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Chelsea

Chelsea image
Parent Issue
Day
10
Month
April
Year
1891
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Fewer sheep have died about here this winter than for many years. The roads have partly settled, and business begins to start up again. The Ladies' Relief Corps was well patronized at their dinner on election day. Sam Guerin has moved back here from Ann Arbor and can be found at R. A. Snyder's grocery store. Rev. H. L. Broadbridge talked to the people on the street last Monday on temperance and religión. Rev. H. L. Broadbridge, of Detroit, is assisting Eider Mclntosh in holding revival meetings at the M. E. church this week. Considerable interest is being awakened and some wül be gathered into the fold. There has been little doing in farm produce the past week on account of bad roads. Prices remain mostly unchanged. Wheat stands at #1.02 for red and $1.00 for white. Somc barley was bought at $1.40 and oats at 52 cents, rye 80 cents, beans #1.75 for the best, clover seed $4.00, potatoes75 cents, butter 20 cents, eggs 13 cents. Most of the wheat in farmers' hands has been contracted at $1.00 and upwards and will be delivered as soon as the going will permit. Percy Brooks, a boy about 14 years old, went three miles south of town last Saturday hunting with a gun. He got on a stump for some purpose and feil off, discharging the gun. The charge nearly severed his right hand just above the wrist, a few shots lodging in the head. He was brought to town and had the hand removed and the arm dressed and is nbw doing well. The average urchin will not go a hunting with his little gun now for a few weeks, after which that kind of business will probably go on as heretofore. This makes the fourth boy that has had an arm shot off while hunting within twenty years in this village.

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News