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Worse Than A Plague

Worse Than A Plague image
Parent Issue
Day
19
Month
November
Year
1897
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

New York, Nov. 16. - A special from Havana says: It riow appears that nearly 75 per cent. of the 400,000 helpless women, children and non-eombatants in Cuba alïected by former Captain General Weyler's policy are dead. Despite the orders issued by General Blanco to feed the starving the daily raortality of the remalning "reconcentrados" is frightful. The rabid Spaniards, who believe that only by extermination of the race can the Cuban war be won, openly challenge the good faith of General Blanco's statements as to nis intention to feed and flnd work for those whom General Weyler has not killed. They jubilantly claim that the new captain general is enforcing the barbarous "concentration" of the country people exactly as nis predecessor did. Half the Population Murdered. The local presa no longer prints the news from the small towns. In one of the last articles upon the hunger situation it was called "one of the awful spectacles ever presented to humanity." More than half of the rural population has disappeared, having been murdered by Weyler and his supporters. The same men are much more directly accountable for the inhuman manner in which their splendidly brave soldiers have been underfed and uncared for. Spain has paid for good treatment of her patriotic sons, but they have been robbed until, half-starved and half-clad, they have died like sheep in the altérnate roasts and chills of Cuba's daya and nights. As nearly as can be conservatively computed from official figures, Jittle more than half are left alive and well of the 180,000 vigorous peasant lads Spain sent to Cuba. The figures are: Died in hospitals, 32,000; killed and died on the field, 12,000; sent back to Spain as "inutile," 25,000; now in hospitals, 12,000; total, 81,000.

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Argus
Old News