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What Shall Schoolgirls Eat?

What Shall Schoolgirls Eat? image
Parent Issue
Day
16
Month
June
Year
1893
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

This is an age of innovation in all things. The whirligig of reform has now stopped at the schoolroom dinner table. There should be a good time coming for schoolgirls, since progress has taken their daily menu in hand. How hungry they always are, to be surel Great growing girls, with an inch or two of red wrist always poking out from sleeves, and spindle legs always peeping unseemly from the skirt hem- ietouttucks notwithstaïïïuïg. -AXew ÍS3T? a?O) eTeg. ifi:S?.PjELiï schools, the'rry%u&g ladies" werë üpposed toíü iöó refined to Laye Jarge agpetites. ïhey lived princif5líy on tïick brëad and butter and weak tÜkJÖLa. JEaS-aS-SJishii' aa.omely folks say, withthe jreakf:tst, Jeat was sgryed ónlf St thTidclay 'dlnnêfTa Stip", per.when itexistedat all, íbTSsTsFeá öL ïl nibble of biscuit and a sip of toilk ani vráte'F Xo wonder the poor girls grov ansemic! "Unlimited diet" always figurec on the school prospectus, but it is a con veniently elastic term. The prospectus of a modern girls' board ing school shows that in this respect the old order has changed. There was a nea dietary table, on which were shown the respective nieals for each day in the week even to the rolly poly jam pudding whicli followed the roast mutton Thursdays anc the occasional fish which figured on Fri day's bill of fare. If I were the mother o: girls ripe for boarding school, I should think more of good plaiu food and plenty of it than of "ologies" and deportment Many a young woman of today is suffering the ill effects of genteel short commons in her school days.

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News