Press enter after choosing selection

Miss New Solomon

Miss New Solomon image
Parent Issue
Day
20
Month
December
Year
1895
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The judge, the renowned Miss New Solomon, aafc diguified in her seat of honor. Her decisions were farued the world over far clearness and justice. Qreat uations snbraitred their disputes to her for arbitrainent id were pleased to learn trom her the truth of their poeitions. That she should sit dignified Was theref ore Dot to be wondered at, but there was perplexity in her conatenance now. Thore was a case before her the like of which never had been knowu fiince her great narnesake sat in judgment over two women who contended for a baby. In all her lawbooks, in all her experience, there was no suggestion yf precedents for snch a case as this. As the matter stood to a casual' observer it was this : Mr. George Wheelking, a beautiful mustached young man, dressed iu gray knickerbockers, dark red sweater, brown and yellow golfing stockings and improved wheeling shoes, claimed that he was the sole and only owner of a fine silver and gold plated bicycle that was in the court for her honor to lock at. But there was anothor claimant, a yonng man just as beautifully mustached as Mr. Wheelking and quite as handsome otherwise, who appeared in brown corduroy knickerbockers, gray sweater, yellow and red golfing stockiugs and quite as improved shoes. This claimaut was Mr. William Bikking. Neither had wituesses, and so the learned jndge questioned them and cross questioued them, but each seemed equally truthful, and the judge paused nonplused for the first time since she had sat in that high seat. Fiually she arose from her chair and ordered the courtroom seats sfcacked around the sides. The audience was eent to the galleries, where it waited with breathless interest as the brawny court attendants oarried out the judge's orders. The reporters were not disturbed, being inside the rail, and only the swish of the pencils broke the silence as the judge ed to Mr. Wheelkmg aud said: "Take that wheel, sir, and ride the best you know how. " And the judge sat down and bnsied herself taking the hairpins ont of her hair and then putting them back again. Mr. Wheelking blushed very prettily as he gave his veiy baggy knickerbockers a twitch and preparedto mount. As gracefully as a bird he rose and settled in the saddle and began to ride. There was not a woman there whose heart did aot jump. The men, of conrse, tried to see a fanlt, but even they could not help noticing that Mr. Wheelking seemed to fit the wheel exactly. A look flitting acrossthe judge's face as of a smile was trauslated by one of the reporters as an indication that the decisión was going in favor of the rider, and she sent ont a full report of a decisión then and there for the newsgathering organization of Éhe city. Mr. Wheelking rode in and arortnd the inassive pillars, backward, forward, turning all the beautiful figures, and in all the ways that pretty riders know how. The flitter on Judge New Soloman's mouth becaine a smile. As Mr. Wheelking dismonnted Mr. Bikking carne daintily forward, and as airily as a falling leaf landed in the saddle and began to ride. The applause that followed Mr. Wheelking's performance died away in wonderment. When thé reporter saw Mr. Bikking riding as gracefully as Mr. Wheelking, she gazed into the judge 's face and saw tfiere, instead of a decisive smile, a look of surprise, followed by the same oíd look of perplexity, whereupon sh8 reached wildly for the nearest telegraph operator, and the recipients of the association's reports took out several columns of interesting matter and announced that the case was still under consideration. When Mr. Bikking dismounted, the critics could point out no difference between the riding of the two graceful young men, and the jndge looked as if she would like to have a good cry, but she bit her lips and restrained herself. Here was a case that needod a measnre entirely different from the usual niethod of deciding such things, and the judge determinad to decide it according to masculino human nature as she understood it. So she stood up, and with a wave of her hand that silenced even the whisperings of gossiping men, she spoke in ineasured tones and syllables : "Thns does this court decide. Listen, that you inay distinctly hear. Rather than render a decisión unworthy of thiís court, or fail to render one in any case, I do declare that the bicycle in question shall be bestowed on Miss Laura Bloomer unreservedly. " Mr. Wheelking turned to leave the court, giving Mr. Bikking a look that said plainly, "Auyhow you won't have it, " %7hile Mr. Bikking burst into tears. At this the jndge rose up, aud in a voice that echoed through the conrtroom said : "Decisión withdrawn, for it is plain to see now that the wheel belongs to Mr. Bikking. Poor fellow, takeitl" -

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News