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How To Avoid Hydrophobia

How To Avoid Hydrophobia image
Parent Issue
Day
28
Month
August
Year
1891
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

If you are unfortunate enough to be bitten by a dog, waste no time in sending for a physician. But the wound requires instant attention. First, wash it immediately with clean, tepid water. If this is not readily obtainable, clean water of any temperoture will answer. This will do untit a physician arrivés. If you should be so situated that a physician cannot attend upon you. then act: After flushing out the wound with clean water, apply. by means of a glass dropper, a powerful antiseptic. I regard peroxide of hydrogen (medicinal) as the best compound. Don't cauterize. In my opinión it is a needlessly painful operation and is seldom accomplished soon enough t prevent the bydrophobic inf ection f rom taking place. Having applied the antiseptic (per oxide of hydrogen) to the sore, tak care not to remove the white foam that will be generated. Let it remai until it disappears, which will occu in a few minutes. This being done, a compress of absorbent cotton, soaked in the peroxide of hydrogen, should be laid over the sore, with an over covering of oiled silk. Twice every day thewound should be dressed in the same manner. with the exception that the peroxide of hydro gen, instead of being full strength should be diluted, half and half, with clean water- tepid or filtered water being preferable. The subsequent treatment depends upon the condition of the dog that in flicted the wound. Don't kill the animal unless it shows evident symptoms of hydrophobia. Have it placed se curely in a safe place. If, at the ex piration of one week, or not more than two weeks, it has not shown any abnormal symptoms, the patiënt need ïot f ear. If, on the contrary, the animal sickens and dies, the patiënt should be treated by the Pasteur method as quickly as possible. The sooner, the netter. At the same time the contents of the dog's stomach and a portion of its spinal marrow, in glycerine, should be sent to thePasteur Iustitute, where experiments may decide whether the animal died with hydrophobia or not. Should the animal have been shot or otherwise killed, it is advisable that the patiënt should submit at once to the Pasteur treatment, for two reasons; first, because it is harmless; second, because its efficacy has been proved beyond a doubt, over 15,000 persons having been inoculated since Pasteur's discovery. In case the animal remains in good liealth it is unnecessary that the