HACKEARRTBOOKS
Thompson, Robert Farris. AfricanArt In Motion,Berkeley, 1974 $75.
Loehr, Max.AncientChineseJadesfrom the 6renullleK.L.Winthrop CollectionintheFoggArtMuseum.CambridgeM,ass..1975 $95.
Parrot,Andre.TheArtsof Assyria.N.Y. S125.
de Tolnay,Charles.HieronymuBsoschN..Y.1966 $125.
Sorlier,Charles,editor.Chegell'tPosten,RCatalogueR1t1onneN..Y.1975 S110.
Peters, Harry T. Currierand luen, Americaonstone,CellfomleonStone. N.Y.. 1976 S375.
Hopps,Walter.Linde,Olf.SchwarzA.rturo,MarcelDuchampA•eedy-medes, etc. (1913-1964). Milan, 1964. $125.
King, ConstanceEileen.TheEncylclopedlaofToys.N.Y.1978. $50.
Russell.John.MIH ErnstLifeendWort.N.Y.1967 $150.
Lassaigne,Jacques. FlemishPainting:TheCenturyofUonEyck.Cleveland 1957. $95.
CD

  Ettinger, Leopold,E. Antonioand PleroPolloluolo.London t 978. $95. Penrose, Roland.Scrapbook,1900•1981. N.Y. I 98 l $60.
PRINCETONUNIVERSITYPRESS Wethey.Harold.Titian'sDrawingsP.rincetonUniversityPress 1989 $125.
UNIUERSITY OFTI HASPRESS
Marzio,Peter C. The Democratic Art-- Rn EHhibition on the History of Chromolithography in America., 1840-1900. AmonCarter Publication $8.95
Taylor, Lonn & Warren. DavidB. (Foreword by Ima Hogg). TeHIS Furniture. TheCabinetmakersendTheirWort. 1840-1880. $70.
Toussaint.Manuel.ColoniaAlrtInMeHlco.S100.
SCHOLARB'SOOKSHELF
de Tolnay,Charles. Mlchelengelo.Five volumes. Princeton. $225. (orig.
$475.)
Meiss.Millard.Longnon,Jean, and Cazelles.Ramond. TheTresRichesHeures of JeanDukeof Berry. $79.50
FlemlshRrt (no author recorded) $49.95 (orig. Sl25) Oberhuber.Konrad.PoussinT,heEarlyYearsInRome,TheOriginsof
French Clo11lcl1m. 1988. $65.
Sayre,EleanorA.,etal. GoyaandTheSpiritofTheEnlightenment.$65. Bacou.Roseline.OdllonRedonP:astels.$65.
Smith,Bradley-- Historiesin Art-- Four volumes -- China,France,Japan, Mexico-- $89.50

  Rodrilguez. Antonio. OtegoRtuer:Mural Painting.S125.
REFERENCPEUBLICATIONINS ARTHISTORYRNDRACHITECTURSEERIES van der ~1eulen,Jan. ChartresCathedral,SourcesandLiterary
Interpretation, Acritical Bibliography.$75.
Chiarmonte. Paula, editor. WomenArtistsIn the U.S.: ASetectlue
Blbllogrophyonthe FineendDecorottueArts. $65.
Bird. Alan. RHistoryof RussianPainting.$50.
Greenthal,Kathryn. AugustuSsoint-GoudenMs:esterSculptor.$49.50
UNIUERSITOYFCRLIFORNIPRRESS--
Bony,Jean. French Gothic Architecture of the 12th 8' 13th centuries. SI35.
Keyes.Roger. TheMale Journey in JapanesePrints. $55. Sullivan. Michael. The Meeting of Eastern and Western Art. $4S.
Kagan,RichardL..editor. SpanishCitiesoftheGoldenRge,TheUiewsof Antonuan den Wyngaenle. S175.
Armstrong, Richard. OeuidPerk. $4-i.S0
Lewis.Mary Tompkins. Cezanne'•[arty Imagery.$39.95
Attoe.Wayne.andLogan,Donn.Rmer1caUnrbenArchitectureC.atalystsIn the Designof Cities. $39.95
Milburn,RobertL. EertyChristianArtandArchitecture.$48.00

   President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
Johnnie A1exander Margaret Cameron Eleanor Collins Isabel Ha1ght Helen Hall
OFFICERS Mrs. Devid Huntington
Mrs .Walter Spink
Miss Frances McSperren Mrs. Haskell Newman/ Mrs. Robert Oneal
BookSelection Committee Mrs.John A1exander
Mrs. Hayward Keniston Mrs. James Plumer Mrs. Amnon Rosenthal
Library Advisory Council Mrs. Hayward Keniston Mrs.Haskell Newman
LAUI~~ LltU(Al<Y A~~Ul..lA I IUN. ANN Al<tJUI<. nlt..HlbAN
Kirby Holl
Trudy Huntington
Joan Innes
PeggyJensen
Roberta Keniston
Frances McSparran
Jan Barney Newman(Mrs.Haskell)
Zibby Oneal Carol Plumer Mary Pryor Prue Rosenthal Nesta Spink Pamala Tabbaa Alice Wethey
Mrs. Stanley
Mrs. Howard Peckham
1948 Hall, H. 1951 Haight 1951 Plumer 1951 Wethey 1956 Collins 1957 A1exander 1957 Keniston 1960 Innes 1960 Pryor 1962 Cameron
VEAROFELECTIOTNOMEMBERSHIP 1970 Hunttngton
1970 Onecil 1976 Hall, K. 1982 Rosentha1 1985 Newman 1986 McSparran 19B6 Spink 1989 Jensen 1989 Tabbaa
MEMBERSHIPANDOFFICERS1990-91
(Mrs.John) (Mrs. George) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Cameron) (Miss Helen) (Mrs. Kirby) (Mrs. Dovid) (Mrs. Perry) (Mrs. Steven) (Mrs. Hayward) (Ms. Frances)
MEMBERS
788 Arlington BlYd.(48104)
663-5879 662-9109 663-6255 663-4520 668-6331 665-2800 761-8331 662-3902 665-3825 662-4164 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 662-2118 665-0941 662-1178 668-7871 668-6225
(Mrs. Robert) (Mrs. James) (Mrs. Millard) (Mrs. Amnon) (Mrs. Walter) (Mrs. Vasser) (Mrs Harold)
Dodge
315 New England Ave., Winter Park,Fl. 32789 213 LondonRoad,Hendersonsville, N.C.28739
1200 Earhart "443
1200 Earhart "358
2112 Vinewood Blvd. (48104)
1200 Earhart "428 (48105) 12GeddesHeights (48104)
2037 GeddesAvenue (48104) 21ooHi11Street (48104) 804 Dewey (48104)
2222 Fuller Road (48105)
1 Harvard Pl ace (48 104) 931 Oakdale (48108)
50 1 Onondaga (48 104)
1931 Jackson Road (48103) 715 Spring Valley (48105) 2105 Devonshire Road (48104) 2GeddesHeights (48t04)
1914 Scottwood )48104) 151OCambridgeStreet (48104)
EMERITUMSEMBERS
(48 105)
(48105)

   Ladies· Library Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Secretary·s Report May 11, 1990
The Ladies· Library Association held its spring meeting at the t1omeof Fran,::esMcSparranon Friday,May 11, 1990. Tllosepresent.,in addition to tlle hostess,were·.JohnnjeAlexander,EleanorCollins, IsabelHaight,HelenHall, Kirt1yHan. Trudy Huntington, Peggy.Jensen,Roberta Keniston, JanNiS>\\rman, Zibby Oneal,Carol Plumer. PrueRosenthal, Nesta Spink, PamalaTabbaa,and
Al1ce'v✓ethey. ThePres1dent,TrudyHuntington..congratulatedPeggy.Jensen and PamalaTabbaaon their election +.othe Associatior, and welcomed them to whet s"1ehope,j 'vVOUlbde many long years of service to the Asso,:::iation. She then thanked Frnnces t1cSparrnnfor her hospitality today, an,j apologised for changing the date of th1s rneetrng.
The Secretary·s report was read andapproved;then Zibby Oneal preser.ted U-1eTreasurers· repo•i, a copy of which is attached. Our total assets as of December31. 1989 were $130,476.31, vv•hichis $12,245 23 more than on December31, 1988 In the d1scuss10nthat followe,j, Z1bD1OJnealremarked thatwehavealotofmoneyinloosecash_a.mountingtoat,out$40,000. \·'lecan keep ·nvesting it, but our continuing accumulat10nM moneyprompted tier to wonder H ·wesr,ouM not consider spending et least some of our excess income on behalf of the LlbrnnJ Roberta Keniston suggest.eathat we rrnght help provide comforteble seating for the Llbrery evtension, or shelving for oversize books. Alice V./ethe1tJhought that our constit1..tion regrettabl!d restn:ted us to buying books, tiut pointed out that •Ne could amen,j it Since members E,eemed in favor of reviewing end perheps changing this stipulat10n, Tn.J1jy Huntrngdon suggested that a committee be formed to look into it, and after further discussion it was decided that a cornmittee ·:onsisting of Pegg,dJensen. Frances McSparnm,Jan Newman,Zibby Dnetil, Carol Plumer .:mdPrue Rosenttrnl woulij examine tJ,e constitution and consider ott1er useful Vv8\.fS in which ··Ne might spendexcess income for the benefit of the Librnry. Zibby Onealand,.Jan Nev•tmanw111convenethe cornrnittee.
Theannual,jues\·Verethencollected, andafter that ,.JanNewmangavea report. on the state of the Library building proJect. It 1s going ·vvon1jerfull!J well, but the renev·rnlof the m1ll~gein .June1scrucial, and·01e should encouragepeople to support it. Pl~nners are concernedabout furnishing tt1e ne1,,avddition, andour financrnl help t.neremight bevery useful. Tru,j1J

   Hunting,jon ne>it ca1led on Helen Hall, Cl1ait-rnanof the Nominating Comrmtt.ee, Vvhich presented Urn f oilovving slate of officers for 1990-91. President: Mr-s. Dav1dHuntington. Vice-Pres1dent: Mrs. Walter Spink, Secretary: Miss. Frances McSparrnn,Treasurer:Mrs.HaskellNe'Nrnfln_C.ha1rrnanoftheBookCommittee· Mrs. Amnon RosenU-1al.Roberta Keniston proposed tf1at t"1eslate be 3ccepteij, and the proposed officers \ht·eredul~ elected, and applauded. At triis point Z1bbyOneal brought us back to financial matters Dyreminding us that we had not 1detvoted rnoneidfor the LlDn1ry at this meetrng, an,j thi·3 w-asspeeed1ly rectifie,j t,yvoting up to $3,500.00, $500.00 to be paid at once to clear ''l'lhat 'fie owe them_.and the remainder to be d1sbursed as and lf needed.
Carol Plumer deiivere,j greetings and good wishes from t"lary PqJor, Vv't"10 t,ecause of illness ..couhj not come to todsy s rneet.ing, en,j reported on r,er health. T~,eSecretary pro,juced a card, snd \h/eall :3ent her our greetings and best wisr·,es.
The Book Cornrnittee Reoort (coo•dattached) followe,j Prndence Rosenthal reported that the Cornmittee nad discovered that :i changl:' 1n tne proce,jure for ordering our books for tt1e Library trnd crept in.inadvertently; as El res1.Jt, the Libn:sry has been ordering books on our behalf \•Vithout prior apprnval by our Book Commit tee The Cornrnittee has asked that the L1brary return to 1ts former pn:ictice of havrng the list of nooks approve,j by us prior to purcnase
Vvediscussed ··Nhether or not to make nominations hr the membership slot, and decided to postoone it for one year, ti 11our ne:,;t spn ng rneeti ng. The Const1tut1on Committee, 1t ·was suggested, migt1t review our processes for normnat10n and elect.10n, as part of their rev1ew process
Several matters were n~ised under the head of ariy otl1er business. The Book Comrnittee undert:Jok to see to supplying t,ookplates in books chosen to commemorate t1arion Bader and an Ementa member, Mrs. Vibbert, 'vVho1jied recent.lid Nesta Spink proposed_.and it was agree,j, that henceforth the '3ecretary should be reimbursed for cost..; incurred in sending out notice'.3 to members.
Zibby iJneai volunteere,j to hosr. our next rneeting on Fnda1:1December 7, at 3 p.rn. '3inee business 'Nfls nov•.1coneluded..t.r,erneetmg vvasadjourned.
Respectfullq sut,rni tted,
Frflnces t1cSmirrnn (Secretary)

   THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Treasurers' Report May 11, 1990
Since our last treasurers' report, changes have been occurring in the world with breathtaking speed. Country after country in Eastern Europe has rejected a Communist- dominated government. The Berlin Wall has fallen. In South Africa a new political climate seems slowly to be emerging with the release from prison of Nelson Mandela. East and West Germany are on the brink of being reunited. Lithuania has declared its independence from the Soviet Union and, as of thjs writing, is withstanding pressures to withdraw its claim. Within Russia, itself, economic and political reforms are struggling to birth. The European Economic Community will very shortly become a functioning reality. New winds are blowing in much of the world.
How the United States will respond to these vast new opportunities and challenges by-and-large remains to be seen. What many of these changes will mean for our own economy is interesting to contemplate. Certainly serious concerns remain about the state of our economy. The national debt, the balance of trade, and the deteriorating condition of many of our industries continue to be problems without forthcoming solutions. Add to these the Savings and Loan debacle, the uncertain state of Social Security, our lagging pace in research and development and the apparent fajlures in our educational system and there appears to be ample reason to worry. Perhaps the new winds blowing in the world will provide us with opportunities to successfully address some of these problems.
In the midst of all this, the Ladies' Library finances continue to live a charmed life. The stock market bobs up and down, but our portfolio, as of December 31, 1989,

   was valued at $49,589.25 and our Ready Assets Fund contained $77,284.90. Adding our checking account balance of $3,602.16 to these amounts gives us a total of $130,476.31, which is $12,245.23 more than on December 31, 1988.
During the course of the year we sold three stocks which had come to us as spin- offs from Household International for a total of $2,073.46. We contributed $2,500 to the Library Revolving Fund and reimbursed Carol Plumer $540.16 for her purchase of books for the Library.
Certainly we can afford to contribute another $2500 to the Library Revolving Fund in 1990 if that is the wish of the Ladies' Library Association members.
Respectfully submitted,
J~\~
~~o~
Q ca Q Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal
Treasurers

        Company
Shares Price
Dividends
$481.52
260.00 380.00
520.00 260.00 2.26
3.15 6,272.27
Value
$1 I ,666.25 4,013.00
5,462.00 12,524.00 15,924.00
77,284.90
$126,874.15 3,602.16
$130,476.31
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT January I, 1989 - December 31, 1989
Household International 225 Central Southwest 100 Amoco 100 Mobil 200 MMM 200 Scotsman Industries 45 Eljer Industries, Inc. 45 Schwitzwer, Inc. 45 Merrill Lynch Ready Trust
51 7/8 40 1/8 54 5/8 62 5/8 79 5/8
Sold 12/12/89 Sold 8/3/89 Sold 12/12/89
Subtotal Bank total
Total Assets
$8,179.20

       -
1,441.00
377.32 255.14
$10,434.97
12.00 2500.00 540.16
2,073.46 6,272.27
$11,397.89
$4,565.08 10,434.97
15,000.05
-11,397 .89
3,602.16
INCOME Dividends Interest - Bank Dues
Sale Eljer Sale Scotsman Sale Schwitzer
EXPENSES
Safety deposit box Library Revolving Fund Check to Carol Plumer
Ready Assets Purchases: Proceeds - stock sales Dividends/ Ready Assets
Balance Jan. 1, 1989 Income during 1989
Expenses during 1989
$8,179.20 180.31 2.00
Cash
12/31/89
3,602.16

  Lacll11Library A11ocl1tloa loot Co■■U&•• lepor,
llay 11, 1990
The BookCommitteeof the Ladies Library Associationmet on May I. 1990 to select new books for the Library. At that time a question of
procedure came up. Since I have been in charge of the BookCommitteethe books have been ordered by the Library without our consent, and we have been sent a semi-annual list of these previously ordered books. The Book Committeehas told me that this is not the usual procedure and that the list of desired books should be sent to us for our consent PRIORto purchase. Jane Sheen is away on vacation, but Ruth Haldeman thought the Librarian had always acted independently---- However.she assured me, it would be
quite possible to send lists every month or so, but it would hold up the purchasing process.
She asked me if we would discuss the purchasing of art books for the branch libraries-- The Library has mixedfeelings about this. Onthe one hand it would be good to have art books out there. on the other hand there is less control of what happens to them. If we want to do this we need to give them guidelines concerning:
the cost limits on each individual book
the subject matter
the 0/0 of total money that should be spent on branch books.
In our Committeewe decided that we should not purchase any books price at under $50.00, and that we should leave the buying of video tapes to the Library. I hope you are all agreeable to that .
Sincerely,
Prudence Rosenthal.Chairman Johnny Alexander
Eleanor Collins
CarolPlumer

   L1dle1 Llbr1r1 A.11oal1tloa loot Lilt
111, 11, 1,,a
Donzel,CatherineandGregoryA,lexisG.randAmericanHotels--S6~.00 Kaufmann,Edgarjr.,Faliingwater-- AFrankLloydWrightCountryHouse--
$55.00
Landau.EllenG.. JacksoPnoHock1.989 L45.00 -- z
GuiHaudJ,acquelineand Maurice.Raphael: Graceof an Angel. Forceof a Genius--L70.00Z
AbstractExpressionism:A CriticalRecord, Editedby DavidShapiro-L40.00Z Richardson, Elizabeth. BloomsburyIconography--L42.00 Z
TheEllesmereManuscriot.Chaucer'CsanterburyTales,A WorkingFacsimile, Introductionby RaphHannaIll-- LIS0.00 Z
Barasche,Moshe.ModernTheoriesof Art:FromWincklemannto Baudelaire. 1989-- L65.00
Schwaab, Dean.OsakaPrints, L60.00 Z
Women'sImagesof Men.Editedby Kent,Sarah and Morreau,Jacqueline.
1989. L37.992
Sandon,Henry and John.Grainger'sWorcesterPorcelain.L40.00Z Baker,David.TheRoyalGunroomat Sandringham.Oxford1989.L70.00
{So~ Reilly,Robin.Wedg,wood,2 vols. LS00.002--- ??????Dowe want this?? Brown,Jane.TheArtandArchitecturoefEnglishGardensL.40.00z
Gaskell,Ivan.SeventeenthCenturyDutch&FlemishPaintingZ.wemmer $140.00
Nurhan,Atrasoy&Raby,Julian. IZNIKT:hePotteryofOttomanTurkey. Thames and Hudson. S175.00
Weingarden,Lauren.LouisH.Sullivan.Rizzoli$.200.00

   ,._,
Links,J. G.,& Betjer,Katherine.Canaletto. Abrams.$60.00 Eisler.Colin.TheGeniusofIacopoBellini.Abrams.# 195.00
Andres,Glenn;Hunisak,JohnandTurner,Richard. TheArtofFlorence. Abbeville.Price per set of 2 volumes-- S38S.00
Geisberg,Maxk, TheGermanSingle-LeafWoodcut,1s00-1sso.Hacker.Price per set of 3 volumes:$275.00
Alexander,Dorothy,in collaborationwith Strauss, Walter.TheGermanSingJe- LeafWoodcut1,150-1600C.atalogue.Pricepersetof3volumes,$12S.00
Henry, Francoise. TheBookof Kells.RandomHouse.$12S.00 Mellerio,Andre. OdilonRedon.DaCapo.$45.00
BretteH,Richard; Chachin,Franchoise;Treches-Thory,Claire;& Stucky, Charles.The Art of Paul Gauguin. NewYorkGraphicSociety.$75.00
LePaul,Judy. Gauguinand the Impressionists at Pont-Aven. Abbeville. $69.95
,\L~).vv,J Sutton,Denys.EdgarDegas:Lifeand Work. Rizzoli.S7S.00
Baynes,Ken,and Pugh. Francis. The Artof the Engineer. Overlook. $79.S0
Catley,Bryan. Art Decoand Other Figures, Antique Collector'sClub. $89.50
Hamaya,Hiroshi. Landscapes:Photographs.Abrams.$69.95
Lambert, Jean-Clarence. Cobra.Abbeville. S59.95
Franzke,Andreas.Dubuffet.Abrams. $59.95
Flam,Jack,Editor. Matisse:ARetrospective,LevinAssociates.$75.00. Matisse,Henri.JAIZB.raziller.$89.50
Eluard,Paul. Illustrations by Joan Miro. A route Eoreuve, Braziller. $$62.S0 It did not say the text was NOTin english.
Coysh,A.W.and Henrywood,RIC.The Dictionaryof Blueand White Pottery, Vol.I & II., AntiqueCollector'sClub. $119.00for both volumes.

