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Wood Vs. Steel

Wood Vs. Steel image
Parent Issue
Day
30
Month
May
Year
1888
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Wliirti I tlie Stronger in Proportion to Weiglit A Simple aml Interetlng Experiment. The relative welght of wood and steel in proportion to their strengtli is a matter which proliahly nul mie out of one hundred readers has ever hád occasion (o investígate. If the conundruni were propniniilcd : " Which is the strenger- Wood or Sttel1.' " ninety-nine out of u liuudred would he likcly toanswer that steel possessés greáter strength In proportion to weigM tliun does wood. Ei[icriments have recently ! been made'in Qhio wÜich show that wnml weígliintí only hall' us inucli as UaeJ will. w 1 1 ¦ 1 1 )ut uixler preflBÜre, stanl R urente]1 struin than steel. The Hlnetratfon mi tilia page shows a piece of il and apteceof stcel, (the lutter weighing just twice iis much ;i the formor), under c(uul prestare, nuá in every tmtúce che itoel yields and B t ¦ 1 1 1 out of line. Auy one "ii makc tliis experiment. The deyice a cxtreniely simple', and yet t Ilústrales an important point with Whifh cvery intelligent farmer should familiarize hiraself, eseeallv a there aeems to be a disposition on tne part oï sume tüanufacturers to change frota trood to steel and iron. AVe are fndebted to Messrs. Aultman, Miller A 'o., of Akroii, Oliio. tur tlc accompanyinK lliustration. It was the pleasure OÍ a representative of tliin pajier, wliile in Akron a few days sinoe, to witness this ex. periment. A pieee of ash, sucli as is used ín the Buckeye machine, was placed in a clamp along jvitli a pieoe of steel of equal length, the same as is useil in all steel Binders. The steel weighed jusi twioe as raucli as tlie wood. and vet tlie steel nvariably yielded and liont a the preaSUTe was hrought down. The wood was scarcily out of line, and when i)ic clamp was removed it sprung lack to its origtaal rioApe Not SO witli the steel, li nt only bent uoder the pressure of the ilainp, luit reniained bent when the oíame was taken ofl'. ïhis, it is claimed, is a olear illustration oí the difíerence between v. I and steel franie Binders. When an all -steel machine is broughtintosharpcontact wit h some unyielding obstarle, its frame s íiable to spring, and when once sprung its nsefulness is at an end. lt rannot be straightened without resort to the shop for repairs. A vhI frame is not tliusatU-i tt-d. If bent ander ¦ violent strain, it ;it unce prinís back t its original shape. At the lirst glance it would Beem that a steel Binder is lighter than a wood franie, and that it posaeBSed ireater strength. Uut it is an instanoe in wliich apiaramea are deceptivr. Apieceof steel onc fuut longandahalf inch square, weighs dötible as mm-h as a i)ieee of seasöned a-h oné foot long and l?i mehee FHuai. In othn w..rls the steel, in propbrtion to Imlk. is Bfteen and one-eighth times aa heavy aa the wood. A steel frame ot a macliine whicb is one-fifteenth as larpc as a wpod frame, weighs exactly the same i the wood. Bn( even witli this difference in size, the wood ha.s fonr Ümee the strength. Tbea are dmpk problema wliicli every fariiur eau wilvc for liimself. He need not accept the word oí any man wbose interests would be subserved by having him believe one way or the Other. " Make the test yoursclf, añil when ai) aprent comes to you with a di'iiial of this propositlon, you can talk intolligenUy from [Mjrsonal knowledge. JL

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Subjects
Ann Arbor Courier
Old News