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He Saw A Bear.

He Saw A Bear. image
Parent Issue
Day
23
Month
August
Year
1895
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

"I have seen bear in the city of Ann Arbor, " said Daniel Hisoock, the pioneer residing on North Main street. "It was in the f all of the year 1830, when the days were short, that my father wanted to go to Detroit. We were then living on the hill back of where my home now stands. I got up early in the morning to f eed the horse. It was still dark when I entered [the barn with our big dog who pitched on a big she bear and cub. I got mixed up in the tussle, and how I got back to the house I don't know. I told what I had seen and was laughed at by my brothers. For a week the continnally bothered me with. the question, "Yousaw a bear, did yon?" Abont a week later we were all husking cara one evening back of the barn. A she bear and cub, probably the same ones I had seen, came up and commenced eating corn. My brotbers saw ;hem and ran to the house and I folowed slowly. After that they did not ask me, "You saw a bear, did yon?" "Yes," said George fihodes, another well known pioneer, who was listening o Mr. Hiscock's story, "I once had an adventure that I have ne.ver forgotten. n th year 1846 I was living near Tonesville. During the winter evnings we yonng men often met at neighbors' houses to have a social game of cards. One dark night after being at a neighbor's I started throueh the woods for home. The road was simply a wagon rack. I had about a mile and a half ;o go. As I walked along I heard slight footstps right back of me. When I stopped the animal, a bear, as I believed, also stopped. I went along a piece wlien my fears increased so that I determined upon desperate ineasares. I pnlled out my jack knife and held it drawn in iny right hand. I stopped and reached back with my left hand, intending when the bear attacked to cut its jngular vein. My hand touched fur, ruy hair rose on end, knocking off my hat, and I found my neighbor's dog who was overjoyed that I recognized him. It seems the dog was in the habit of seeing home all visitors who called in the evening. When I got home I tried to coas the dog into the house, bnt he would not come in, but trotted off f or home. That was as near as I got to seeing a bear. ' '

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News