   Hussy,Christopher.GeorgianHouses.Vol.I: EarlyGeorgian,1715-1760. Vol. II: Mid-Georgian1,760-1800. VolIII:LateGeorgian,1800-1840. Antique Collector'sClub. Paper.$125.00
Nabakov,Peter and Easton,Robert. NativeAmericanArchitecture. Oxford. sso.oo
Levin.Gail.Twentieth-centuryAmericanPaintina Sotheby.S79.9S
von Moos,Stanislaus.Venturi,Rauchand ScottBrown:Buildingsand Projects.
Rizzoli$.49.95
Franch,JoseAlcina.Pre-ColumbianArt. Abrams.$75.00
Amit,Pierre. Artofthe AnicientNearEast. Abrams.$79.S0 Gans-Reudin,Erwin. The Splendorof Persian Carpets.Newsweek.$79.~0
Rogers,J.M.,Editor.Topkapi. Vol.I: Manuscripts.VolII: Textiles.VolIII: I.he. Treasury. VolIV:Carpets.NationalGeographicSociety. All4 volumes-- $259.S0
HiroshigeB:irdsandFlowers.Braziller.$75.00
EightDynastiesof ChinesePainting;TheCollectionsof the NelsonGallery-
AtkinsMuseum,KansasCity.and the ClevelandMuseumof Art. Cleveland Museum.$39.9S
Illustrationin Japan
Vol.I: IntroductoryEssayby Ikko Tanaka. Vol.II: IntroductoryEssay
by MamoruYonekure.Kodansha.Sl 19.00
Lane,Richard. Imagesfrom the FloatingWorld: The JapanesePrint.
Chartwell. S39.9S or/and
Neuer,RoniandYoshida,Susugu.UKIYO-E25:0YearsofJapaneseArt. Gallery. $39.95

  I,,._,,
Berliner.NancyZeng. ChineseFolkArt:TheSmallSkillsofCarvingInsects. Little, Brown & Co. $60.00
Eisenberg,Marvin.LorenzoMonaco.1989/ 1990
Derry,Ramsay. The Worldof RobertBateman. RandomHouse(Madison
House. 1985, 1986 reprint.
Tomlinson,Janis Angela. FranciscoGoya:TheTapestry Cartoonsand Early
Career at the Courtof Madrid. CambridgeUniversity Press. $52.00 Hand,JohnOliver,and Wolff.Martha. EarlyNetherlandishPainting.National
Galleryof Art.$52.00
Camille,Michael. The GothicIdol:Ideologyand Image-Makingin Medieval
All. CambridgeNewArtHistory&Criticism.$47.00
Bourriau,Janine. Pharoahs and Mortals.. Egyptian Art in the MiddleKingdom.
FitzwilliamMuseum Publications.
Pollitt,J.J. Art in the HellenisticAge. CambridgeUniversityPress. $60.00
TheAltarpiecein RenaissancIetaly. Burckhardt,Jacob,Editor& translator. PhaidonPress. $76.00

  Ladies' Library Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan Secretary's Report December 7, 1990
The Ladies' Library Association held its fall meeting at the home of Mrs. Robert Oneal on Friday, December 7, 1990. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: Johnnie Alexander, Eleanor Collins, Isabel Haight, Helen Hall, Kirby Hall, Joan Innes, Peggy Jensen, Roberta Keniston, Frances McSparran, Jan Newman, Carol Plumer, Prudence Rosenthal, Nesta Spink, Pamala Tabaa, Alice Wethey. The Vice-President, Nesta Spink, officiated in the absence of Trudy Huntington, and Prudence Rosenthal deputized for the Secretary, who was teaching on campus, until her arrival. Nesta Spink thanked Zibby Oneal for her hospitality today, and called the meeting to order.
The Secretary's report was read and approved. The Treasurer's report, prepared by Zibby Oneal, was read by Jan Newman. The report, which is attached, shows that our assets amount to $132,552.60, showing a modest advance of $2,076.29 on our worth as of December 31,1989. This reflects the continuing disarray of the stock market. In July, 1990, the Treasurers conveyed $4,000.00 to the Library Revolving Fund, which had overspent its allowance, on the understanding that this would be our only gift this fiscal year. Joan Innes, seconded by Peggy Jensen, moved that the Report be accepted as read.
Jan Newman reported on the progress of the Library extension. The opening will be next fall, though the date is not yet set, and will run from noon till 5p.m.. She distributed copies of a form inviting people to volunteer to help in planning the dedication and celebration of the completion of the building. Discussions followed as to what part we should play in the opening, which will feature various events taking place simultaneously in different parts of the Library. Nesta Spink suggested that we prepare a short history of our Association and its connection with the Library. We discussed at length what special contribution we might make towards the new building. Mr. Hernandez had suggested that we might fund an art exhibition to mark the opening; Jan had proposed to him that we might donate
display cases, or a screen for the display of art reproductions. Carol Plumer suggested that we replace the screen for art reproductions, since we had started this collection, and might well continue to support it. Nesta Spink favored a contribution towards the housing and display of the art books and prints which we had given the Library, rather than towards display cases used for a wide variety of items of community interest, and this was agreed. We discussed also contributing to the care of art books by donating display shelving and /or horizontal shelving. It was
1

   agreed that Jan Newman will consult the Advisory Board, and particularly Jane Sheen and Cathy Daly, as to what would be our most appropriate contribution. Following further discussion Kirby Hall moved, and members passed the following motion:
'We authorise Mrs Newman and Mrs. Jensen to make a decision, in consultation with the Library, about the expenditure of up to $20,000.00 to be used to improve the housing and care of the art books and reproductions given to the Library by the Ladies' Library Association.'
Prudence Rosenthal reported for the Book Committee, and a copy of her report is attached. Since our last meeting the Ladies' Library Association has bought fifty-nine books, chosen before our spring meeting, for the Public Library. We gave the Library $4,000, sufficient to pay for the books already chosen and to make up a deficit caused by overspending what we had given the Library for the previous year. This had been caused by some misunderstanding in the Library about the procedures for purchase of books paid for by us, and Prudence Rosenthal had now clarified for Jane Sheen the need for our advance approval of the purchase of books which we buy for the Library. Roberta Keniston next asked how the Association felt about buying art books for branches of the Public Library which are eager to have some handsome art books available for users. Eleanor Collins pointed out that we have in the past bought some books for branch libraries, and we decided to authorise the expenditure of money through the Central Library for some duplicates for the branch libraries. The Secretary asked how the allocation of money between new single purchases for the Library and duplicates for the Branch Libraries would be determined, and Prudence Rosenthal thought the Book Committee could take care of this. We will vote money for book purchases at the spring meeting of 1991. We discussed briefly the selection of books in memory of Madeleine Vibbert,
Marion Bader and Mary Pryor.
Nesta Spink reminded us that we should bring nominations for new members to the spring meeting , and in the course of discussing this, we decided to invite a former member to rejoin the Ladies' Library Association before the spring meeting takes place. Johnnie Alexander volunteered to host our next meeting on Friday, April 26, 1991, at 3 p.m.
Since business was now concluded, the meeting was adjourned. Respectfully submitted,
Frances McSparran (Secretary)
2

  THELADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOPANNARBOR,MICHIGAN TREASURERS'REPORT
Dc:ccmber7, 1990
As most be familiar news to everyone these days, the economy cl the United
States is sufferillg. Depending on whom yo■ listen to wc arc .ua slow•d~
a recession, or on the brink cl something worse. Prices in the stock market
have dropped coosidcrablJ mmost case1, and your treasurers' report this ,, December rellects thaL Our gains have been modest in the last six months
as compared to the 19S<rs.
Our portfolio value aa cl October 26, 1990 was $93,148 and our Ready Assets Fund contained $38,6S9.93.Adding our checking account balance cl $744.67 to these amounts, wc have a total ~ $132,552.60, which is oa.ly $2,076.29more than on December 31 cl last year. ht May we were able to report that in 1989 the value ~ our holdings bad increased more than $12,000 over the preceding year. The effects cl the martet downtuna are obvious.
ht July, 1990 we gave $3,500 to the Au Arbor Public Library's revolving fo.nd,with the understanding that that would be our only gift this fiscal year.
Respectfully submitted, J~\)~
b~OD-~- 9 ~
Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

  -I, !
LA.DIii LlJIAIY ASSCtIATlCX
11
llCCl CCKilliililll lillPOIT
~llCllliliilll 7, a990
Since our last meeting the Ladies Library .-\ssociation Book Committee haspurchased fifty-nine books for the Public Library. These were books that had been chosen by the Book Committee before the spring meeting. ~o other bnoks were bought because the Library had spent more than thev had
been given the previous vear and the LLA decided thev shouldn't have any ' 3,~5.PY '
more money Wegave them $+,B-{:tt:).00which was enough to make up their deficit and LOpurchase Lhebooks we had already chosen, but did not to give tl1em any more
I asked them to give us reviews about books they would like us to buy which we w11ldiscuss and let them know if they are appropriate for us.
I also asked that a book be found on the history of jewelry for us to buy in memory of \ifarian Bader. Although there was one book available at the time, it did not seem very elegant and Jane Sheen, the reference librarian. said she would continue to look for a better book. There was a bookplate put into the book, EdgarDegasH;isLifeandWork,by Sutton Derys. m memory of Madeleine Vibbert.
There are many books that the Library would like us to purchase, and I have the reviews for them. Although the library is still in transition, they are anxious that we continue to buy books, and I think they have realized now that we need to be in charge of which books we buy, and we will not have the same problems again.
Prudence Rosenthal Book Chairman

  TITLE
ABSTRACTEXPRESSIONISM ALBERTPINKHAMRYDER
THEALTARPIECEIN RENAISSANCE ITALY
AMERICANCANVAS AMERICANCERAMICS
AMERICANPORCELAIN
THE ART ANDARCHITECTURE
OF ENGLISHGARDENS
ART DECOANDOTHERFIGURES
ARTIN THEHELLENISTICAGE THEARTOF FLORENCE
THEARTOF PAULGAUGUIN
THEARTOF THEENGINEER THEARTSOF PERSIA BLOOMSBURICYONOGRAPHY BOOKOF KELLS
CHINESEARCHITECTURE CHINESEFOLKART COBRA
THEDICTIONARYOF BLUEAND WHITEPOTTERYVOL.I&II
DUBUFFET DUFY
EARLYNETHERLANDISPHAINTING
GIFT BOOKS One Copy of Each
AUTHOR
Shapiro, David Brown, Elizabeth
Burckhardt, Jacob Simpson, Marc
PUBLISHER
Smithsonian
Phaidon Rizzoli Rizzoli
Abrams
Antique Coll. Cambridge Abbeville
PRICE
$ 55.00
76.00 50.00 75.00 60.00
89.50
60.00 385.00
Frelinghuysen,
Brown, Jane
Alice
Catley, Bryan
Pollitt, J.J.
Andres, Glenn; John
Hunisak Brettell,
& Richard Richard
Turner
Baynes, Ken
Richardson, Henry, Francoise
Liu, Laurence
Berliner, Nancy Zeng Lambert, Jean-Clarence Coysh, A.W.
Franzke, Andreas Perez-Tibi, Dora Hand, John Oliver
Overlook Vale Univ.
Random House Rizzoli
79.50
60.00
125.00
75.00
60.00
59.95
119.00
59.95
75.00
52.00
1
Elizabeth
NewYork Graphic 75.00 Society
Little,
Brown
Abbeville Antique Coll.
Abrams Abrams
Nat'l Gallery

  EDGARDEGAS:LIFEANDWORK EDWARHDOPPER
EIGHTDYNASTIESOF CHINESE PAINTING
Sutton, Denys Goodrich, Lloyd
Rizzoli Abrams Cleveland
Abrams
Cambridge
Abbeville
Knopf
Yale 60.00
ERNSTHAASCOLORPHOTOGRAPHY Haas.
75.00
67.50 Museum 39.95
49.50
55.00
52.00
FALLINGWATER-F-ARANKLLOYD WRIGHTCOUNTRHYOUSE
FRANCISCOGOYA GAUGINANDTHE IMPRESSIONISTS
AT PONT-AVEN
GEORGIAO'KEEFEIN THEWEST
GIOVANNBIELLINI
THE GOTHICIDOL
GOYA&THESPIRIT OF ENLIGHTENMENT
GRAINGER'SWORCESTER PORCELAIN
GRANDAMERICANHOTELS
HENRYMOOREDRAWINGS
HIROSHIGE:BIRDS ANDFLOWERS
HOKUSAI:THE ONEHUNDREPDOETS
IDLE HOURS
IMAGESFROMTHEFLOATING WORLD
IMAGESOF NATURE INTIMATEWORLDOF ALEXANDER
CALDER JACKSONPOLLOCK JAZZ
JOHNMARIN LORENZOMONACO
Ernst Kaufmann, Edgar Jr.
Tomlinson, Janis A.
LePaul, Judy
69.95 100.00
Callaway,
Goffen, Rona Camille, Michael
Sayre, Eleanor
Sandon, Henry Donzel, Catherine
and Alexis Gregory Garrould, Ann
Morse,
Pisano,
Peter Ronald
Bulfinch
Chartwell MacMillan
Abrams Abrams Braziller Abbeville Princeton
Press
Lane, Richard Mangelsen, Thomas
Marchesseau, Daniel Landau, Ellen Matisse, Jenri
Fine, Ruth Eisenberg, Marvin
Univ.
Nicholas
& John
Cambridge
Mus. Fine Arts
Rizzoli Braziller
G. Braziller
47.00
65.00
65.00
75.00
75.00 80.00 65.00
39.95 60.00
85.00
67.50
89.50 62.50 80.00

   ---✓
GRAPHICWORKS VENTURI,RAUCHANDSCOTT
MATISSE:A RETROSPECTIVE
MODERTNHEORIESOF ART
Flam, Jack Barasche, Moshe
Levin ~ssoc.
Oxford
Abrams
Da Capo
Fitzwilliam
Bulfinch
Rizzoli
Abrams Thames Hudson
75.00
50.00
60.00
45.00
70.00
65.00
75.00
60.00
NATIVEAMERICAANRCHITECTURE Nabakov, Peter
NEWVISION!: PHOTOGRAPHY BETWEETNHEWORLDWARS
ODILONREDON
OSAKAPRINTS
PHAROAHASNDMORTALS
PICASSOANDBRAQUE: PIONEERINGCUBISM
POUSSIN- THEEARLYYEARS IN ROME
PRE-COLUMBIANRT
Hambourg, Maria
TOULOUSE-LAUTREC:
Schwaab, Dean Bourriau, Janine
Rubin, William
Oberhuber, Konrad Franch, Jose Alcina Adriani, Gotz
COMPLETE
Mellerio,
Andre
von Moos, Stanislaus BROWNB:UILDINGSANDPROJECTS 49.95
WOMEN'ISMAGESOF MEN
Kent, Sarah & Morreau
Rizzoli

   THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OP ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN TREASURERS' REPORT
December 7, 1990
As must be famillar news to everyone these days, the economy <:Ithe United
States is suffering. Depending on whom yoa listen to we arc in I slow•dOW11,
a recession, or on the brink <:sIomething worse. Prices in the stock market
have dropped considerably ia most cases, and your treasurers' report this ,, December rdlects that. Our gains have been modest ia the last six months
as compared to the 1980's.
Our portfolio value II cl October 26, 1990 was $93,148 aiad ou Ready Assets Fund contained $38,659.93. Adding our checking accouiat balance <:I $744.67 to these amounts, we have a total cl $132,SS2.60,which is only $2,076.29more than on December 31 (I. last year. In May we were able to report that in 1989 the value cl our holdings had increased more than $12,000over the preceding year. The effects <:Ithe martet downtuna arc obvious.
IA July, 1990 we gave $3,500 to the Ana Arbor Public Library's rcvomn1 fund, with the understanding that that would be our only gjft this fiscal year.
Respectfully submitted, J~\)~
2>~aD~~-~
Jan Ncwmu and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

