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Dr. Boone To Cincinnati

Dr. Boone To Cincinnati image
Parent Issue
Day
8
Month
September
Year
1899
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Last night Dr. R. G. Boone was eleetedjsuperintendentj of the Cincinnati public schools to succeed Superintendent Morgan who had resinged. It is understood the salary is $4,500. Tbis position is a political one in large degree bnt it is understood tbat Dr. Boone was the candidate of all factions, so that he will comruence bis duties tbere with a practically nnauimons board back of him. This will enable him to give the schools an adrninistration of raerit which they have not always had because of divisions and factions. Because of politics in the schools there in the past real educational york üas suffered. But in Dr. Boone the city will have au adrninistrator and edneator who will unqnestionably be a blo to advauce the edncational interests of the city, especially since ne goes as a unión candidstf. There is ueed in Ciuciunari of sneh an overhauling of things as Superintendent Andrews is giving Chicago and Dr. Booue is a man in all always equal to the einergeucy. He is id the very prime of physical and intellectual inanhood, he is progressive ana aggressive in all educational mattrs and a broad and liberal student of affairs in general. While he knows the literature of his ptofessiou thoroughly, he is no book worm, beiug as able as au adininistrator as he is liberal and broad and deep as a student. He kaows what good teaching is and is as competent to do it himsslf as he is to direct it, He is a self made man and a man of wide and varied experience. He has served in the district school, in village schools oud was for 10 years superintendent of the Frankfort, Indiana, city schools, for seven years professor ot pedigogic in thB University of Iodiana, at Bloomington and for the pat six years jrincipal of the Michigan State Normal College of this city. In all these positions he was highly successful. Durug his administration of the normal college, its numbers have Jargely iiicreased, its graduates nearly or quite doubled and it has gained a repntaion outside of Michigan that it never posessed before. It is entirely safe to say that he is the ablest educitor who has ever stood at its head. During nis 'ears at the head of the normal college be has been in constant demand, berond the limita of bis time, in instiutes, souimer schools and for lectores ;hrougbout a large portion of the country, east as well as west.