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Some Personal Peculiarities

Some Personal Peculiarities image
Parent Issue
Day
8
Month
November
Year
1895
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The late Senator Reagan of Texas nsed to do his thinking with a short 8tring on his fingers, and this string he wound np and twisted and nntied and tied again ruechanically as he followed the debate. Senator Vest always chews a quill toothpiek. Carlisle used to tear paper into bits and drop the pieces one by one on the floor. The latter is a tobacco chewer and sputters when he talks, making it uncomfortable for the interviewer. Max Freeman, the expert stage manager, pulls you by the coat lapel and ihen pnshes yon away witb his thnmb in the most erabarrassing manner. He will suddenly pnll yon, and then, as if he feared yon are likely to tread on him, push yon away from him quite as unexpectedly. Jim Thompson, who aspires to be the best dressed man in town, and comes pretty close to it, has been trying to raise a mustache, but his habit of fingering one si de of it wears that section out, and then the whole must be shaved off and he has to begin over again. A gentleman comes down through Herald square every day who may be seen glancing at his left shonlder and flecking at it with his right hand. There isn't anything there - not even the nap of his coat, whicb he has thus worn away. Yet he will keep pecking at it about twice a minute. Another man of my acquaintance is always glancing from one shoulder to the other, as if to see if they are yet really there. A popular Pittsburger on the square sotinds your lungs with his forefinger while he talks to you - tapping away like a woodpecker on a hollow limb. Another from the same burg - a good story teller - always emphasizes his stories with liberal punches in vonr ribs. - ■

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News