   Jane Sheen,ReferenceLibrarian Ann Arbor PublicLibrary
343 S.Fifth Ave.
Ann Arbor, Mi.,48107
Dear Jane,
MaylS,1990
LADIBSLIBIAIT ASSOCIATION BOOIC:OIIIIITTD
At the Ladies Library Associationmeeting on May 11 we made some decisionsconcerningchangeswe would like to implement in the procedure the Ann Arbor Public Library uses to purchase books for the Ladies Library Associationaccount. Beforeyou buy these bookswe would like to have a list andsomeaccompanyingreviewsoftheproposedbooksforustoapprove. I would like to talk with you about the number of times you submit orders and how that system works, then the committee can decide on the number of times we need to meet to review the lists.
Wewere concernedto discoverthat there had been an overdraft this pastyear,andhopethatthisdoesnothappenagain.Youwillsoonbehearing
from the treasurer that we will give you $500.00 to cover the overdraft, and $3000.00moretobeusedthroughouttheyeartopurchasenewbooks.We wilJ give you the money necessary as the lists of books are approved.
I would like to establish better communicationbetween the Library and the LadiesLibrary Association,particularly the BookCommittee,and lookforward to working with you more closelyin the next year.
I hope you had a relaxing vacation, and look forward to hearing from you soon.
Sincerely,
Prue Rosenthal, BookCommitteeChairman

   Ladies' Library Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan Secretary's Report April 26, 1991
The Ladies' Library Association held its spring meeting in the Ann Arbor Public Library, on April 26, 1991. Mr. Hernandez had suggested this to the Secretary to mark our 125th anniversary, and to allow him to show us the completed part of the extension to the Library, and the area which our donation would help equip and furnish. The meeting had been originally scheduled to take place at the home of Johnnie Alexander, and Trudy Huntington thanked her for agreeing to postpone this. Those present were: Johnnie Alexander, Eleanor Collins, Betty Gosling, Isabel Haight, Helen Hall, Kirby Hall, Trudy Huntington, Joan Innes, Peggy Jensen, Roberta Keniston, Frances McSparran, Jan Newman, Carol Plumer, Prudence Rosenthal, Nesta Spink, Pamala Tabaa, Alice Wethey. Proceedings began with a tea, which Jan Newman kindly supplied, and after that Mr. Hernandez showed us around, and took us to the area in the third floor of the new extension, where our gift will be used. We then returned to our meeting room, and Trudy Huntington called the meeting to order.
Carol Plumer collected the dues, and the books bought in memory of Mary Pryor and Marion Bader were passed around for everyone to see. The President thanked Carol Plumer for her role in transmitting the history of our Association to Mr. Hernandez, who has made copies for the Library, and thanked Alice Wethey for her many years of service as historian of the Ladies' Library Association. She then welcomed Betty Gosling who has rejoined the Ladies' Library Association.
The Secretary's report was read and approved. The Treasurer's report, which is attached, was read by Zibby Oneal; it shows that our total assets at the end of 1990 amounted to $133,842.13. We discussed briefly possible ways of investing and pro- tecting our assets. In 1990, we contributed $4,000.00 to the Library Revolving Fund, and we decided that for 1991 we would give the same amount, in addition to our special $20,000 donation. Prudence Rosenthal suggested that in future, instead of giving our contributions in July and January, as has been our custom, we should give them in May and November, since each could then be drawn on in the month following our meeting. The Report was accepted as read.
Prudence Rosenthal reported that she had no report. The Book Committee had no occasion to meet, as the Library had exhausted our contribution before a meeting was due. The Committee will now meet to discuss the selection of new books. In the following discussion, members were encouraged to recommend to the committee significant books for future purchase.
1

   2 Jan Newman reported that there will be an opening day celebration for the
completed Library in October. Frances McSparran, pursuing an earlier suggestion by Nesta Spink, suggested that the Ladies' Library Association publish a short pam- phlet on the Association, and its historical relation to the Public Library. Copies of this should be available to interested members of the community at the opening cele- bration, and after, in the area designated as the Ladies' Library Association comer. She proposed that Alice Wethey should write the history, and offered to see to the printing of it. Roberta Keniston, seconded by Prudence Rosenthal, put forward a motion to this effect, which was passed.
The following were nominated as officers for the Association, and their elec- tion duly took place: President: Nesta Spink, Vice-President: Joan Innes, Secretary: Peggy Jensen, Treasurer: Zibby Oneal and Jan Newman.
Trudy Huntington opened a discussion on the status of Emeritae members, and of continuing members who no longer took part in meetings of the Association. This is a problem, since it deprives us effectively of a working member. She sug- gested that if a member of ten years' standing fails to attend meetings for a period of two years without contacting a member of the Association, she should be approached once more, asked if she wishes to continue, and, failing an affirmative reply, should be declared Emerita, and replaced. Following discussion, Prudence Rosenthal, sec- onded by Frances McSparran, moved a motion to this effect, which was passed.
It was suggested that this decision should be made part of the Bylaws. Next, Carol Plumer read a letter from the President of the friends of the Library, acknowledging the Library's acquisition of copies of our minutes.
The Association then moved to nominations for two membership slots on the Association. Five names were put forward, and members were asked to send infor- mation on their nominees to Nesta Spink. Members then discussed Article 2 of the Bylaws on the dates of meetings, and the advisability of allowing ourselves greater flexibility on these dates. It was agreed that the Executive Committee should decide on this, and bring a proposal to the October meeting for consideration, with the intention of emending the Bylaws for the following year.
This concluded the business of the Association. Johnnie Alexander volun- teered to host the fall meeting, on October 18th. A vote of thanks was made to Jan Newman, who organized the tea, and to the outgoing officers, Trudy Huntington and Frances McSparran, and the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
Frances McSparran (Secretary)

   THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR, MICHIGAN
Treasurers' Report April 26, 1991
The portfolio of the Ladies' Library Association as of December 31, 1990 was valued at $91,038. Our Ready Assets Trust contained $39,266.64. Adding to our checking account balance of $747.28 and the cash in our Ready Assets account of $2,790.21, our total assets at the end of 1990 were $133,842.13.
During the course of the year we sold our shares of Household Finance and with the proceeds from that sale together with cash from our Ready Assets account bought United States Treasury notes and 100 shares of IBM.
Wecontributed $4000 to the Library Revolving Fund in 1990 and would like to discuss again at this meeting what our gift should be for 1991 in addition to the gift for up to
$20,000 which we have pledged to furnishings library.
in the new
Re
~
b~
fully
submitted.
-n.i;a o_
Newman and Zibby Oneal
Jan Treasurers
Barney

       Company
Central
Amoco
Mobil
MMM
IBM
S'west
Shares
100
100
200
200
100
44
$276.00 408.00 565.00 584.00
$4,400 5,738 11,600
17,150 11,300
40,850
39,266.64
$130,304.64
747.28
2,790.21 ---------
$133,842.13
U.S.TRESURY
NOTES
Household Finance 5/14/90)
40,000
225
Trust
105.13
1,675.00
240.76
4,028.74
$8,019.49
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT
Merrill Lynch
Ready
Assets
(sold
January
1,
1990 - December 31, 1990
Price Dividends Value
Subtotal
Bank total
Cash in Ready Assets
Total Assets
57 3/8
58
85 3/4
113 242.00

       Treasurers' page 2
INCOME
Report
Dividends Interest
Dues
Sale Household
EXPENSES
Library Revolving
Memorial Gift
$8,019.49 108.14
2.00
9,925.26
$18,054.89
Fund
Brokerage Commissions
Check-Jan Newman stationery
Check-Frances Mcsparren Ready Assets Purchases: Proceeds - Stock sale Interest - Ready Assets
Balance January 1, 1990 Income during 1990
:Expenses during 1990
Cash on hand 12/31/90
$4000.00 100.00 275.17
83.78 9.35
9,925.26
4,028.74 $18,422.30
$3,904.90
18,054.89 $21,959.79 - 18,422.30 $3,537.49
$3,537.49

   LADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIA TIONA, NN ARBOR,MICHIGAN SECRITTARYR'SEPORT
OCTOBER18, 1991
The Ladies' Library Association held its fall meeting at the home of Johnnie Alexander on October 18, 1991. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: Eleanor Collins, Betty Gosling, Isabel Haight, Helen Hall, Trudy Huntington, Joan Innes, Peggy Jensen, Roberta Keniston, Carol Plumer, Prue Rosenthal, Nesta Spink, Pam Tabbaa and Alice Wethey. After tea, Nesta Spink called the meeting to order by thanking Johnnie for her hospitality and welcomed guest Kathy Daly, Assistant Director of the Ann Arbor Public Library.
Ms. Daly reviewed the progress of the library's soon to be completed building and renovation project, with particular emphasis on the furnishings which our group is donating for the area designated as the Ladies' Library Association Art Comer. The area will also contain a plaque acknowledging our gift. The President presented Ms. Daly with a check for our $20,000 donation. Ms. Daly thanked the group and provided some information about the dedication of the new library, to be held on October 27, 1991. The President then thanked Alice Wethey and Frances McSparran for
their work on a new booklet about the Ladies' Library Association, a proof copy of which she passed around. It was decided that 500 copies should be printed. Carol Plumer, Pam Tabbaa, Johnnie Alexander and Trudy Huntington volunteered to take turns distributing the booklets to visitors to the Art Corner on dedication
day. Some copies will be held back from distribution and Kathy Daly will arrange to have a couple of them placed permanently in the area.
1

   The Secretary's report was read and approved. In the absence of both our Treasurers, their report was read by the President. At the end of September, 1991, our assets amounted to $148,251.50. The report was accepted as read.
Prue Rosenthal presented the Book Committee report. The current balance in the account for the purchase of books is $3,871, due to the delay until September of a deposit ordinarily scheduled for May. Prue therefore suggested that the $2,000 deposit usually made in November be deferred until early 1992. Joan Innes, seconded by Carol Plumer, moved that the Treasurers be authorized to deposit up to $2,000 into the account at Prue's request after the beginning of the year. The motion was passed. It was also suggested that the Book Committee consider the purchase of magazines and videos for the library. The committee will discuss this, consult with library staff, and report back to the membership. The committee's report was approved.
The President next read a list of committees and their membership. They are the Nominating Committee: Trudy Huntington (Chair), Helen Hall and Betty Gosling; Book Committee: Prue Rosenthal (Chair). Carol Plumer, Johnnie Alexander, Eleanor Collins and Pam Tabbaa; Finance Committee: Zibby Oneal and Jan Newman (Co-chairs) and Alice Wethey; Representative to the Ann Arbor Public Library Advisory Committee: Jan Newman; and Historian: Alice Wethey (appointed for a three year term in April, 1989).
At this point, Kathy Daly left the meeting and two new members, Joy Blouin and Gretchen Whitman, were elected.
A discussion of proposed changes to the bylaws followed. These changes include expanding the definition of our purpose to permit the purchase of visual arts materials other than books; allowing for more freedom in the selection of dates to hold our meetings; clarifying the process for nominating and electing new members; allowing emeritae members to vote; and providing for
2

   more flexibility in the number of members on the various committees. There were also a few other minor wording changes. The membership is to review the suggested changes before the next meeting, when we will vote on them.
It was decided that emerita status would be conferred upon Margaret Cameron. The Secretary will write a letter notifying her of this.
This concluded the business of the Association. Joan Innes volunteered to host the spring meeting on Thursday, April 23, 1992, and the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
PeggyJensen, Secretary
3

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    V
1. 14
2. 4
3. 2
4. 5
5. 21 6.2 7. 1
051091 cl
Tuohy Chairs (#8) @ $385.62 End Tables (#120) LowTables (#103)
Tables (#40)
$5,398.68 907.08 642.88
3,155.00 6,831.30 865.60 2,021.00
$19,821.54
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATIOCNONTRIBUTION Audio Visual Area/Third Floor
Chairs (#13)
Chairs (#12)
Carrel Multi-Use Station
TOTAL
( #135)

  __,
Zibby Oneal Carol Plumer Prue Rosenthal Nesta Spink Pamela Tabbaa Alice Wethey
(Mrs. Robert) (Mrs. James) (Mrs. Amnon)
(Mrs. Walter) (Mrs. Yasser) (Mrs Harold)
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN MEMBERSHIP AND OFFICERS 1991-92
Johnnie Alexander Margaret Cameron Eleanor Collins Betty Gosling Isabel Haight Helen Hall
(Mrs. John)
663-5879 662-9109 663-6255
(Miss Helen) Trudy Huntington (Mrs. David)
663-4520 668-6331 761-8331 662-3902 665-3825 662-4164 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 665-0941
665-117 8
President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
OFFICERS
'
Mrs. Walter Spink
Mrs. Perry Innes
Mrs. Steven Jensen
Mrs. Haskell Newman & Mrs. Robert Oneal
MEMBERS
788 Arlington Blvd. (48104)
Joan Innes
Peggy Jensen
Roberta Keniston
Frances McSparran (Ms. Frances) Jan Barney Newman (Mrs. Haskell)
(Mrs. George) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Betty) (Mrs. Cameron)
1200 Earhart #443 (48105) 1200 Earhart #358 (48105)
(Mrs. Perry) (Mrs. Steven) (Mrs. Hayward)
EMERI11JMSEMBERS
Mrs. Howard Peckham 213 London Road, Hendersonsville, N.C. 28739
Mrs. Kirby Hall
1948 Hall,H. 1951 Haight 1951 Plumer 1951 Wethey 1956 Collins 1957 Alexander 1957 Keniston 1960 Innes 1962 Cameron
63 Centre St., Concord, NH 03301
YEAROF ELECTION TO MEMBERSHIP 1970 Huntington
1970 Oneal 1982 Rosenthal 1985 Newman 1986 McSparran 1986 Spink 1989 Jensen 1989 Tabbaa 1990 Gosling
3000 Glazier Way #320 (48105) 662-9917
2112 Vinewood Blvd. (48104) 1200 Earhart #428 (48105) 2037 Geddes Avenue (48104)
2100 Hill Street (48104) 804 Dewey (48104)
2222 Fuller Road (48105) 1 Harvard Place (48104) 931 Oakdale (48108)
501 Onondaga (48104) 1939Jackson Road (48103)
2105 Devonshire Road (48104) 2 Geddes Heights (48104)
1914 Scottwood (48104)
1510 Cambridge Street (48104) 668-6225
668-7871

      THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN TREASURERS'REPORT
October 18, I 991
The value of The Ladies' Library Association portfolio as of September 27, 199J was $109,804 and our Money Market Fund contained $38,056, giving us a total of $148,251.50. Our total assets as of December 31, 1990 were $133,842.13, and so we have a gain of $14,409.37 over the past nine months.
We contributed $2,000 to the Library Revolving Fund in September, although we had voted at the April meeting to make the contribution at that time. Your treasurers regret the delay which was caused by our decision to shift our checking account from the First of America Bank to a Merrill Lynch account. Although we believe this will streamline
our operations ultimately, the shift did cause the delay. Therefore, The Ladies' Library Association may wish to make a second gift to the Revolving Fund this Fall in addition to our gift for furnishings.
Jan Barney Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

    lLAIIUIILRIIAl'f AIIOCRAilON ioot Coimimui,, li•i,or& Ociob•ir 11, 199 R
The Ladies Library BookCommittee: Chair-- Prudence Rosenthal
Johnny Alexander Eleanor Collins CarolPlumer Pamela Tabbaa
The Ladies Library BookCommittee met on June 9,1991 without Johnny and Caroland selected 22 new books for the Ann Arbor Public Library. Some of them were selected by the library and some by us. but they were all purchased after our approval was given. We seem to be on the right track finally and the referenee Librarians understand what we want.
We gave the Library $2,000.00 in the spring for books. At present we have a balance of$ 3,~I. --
Respectfuly sub milted.
Prudence Rosenthal.Chair

   LAllUISll.lllAIT A!SOCIAT!OM !oot Co&eUi•• 1,,or&
o~,=~•raa.n,,1 BOOKPSURCHASEBDYTHELADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATIO--N
Summer l<J91 ~ Baetjer.Katherine&.JG.LinKs.CanelettoM.etropolitanMuseumofArt.
Abrams $60.
Christo. ChristoT: hePont-NeufW. rappedP. aris $85.
Courtney-Clark:eM. argaret. AfricanCanvas.Rizzoli.$60.
Distel.Anne. 1mpressionismT;heFirst Collectors1.874-1886 Abrams$75.
Dunford.Penny.ABiographicaDlictionarvofWomen~rtistsinEuropeand Americasince 1850. U.of Pennsylvania. $89.<}5
Eisler,Colin.lacopoBelliniA.brams $200.
FrankLtovd WrightDrawingsm:asterworkfsromtheFrankLloydWright
archives, Abrams $65.
Freeman.Judi. TheFauveLandscapeA.bbevillePress. $65.
c;erdts, William.ArtAcrossAmenca:TwoCemunesofregionalpainting. Abbeville,3 vols.$495.
Greenough,Sarah.PaulStrand:AnAmericaVnision.Aperture.$ 100. Hughes.Robert & Julie Silber. Amish:The Artof theOuilt.Callawa/yKnopf
$100.
Huse.Norbert & Wolfgang.The Art ofRenaissanceVenice:Architecture.
Sculpture and Painting, U.of ChicagoPress $S9.95
Kemp.Martin. The Scienceof Art:opticalthemesin westernart from Brunelleschito Seurat. Yale$60.

   I.
Lowery,Glenand TomLentz. Timur:PrinceJvVision(don't know pub. or$) Razina,Tatyana&others. FolkArtintheSovietUnion.Abrams.$49.50
RewaJd.John. Seurat--3rd edition-- Abrams $67.50 tctowe have the earlier 'edition?-- if so don't get this one/
RobertGoreRifkindCenterExpressionistStudies. Germanexpressionist prints and drawings:the RobertGoreRifkindCenter for German
ExpressionisSttudies.Y.1:Essays;v.2:Catalogueof the Collection.LosAngelos County/ Prestel S190.
Salgado.Sebastiao.An UncertainGraceA. penure. $60. Weinhardt. CarlJ. RobertIndiana. Abrams. $75.
Wil~ins.DavldG.& Bernard Schultz. Art Past & Art Present. Abrams. $49.95 1For branche~1
Woll'e.RichardJ.MarbJePdaper:It~Histoo'T,echnigue&s,PatternsU..of Pennsylvania l qqo. $95.

