Press enter after choosing selection

You Call This Hot, Sonny?

[img_assist|nid=229198|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=80]

On Wednesday, July 8, 1936, the temperature in Ann Arbor [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360708-mercury_100_pg1|reached 100 degrees]. [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360709-relief_not_in_sight_pg1|Thursday] no relief was in sight so the kids took [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360710-kerplunk_pg3|to the water]. By [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360710-two_prostrations_pg1|Friday] area residents were being felled by the high temperatures. On [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360711-early_break_pg1|Saturday, July 11,] the weatherman forecast a break in the weather, but he was wrong. The [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360713-heat_mark_set_pg1|next day] temperatures again reached 100. On [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360714-break_promised_pg1|Tuesday] the weatherman again forecast a break in the weather and [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19360715-michigan_welcomes_pg1|Wednesday, July 15,] relief finally arrived. The two consecutive days of 100+ degrees set a record for Ann Arbor. The high temperature record, however, had been set in July, 1934, 105.2 degrees.