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Adrian Press Washtenawisms

Adrian Press Washtenawisms image
Parent Issue
Day
3
Month
March
Year
1893
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

It is reported that there is a great dearth of candidates to fill the city offices of Ann Arbor, and it imay become necessary to use bear-traps. Dr. Nancrede, of Ann Arbor, recently performed an unusual operation in brain surgery, removing a cortical center, in a case of epilepsy. How the poor fellow must have suffered with that thing in his headl Alas, what ills flesh is hair to! # # Cellars have been entered by frost and vegetables frozen, which moves the Chelsea Herald toremark: "Potatoes are so scarce that they ought to be well protected." W.hy, they are protected 25 cents a bushel. You see that protection don't protect, don't you? Told you so! Prof. Schaberle, who has been sent by Lick observatory to Chili, to capture an eclipse, soaked up his iïrst knowledge of astronomy at. the Michigan University, and can see further around the back side of a penumbra, or a doublé sun-dog, than any other sky-gazer on the Pacific coast. H. W. Newkirk, in the Dexter News, advises Populator Peters to give up his "calamity notions" aird says if he should go to heaven, he would soon be raising a great row over the golden pavement and demand the remonetization of silver; and as a consequence would "get dropped outside the fence." A coasting sled and three boys ran down a hill at Ann Arbor last week. A vagrant post saw them and went and stood in the way. The front boy and the hind boy dodged, but the middle boy couldnt, and the post broke his leg. Moral: Don't be the middle boy. If you can't be the head, be the tail, and done with it. e Cordelia Babcock, of Stockbridge, wants a divorce from Rev. Thos. F. Babcock and alleges cruelty and non-support. What did Cordelia expect of a husband with a salary of $150 a year and a donation of :en bushels of raw turnips - a brownstone front, silk bed-ticks and humming-birds on toast? Madam, the thing is impossible. "Black Oats." Well, look out for them. Leave them alone. They are on a par with the Bohemian. It is simply a dodge to catch the farmer, who is so poor now that he can't say his prayers without kneeling under mortgaged shingles. - Monroe Democrat. Better raise black cats. A "c" for an "o" and you have them. # The Milán Leader was XI years oíd last week. It is a faithful reflector of life's battle - as it is fought around those diggings, which, with electric sugar, blooded stock and chicken thieves, makes up a community that often publishes itself to the world. Success to the Leader! and may it be many years before it will be obliged to dye its whiskers - or die at all. S. W. Beakes, that youthful veteran in political journalism and proprietor of the Ann Arbor Argus, has associated with himself in newspaper partnership, S. W. Curtiss, of Monroe, by reputation "a gentleman and a scholar." The Argus, under Mr. Beakes' able management was a splendid newspaper, and a strong, sensible, level-headed organ of the democracy. The two S. W. 's together will make of the Argus about all that could be expected of a firstclass country publication. ün Lyndon (Washtenaw county) when the sun was low, (this happened some two weeks ago.J all bloodless lay the trodden snow, and saw the merry skaters go, on ice sir, scooting rapidly. But Lyndon saw another sight! 'Twas Rev. Lobb's donation night, and $17, new and bright, were all he got - for times were tight! He held those "cartwheels" in his fist, and read their motto which he kissed. Said he, " 'I've got you on my list.' 'In God we trust' - Let's be dismissed." Ypsilanti young ladies recently gave a dance, and - dearcreatures - they sent out a host of invitations on the theory that not half the gentlemen invited would attend. Not a regret did they receive, and every gent invited arrived early and staid late. This was what the Ypsilantian calis " an embarrassing success." The ".wild procession" of swallowtails fairly swamped the ladies. The Ypsi gents should either "regretv more, or go south, where the ladies regret that there are not gents enough to match them.

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News