Press enter after choosing selection

Engineer As A Popular Hero

Engineer As A Popular Hero image
Parent Issue
Day
2
Month
December
Year
1885
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

iitniiM on the rail, of the ¦ ii i cii'.'iiH'i'rs and firemen, the iiiy and luivry Of' conductora, the 11 escapea from daath of brakemen, auii of llin mauy Hiipunilitions of rail rom i regardiug theur dangeroua calling, constitütea form of litcralure aa entirely li ir tii the lat lil'ty years of the nine; bcenth century as the develojmient of i iui-lt'. The engineer's positiou as piular hcro and rouiancer seems asI. The ncwspapcr reporter apparently ncver tires of stories of the grimy ihivir-' afléetion for the ponderous machine which he control, of his half belief [lm there is something al most human in a favorita locomotiva, and of his yarns about heilig chued Ity a phantom engine, and miraniloiis escapes from aniinmediate and horrible death. Perhaps next u popularity 8 theñreman'salwaysexciting account of how lie crawled out on the -uu catcher of his engine and snatohed from the rails a golden-haired lovely baby list in the very nick of time to save it from being crushed beneath the great wheels. Ilow we all admire him for it, and feel as thankful for his heroism as the horror-stricken mother who is invarially a helpless witness of her darling's dapger and who faints away when she him safe in the artus of the fireman. KnightS of the cab we honor you and fee! sure that beneath many an oil-stained lilouse beats a more chivalric and courageous heart than did beneath the bulletproof annOr of many a knight whoindays of old boldly led his unprotected soldiers wherpthe leaden hail feil thickest. üut u ¦ ask ;i hearing for the train-despatcher. Il' liis position is not hedged around with danger it is at least one of great responsibility and iraportance, and he merits nt; i-iit ion. Mr. Williani l!l;iir, the traindfematcher O the Detroit, (rand Haven and Milwaukee Railroad at Detroit, tells tliis Rood story of a notaltogetherpleasant experience of his : "For about fifteen years I have been an almost constant suflérer from neuralgia, which often imfitted me for my duties and made life a burden. The strain on my nerves was so great that 1 nearly last the use of one of my eyes. I never sueceeded in t'C'ting anything that would give me more t lian temporary relief until I began ij in;; Athlopnoros. A few doses relieved me and the tirst bottle made a very decided changa. In all 1 have probably used half a dosra bottles, and it is six months since I have had an attack. "I keep the medicine on hand all th8 time. I have some here at my office and some at home, so that I am well prepared in MM I may need it. If the neuralgia carne on during business a dose or two would soon drive it away. For neuralgia Athlophoroj isundoubtedly the best medicine 1 know of, and I think I ought to know as during the many years that I have Boffend I have had occasion to try about evervthing in the line of medicine for tliis cornplaint. My confidence in Athlophoros is suili that 1 have reeommended it to n.any persons trouliled with neuralgia, and in all rases it has been used very sntislai - torilv. ]n one case that I cali to mimi the gentleman found relief in two doses and in a ghort time was entirely well. I have reeommended it. If yon onnnnt pet ATiii.ornor.oi of yonr flrnirCirf, we will Band il expre.-s nuid, ou receiptof regiilarpriee - one dollnr perïiottle. We prefer tlnit you buy it from youriiriiKgist, bat it he h.isn't it, d.) not be persuaded to try sometliini; else, but iirder at iue from us, as directed. ATHLOrnoKos ('o., 11 Wall Street, New York. Thb annual report from the lilfe-ttoTlng Service showf that there are 203 stut !7 beiiijf on the Atlantie, thirty-night ou the lakrs. si ven on the l'acilic and 01 the fulla of the Ohio, Louisville. Ky. Out iperilod in 250 disasteis to ressels 3,19(5 were rescued, taid property vahi.'d at ' I rflO ras saved. ( h Sn.v mm PaBKBIX and Timntuy llcni. n.ii iii.-j ü.-i -. h.-ivi' ben elected to Parliament tor tbe city of Cork. Thhek' ïiK-ii were instantly killed anil anothor reeoived a fracture of tbe skull on ¦i n It l.y mi acddajltOO au nqueitmt undei eoni truction ar Merrítt'j Coi neis. N. ¦ . Tliis mnili' iwuuty-nine men killiil liy accldent i 'n ¦ ¦-inic pluce siuc:e [ay last. Tw i:i ¦. "; imildings were destroyed by flre atRednood ülls. Minn., the other momla. Tuk B.iliirian army on the28th onjiturort and ui ot. Tlirough the efforts ol the AuaUO-IIüngarian envoy at Belgrude. un arniKiire between Hei'Via and Buh bas boep i'ourlinled. Bisie tune over six thoosand of the French (aoops in Tomiuiu have died orbeen disablcá ly ük'ki 'l'iii imirn.i. pólice and municipal offioen of Indianapolis, on the 28tn uit. escorte! tho lema i ns of Vlce-President Hendrkks froiu Lis residenee to the eourt-houe, wuere it would lie in s!ate until the funeral. At Bevior. Mij., whito ininers on the 28th nlt. attáoki in"ii wlio had been imported to tnlo t'ntir jilares. and in the meleo tliiti' iin'ii vi;rc iimtantly killed and half a dozen seriously wonnded. A Bonn; in tho TrOplo Furnace hoistin;sliaft at Jaikson. o., burst on the 'Aih and killed tinco men, Jumes Dobbins, (itorgo Ingalis and lienry Jones. Childn.'u wet a blown fiftj feet, bnt were unin jnred. Mus. llAiiiv Wiions, an inmuto of th county poor house ut Indianapolis, aged 102 yeais. '¦¦11 trom a third-story wiudow of the buililiii Lo the brick pavemc.ut on the 2ííth uit., roceiviug fatal injuries. Tin: riótous minera in tho Monongahola (l'a.) Valley, frightened at tbe detüimined stand taken by Iho authorities, fled to their homes on the 'Üth uit. At twenty-six leading clearing-hotises in tho United States the exchanges duriug tho week ended on the iiöth uit. afigregated $1,000,105,545), agninst f 1,15H,'M7,VM the previous woek. As eompaxed with thecorreEponding week of 1SS4, the increase amounts to 51.4 per cent. FrpEUAi, soldiers on tlio 2(Hh nlt. drove the cattle of Burko & Martin from lumls in Üklahomo and linraed thoir building. Tuf. element of unoertainty still existod on the 28th uit. regard ing the futí n of Spain. A state of siege had been declared in e '¦ ixge inntion of the ri.uiitrv. and outtis uil! Ciulisls wi'ie ¦ '!¦: i ¦ ! ; i i - ujl tbe noüti-1-, i i oi ii, r

Article

Subjects
Ann Arbor Courier
Old News