   President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
Chair, Book Representative,
Mrs, Walter Spink
Johnnie Alexander <Mrs.
Ar 1 i ngton
King George Blvd.(48104) Earhart #358 (48105) Glazier Way #320 (48105) Vinewood Blvd. (48104)
Joy Blouin
(Mrs. (Miss <Mrs. <Mrs. (Mrs. <Mrs. (Mrs. (Ms. <Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Eleanor Betty
Isabel Trudy Joan Peggy Frances
Col I ins
Gosling
Haight
Huntington
Innes Jensen
1200
3000
2112
2037 Geddes Ave, (48104) 2100 Hi 11 St. (48104)
804 Dewey (48104)
Jan Zibby Carol Prue Nesta Pamela Alice Gretchen
McSparran
Newman
Spink
Tabbaa
Wethey Whitman
1 Harvard
Pl . <48104) (48108)
Barney Oneal
931
Oakdale
Plumer Rosenthal
Jackson
Mrs. George Cameron Mrs. Kirby Ha11
Erner i tae
1200 Earhart
63 Centre St.,
Ann Arbor, MI NH 03301
48105
Mrs. Howard
1951
1951
1951 Wethey
1956
1957
1960
1970
1970
1982
CoI 1ins Alexander
Innes
LADIES'
Cammi ttee
Library
Peckham
Haight
Year of Election
to Membership
Plumer
1985 Newman 1986 McSparran 1986 Spink 1989 Jensen 1989 Tabbaa 1990 Gos 1ing 1991 Blouin 1991
Huntington
Onea1 Rosenthal
Whitman
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION,~
ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Membership
and Officers Officers
Council Members
788
1430
1991-1992
Advisory
John)
Francis) Eleanor) Betty) Cameron) David) Perry) Steven)
Frances) Haskel I) Robert) James) Amnon) Walter) Yasser) Harold) Nathan)
Mrs.
Haskell
Newman
663-5879 971-0239 663-6255 662-9917 663-4520 761-8331 662-3902 665-3825 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 662-1230 665-0941 665-1178 668-7871 668-6225 769-0485
501
1939
2105
2 Geddes Heights
1914 Scottwood (48104)
1510 Cambridge St. (48104) 1603 Fernda 1e Pl . <48104)
Onondaga
(48104)
Devonshire
(48103)
Rd. (48104)
Rd.
Rd. #443, Concord,
Mrs. Perry Mrs. Steven Mrs. Haskell
Innes Jensen
Newman & Oneal
Mrs. Robert
Mrs, Amnon Rosenthal
81 vd.
( 48104)
(48104)

   LADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIA TIONA, NN ARBOR,MICHIGAN Secretary's Report
April 23, 1992
The Ladies' Library Association held its spring meeting at the home of Joan Innes on April 23, 1992. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: Johnnie Alexander, Joy Blouin, Eleanor Collins, Betty Gosling, Isabel Haight, Trudy Huntington, Peggy Jensen, Frances McSparran, Jan Newman, Zibby Oneal, Prue Rosenthal, Nesta Spink, Pam Tabbaa, Alice Wethey, and Gretchen Whitman. After tea, Nesta Spink called the meeting to order by thanking Joan for her
hospitality and noting the loss since our last meeting of members Helen Hall and Roberta Keniston, both very dedicated to the Association for many years. Nesta also announced that she has some copies of the updated history of the Association to distribute to members who wish them. The library will keep the 150-200 copies it has on hand.
The Secretary's report was accepted as read. The Treasurers' report followed. Our total assets at the end of 1991 were $127,933.95. Zibby Oneal asked if it would be possible to convey funds to the library without having a vote of the membership for each disbursement. Joan Innes, seconded by Frances McSparran, moved that the Treasurers, at the request of the Chairman of the Book Committee, be authorized to deposit up to $2,000 into the library's revolving account two times per year. The motion was passed. Jan Newman collected the dues. The Treasurers' report was accepted after a motion by Joan Innes, seconded by Prue Rosenthal.
Jan Newman, Representative to the Library Advisory Committee, then read her report. She commented on how busy the library has become since its reopening. She also filled the group in on the Library Advisory Committee's investigation of the feasibility
1

   of making the library a district library independent of the school district. Due to a lack of interest by the school board, the issue is in abeyance for the time being, but may be taken up again. The report was accepted after a motion by Alice Wethey, seconded by Frances McSparran.
Prue Rosenthal presented the Book Committee report. She asked for the membership's reaction to a proposal to purchase a copy of Frederick Hartt and Gianluigi Colalucci's The Sistine Chapel for the library. The cost ($1,000) of the book raises security concerns and Prue suggested that we also consider buying a table on which to display the book where it can be monitored by the staff at the third floor circulation desk. After some discussion, Trudy Huntington, seconded by Joan Innes, moved that we purchase the book and a table, if it is needed. The motion passed. Prue will consult the
library staff and work with her committee on this project.
Prue then described the process by which her committee does its work. The group meets in early fall and late winter prior to the two meetings of the full membership. Jane Conway, of the library staff, provides them with reviews of books she feels are of interest to the public, and members of the committee also bring suggestions. Once a list of the committee's selections is assembled, Jane checks it against the library's current holdings and consults with Prue. Prue would like to be able to see circulation records for books in the collection in order to make new purchases in response to indications of use and interest. However, this is impossible with the library's current system. She also thinks it would be a good idea to have meetings in the library in order to be able to view videos and consult with staff. While most of the group wishes to continue meeting in members' homes, we will think about this suggestion and discuss it
at a future meeting. The Book Committee report was accepted.
The President announced that Trudy Huntington and Betty Gosling will continue as the Nominating Committee without a replacement for Helen Hall for the time being. The group proceeded
2

  to a discussion of the proposed changes in the bylaws which were introduced at the last meeting. Johnnie Alexander moved we accept the changes, Pam Tabbaa seconded, and the motion was passed.
Trudy Huntington, as Chairman of the Nominating Committee, announced that all current officers have agreed to serve for another year. Eleanor Collins moved we cast a unanimous ballot for the whole slate. Johnnie Alexander seconded and the motion was passed. Continuing as officers are: Nesta Spink, President; Joan Innes, Vice- President; Peggy Jensen, Secretary; Zibby Oneal and Jan Newman, Treasurers; and Prue Rosenthal, Book Committee Chairman. Alice Wethey will continue to serve as Historian for two years and Jan Newman will continue as Representative to the Library Advisory Committee.
We proceeded to new business. Prue Rosenthal suggested that we dedicate the library's copy of Betty Gosling's new book to the memory of Roberta Keniston, and the membership supported her proposal. Prue would also like suggestions from the membership of other books to dedicate to Roberta, and also to Helen Hall.
There are three vacancies in the membership and nominations were taken, to be voted upon at the fall meeting. Eight nominations were made by Frances McSparran, Prue Rosenthal, Betty Gosling, Trudy Huntington and Joan Innes. The Nominating Committee will need a biography of each nominee for the fall meeting.
It was determined that the fall meeting will be held on Friday, October 16, at 3:30 p.m., at the home of Betty Gosling, and the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
PeggyJensen, Secretary
3

  '--
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION
BOOKREPORT Thursday, April 23, 1992
TheLadiesLibrary BookCommittee.CarolPlumer.Pam~. EleanorCollins.Johnny Alexander and Nesta Spink,ex-officio.met in February 1992 at the Public Library in one of the new conference rooms on the third floor to select books for purchase. We selected 33 books for a total of$ l 641.90
The LLAalso purchased three videos on Picasso. There is an Picassoexhibition at the University of MichiganMuseum of Art that will be there for three years. and we thought this might create more interest in Picasso·swork.
The three we purchased. all of which I looked at are: The Mystery of Picasso
Picassoat Ninety
The Unity of Picasso-- Meyer Shapiro The total cost of the videos was $407.45
The balance in the LLAfund is $625.50
Onebookwe d1dNOTbuy is The Sistine Chapel by FrederickHartt and Gianluigi Colalucci.This book is in two volumes with over 600 color photographs and costs $1,000. One reviewer said:
"Thislavish tome records the results of a 13 year restoration project due for completion m 1993. Over 600 color photographs, taken from the restorers' scaffolds,offer nearly life-size close-ups of Michelangelo'swork. At S1.000,this publication may be beyond most library budgets, but the publisher considers it the perfect item for a library to receive as a gift from interested patrons. In fact. a few libraries, including the Chicago Public Library, have already been promised a donation, and at the recent American Library Associationconvention interest in this unique set ran high."
When we discussed purchasing this book we thought it would be a good idea to place the book m a safe place. This might mean buying a table for it so it could be kept by the librarians desk.
There is also a video put out by SONYof the restoration, and although that is not available yet. we wUJ watch for it, as it is supposed to be excellent.
If wehold the LLAmeetingsin thePubliclibrarywe canviewpartsof thevideosand have a chance to talk to the staff about the ongomgchanges taking place. I would like to propose that we make this change of venue.
Sincerely,
?M 1C~n"'"hw,\
'--
'-'
Prue Rosenthal
Chairman

   '--..-/
Shaver-Crandell Reynolds
Mains tone Woodford Woodford
Letts
Lambert Freeman Palavi Fabre Fane
Barron Arnold Kiefer Vogel Terenzio Scul 1y Keen
Laughton Shanes Fink
Middle Ages
Eightneenth
Seventeenth
Greece and Rome
Looking at Pictures Renaissance
Twentieth Century
Fauve Landscape
Picasso Cubism 1907-1917 Objects of Myth and Memory Degenerate Art
Art Atlas of Britain and Ireland Books of Anselm Kiefer (1969-1990) Africa Explores
Prints of Robert Motherwell Architecture: Natural and Manmade Jewish Ritual Art in the Victoria & Albert
Drawings of Daumier and Millet Turner's Human Landscape
American Art at the 19th Century Paris
Children at War, Children of Peace America and the Daguerreotype
Seurat Catalogue
Arts and Crafts Style
Prado
Circa 1492-Art in the Age of Exploration
Medicine: A Treasury of Art & Literature
Law: A Treasury of Art & Literature
China Trade
Beauty of Stained Glass
Sukhotha: Its History,
and Art
Mirror of Empire
James Abbott McNeil! Whistler Pastels
List Price
$ 12.95 12.95 12.95 11.95 12.95 12.95 12.95
65.00 250.00 60.00 75.00 50.00 95.00 70.00 85.00 40.00 59.95
55.00 75.00 60.00
50.00 65.00 75.00
50.00 95.00 59.95
75.00 75.00
89.50 40.00 45.00
65.00 65.00
Discount Price
$10.50
11.00 11.00
52.00 44.00 30.00
63.00
59.95 48.00 52.00
57.00 44.00
30.00 56.00 52.00
44.00 44.00 80.50
57.00 38.00
Capa
Madeleine- Pedrillat Anscombe Blanch Levenson
Crossman Reyntiens Gosling
Keyes
Picasso is 90 '-...,;Mystery of Picasso
The Unity of Picasso's Art
Culture,
VIDEOS
$337.50 40.00 29.95
LADIESLIBRARYPURCHASLEIST April1992
BOOKS
Century Century

   April 23, 1992
Ann Arbor Library Advisary Committee Report
Jan Barney Newman, Ladies' Library Representative
The beautiful new Ann Arbor Main Library is open and functioning to capacity. However, the department heads of the library report that the growth experienced since the opening of the New Main library and extention of service at the branches since they have changed to being open seven days a week, has had a profound affect on services and operations as well as a stressful one on the staff. The director therefore has recommended that aside from the new automation system implementation, 1992-93 should be a year of reflection and evaluation.
Last winter the School Board President, Duane Renken suggested that the School Board consider a study of the feasability of the Library's operating under its own governing authority, rather than under that of the Ann Arbor Public Schools. The Advisory Committee requested that it be allowed t9.conduct a thorough investigation of the impact of such a move. Since the subjec(ehange in designation from a public library to
a district library has come up in the past and has the support of some members of the Advisory Committee, it appointed a study committee and made a careful plan for the evaluation. However, the School Board at its last meeting did not support the study. We assume therefore a waning interest on the part of the School Board for establishing a District Library which would be autonomously governed.
This issue may come up again, however. Because the Library is fiscally sound and the school system is fiscally stressed and from the point of view of the Library sometimes encroaches on the Library's funds, the Advisory Committee may want to conduct its own study and make recommendations independent of those recommended by the Ann Arbor Board of Education.
A memorial fund in the name of Robert Keniston has been established at the Library. Its purpose is to provide grants for staff enrichment and development.

    THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Treasurers' Report
April 23, 1992
The portfolio of the Ladies' Library Association as of December 31, 1991, was valued at $110,709. Our CMA Money Fund contained $17,177. Adding the money in our cash account ($47.95), our total assets at the end of 1991were $127,933.95.
During the course of the year, we bought 200 shares of Florida Power and Light and
500 shares of Alliance Mutual Fund. We contributed $2,124.50 to the Library Revolving Fund in 1991, made a gift of $60 to the Friends of the Library, and made a gift of $20,000 to the new library.
Respectfully submitted,
Jan Barney Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

   Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report ------------------------------------------------
January 1, 1991 - December 31, 1991 ------------------------------------------------
STOCK:
COMPANY
CENTRAL S'WEST
AMOCO
IBM
MOBIL
MMM
FPL
MUTUAL FUNDS: ALLIANCE
MUTUAL
NOTES:
U.S. TREASURY NOTES
SHARES
100
200
100
200
200
200
500
40000
PRICE
54
49 1/8
89
67 7/8
95 1/4
37
9 2/3
104.312
DIVIDENDS
$292.00
440.00
484.00
625.00
624.00
120.00
279.46
3350.00
$6,214.46
SUBTOTAL
CASH ACCOUNT CMA MONEY FUND
VALUE
$5,400
9,825
8,900
13,575
19,050
7,400
4,835
41,724
110,709.00 47.95
17,177.00
$127,933.95
TOTAL ASSETS

     LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT PAGE TWO.
INCOME
DIVIDENDS
INTEREST - FOA BANK DIVIDENDS - CMA ACCT. DIVIDENDS - READY ASSETS STOCK DIVIDENDS - WCMA
MISC. INCOME
TOTAL INCOME:
ACCOUNTFEE - BROKERAGEFEE MISC. FEES
GIFTS TO LIBRARY
REVOLVING FUND CHECKTO FRANCES-
$6,214.46
19.86
4.84 971.96
1,244.00
20.00
$8,475.12
50.00 65.00 9.35
2,124.50
EXPENSES
CMA ACCT.
McSPARREN 8.50
CHECK FEES
GIFT TO NEW LIBRARY
FOR SHELVING
GIFT TO FRIENDS OF
LIBRARY
TOTAL EXPENSES:
.45 20,000.00
60.00
$22,317.80

       LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT PAGE THREE.
AT DEC.,1990
LESS:
MERRILL LYNCH R/A TRUST
PURCHASE - FPL STOCK
PURCHASE - ALLIANCE MUTUAL
GAIN ON VALUE OF STOCK
VALUE@ DEC., 1991
AT DEC., 1990
ADD:
MERRILL LYNCH R/A TRUST
MERRILL LYNCH R/A CASH
ADD: INCOME
LESS: EXPENSES
LESS: STOCK PURCHASES
CASH
CMA MONEYFUND
CASH@ DEC.,1991
39,266.64
2,790.21 $42,804.13
8,475.12 (22,317.80) (11,736.50)
$17,224.95
$ 47.95 17,177.00
$17,224.95
EQUITIES ACCOUNT $130,304.64
(39,266.64)
5,000.00
6,736.50 $102,774.50
7,934.50 $110,709.00
CASH ACCOUNT $747.28

   IADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIA TIONA, NN ARBOR,MICHIGAN SECRETARYR'SEPORT
October 16, 1992
The Ladies' Library Association held its fall meeting at the home of Betty Gosling on October 16, 1993. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: Joan Innes, Peggy Jensen, Jan Newman, Zibby Oneal, Prue Rosenthal, Nesta Spink, Pam Tabbaa, and Alice Wethey. Nesta Spink called the meeting to order by thanking Betty for her hospitality and noting the loss since our last meeting of Johnnie Alexander, who had been a member of our group for thirty- five years. Nesta also announced that Carol Plumer has decided to become an emerita member, and Peggy Jensen read a note from Carol to this effect.
The Secretary's report from the spring meeting was accepted as read. Peggy Jensen also announced that copies of the revised by- laws will be distributed at the next meeting.
The Treasurers' report followed. As of September 25, 1992, our assets were $130,947.41. Gifts to the Library Revolving Fund in the amount of $1,000 each were made in May and August, 1992. The May gift covered the $1,000 cost of Hartt and Colalucci's The Sistine Chapel. There was a brief discussion of how well our investments have done over time. The report was accepted after a motion by Joan Innes, seconded by Prue Rosenthal.
Prue Rosenthal gave the Book Committee report. She asked the membership for suggestions for a book to buy for the library in memory of Johnnie Alexander. Those who have suggestions should get them to Prue. The library would like to have a locked case to display the Sistine Chapel book in a secure manner. The cost of such a case is estimated to be around $1,000. Everyone agreed that we
1

  should do some further investigation before making the commitment to donate such a large sum for this purpose. Prue will continue to look into the matter, and in the meantime suggest to library staff that they use a case which they already have. It was felt that the book should go onto display as soon as possible since there is currently a lot of interest in the cleaning of the paintings.
Betty Gosling was asked to fill Carol Plumer's place on the Book Committee and she agreed to do so. The committee's report was accepted after a motion by Pam Tabbaa, seconded by Peggy Jensen.
Jan Newman, as representative to the Library Advisory Committee, reported on some of the activities which are taking place at the library. She passed out outlines of ballot proposals A and C, both of which would be harmful to the library. She also announced that the automated catalog would be coming up at the beginning of
1993, and that the library would no longer be handing out tax forms. There was also some discussion about the exhibits and special events which the library sponsors.
Nesta Spink announced that the officers had agreed that we would vote to fill only three out of our five vacancies at this meeting. Nominations to fill the two remaining vacancies should be brought to the spring meeting. Those chosen to be invited to join the Association were Julie Casa, Sarah Innes, and Bib O'Neill.
The Nominating Committee will assemble a slate of officers to be voted upon at the spring meeting.
It was determined that the next meeting will take place on Friday, April 23, 1993, at 3:30, at the home of Gretchen Whitman. The meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
Peggy Jensen (Secretary) 2

   Ladies' library Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Amendment to Secretary's Report for meeting held on October 16, 1992
Due to a scheduling conflict, it was decided that the Spring 1993
meeting would be held at the home of Joy Blouin, rather than that of Gretchen Whitman.

