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Rawsonville

Rawsonville image
Parent Issue
Day
28
Month
April
Year
1899
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The Rasvsonville school is takitig a vacation ou account of ineasles Alouzo Hubble wil] move next week on the Ti-onpe farm south of Belleville. Measles, both Dntch and Red, are very prevalent in the Normal as well as in the country at large. Percv Wilcox. a young lady living soath of Belleville, was bnried last week Mouday, she is a sister of Mrs. Anna Cross. We learn with regret that Rev. and Mrs. Howard Moore of the Island district, will soou return to their old station at Mantou. The funeral of Vin Chrysler, son of Martin Chrysler, was held at Willis Saturday af ternoon. The deceased was traveling in California for his health at the time of his death. The body was sent to Belleville. Plnmbs, cherries and pears will blossom full. The Smock peach, a late variety of yellow .peaches, moderately, the late peaches in common varieties full, but the Mountain Rose and Crawford famiücs promise nothing. The Misses Waterbury, Tutele, I Rnthruff, Shenvood, Biuning and Mesdame Freemau and Burrell attended tbe state conventiou of the order of the King'.s JUaughtei.s and Sons held in Detroit last week. Au important featnre of tbe conventiou was the lecture given by Mrs. Bottome, of New York city, president of the international order. Mr. and Mrs. Bert Johnson and family, of Maple Grove farm, Stony Creek, spent Saturday at Chas. Crittenden's. Mr. Johnson has recently moved from Vinewood ave., Detroit. Maple Grove farm is being remodled into a beautiful snmmer resort by its present owner. Dogal Roberts, of Detroit, feels coufidéut be will have an electric road by his farm in the near future. Hay is more scarce thau it has been for years. It is #12 per ton. People say when such farmers as Mart Craine have to buy hay you can depend upon it somethiug is up. This somewhat prepared us for the shock when we saw Jerome Brayton who owns 400 acres of as good grass land as the sun ever sbone on, 40 eows, etc, going home with a bale of hay in the rear of his farm wagon.