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The Ingham county grand jury, althougb i...

The Ingham county grand jury, althougb i... image
Parent Issue
Day
2
Month
March
Year
1894
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The Ingham county grand jury, althougb it has completed the duties for which it was called, has not yet been discharged nor will it be for some time. It is held in view of the possibility that something may yet come to light in connection with the frauds that will need further investigation. The Mason grand jury is said to be very representative in character and jnuch above the average in ability. As to political affiliations it is diyided between the two parties about half and half - a circumstance tenriing to give the people much confidence in its practicability. The foreman is a democrat and the secretary a republican. Tis said that crae or two persons other than those indicted barely escaped having true bilis returned against them. Owing to the conviction that interacademic games of football are detrimental to discipline, and advancement in study. Secretaries Lamont and Herbert have decided that there shall be no football contests between the West Point and Annapolis cadets. There is food for reflection in this action of the Secretaries of War and of the Navy for the various college presidents of the country. If these contests are detrimental to the highest interests of the students in these institutions which lay so much stress upon physical training, is it not probable that they are at least equally detriraental to the best interests of students in other institutions. The motion for a stay in the case of Boss McKane, the political criminal of Gravesend, has been denied by Judge Cullen, and it looks mightily as though the felon boss would have to put on the stripes and take up his abode in Sing Sing for the six years to come. His fate should furnish a decidedly wholesome lesson to assassins of the people's will and all sorts of election crimináis. It should teach the bosses and their heelers as well that there is such a thing as going too far in in the commission of election felonies, and that even those who have the "pull" cannot always save themselves from the vengeance of outraged laws. His conviction is a great triumph for popular rights and the sacredness of the ballot. Judge Person in handling the political conspirators of Michigan would do well to study deeply the lessons contained in this case. The scènes transpiring daily in the house of representatives at Washington are a disgrace and a scandal. With a majority of a hundred the democrats seem to be unable to do business and continue to make a spectacle of themselves from day to day. A quorum is constantly present and participating in the discussion, it is known to be present by all members,but because members decline to vote on roll cali they are considered as absent. There ought to be and is a way for the majority to do business. The fiction of being constructively absent when really present is an intolerable nuisance and should be abated. The assembied wisdom of four states should be able to find a remedy for this condition of things. Rules which defeat the very purpose of the existence of a deliberative body are too great an absurdity to find countenance with the people. They are inimical to the public welfare and should be amended without delay. The New York World of the 27A uit. contained the following statement by a member of the firm as to the cause which led to the recent -eduction of wages in the iron-works ji Coöper, Hewitt & Co., of Trenton, and also, the opinión of Jïr. I Hewitt as to the most important: need of business just now. It is, commended to the attention of all Argus readers. Vesterday a reduction of wages went into effect in the iron-works of Cooper, Hewitt & Co., aï Trenton. In commenting upon the reasons for it Mr. Hewitt said it was due to the prevailing business depression, which caused heavy losses last year. The business depression, he said, could be traced back to the McKinly bill. "The country could stand almost anything except a McKinly bill. Ever since that bill was passed wages have decreased." Speaking of the probable effect of the Wilson bill on business interests, he said anything that would do away with the present uncertainty would be good. "Business interests are waiting for something definite, so that men can know where they stand." As regards the iron interest, he said that not even free trade would hurt the Carnegie business, and that if free trade did not close out the New Jersey company Carnegie would. He regards the prompt passage of the Wilson bill as the most important for business now. The ten men indicted by the grand I jury at Mason last Friday, were called into court early this week and asked to plead to the indictments against them. Some entered pleas of not guilty, while others refused to plead and had pleas of not guilty entered by direction of the court. All have given bail ranging from Si,ooo to $7,000. Judge Person favors early trial of the cases, and as the regular term of court begins on March i2th, itis probable that some or all will be brought to trial at that time. This is well. While there should be no unseemly haste in the matter, there ought to ie no unnecessary delay. The very gravity of the charges makes swift ustice imperative. The crimes alleged to have been committed by these persons are among the worst that could be committed against free institutions. Outraged public sentiment, and justice to the accused as well, demand that they be given a speedy hearing. If they are responsible for the humiliation and disgrace brought upon the good name and fair fame of the State, the quicker they are proven guilty and hidden from public view the better. On the other hand, if they, or any of them, are innocent, justice requires that they be not required to bear the burden of infatny charged against them any longer than is absolutely necessary. The character and reputation of Judge Person are such as to give confidence to the desire of the people that the interests of the State and of all concerned will be duly guarded.

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Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News