     TO:
All Staff
Library Advisory Committee
FROM: Ramon R. Hernandez~ DATE: October 16, 1992
Ballot The following is
Proposals a listing
A & C
of the key
November ballot:
features
f Proposals
A & C
that will appear on the
(1) Began as House it would be a constitutional
Proposal
Joint
A (HJR H) Resolution H (HJR
H). If approved
assessed)
(4) township,
property would pay more.
Affects all property tax millages inc uding city,
ISD. county, and community colle~e a well as library district.
districts (e.g ..
(including
Ann Arbor)
public library) and stable, whose
that are residences±only
I
occasionally
could be assessments.
turn over, negatively
and thus only occasionally
impac~ed,
d
ed
of inflation. sale, new
whichever
assessment
is less. until kicks in. Similar and school district
districts
#3.
projected Therefore. be cut districts
in
(5)
limitations
SEV
(6)
Because of the homestead only provi5i
ns, school
eavily residential
Proposal C (CUt & Cap)
( l) Be~an as the governor's ..cut & cap" p
oposal. If
MEMORANDUM
chang~.
(2) Limits SEV increase
and industry) to the lesser of 57. or CPI until he property 1s sold.
(3) The sale price would create a new ass sed valuation.
This is similar to the California situation. w~~re two properties worth the same will pay lower taxes until sold. and a sold (newly
on homestead prope
ty (not business
and school
(5) No new revenues to these units of gov rnments to offset
the loss of funds.
reassess because of infrequent rai
approved it would be a constitutional chan~e.
(2) Limits increase in SEV of all propert to 37. or the rate
propert
to #2
(4) The State of Hichigan is to make-up r~venues school and school district operated public /libraries lose
However. there is no plan to do this ot;.t;er than revenues
(3) for schools
opera 5-yea~
is sold. Upon
#3 in Proposal A. ed public
libraries
$Chool operating tax exemption to property
157. in 1994; 207. in 199S; 257. in 1996; and 307. in 1997.
(city, etc.>.
(only) taxes, there would be
a
phase-in plan for ownFrs: 107. in 1993:
by the state, it is argued
back
which some that other the necessary
critics cl~im
are not ~ould
there. need to
school
to provided
mandated by
Except for the exemption on propertx taxes,
this constitutional (#2 above) applies to all
charlge.
propertY. tax milla~es
state
serv~ces
funds to r~imburse
[

        -2-
(6) School {& library) property tax revenu reimbursement by the st3te is frozen at its 199 increase in the levy by a school district is in
s subject to rate. Any
li~ible for {of an
will go into opoisal with the
be a
(5) Because this is a constitutional amen ment any future change to the what is approved by the voters wold also have to
reimbursement. authorized
. (3) constitutional
1.3
Those
Those
For AAPL the rate is 1.2992 mil mill).
effect.
mo5t votes
will Thus,
.
that would combine
(1) (2)
items that are items that are
"unique"
"similar",
in
both
the p would
the le~islature,
district capital
and revenue collected from
a local
operated part of
a imp~ovements
Currently, neither or, as millage,
document.
public identified
capital
or another form.
Yes. The at Michi2an State
Property 1'ax Ballot for v1ewinK in the
Institute
University
Proposals".
Reference Dep~rtment.
nd Social Analysis
copy is
Research of Two available
- .... ,....,... ""C'
be in effect
it is change
new
being considered.
appears constitutional
ea
bill
improvements
would
be
school
State
local
a
property
locally,
millage.
are separately
tax
Is There a Definitive
I
I
Study of A & C vailab.le?
libraries
as being
the part of a
~istricts unding
improvements,
1£Both A&CPass
possible
Who will decide what is "unique"
a
that there
(4)
State officials will decide is no~ known. It i~ likely to end up in the courts.
be approved by the governor.
(1} Schools
voters, and not changed
byte
t mosiy
to
legislature
the status by the
and
quo. State of
through School
(2) A Michigan - is
proposal - rather than
schools It
funded
If Both Fail and libraries are
returned
How is AAPL Affected
By every feature identified in A &c 11sted 1n this
still
capital
by
for Public Policy has published "An
Au!;ust 1992.
featur and
s of both.
f-s1milar" and how
by A & C,
endment.
roved

  LADIES LIBRARY .ASSOCIATION
BOOK REPORT Priday, October 16, 1992
Attached are lists of books chosen at two meetings of the Ladies Library BookCommitteeonJuly31st andOctober13th.
We spent close to $3,000. m this last six monthes, as we had $960. in the account U!_:of la~tspring and "''C have spent the $f()oot.hat the library ,vas given in July. Apparently tt is not possible to know exactly how much a boot will be discounted from the list price unt.il it actually arrives m the library.
The stand we ordered for the Sistine Chapel by Frederick Hartt and Gianluig1Colaluccis too small. At this time we need to decide whether we should spend close to $1,000. on a stand that would be of sufficient size to hold the book correctly, or ask the library to do that. Now the book is kept in the back and there is a sign on the desk with information about the book and invitrng them to ask for it. Some people have. but the librarians perception is that it would be used much more often if it was visible. My own belief is that the library would not buy the stand if it were left to them. Since we have the money, I would like to recommend we buy the stand so
the book can be more accessible to library patrons.
n He\l.l'-
H4ll
After consultationwith EleanorCollinswe choseto dedicaterPrawings from the Fogg Museume.dited by Paul Sachs and Agnes Mongan. They were purcha5ed from a frien,j of Eleanors for $100.
we l1ave purchased Betty Goslingsbook Sukhothai-- It's History, Culture. and Art. in memory of Roberta Kenniston.
Al this time we need to chose a book in memory of Johnny Alexander.
CarolPlumer asked to relieved from her responsibilities as a member of the BookCommittee.
SincereJy,
Prudence Rosenthal. Chairman,BookCommittee

    Author
0lmert
Griswold
Camusso Wilhide McCarthy
Edmonds
Finch
Ketchum Sims
Noon Murat Forrer Beck Boggs Lloyd
Hadiamach
Newman Bailey
Botero
Leibovitz
Li gh tt(own Villegas
Kennedy Eitner
Title
Smithsonian Book of Books Golden Age of American
Gardens
Ceramics of the World
William Morris:Decor & Design Women's Culture: American
Price
45.00 75.00
95.00 45.00 35.00
40.00
95.00 50.00
65.00
75.00
65.00
85.00 125.00
65.00
95.00 75.00 60.00
89.50 35.00 75.00
69.95
60.00 95.00 45.00
27.50
88.50
LADIESLIBRARYPURCHASLEIST August 1992
Philanthropy
Samplers
American
Nineteenth-Century
Watercolors
American Stoneware
Stuart Davis: American Pa il'lter
American Paintings in the Detroit Institute of Arts Matisse: Drawings and Sculpture
Richard Parkes Bonington
and Art
& Samplermakers:
An
Schoolgirl
Art
Splendor
Hokusai:
Jacopo
Picasso
Queen's
Collectors
Centuries
British
Arnold
Loves of the Gods: Mythological Painting from Watteau to David
Fernando Botero: Paintings
and Drawings
of France Prints and
Drawings
della Quercia & Things Pictures:
Royal the
Through
Glass, 1800-1914 Newman's Americans
Photographs
Piero Della
Artefactos:
from the Andes to the Amazon Planning the City Upon a Hill Gericault: His Life and Work
1970-1990
Francesca
Cokmbian
Crafts

   Author
Boorsch
Couldrey Penney
Turle
Baldini Fletcher Boggs
Eisler We1tzenhoffer Elderf1eld Neustadt
·Sylvester
Merrill Morris
Levin
Homer O'Keeffe
Title
Andrea Mantegna
Art of Islamic Spain
Art of Louis C. Tiffany
Art of the American Indian Frontier
Art of the Conservator
Art of the
Brancacci
Crosscurrents
Degas Pastels
Durer's Animals
The Havenmeyers
Henri Matisse
Lamps of Louis
Magritte: Silence of the World
Price
.Qi
LADIES LIBRARYPURCHASELIST October 1992
Maasai
Chapel
Masterworks of Pot of Paint:
65.00 75.00
60.00
39.95 50.00
125.00 60.00 75.00 90.00
75.00 195.00
75.00
39.95
35.00
50.00
95.00
40.00
Trial
Stained
Theme:
"Whistler
v.
Rushkin" Glass
& Decorative Improvisation Eakins: His
Thomas
Two Lives: A Conversation Paintings and Photographs
of Modernism
Tiffany
Louis C. Tiffany
Aesthetics
on
& Art in
Life

    THELADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
Treasurers• Report
October 16, 1992
The portfolio of the Ladies• Library Association was valued
at $114,899 as of September 25, 1992. Our CMAMoney Fund contained $15,674. Adding the accrued interest of $373 in our account, our total assets as of September 25 were $130,947.41.
We made a gift of $1,000 to the Library Revolving Fund on May26, 1992 and another gift in the Same amount on August 14,· 1992.
Jan Newman
6~~-
Zibby Oneal
Treasurers

   LADIES'LIBRARYASSOCIATIONA,NNARBOR,MICHIGAN SECRETARYR'SEPORT
APRIL23, 1993
The Ladies' Library Association held its spring meeting at the home of Joy Blouin on April 23, 1993. Those present, in addition to the hostess, were: Julie Casa, Betty Gosling, Trudy Huntington, Joan Innes, Peggy Jensen, Frances McSparran, Jan Newman, Nesta Spink, Pam Tabbaa, and Alice Wethey. Nesta Spink called the meeting to order by thanking Joy for her hospitality and welcoming new member Julie Casa and noting that our two additional new members, Sarah Innes and Bib O'Neill, were unable to attend the meeting.
The Secretary's report was read and approved after a motion by Pam Tabbaa, seconded by Frances McSparran. Jan Newman then read the Treasurer's report. At the end of 1992, our total assets were $126,439. The Treasurer's report was approved after a motion by Joan Innes, seconded by Pam Tabbaa. Betty Gosling collected the annual dues.
Jan Newman, Representative to the Library Advisory Committee, then gave her report. The library is concerned about how it will fare financially if the property tax reduction proposal coming up on June 2 is approved. Library supporters are encouraged to vote against it. There is ongoing discussion of the possibility that the library will pull away from the school system, but nothing will happen immediately. Several members suggested ways in which the library could publicize its position, such as in the Ann Arbor Observer or the "Viewpoint" section of the Ann Arbor News.
In Prue Rosenthal's absence, the Book Committee report was presented by Pam Tabbaa. She suggested that we consider purchasing children's art books for the library, noting that there are many desirable ones available. Joan Innes, seconded by Betty Gosling, moved that we accept Pam's suggestion, and the motion was
1

  passed. Pam also announced that the BookCommittee has agreed to the library's request that we buy Mayers International Art Auction Records. We have not yet made a commitment to purchase it annually, in the expectation that the library will monitor its use and report back to us on the advisability of subscribing to it indefinitely. The lighting in the exhibition area on the third floor of the library needs to be improved. It was generally agreed that the Association should not make a contribution toward such an improvement, but Jan Newman, as Llbrary Advisory Committee representative, will bring the problem up with the library administration.
We resumed our discussion about a secure way to display the Sistine Chapel book which we purchased for the library. It was eventually decided that the book should be placed on a bookstand which would sit on a table. The bookstand would have a hinged plexiglass cover which could be removed by patrons in order to turn the pages. The intent is to insure that the book is handled well without having to keep it locked up. Pam or Prue will take our recommendation to Jane Conway at the library.
We discussed four titles as possible purchases for a memorial
to Johnnie Alexander. It was decided that we would buy two out of the four immediately, and possibly consider the others later. The titles chosen were: Alexander's Medieval Illuminators and Their Methods of Work and Horste's Cloister Design and Monastic Reform in Toulouse.
Nesta Spink suggested that members examine the library's collection in their particular areas of expertise and give suggestions to Prue. We need to find out more from Jane Conway about the interests and needs of the readers the library serves so that we have a better idea about what to select. We also need to ask Jane about replacing mutilated books. A question came up about the procedure for purchasing remaindered books for the library from Afterwords. Again, it was agreed that Jane would have to be consulted about the necessary logistics. Pam then showed the group some of our recent
2

  purchases for the library. The Book Committee report was approved after a motion by Betty Gosling, seconded by Frances McSparran.
Trudy Huntington, as Chair of the Nominating Committee, presented a slate of new officers. They are President: Joan Innes; Vice-President: Pam Tabbaa, Secretary: Gretchen Whitman; Treasurers: Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal; and Book Committee Chair: Prue Rosenthal. A unanimous ballot was cast for the whole slate after a motion by Frances McSparran, seconded by Julie Casa. Nominations were then made to fill two membership vacancies, to be voted on at the fall meeting. Five candidates were nominated by Peggy Jensen, Betty Gosling, Jan Newman, Nesta Spink, and Joan Innes. Those making the nominations should get biographical information to Betty Gosling before the fall meeting.
Peggy Jensen announced that she would send updated membership lists to all members through the mail soon. The new version of the bylaws will be distributed at the next meeting, which will be held at the home of Frances McSparran on October 22, 1993, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted,
PeggyJensen, Secretary
3

   The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan
Treasurers' Report April 23, 1993
The Portfolio of the Ladies' Library Association as of December 31, 1992was valued at $109,727, representing a slight drop from the year before and due, primarily, to the troubles at IBM. Our CMA Money Fund contained $16,686, bringing our total assets at the end of 1992 to $126,439.
In August we made a gift of $1,000 to the Library Revolving Fund, and this was our only contribution to the Revolving Fund in 1992.
........
• .:.. • .1 .
.. ·:'!'
Respectfully submitted, -
~
0~
Jan Barney Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers
~
•-A.~ Q_ ~ ...

    The Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor, Michigan Attention: Peggy Jensen, Secretary
Addendum to Treasurers' Report
April 26, 1993
In our report of 23 April we omited mention of the $1000 donation made to the Library Revolving Fund in May 1992. The donation is cited under expenditures in the finanacial statement that accompanied our report.

        Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers'
------------------------------------------------
January 1, 1992 - December 31, 1992 ------------------------------------------------
Report
STOCK:
Company Shares CENTRAL 200
S'WEST
AMOCO 200 IBM 100 MOBIL 200 MMM 200 FPL 200
BPPAN 100
MUTUALFUNDS:
Alliance 500
NOTES:
U. S. Treas. 40000 Notes
SUBTOTALS
Price 29.125
49.75 50.375 63.125
100.625 36.25 45.75
8.68
100.50
Dividends $308.00
440.00 484.00 640.00 640.00
486.00 184.83
351. 35
3350.00
$6,884.18
7.44 556.00
$7,447.62
Value $5,825
9,750
5,037 12,625 20,125
7,250
Cash In Money Market Fund CMA Money Fund
TOTALS
TOTAL ASSETS . .............................
$109,727
26 16,686
$126,439 $126,439
4,575 $65,187
4,340
40,200

      'C
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT PAGE TWO.
INCOME
DIVIDENDS DIVIDEND-CMA
STOCK DIVIDENDS-WCMA BOND INTEREST FROM
U.S. TREAS. NOTES
TOTAL INCOME
ACCOUNT FEE-WCMA FOREIGN TAX ON
DIVIDENDS BUSINESS CHECK
SERVICE CHARGES
CHECKS:
NESTA SPINK
PURCHASEOF STOCK:
BRIT PETE PLC ADR NEW
GIFT TO LIBRARY REVOLVING FUND
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
TOTAL EXPENSES
LESS: STOCK PURCHASE
TOTAL GENERAL EXPENSES
$3,534.18 7.44
556.00 3,350.00
$7,447.62
EXPENSES --------
$
80.00 27.73
.60
17.16
5,834.85
1,000.00
1,000.00
$7,960.34 (5,834.85)
$2,125.49

       LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - TREASURERS' REPORT PAGE THREE.
AT DEC.I
1991
EQUITIES ACCOUNT $110,709.00
{16,712.23)
5,834.85 $99,831.62
9,895.38
$109,727.00
$ 47.95 17,177.00
$ 17,224.95
7,447.62
{2,125.49)
{5,834.85)
$ 16,712.23
$ 26.23 16,686.00
$16,712.23
LESS:
MERRILL LYNCH R/A TRUST
PURCHASE- BPPAN STOCK
GAIN ON VALUE OF STOCK
VALUE @ DEC. I
1992
CASH ACCOUNT
AT DEC., 1992 CASH
CMA MONEY
FUND
ADD: LESS: LESS:
INCOME
CASH
CMA MONEYFUND
CASH AT DEC., 1992
GENERAL EXPENSES STOCK PURCHASES

    -...-
LADIESLIBRARYASSOCIATION BOOKREPORT
Friday,April23. 1993
Attached are the list of books chosen at the last meeting of the LLAbook Committee-- There are five items that need to be discussed:
1- Since there are an increasing number of good childrens art history books available, should we considerinvestingin somefor the childrenslibrary?Thereis a newchildrenslibrarian.who
started on April 12th. If we think it is a good idea in principle. Jane Conway wiJl consult with her and recommend a list to us.
2- With the approval of the LLA, the book committee has decided it would be a good idea to by Mayers International Art Auction Records. The discounted cost will be S179.00 a year for the
Library. People often ask for it.
3- There are two exhibition walls on the third floor, and one of them has no track lighting. Jane Conwaytells me that artists do not like their works to be hung there-- Werecommend that
the library put in track lights, however, Jane doesn't think they will pay the whole cost. Would we like to share the cost with the library???
4- Jane is investigating other ways to get the case built for the Michelangelobook. 5- The third page of the book list has four book choices to give in memory of Johnny
Alexander. Please choose which one (or ones) you think would be most appropriate.
Jane Conwayhas asked Nesta to recommend some additional books on Whistler for the library.
We do not have a very good selection.
Although it is still not possible to get a printout of all the books on art history in the library we can get printouts of particular artists, authors, or periods if we want to. Apparently the printout would be many feet high!!
The books we chose for this period cost $1024.00. excluding the ones we will choose for Johnny. The Library will get a discount of between 10%and 40%, so the total cost will come down.
Finally, I would like to invite Jane to come to the fall meeting of the Ladies Library. She has many good ideas that we should all hear about.
'-'

