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Large Mails At Postoffice

Large Mails At Postoffice image
Parent Issue
Day
3
Month
November
Year
1899
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

LARGE MAILS AT POSTOFFICE

 

Over 5,500 Letters a Day Go Out.

 

WHILE 7,500 COME IN

 

Nearly Half a Ton of Mail is Sent Out of The Ann Arbor Office Each Day.

 

Uncle Sam's postmasters and assistants are busy weighing mail. They are having a siege of it in the Ann Arbor postoffice. The figures may surprise the people.

 

The mail sent out of Ann Arbor in the first nine days of the weighing, footed up to more than three tons and a half and averaged 814 pounds a day. The number of sealed letters sent out in the nine days was 50,162, an average of 5,564 per day.

 

The following (able shows the weight of the mails sent out for the first nine days, Oct. 3 to 11 inclusive, with the number of letters sent out on those days :

 

Oct. 3 ......604 lbs. 11 oz. 5746 No. Letters.

Oct. 4 ....1118 lbs. 07 oz. 5538 No. Letters.

Oct. 5 ....1250 lbs. 11 oz. 5982 No. Letters.

Oct. 6 ....880 lbs. 01 oz. 4849 No. Letters.

Oct. 7 ....580 lbs. 03 oz. 4756 No. Letters.

Oct. 8 .....121 lbs. 09 oz. 3900 No. Letters.

Oct. 9 .....734 lbs. 03 oz. 7785 No. Letters.

Oct. 10 ...943 lbs. 08 oz. 5475 No. Letters.

Oct. 11 ...1092 lbs. 11 oz. 6131 No. Letters.

Totals .....7326 lbs. 00 oz. 50,162 No. Letters.

 

It will be noticed that Oct. 8 was a light day. That is because it was Sunday.

 

These figures mean that a letter is sent out every third day for every man, woman, child or infant in Ann Arbor. It means that there is an average of much more than one letter a day for each family in this city. It means that there is an average of two letters a day for each house in the city.

 

Mailing Clerk Sauzi estimates that for every 100 letters sent out, there are 150 received in the city. This would indicate that letters are coming into Ann Arbor at the rate of 7,500 a day.

 

If Ann Arbor had one or two big factories, the kind which in other cities furnish the bulk of their mail, she would long ago have been a first class postoffice. But there is no manufacturing institution here which buys stamps in what in other places would be regarded large quantities. Hence, it can be seen that the people of Ann Arbor are pre-eminently a letter-writing and a letter-receiving people.

 

It is no wonder that Postmaster Pond and his assistants have their hands full.