    Author
Bayer Woodbridge
LADIESL'IBRARYPURCHASELIST April 1993
Title
Art Deco Architecture
Bernard Maybeck: Visionary Architect
Royal City of Susa: Ancient Near Eastern Treasures in the Louvre
Great Utopia: The Russian and Sbviet Avant-Garde
Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History
List Price 49.50
55.00
60.00
85.00
50.00
85.00
40.00 40.00 75.00
Fong
Ellis
Brettell
Kertess Steinberg
Mann
Llnd
Beyond Representation: Painting and Calligraphy
Chinese
Rockwood Pottery: The Glorious Gamble
Impressionist and the City Claude Monet: Life and Work

Brice Marden: Paintings and Drawings 95.00
Discovery of America
Imperial Splendor: Palaces and
Monasteries of Old Russia Convivencia: Jews, Muslims, and
Christians in Medieval Spain
Wright Style: Recreating the Spirit of Frank Lloyd Wright
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00

   O'Brien
Great Irish Ilouses and Castles Splendid Legacy: The Havemeyer
Collection
Albrecht Durer: Master Printmaker
TOTAL 1024.00
GS.00
65.00
59.50

     Author Hendrlx Alexander
Horste
Mayr-Harting
Title
Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta
Medieval Illuminators and Their Methods of Work
Cloister Design and Monastic Reform in Toulouse
Ottonian Book Illuminations: Art Historical Study, Volumes 1 and 2
List Price
125.00
I
50.00
155.00
170.Q0
TOTAL 500.00

   Sarah
approved Frances
minutes
to do. Joan fulfilling Whitman.
the position. Zibby
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT
The Ladies' Library
at the home present, in Julie Casa, Huntington, Newman, Zibby
APRIL 22, 1994
Association held McSparran on October the hostess, were:
Betty Gosling,
its fall meeting
22, 1994. Those Joy Blouin,
Trudy
Innes, Jan
and
order by thanking
Gretchen
Innes to the The secretary's
report was read by Peggy Jensen and
after a McSparran. by sent
motion
by Jan Newman, Spink suggested
Plummer, which out that the
which was seconded by that a copy of the
Peggy
Joy place Joy's
the The
of
members voted to approve
of Frances addition
Eleanor Peggy
Jensen, Oneal, Nesta
Joan Innes, Spink, Pam
Sarah Tabbaa,
Alice Wethey, meeting to
and welcoming
to
Innes duties
Nesta
Carol pointed
Jensen Blouin was
of Gretchen placement in
to Collins,
Whitman. Joan Innes
called hospitality
the
Frances meeting.
for her
Oneal presented the treasures's
report. As of Ladies Library
The association's
secretary, in
September
Association
CMAMoney fund contained $22,223.00, bringing the total assets as of September 24, 1993, to $138,449.00. The association made a gift of $1,285.00 to the Library
24, 1993, the portfolio
was valued at $116,226.00.
of The
agreed

   Revolvina Fund on June 24. 1993. The approved followina a motion bv Julie Pam Tabbaa.
treasurer's report was Casa and seconded bv
book committee's
In report
Prue Rosenthal's was presented
absence, Pam Tabbaa.
the
the association. Zibbv
offered
in response
that to
in recent specific members
from funds
aareed
reasonable. but to the
have been prePared spending that the library's
transferred
bv the book $1000.00 or association
vears budaets
to house issues
A committee
issues of
the volumes. with the library.
and space these
association libraries. appropriate the library.
Next, purchase
association
currently Nesta for the
purchases books Spink suggested that book committee to
for the
it would be
discussion followed.
appropriate raised
to if the
the book
of
Pam Tabbaa children's consider
presented books.
purchasing,
recommendations Pam recommended
in addition
by
Julv and drafted
that the of books
committee had met in
totalinq $764.90 to be
was distributed to the
askina for a clarification of how much monev the committee
should receive and how the monev
should be transferred
considered for
members. Prue's report
committee. higher twice should remain
The
yearly was
that
sensitive
user demand for the material
Pam Tabbaa agreed to
concerning issues
The question was
explore
Pam reported
a list
purchase.
The list concluded bv
explore
the issue with
for the that the
to children's
branch

  art history indicated children's
books, that the
collection selected
children's book
about artists.
Pam to the
did not have purchase.
to purchase
a
list of The
titles authorized
to be considered for
for
to Pam report.
meeting library
a
the book the books recommended
committee by the
committee, and recommended by informative
the include
selection
The president
of children's thanked
books Pam for
purchasing that such
as an
Tabbaa.
A brief
concluded be delayed concerning and their
should
library's Next,
articles inconsistency
in time to predict
copies of the revised Peggy discussed an
The president
asked Jan Newman to comment on the
library's
the funding
it was very difficult
of
the
version concerning the
library of
was in art history
favor of
books, but
discussion
with the recommendation
intended use.
videos purchases
until the association
reaction to base for
at future position.
Peggy Jensen of association
which she corrected in the
in the previous
but was
procedure for
Previously,
the book
stated that the position
version,
the committee
articles as
while the bylaws by the president.
designating
book defined
committee.
the chair of
concerning
has more research the relationship between the quality of
the state's proposed public education.
reorganization
Jan commented that
this point
distributed and bylaws. had noticed
present
a chair of the
of association
an elected officer,
was appointed
adding
videos

   The revised position is articles of her thorough
The members,
that the approved the revised
bylaws have been corrected to state
elected. The members association and bylaws,
and thanked applause.
Peggy for
work with a meeting continued
round of with the
election of two new Simsar.
Grace Beardsley
It was determined that the spring meeting
and Alice
will be held on Friday, April 22, 1994, at 3:30 p.m. at the home of Julie
Casa and the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted, Joy Blouin, Secretary

  '-.,/
President Vice-President Secretary Treasurers Representative,
Council
Grace Beardsley Joy Blouin
Library
Advisory
Joan Innes
Pam Tabbaa
Joy Blouin
Jan Newman & Zibby Oneal
Jan Newman
Members
609 Oswego 48104
Julie
Eleanor
Betty
Isabel
Trudy Huntington Joan Innes
Sarah Innes
Peggy Jensen Frances Mcsparren
Francis) Frank)
Casa Collins
#358 48105
Way #320 48105
Gosling Haight
Blvd.
48104
Jan Barney
Zibby Oneal
Bib O'Neill
Prue Rosenthal Alice simsar
Nesta Spink
Pam Tabbaa
Alice Wethey Gretchen Whitman
(Ms. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Frances) Haskell) Robert) James) Amnon)
Walter) Yasser) Harold) Nathan)
Mrs. George
Mrs. Kirby
Mrs. Howard
Mrs. James Plumer
1951 Haight 1951 Wethey
Arbor,
1956
1960
1970
1970
1982
1985
1986
1986
Collins Innes Huntington Oneal Rosenthal Newman McSparran Spink
1989 Tabbaa 1990 Gosling 1991 Blouin 1991 Whitman 1992 Casa 1992 Innes 1992 O'Neill 1993 Beardsely 1993 Simsar
Ladies'
Library Association, Ann Arbor,
Michigan
Newman
Cameron Hall
Peckham
(address unknown)
1939 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Year of Election to Membership
1989 Jensen
(Joan)
Membership
and Officers Officers
1994-1995
(Mrs.
(Mrs.
(Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Betty) (Mrs. Cameron) (Mrs. David) (Mrs. Perry) (Ms. Sarah) (Mrs. Steven)
Dr. 48105 48104
803 Greenhills
1410 Hill St.
1200 Earhard
3000 Glazier
2112 Vinewood
519 Onondaga 48104
2100 Hill St. 48104
717 N. fifth Ave. 48104 1422 Morton Ave. 48104 1 Harvard Pl. 48104
931 Oakdale 48108
501 Onondaga 48104
1025 Baldwin Ave. 48104 2105 Devonshire Rd. 48104 1103 Baldwin, 48104
662-4667 994-7923 761-5879 663-6255 662-9917 663-4520 761-8331 662-3902 668-6377 665-3825 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 668-8548 665-0941
769-4479
665-1178
668-7871 668-6225 769-0485
48105
2 Geddes Heights
1914 Scottwood Ave. 48104
1510 Cambrdige 1603 Ferndale
Emeritae
Rd. Pl.
48104 48104
1200 Earhart Rd., #443, 63 Centre st., Concord,
Ann
NH 03301
MI
48104
(Sarah)

   President Vice-President Secretary Treasurers Representative,
Council
Grace Beardsley
Joy Blouin
Joan Innes
Pam Tabbaa
Joy Blouin
Jan Newman & Zibby Oneal
Jan Newman
Members
609 Oswego 48104
803 Greenhills
1410 Hill St.
1200 Earhard
3000 Glazier
2112 Vinewood Blvd.
519 Onondaga 48104
2100 Hill St. 48104
717 N. fifth Ave. 48104 1422 Morton Ave. 48104 1 Harvard Pl. 48104
931 Oakdale 48108
501 Onondaga 48104
1025 Baldwin Ave. 48104 2105 Devonshire Rd. 48104 1103 Baldwin, 48104
662-4667
994-7923
761-5879 663-6255 662-9917 663-4520 761-8331 662-3902 668-6377 665-3825 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 668-8548 665-0941 769-4479 665-1178 668-7871 668-6225 769-0485
48105
Julie
Eleanor
Betty
Isabel
Trudy Huntington Joan Innes
Sarah Innes
Peggy Jensen Frances Mcsparren
Dr. 48105 48104
Casa Collins
#358 48105
Way #320 48105
Gosling Haight
48104
Jan Barney
Zibby Oneal
Bib O'Neill
Prue Rosenthal Alice Simsar
Nesta Spink
Pam Tabbaa
Alice Wethey Gretchen Whitman
Mrs. George Cameron Mrs. Kirby Hall
Mrs. Howard Peckham Mrs. James Plumer
1951 Haight 1951 Wethey 1956 Collins 1960 Innes
1970 Huntington 1970 Oneal 1982 Rosenthal
1985 Newman
1986 McSparran
1986 Spink
Ladies'
Library Association, Ann Arbor,
Michigan
Newman
Membership
Library Advisory
(Mrs. Francis) (Mrs. Frank) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Betty) (Mrs. Cameron) (Mrs. David) (Mrs. Perry) (Ms. Sarah) (Mrs. Steven) (Ms. Frances) (Mrs. Haskell) (Mrs. Robert) (Mrs. James) (Mrs. Amnon)
(Joan)
1989 Jensen 1989 Tabbaa 1990 Gosling 1991 Blouin 1991 Whitman 1992 Casa 1992 Innes 1992 O'Neill 1993 Beardsely 1993 Simsar
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Walter) 2 Geddes Heights 48104 Yasser) 1914 Scottwood Ave. 48104
and Officers Officers
1994-1995
Harold) 1510 Cambrdige Nathan) 1603 Ferndale
Emeritae
1200 Earhart Rd., #443,
63 Centre St., Concord, NH 03301
(address unknown)
1939 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Year of Election to Membership
Rd. 48104 Pl. 48104
Ann Arbor,
MI
(Sarah)

    THE LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Treasurers' Report
October 22, 1993
As of September 24, 1993, the portfolio of The Ladies Library Association was valued at $116,226. Our CMA Money fund contained $22,223, bringing our total assets as of September 24 to $138,449.
We made a gift of $1,285 to the Library Revolving Fund on June 24, 1993.
Jan ewman an Zibby Oneal Treasurers

  Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor April 23, 1992 343 South Fifth Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Articles of Association
1. Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor is
this Association's
2. This build the collection
name.
Association's sole purpose shall be to of books and other media on the visual
arts for the Ann Arbor Public Library.
3. This organization is formed exclusively for this charitable and educational purpose. The Association's dues and ~arnings shall not inure to the benefit of any member, officer, or private person. The dues and net
earnings shall be used solely to make purchases for the Ann
Arbor Public Library and to pay administrative incurred in the furtherance of the Association's purpose. Thus, this Association is limited to
expenses
tax exempt
4. This Association shall not carry on propaganda or otherwise attempt to influence legislation. The Association also shall not in any way participate in any political campaign on behalf of any candidate for public office.
for education,
meaning of Section 50l(c}(3} of the Internal Revenue Code.
charitable and literary purposes
1
spending money within the

  5. The Association's mailing address shall be: Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 South Fifth Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
6. The Association's consist of the Association's
delineated in the Association's
Executive Committee shall elected officers. As further
7. If the Association ever decides to dissolve,
after paying or providing for the payment of all its
liabilities, the Association must distribute all its assets
to the Ann Arbor Public Library. If the Association cannot make such a distribution, it must distribute the money to one or more organizations which qualify as exempt under Section 50l(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code or the corresponding provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law.
officers shall be the
Bylaws, the Association's President, Vice President,
elected
Secretary, Treasurer and Chairman of the Book Committee. The President shall convene the Executive Committee whenever necessary to conduct business.
2

  Ladies' Library Association of Ann Arbor 343 South Fifth Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Bylaws
ARTICLE I - MEETINGS
The annual meeting shall be held in the spring, at which time annual reports shall be submitted in writing by all elected officers with such other reports as the President may deem desirable.
The Presidenc shall call a second meeting sometime in the fall. Special meetings may be called by the President
or by two members of the Executive Committee whenever necessary.
ARTICLE II - QUORUM
A quorum shall consist of eight members. ARTICLE III - AMENDMENTS
These bylaws may be amended at the annual meeting, provided notice of the proposed changes has been given at the preceding fall meeting.
ARTICLE IV - OFFICERS
The officers shall consist of the President, Vice
President, Secretary, Treasurer
and Chairman of the Book
3
April 23, 1992

   Committee, and shall hold office for a term of one year. The Nominating Committee shall prepare a ballot of officers for the spring meeting.
ARTICLE V - DUES
The dues shall be ten cents a year, payable at the annual meeting.
ARTICLE VI - MEMBERSHIP
Active members shall be limited to twenty members resident in Ann Arbor. When new members are to be elected, the Nominating Committee shall assemble a list of nominees
(with brief biographies) submitted by the membership at the spring meeting, to be voted on at the fall meeting. Emerita membership shall be confined to women who have served ten years or more as members of the Association. A member may become an emerita by her own choice or by vote of the Association. Emeritae members shall be notified of all meetings and may attend them and may vote if in attendance. They shall be entitled to all reports or publications of the Association, should they request them. They shall pay no dues.
ARTICLE VII - DUTIES
The President shall preside at all meetings of the Association. She shall appoint the Chairman of the
Nominating Committee. The Chairmen of the Nominating Committee and the Book Committee shall select additional members of their respective committees. The Treasurer shall select members of the Finance Committee. The Chairman of each committee shall be responsible for informing the President of the membership of her committee. The President may appoint such other committees or representatives of the
4

   Association to civic affairs as she deems desirable. She shall serve on all committees ex officio except the Nominating Committee.
The Vice President shall perform all the duties of the President in her absence.
The Secretary shall notify the members of all meetings, keep the minutes of all meetings and maintain the membership roll.
The Treasurer shall receive, conserve and disburse all funds of the Association. She shall act as Chairman of the Finance Committee and at the end of the fiscal year, obtain an audit of her books.
The Chairman of the Book Committee shall with her Committee select the books and other materials to be
purchased during the year, according to the status of the Treasury. She shall keep an up-to-date file of the items so purchased and deposit them in the Ann Arbor Public Library.
The Executive Committee shall consist of all elected officers and shall convene on the call of the President to transact any necessary business in the interim between meetings.
The Finance Committee shall advise with the Treasurer on the assets of the Association. No stocks or bonds may be bought or sold without the consent of the Finance Committee.
ARTICLE VIII -DEPOSITORIES
The depositories of the Association shall be a bank for the monies, a safety box for securities and legal and
5

   rare documents, and the Michigan Historical Collections for such records as the Association may wish to preserve there. A historian appointed by the President for a term of three years shall act as curator of such records and write a history of the Association's activities at fitting times.
6

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT for APRIL 22, 1994 MEETING
The Ladies'
Library Julie Casa the hostess, Casa, Eleanor
meeting
present, Joy Trudy
at the home in addition Blouin, Julie Huntington, Newman, Bib
Tabbaa. Julie
of to
on
April were:
Collins,
Casa for her The secretary's
called hospitality.
Submitted
October
Association
28, 1994
held its spring 22, 1994. Those Grace Beardsley,
Peggy Jensen,
Joan Innes,
Betty Gosling,
Frances McSparran, Jan
O'Neal, Joan Innes
Prue
approved after a motion Peggy Jensen.
Jan Newman presented
December 31, 1993, the
Association was valued at $115,309.00.
CMA Money
assets at the end of 1993 to $138,593.00.
given Library report
which
by the association was a Revolving Fund on June
was approved.
Prue Rosenthal presented
discussed the opportunity
the
book committee's report,
Rosenthal,
the meeting to order by thanking
report was read by Joy Blouin and
fund contained $23,284.00,
by Jan Newman,
the treasure's
portfolio of
Nesta Spink, and Pam
which was seconded by
report. As of The Ladies Library The association's
bringing the total The last gift gift of $1,285.00 to the
24, 1993. The treasurer's
for the
association to

   purchase the The Dictionary of Art, a
publication which will the members present
be available in 1996.
After discussion,
Dictionary of
approved prepublication that the Ann the availability
The
of Public
of gift.
Tabbaa
which was
Art
for the
Spink suggested
Next, children's
Pam books
the following
the association
The behalf of
reading,
in the way
art books. that the
Next Arbor Public
a
it was as meeting.
purchasing price
$6000.00. Library
Nesta
be encouraged to publicize
of Asian
suggested
recommended by Betty
of be delayed
initiatives.
likely
Newman
r~ported part of
that the library
not
the Ann
Arbor
Betty Gosling,
After purchase
of
recommended purchases group discussion,
Asian art books until the fall
followed Library
Jan
continue to be
school
Hernandez, has announced
system. Jan also
that library director, his retirement.
Ray
a
discussion in context
of the
of recent legislative
presented
purchased by
list of
The Visual
Dictionary Getting to
of Buildings, Know the World's
for
(2)
(4) a of
(1)
under
book committee report continued with a
the library:
two series
Greatest Artists:
set of art books
Art, titled What Makes Van Gogh Van Gogh?, etc.
the title, (3) an
Bill Peet; and Museum
published
autobiography,
by the Metropolitan
reported
Following a thank you by Pam Tabbaa for the gift of flowers sent by the Ladies Library Association in
ze~
commemoration of the birth of her daughter, zep,ya, it was ,....,
status
of the
Ann
wiil most Arbor public
on

  determined that the fall meeting would be held on Friday, April 28, 1994, at 3:30 p.m. at the home of Jan Newman and the meeting was adjourned.
Respectfully submitted, Joy Blouin, Secretary

    THELADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
1 TREASURERSREPORT
April 22, 1994
The portfolio of the Ladies• Library Associ.tion .s of December -31, 1993 was valued iiilt $115,309. Our CMAMoney Market
Fund contained $23,284, bringing out totdl assets •t the end of 1993 to $138,593.
In June we made a gift of $1,285 to the Library Revolving Fund.
lly submi
Jan Barney Newmanand libby Oneal Tre.surers

   Public
LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BOOK COMMITTEE REPORT
APRIL 22, 1994
The Book Committee met on March 29, 1994 at the Ann Arbor Library.
Present
Pam Tabaa (with daughter!), and Betty Gosling.
unable
were: Bib O'Neill, Prue Rosenthal, to come.
Art. from anything
~, the 1960's,
purchase buy it.
chose
34 volumes with 120 countries.
contributions
There is nothing
We have several recommendations
Jane Conway
recommended that consists of
This dictionary
6,700 people from
more than library at
resource
updated. Committee
it has $8,000
like it in the
this time.
The Encyclopedia of in the late
a very important recommends that we
only
comparable
was It
published seems like
and has not been
for
Needless to say,
unanimously a hefty price
us. The Book It will cost is
when it is
tag.
published in 1996. We
it.
several different ways of paying
for
If we pay by 12/31/94 it will cost us $6,000.
If we reserve now and pay in full upon receipt (1996) we pay $7,000.
We can pay $1250 installments Total cost $6,750.The
dictionary, the second 12 month's after the second.
every year for 3 years.
first installment upon receipt of
later, the third 12 month~
We did not know how the committee would decide to pay for the purchase. We could designate additional funds, or we could use
the $2,000 we get every year to buy it---- If we have the money in
the bank we recommend that we allocate
the funds to do it. purchase, the only other
Since this purchases we have
books-- The list In addition,
in some countries, that seems to have
is such a monumental
decided
is attached.
we would particularly neglected.
on for
this time
the Book
are some children's
like
Committee
to focus on art the library
Eleanor Collins, Nesta Spink was
to make.
we purchase The Dictionary of
Southeast
Asia, that
Betty Gosling will present a list of
books that she thinks we should purchase .to begin to create a more comprehensive resource.
Prudence Rosenthal, Book Committee Chair

  LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BOOK COMMITTEE REPORT
BOOK LIST APRIL 22, 1994
LIST OF CHILDRENS BOOKS PURCHASED FOR THE LADIES LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
1. The Visual Dictionary Darling, Kindersley,
2.
$14.95 Series
of Buildings Inc
"Getting to
Written & illustrated by Mike Venezia
Artists"
both.
There are
two series,
getting
3. Bill Peet, Houghton,
an Autob:Lo_graphY Miffin, Co.
4.
Set of Art Metropolitan
$59.95
Books, "What Makes Van Gogh van Gogh?" etc •• Museum of Art
2 Park
St.
Boston, MA., 02108
Children's Press $29.70 for each
Chicago series
we recommend
Know the World's Greatest

  To: The Ladies' Library Association From: Betty Gosling
Dear Ladies,
I'm sorry that I can't be at the spring meeting, but Pam has very nicely offered to present my book selections to you, so all is well.
I did a quick check through the on-line catalog at the Library, and though you might be interested to know what we have in the way of Asian art books. Here are the approximate numbers:
Asia, general, 50 China, 60
Japan, 40
Korea, 2
India, 26
Sri Lanka, 1
I'd like to suggest that we buy the following books, not only because they fill some important gaps, but also because they are good books. All are high quality· and profusely illustrated--mostly in color. The texts are authoritative, interesting, and enjoyable. (Prices are retail; I think the Library gets a 30-40% discount.)
Paul Strachan, Pagan: Art and Architecture of Old Burma.
Edinburgh,
Henry Ginsberg, University
Kiscadale Publications, 1989. ($55.00) Thai Manuscript Painting, Honolulu,
of Hawaii Press, 1989. ($34.00)
Islamic, 15
Iraq, 2
Iran, 2
Tibet, 6
Nepal, 1
Central Asia, 1 Vietnam, o
Steve Van Beek and Luca Invernizzi Tettoni, The Arts of Thailand, Hong Kong, Travel Publishing Asia Limited, 1985. ($45.00)
Roxanna M. Brown, The Ceramics of South-East Asia: Their Dating and Identification. Singapore and London, Oxford University Press, 1988. ($95.00)
Smittthi Siribhandra and Elizabeth Moore, Palaces of the Gods: Khmer Art and Architecture in Thailand. Bangkok, River Books, 1992. ($85.00)
Robyn Maxwell, Textiles of Southeast Asia. Singapore and London, Oxford University Press, 1991. (About $225.00)
I hope you'll vote to buy these. They are all nice!
southeast Asia, 2 Thailand, 2
Burma, 1
Indonesia, 2 Khmer, O

  LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT FOR OCTOBER 28, 1994 MEETING
Submitted May 5, 1995
The Ladies' Library Association held its fall meeting at the home of Jan Newman on October 28, 1994. Those
present, in
Julie Casa;
Rosenthal;
Spink; and from the Ann
President Joan Innes called the meeting thanked Jan Newman for her hospitality.
approved. living copies
to send retired
Joan noted
in New Hampshire,
that Kirby Hall, had expressed
member interest
that retired
$113,786.00, bringing
the stock strengthen
was approved.
addition to
the hostess, Joan Innes; Peggy Jensen;
were: Betty Gretchen
Bib O'Neill; Gosling; Prue
Sarah Innes; Pam Tabbaa;
Whitman; Nesta Arbor Public Library, Jane Conway.
Betty Gosling read the spring
who was in Italy. After minor corrections,
to order and
for Joy Blouin,
the minutes were
of the minutes. minutes to Kirby members who cannot
emeritus now in receiving
Betty ask Joy
semi-
As of at
$9,511.00,
to $123,297.00. It was noted that
Jan Newman presented October 4, 1994, our equity
always attend the Treasurers'
report. valued
our total assets market was still
down, and that a recovery position. The Treasurers'
should report
our financial
It was suggested and to other
or meetings.
portfolio
and the CMA Money Fund contained
minutes
was

  Prue $6000.00
Dictionary
Rosenthal reported for the Book
Committee of The
of the high for the fall
cost of the Dictionary,
no books discussion
1996. were
Gosling's collection,
report Prue
on
reported that
books (Prue)
in the was
judge Asian meet again decided that,
allocated Jane
art in
books, January
beginning yearly
and that for further
in 1995, for the
she the
Book Committee discussion. It was
had been approved for the of Art, which will be
purchase published
in
that
Because selected
of Library
unqualified to
twice Conway
$1000.00 should be purchase of books.
on
Innes's
and Library volunteers,
of the for art year) are
Library.
exhibitions
being utilized, and
always looking acquisitions Library has $16,000.00
the world: Africa, and acquisition
and there
to also
for new
the Library's
There permanent
is
The State--
areas of
books,
meeting. After
a brief art
Betty
informative
level and
(including
the new wall on the third-floor pictures. Many interesting
report third-floor
the galleries
Sarah
last
are artists.
a
will be lectures
the Asian
presented
a very status
interesting
and
Lower
received a
year--to
Middle
Europe.
of videos, art prints,
of five
is working fine for hanging exhibitions, organized by Jane
being planned,
five-year promote the
East, Americas, The program
a'nd
special exhibitions.
and Jane have been new
art collection. grant from the
cultures
Asian and Pacific,
will include the CDs, as well as
would

   Joan and for
Joan Nominating
to serve volunteered.
others thanked us informed
Jane for her interesting report on Library events.
and keeping
also
Committee, had
on the committee.
Huntington,
to ask for volunteers
Spink and Betty Gosling
reported that telephoned
Trudy
Chair of the
Nesta
Dues
meeting will be held on May 5, 1995, at Prue Rosenthal's home.
The meeting was adjourned.
Notes on the meeting were taken by Betty Gosling for Joy Blouin.
were collected,
and it was decided
that the spring

   The Dictionary of Art floor rather than on the other reference books are librarians work.
will be third floor
kept and
well. Director search Straight, Library, vision.
is undergoing
has retired, and
Big changes are in store
which is one
of thirty-two libraries in
libraries," new tax matters
is passed many legal have been curtailed.
The Director
Cathy has begun
Jane people at
Independence
technological
electronic future, and
separate from proposal was voted
Public School system
such as the (hopefully
leasing
deal with until
a
matters hired
to make sure that is a committee
library
to oversee
are not
Ann
Library Hernandez
Daily will
for replacements. In
There Arbor
Acting
is carrying
formerly of with many new
that, in spite
also
the
reported library
are excited
about the system
future.
is welcomed. New
from the innovations publishing--with there is a
public
sense of renewal
the the
in. of
in
that need to
Director, on
1996)
is a be
major
considered, and
also be
soon. A national the meantime Lana the West Branch
ideas, energy, and
of all the changes,
school such as
ROM collection and
for an exciting and excitement.
housed on because
for the Library,
area that became "district
How to buildings
when the financial
new mileage There are
lawyers
services
the transition.
other changes as Assistant
leaving
the CD sound!--make
concern.
the second
that is where where the reference

       rown, Roxanna
lark, Garth
ortlett, Mary
e Hamel, Christopher
istel, Anne '--"
insberg, Henry
oannides, Paul
axwell,Robyn
eek, H.A.
trachan, Paul
Ladies' Library Book Selections Spring 1995
Ceramics of Southeast Asia: Their
Dating & Identification Oxford, 1989
The Potter's Art
Phaidon_, 199 5
Prints of Roy Lichtenstein
Hudson Hills, 1994
Arts & Crafts Architecture
Phaidon, 1994
A History of Illuminated Manuscripts
Phaidon, 1995
Gustave Caillebotte: Urban Impressionist Abbeville, 1995
Thai Manuscript Painting Univ. of Hawaii, 1989
Masaccio & Masolino: A Complete Catalogue Abrams, 1993
Tradition, Trade, & Transformation Oxford, 1990
The Synagogue Phaidon, 1994
Imperial Pagan: Art & Architecture of Burma
Univ. of Hawaii, 1990
(OVER)
95.00
50.00
95.00
60.00
50.00
65.00
34.00
195.00
135.00
50.00
30.00

    THELADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
Treasurers' Report April, 1995
The portfolio of the Ladies' Library Association as of December 30, 1994 was valued at $115,975. Our CMAMoney Fund contained $10,674.54, bringing our total assets to $126,649.54.
In June we made a gift of $6,000 to the Library Revolving Fund and this was our only contribution to the Revolving Fund in 1994.
Jan Barney Newman and Zibby Oneal Treasurers

        STOCK:
Company Shares
AMOCO 200 BPPAN 100
CENTRAL S'WEST
ENTERGY CORP 300 FPL 200 IBM 100 MMM 400 MOBIL
NIAG 400
MUTUAL FUNDS:
Equity Income - Utility Stock 152.0951 Ml Global Allocation Fund 1903.361 Alliance Multi Market 500
SUBTOTALS
Cash in Money Market Fund CMA Money Fund
TOTALS
TOTAL ASSETS
Price Dividends
$59.125 $440.00 $79.875 $206.53 $22.625 $340.00 $21.875 $540.00 $35.125 $376.00 $73.500 $100.00 $53.375
Value
$11,825.00 $7,987.00 $4,525.00 $6,562.00 $7,025.00 $7,350.00
Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report January 1, 1994- December 31, 1994
200
200
$704.00 $21,350.00
$84.250 $680.00 $14.250 $436.00
$0.910
$12.120 $1,132.09
$16,850.00 $5,700.00 $89,174.00
$8.930 $302.40 $5,691.47
$3,595.00 $115,975.00
$434.45 $138.00 $23,068.00
$26.54 $435.28 $10,648.00
$6,126.75 $126,649.54
$126,649.54

      Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report Page Two
INCOME:
Dividends
Dividends - CMA Money Fund
TOTAL INCOME
$5,691.47 $435.28
$6,126.75
EXPENSES:
Account Fee - WCMA
Foreign Tax on Dividends Business Check Service Charge Check to Tom Thompson Flowers Gift to Library Revolving Fund Purchase of Stock:
MLGlobal Allocation Fund
Entergy Corp
Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
Utility Common Stock
ML Global Allocation Fund
TOTAL EXPENSES
Less: Stock Purchase
Less: Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
TOTAL GENERAL EXPENSES
$80.00 $30.99 $0.30 $34.70 $6,000.00
$23,995.73 $11,372.12
$434.45 $1,132.02
$43,080.31
($35,367.85)
($1,566.47)
$6,145.99

            Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report Page Three
Value at December 1993
Purchase of Stock:
Entergy Corp
ML Global Allocation Fund
Sale of Utility Common Stock Loss on Value of Stock
VALUE AT DECEMBER 1994
$115,309.00
$11,372.12 $23,995.73
($24,317.99) ($10,383.86)
$115,975.00
$26.11 $23,284.00
$23,310.11
$6,126.75 $24,317.99
($6,145.99)
($35,367.85)
($1,566.47)
$10,674.54
$26.54 $10,648.00
$10,674.54
Value at December 1993 Cash
CMA Money Fund
ADD: Income
ADD: Redemption of U.S. Treasury Bond LESS: General Expenses
LESS: Stock Purchases
LESS: Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
VALUE AT DECEMBER 1994
EQUITIES ACCOUNT
CASH ACCOUNT
Cash
CMA Money Fund

  Zibby December
Association
O'Neal presented the
report. As of Library
LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SECRETARY'S REPORT FOR MAY 5, 1995 MEETING
Submitted October 27, 1995
The Ladies' Library Association held its spring at the home of Prue Rosenthal on May 5, 1995. Those
present, Beardsley, Huntington, Oneal, Bib
meeting
Trudy Zibby
and
in addition to the hostess, included:
Grace Gosling,
30,
1994, the portfolio
was valued at $115,975.
Joy Blouin, Eleanor
Collins,
Mcsparren,
and Gretchen Whitman.
Joan O'Neill,
Innes, Pam
Frances Tabbaa,
Betty Jan
Newman,
President Joan Innes
thanked Prue Rosenthal for her hospitality.
to order
The secretary's
approved after a motion by Trudy seconded by Pam Tabbaa.
called the meeting
report was read by Joy Blouin and
Combined with in the association's CMA Money fund, the
the
$10,674.54
association's
During June 1994 a gift of $6,000.00 was made to the library
total assets are valued at $126,649.54.
revolving
reported. Next,
Rosenthal
the association for the
included: Ceramics of
Identification; The Potter's Art;
fund.
The treasurer's
report was
committee's which had The titles
accepted as
report, Prue been purchased by
listed
Dating and
in listed
presenting
the book titles
fourteen
library. Southeast
Asian:
Prints of Roy
Huntington,
treasurer's
for the Ladies'
Their
which was

  '\,.__/
Lichtenstein; Illuminated Impressionist; Masolino: Transformation; Architecture
of Painting;
Arts and Crafts Architecture;
A History of Urban
Masaccio and
Trade,
Museum
directly
the
library.
of of
to Following
death
question:
to purchase memory. The
Representative
report on
context of
focused on
prepares to System. Jan also programs initiated
Advisory Ann Arbor
initiatives. facing the
from the Ann Arbor reported on several
Jan Council,
a
the
Art.
Molly
electronic
University
High School,
Foundation,
family literacy program.
between the Engineering and Pioneer
National Science
Manuscripts; Gustave
Caillebotte: Painting;
Thai A Complete
of and
Thailand; 1760-1930:
Manuscript Catalogue;
The
Burma; Arts of
American Glass, Prue also report
Tradition, Imperial
and Art and
& the Art
Toledo
the recent with the
a book for group felt
the library in Ms. such contributions
Prendergast's
separate
library Public
new
the
book committee's report,
Newman,
presented Library in
Jan's remarks as it
School exciting
to the Library the status of the
Public
recent
the difficulties
media
of Michigan
Synagogue;
Pagan: Vermeer
The
that following
Prendergast, Prue
Could a gift a money be given to the association
legislative
by the library, which
and
include: (1)
projects;
(2) collaboration
with monies to establish
School of from the
a digital
library;
and (3) a new
was approached
should
be made

  Next, officers
president,
treasurers,
chair,
voted on and membership also Rosenthal, should
Library
cease
library. representation discontinued.
Council,
during
Prue
a comparable
Joan recommendations
administrative with the
unit reorganization
President meeting written
board be
to the fall Frances
that Carol Plumer and Isabel Haight had
It October
made a Gretchen
was decided that the 27, 1995, at the home
and Isabel's fall meeting would
names. be held
It
was noted away. Betty
Betty
Gosling. unanimously
The suggested slate of officers was
Trudy
for
Huntington offered the 1995-96 year: president,
following slate of Pam Tabbaa; vice-
Advisory to function
1996
of the to ensure the association's
the Frances
Jan
and on
will try
Mcsparren; secretary,
Jan Newman and Zibby Oneal, and book committee
agreed continue
to an
serve as representative
to the which may
passed
agreed to research
presented to the library in Carol's
of the appropriate
Book Committee, books to be
accepted by the that Jan Newman,
membership. The accompanied by Prue
Innes asked
members to bring
for
Mcsparren agreed
for discussion
vote on a new member during the 1996 fall meeting.
to consolidate at the spring
the
meeting.
sketches The membership will
Gosling, Chair and recommend
of Zibby Oneal. motion to adjourn the meeting, which was
on Jan Newman
Whitman. The meeting was adjourned.
board,
should this
Gretchen Whitman;
a new member. biographical
seconded by

   '-----'
Copies of these minutes were sent to Alice Wethey, Mrs. George Cameron, Dorothy Peckham, and Kirby Hall.
Respectfully submitted, Joy Blouin, Secretary

     resident ice-President ecretary reasurers epresentative,
council
race Beardsley oy Blouin
ulie Casa leaner Collins etty Gosling rudy Huntington oan Innes
Library Advisory
(Mrs. Francis) (Mrs. Frank) (Miss Eleanor) (Mrs. Betty) (Mrs. David) (Mrs. Perry) (Ms. Sarah)
Pam Tabbaa
Frances Mcsparren
Gretchen Whitman
Jan Newman & Zibby Oneal
Jan Newman
Members
772 Peninsula ct. 48105
662-4667 994-7923 761-5879 663-6255 662-9917 761-8331 662-3902 668-6377 665-3825 994-3537 761-9574 769-0238 668-8548 665-0941 769-4479
arah Innes
eggy Jensen
ranees Mcsparren
an Barney Newman (Mrs.
Morton Ave. 48104 Frances) 1 Harvard Pl. 48104
ibby Oneal
ib O'Neill ?rue Rosenthal
....._. lice Simsar esta Spink
am Tabbaa
lice Wethey
retchen Whitman (Mrs.
rs. George Cameron rs. Kirby Hall
rs. Howard Peckham
501 James) 1025
1951 1956 1960 1970 1970 1982 1985 1986 1986
Wethey Collins Innes Huntington Oneal Rosenthal Newman McSparran Spink
Year of Election to Membership
1989 Jensen
1989 Tabbaa
1990 Gosling
1991 Blouin
1991 Whitman
1992 Casa
1992 Innes
1992 O'Neill
1993 Beardsely
1993 Simsar
Ladies'
Library Membership
Association, Ann Arbor, Michigan
(Joan)
(Mrs. (Ms.
Steven) 1422
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Robert)
(Mrs. (Mrs. (Mrs.
Walter) 2 Geddes Heights 48104
Haskell) 931
Oakdale 48108 Onondaga 48104
Baldwin Ave. 48104 Devonshire Rd. 48104 Baldwin, 48104
Amnon)
2105 1103
and Officers Officers
1994-1995
803 Greenhills
1410 Hill St.
1200 Earhart
3000 Glazier
519 Onondaga 48104
2100 Hill St. 48104
717 N. Fifth Ave. 48104
665-1178 Yasser) 1914 Scottwood Ave. 48104 668-7871
Harold) 1510 Cambrdige Rd. 48104 Nathan) 1603 Ferndale Pl. 48104
1200 Earhart 63 Centre 600 Carolina 28792-2827
Rd., #443, Concord,
Ann Arbor, NH 03301
48105
Emeritae
st.,
Village Rd., #361,
Dr. 48105 48104
#358 48105
Way #320 48105
(Sarah)
668-6225 769-0485
MI
Hendersonville, NC

   The Fall meeting of the Ladies' Library Association, held 19 October 1995 at the home of Zibby Oneal. was called to order by President Pam Tabbaa Those present were Grace Beardsley. Julie Casa. Eleanor Collins. Betty Gosling, Trudy Huntington. Joan Innes, Sarah Innes. Peggy Jensen. Frances McSparran. Jan Newman. Zibby Oneal. Bib O'Neill,Prue Rosenthal, Nesta Spink.and Pam Tabbaa Pam thanked Zibby for her hospitality, then announced that Gretchen Whitman had sent a letter of res:lgnation from her position as secretary and. as well. from the association: Gretchen cited a greater involvement in both hospice and her commitments lo St. Mary's Chapel, and, moreover, recent surgery. as compelling her action.
The minutes from the Spring 1995 meeting were read and accepted with the single correction that Prue Rosenthal was not only to accompany Jan Newman to the School Committee but in fact is henceforth to be Jan's replacement. Jan added that although the members of that committee would be elected when the library was reorganized as a District Library. the assurance had been given that the Ladies' Library Association's ex officio and advisory statuses would be maintained.
Next. Jan Newman gave the treasurer's report. summarized as follows: as of 29 September 1995 the association's portfolio was valued at $131,089. the CMA Money Fund contained $12.303. bringing total assets to $143.392. Agl.ft of $1.000 had been made to the Library
Revolving Fund in May 1995 and another gilt of $1.000 had been made in September 1995.
Thereafter. Betty Gosling gave her report on the work of the book committee. Her request for comments and suggestions as to criteria and preferences in purchasing was readily answered with a spirited discussion on CDRoms, landmark books. out-of print. et cetera In this connection. the continued purchase of The International Auction Record was approved: but consideration of CDRoms was left to the future when the library will have completed its own study of their use. Betty's suggestion that the ceiling for purchases be raised from $2.000 a year to $4,000 produced a discussion of the Association's finances. the upshot of which was that
the dividends earned from the CMAMoney Fund offered a deep enough pocket to warrant
raising the allotment. Therefore a motion was made to have a budget of$4.000 for the year 1 November 1995 - 1 November 1996. $1.000 of which is to be set aside for "pounce· purchases. and the motion was accepted unanimously. What happens if the fund is not entirely used will be discussed in the Fall, 1996 meeting. Passed also was a second vote to allow the treasurer to pay the $1327 still owed the library. Moreover. since the wish list presented Fall 1995was large, it was decided to put a six-month freeze on further purchses.
Toe in memoriam books The Topkapi Scroll and Hamada: Potter. commemorating Isabelle Haight and Carol Plumer respectively. will have book plates.
Jan and Prue annouced that the Library Advisory Council will meet later this month with the new head librarian. Mary Ann Hodel, at which meeting Jan and Prue will be present in order in insure that our ex officio status on the board is indeed known. Pam proposed that an invitation be extended to Ms. Hodel to meet with the LLAmembers. preferably in a home, and the proposal was readily accepted.
Lastly. the nominating committee for new members will be Trudy Huntington, Nesta Spink. and Betty Gosling. 1\vo new members will be elected. Frances McSparran will process the list of nominees and submit it by the end of March 1996. In accordance with the bylaws the nominations will be discussed in the Spring. voted on in the Fall.
The motion to close the meeting was made and seconded. Submitted by Bib O'Neill

    THELADIES' LIBRARYASSOCIATIONOF ANNARBOR,MICHIGAN
Tre.surers' Report October 27, 1995
As of September 29, 1995 the portfolio of the L.dies' Libr.ry Associ.tion w.s v.Jued .t $131,089. Our CHAMoney fund cont.ined $12,303, bringing our tot.I .ssets •5 of September 29 to $143,392.
Wem.de • gift of $1,000 to the Libr.ry Revolving Fund in M.y .nd .nother $1~000 gift to the Fund in September.
submitted,
u2.,...b~ ~ J.n B.rney Newm.n
Zlbby One.1 Tre.surers

         ..~ STOCK:
Company Shares
AMOCO 200
Price
$71.500 $102.125 $27.875 $29.250 $46.375 $91.375 $66.375 $111.750 $0.000 $63.000
$1.115 $13.730
$6.900
Dividends
$480.00 $299.77 $344.00 $540.00 $352.00 $100.00 $681.50 $725.00 $336.00
$65.00 $3,923.27 $9.01
$1,408.20 $654.87 $302.42
$6,297.77
$625.67
$6,923.44
Value
$14,300.00 $10,212.00 $5,575.00 $8,775.00 $9,275.00 $9,137.00 $16,593.00 $22,350.00 $0.00 $15,750.00
$111,967.00
$180.00 $28,233.00
$3,450.00 $143,830.00
$9.55 $10,826.00
$154,665.55
$154,665.55
BPPAN
CENTRAL S'WEST 200
ENTERGY CORP
FPL
IBM 100 MMM 250 MOBIL 200 NIAG 0 PFIZER
MUTUAL FUNDS:
Equity Income - Utility Stock 161.4312 Ml Global Allocation Fund 2056.316
--Dividends
-Long Term Capital Gains
Alliance Multi Market 500
SUBTOTALS
Cash in Money Market Fund CMA Money Fund
TOTALS
TOTAL ASSETS
Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report January 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995
100
300 200
250

      Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report Page Two
INCOME:
Dividends
Long Term Capital Gain Dividends - CMA Money Fund
TOTAL INCOME
$5,642.90 $654.87 $625.67
$6,923.44
EXPENSES:
Account Fee - WCMA
Foreign Tax on Dividends Business Check Service Charge Gift to Library Revolving Fund Purchase of Stock:
Minnesota Mng. Mach
Pfizer Inc.
Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
Utility Common Stock
ML Global Allocation Fund-Dividends
--Long Term Capital Gains
TOTAL EXPENSES
Less: Stock Purchase
Less: Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
TOTAL GENERAL EXPENSES
$80.00 $44.97 $0.15 $2,736.80
$5,722.35 $14,731.87
$9.01 $1,408.20 $654.87
$25,388.22 ($20,454.22) ($2,072.08)
$2,861.92

             Ladies' Library Association - Treasurers' Report Page Three
Value at December 1994
Purchase of Stock: Minnesota Mng. Mach Pfizer Inc.
Sale of Stock:
NIAG Mohawk
Minnesota Mng. Mach Gain on Value of Stock
VALUE AT DECEMBER 1995
$115,975.00
$5,722.35 $14,731.87
($4,760.64)
($13,865.15)
$26,026.57
$143,830.00
$26.54 $10,648.00
$10,674.54
$6,923.44 $18,625.79
($2,861.92) ($20,454.22) ($2,072.08)
$10,835.55
$9.55 $10,826.00
$10,835.55
Value at December 1994 Cash
CMA Money Fund
ADD: Income
ADD: Sale of Stock
LESS: General Expenses
LESS: Stock Purchases
LESS: Reinvestment of Dividends & Gains
VALUE AT DECEMBER 1995
EQUITIES ACCOUNT
CASH ACCOUNT
Cash
CMA Money Fund

   LADIESL'IBRARBYOOCK<»IIITTREEPORFTA,LL1995
Membersof the BookConvnittee,GraceBeardsley, BibO'NJfi, andNesta Spink, met at Betty Gosling's homeon Aug. 22 to select books for the
fall. Bib and Grace had done research
and each membersubmitted suggestions
approximately 80 titles with a retail
four hours of deliberation (debate!) and subsequent discussions with Jane Conway,the list was pared downto a manageable40 titles with an estimated cost of about $3500.00. {Asalways it's impossible to knowin advance the exact cost of books because of the variable library discounts--anywhere from 25 to 50 percent.) Someof the books were either out-of-print or very neWa;nd not yet available. These are on order. Booksselected in the spring of 1995but whichwerenot then available were reordered. Jane's accounting is attached.
Criteria for selection evolved as the discussions progressed. Convnents and additional suggestions from atl the Ladies of the Association
would be greatly appreciated. So far, the criteria following:
Expertise of the author in his or her particular field
Quality and numberof illustrations
Readability
include the
Elegance: above average price range. The Library staff is particularly interested in our buying this type of book.
Preference was given to books in the following categories:
Books suggested by the library staff (titles and cateiories). This
time the Library asked for books on "collectibles, and the Convnittee tried to acconvnodate.The Library also requested that we continue to buy neweditions of International Auction Record, published
annually or biannually. Ladies' Library donated the 1993copy, and, according to the Library staff, it gets a lot of use. The Convnittee agreed to the purchase of future editions.
Books that filled weak spots in the library collection. Here, we continued to focus on Asian art (Japan, China, India, Southeast Asia, Central Asia), which is still weaklyrepresented in the collection. The Library was given catalogs from a good dealer of Asian books, and it is hoped that the library staff will buy more Asian books on their own.
The Connittee discussed focusing on ethnic art for the spring meeting; however,Jane Conwayreports that the Library already
has a large grant for the purchase of African, Native American, and Oceanic Art, so that is going well without us.
on what the library already owns, for purchases that totaled
value of about $5000.00. After

   Important landmarkbooks, older ones whenavailable. It was discussed whether the Ladies should makean effort to buy old, out-of-print books that the library staff would have to go to great trouble to find themselves. Ladies?
Books reviewed highly in The NYTimes; The NewYorker, etc. Booksof local interest
Books that we'd simply like to own!
Youngpeoples' books: a category that Prue Rosenthal encouraged a
few years ago and heartily endorsed by Yvette Shane, head of the Library's YouthDepartment. Yvette wouldvery muchlike to get multiple copies of popular books, since, apparently, there are very few kids' art books comparedto the numberof readers whowant to check them out. Howdoes everyone feel about this?
Books eliminated from the selection process
Books on very popular subjects that the librarians might very well choose for themselves
Very specialized or scholarly books for which.there is little demand. The Library does not want these books, and they are available in the University Libraries for readers whodo want them.
Paperbacks, unless the he book is of exceptional interest and there is no hardback edition available. The Library has to pay to have paperbacks hard-bound.
Other business
The Library was asked to post a list of newLadies' Library books in an appropriate place in the Library in order to give us exposure and alert readers to newbooks in the art book collections. Jane agreed.
Our financial situation, as reported by Jane is attached. Although our present budget is $2000.00 a year, it is hoped that the Ladies might approveat least twice that much:there are many,manywonderfulart books on the market, and prices are increasing rapidly. With the extra funds, wewouldbe able to focus onmoreupscale books.
The Conmittee discussed whether membersshould rotate regularly in order to get the benefit of association memberswith different interests and areas of expertise. I hope so. Weare also looking for suggestions from all Ladies' Library members--not just the BookConmittee. It would be great if everyone would jot downtheir suggestions on post cards and send them to one of the Conmittee membersfor consideration at the next Committeemeeting. Everyone's help wouldbe appreciated!
Submitted by Betty Gosling, October 27, 1995

    Ann Arbor Public Library
343 South Fifth Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-2293 313/994-2333 Mary Anne Hodel
Director
October 23, 1995 Dear Betty,
The figures listed below are our estimates for the total cost of the books and videos selected by your committee in August:
Adult Books
Youth Books
Youth Videos
TOTAL 2745.00
Account Balance 10/15/95 1418.00
We will need an additional $1327 to complete the entire purchase.
Attached is a list of titles purchased by the Youth Department. We ordered all of the adult book suggestions, so I did not retype that list.
Please let me know if you need any additional information for your meeting this week.
Sincerely,
J~y~
2440.00 224.00 81.00
Administration 313/994-2339 Fax313/994-4762

     LADIESL'IBRARAYSSOCIATIBOONOKBSOUGFHOTRTHEANNARBOPRUBLILCIBRARY FALL1,995
***
In memoryof Isabel Haight. GubruNecupolglu, The Topkapi Scroll. Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, 1995.
InmemoryofCarolPlumer.BernardLeach,HamadaP:otter. Tokyo,1981.
Collections andCollectibles
Maier, International Auction Record, 1994-1995.Library price: $179.00.
Huxford's Old BookValue Guide. Schroeder Publishing, 1995.
Allen and Patricia Ahearn, Collected Books: The Guide to Values. New York: Putnams's Sons, 1991. Retail, $50.00.
Allen and Patricia Ahearn, Book Collecting: A ComprehensiveGuide. New York, Putnam's Sons, 1995. $30.00.
Frank Ames,The KashmirShawl and Its lndo-French Influence. Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Antique Collectors' Club, 1986.
Jenny Housego,Tribal Rugs: An Introduction to the Weavingof the Tribes of Iran. NewYork; VanNostrand, 1978.
JonThompsonO,rientalCarpetsfromtheTents,Cottages,andWorkshops of Asia. NewYork: Penguin, 1983. Retail, $23.95, paper.
Geoffrey Godden,Godden'sGuide to EuropeanPorcelain. Cross River Press {Abbeyville), 1994. Retail, $50.00.
France Borel, The Splendor of Ethnic Jewelry. Abrams, 1994. Retail, $67.50.
MalcolmHaslam, Arts and Crafts Carpets. Rizzoli, 1991.
Janet Zapata, The Jewelry and Enamelsof Louis Comfort Tiffany. Abrams,
1993. Retail, $39.95.
Clothilde Bacri, Daum:Masters of FrenchDecorative Glass. Rizzoli, 1992. Retail price: $85.00.
LouisLawrenceandShepBrozman,JapaneselnrQ, 1993.Retail, $175.00.

   Morihiro Ogawa,JapaneseSwordsandSwordFurniture in the Museumof Fine Arts Boston, 1987. $225.00.
Barbara Ford, East Asian Lacquer in the Florence and Herbert Irving Collection. Metropolitan Museum.Retail, $65.00.
Jessica Rawson,Chinese Jade from the Neolithic to the Qing, 1995. Retail, $85.00.
Sylvia Fraser-Lu, BurmeseCrafts, Past andPresent, Oxford, 1995. Retail, $150.00.
General
Marilyn Rhie and Robert Thurman,Wisdomand Compassion:The Sacred Art of Tibet. Abrams, 1991. Retail, $75.00
Richard Dormentand Margaret MacDonald,Whistler. Tate Gallery, D'Orsay, National Gallery, 1995. Retail, $75.00.
Michael Freemanand Roger Warner, Angkor: The HiddenGlories, Mifflin, 1990.
Stephen Huyler, Painted Prayers, Asia Society. Retail, $50.00. Jan Fonteyn, The Sculpture of Indonesia, 1990. Retail, $65.00.
I
Houghton
Gerald L. Carr, Frederic EdwinChurch:CatalogueRaisonneof Woksof Art at Olana State Historic Site. CambridgeUniversity Press.
Carlo Cresti and MassimoListri, Villas of Tuscany. VendomePress, 1993. Barbara Braun, Pre-ColumbianArt and the Post-ColumbianWorld: Ancient
AmericanSources of ModernArt. Rembrandt,ExperimentalEtcher, BostonMuseumof Fine Arts.
Periodical
Arts of Asia: 1 year (to be renewed if there is sufficient interest from Library readers}.

     lADIES' LIBRARYYOUTHPURCHASES
:OOOKS
Bond, Michael. Paddington's Colors. (Two copies.)
Dial Books for Young Readers. Visual Magic. (Two copies.)
Frayling, Christopher and Helen. The Art Pack.
Gaughenbough, Michael and Herbert Camburn. Old House, New House: A Child's Exploration of American Architectural Styles.
Glenn, Patricia Brown. Under Every Roof: A Kid's Style and Field Guide to the Architecture of American Houses.
Knox, Box. The Great Art Adventure.
Millet, C. D. Castles.
Muhlberger, Richard. What Makes a Bruegal a Bruegal? _________ . What Makes a Degasa Degas? _________ . What Makes a Monet a Monet?
What Makes a Raphael a Raphael? WhatMakesaRembrandt aRembrandt? What Makes a Van Gogh a Van Gogh?
Voss, Gisela. Museum Colors. (Two copies.) ____ . Museum Numbers. (Two copies.) ____ . Museum Shapes. (Two copies.) Wilkinson, Philip. Amazing Buildings. VIDEOS
PBSVideo. Castle.
____ . Cathedral.
----· Pyramid.
Sesame Street. Don't Eat the Pictures: Sesame Street at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Two copies.)

        Ladies Library Assocrnt1on iiominating Committe 1996