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Arrival Of Lady Franklin

Arrival Of Lady Franklin image
Parent Issue
Day
17
Month
August
Year
1860
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Amoiig the passengere by the Adriatio, wlneh arrived on Satunbiy, was Nady Fr:inklïn: the vvidovv of Si. John Franklii), t'10 disliiiguisbod Arctic ex plorer. 'Ier purpos, we under i to travel through tba United 63 ■ nid Ganada, and sha will probably extond her four as far bs California, (thora r-ho propcsM to pass the winter. Wliile in this city and victnity she is the guesl oí Mr. Henry Griflnetl. No prn ata wo.nao of curOay. i perbapa hjr nieö EÜoronca Nisyhtinirale, is wo ve!l knowfl its Lady Franklio ; nor wil) hor name ever bo forgot ten po long as Arotic explorat.on remains a matter of hiutory. Her luisband taüed on hia third voyage to the Arctiu regions in the oommand of the Erebua and ihu Terror, in 1845, and from the momont thftt h.s failnre to re turu mudo it probable thiit he and bis gaüant ;ew haif fierishtd, or wt-reimprisooed by the lossof hisships in the rolenllees ico of the frozen North, biwife neverc8a8tid hor euort to ajscertaia their fatü and eosure their release ii' Blill in uxistenoe. Tho story has often boen lold. She sought the aid ot her oi.WM'nmont ; sha appuwlad to tho vvorlij for aáeiatánoe ; and -sho spent nearly the whole of her own larga private fjrtune ÍD a nevor-tiring duvotion to this 0110 sola object of hor life. Nor wero her appeala ia vain. The Britih government sent sxpedition alter eypödition, manned by men as bravo and as self-devoto.l as thosa tho' went to seek ; two went from tliis coanti1)' on tlio same errand, one of vvliicn was projaotBd ontireiy, and the otlier in paft, by Henry Q-rinnell. They al! addcd much to the geographical knowladuo of the world, but do sin was fonnd by any one of them of the fate of the missing sailors. The last of tffese voyages of mexey was under Capt. McOlintook. Fourteen years had piwsed away, and there RMined barely ro rn for tl:e sübtest doubt that Franklin and bis tnen ha'i long nee pei'islicd. But Lady Pranklin ivas not contontcd tócense hwefiorta while there was the fain test uncertainiy. The government, however, did not share her feelings, and declined any further expenditure, any iurthor risk r:f life, in what seeined a barran search and a useless labor. Capt. McClintook's oxpedition, therefore, was sent out at her own charges, and this, which seemed a last, forlorn hope, was saccessfnl. He foüowed the Franklin expedition to Beechy Island, then making his way down Peei's Srund, towardsthe Magnetio Pole, he fonrid, at length, what he sought, and what so manv had sought for in vain bofore him. On King William's Iflland, he carne upon the cairns whioh the uuhappy men had erected, in the liopes that at some fature day thev would be opened by tho p'ous hands of countryinen. From the records lcft in them, he learned that Sir. John Franklin had died on board of his ship, when beset in the ice, on the llth june 184-7, but died, happüy, before thatgreat suffering overtook his men whioh aftervvards bei'ell thum. In April followiog, when, nu doubt, starvation had begun to stare them in the face, and whan it was evident that the release of their ahips was hopeless, they abandoned them, and started oo their terrible rnarch lor the Groat Fish Eiv er. They novcr reached t. Tho Esquimaux, whorn Capt. MoOlintock met, and who had seen tliem, said ' They dropped by ths way as they went ulorig.1' The bleaelied skeletons which he afterwards found attested the trnth of the report. Exhausted by diseaso and hunger and cold, tho heroic men had failen one by ona as thev dragged their weary lirnbs and gaunt bodies through the Arctic darkneas over tofl Arctic ice. Capt MoCiintock ruturned to England with the evi ionces of the result of his expedition, and laid bef-re the widnw the few sad relies that attested the fate of her busband and his fol owers. Lady Fr -iiklin, we understand, will remain for a week at tiie O'iuntry place of Mr Grien all, on the North River, to recover from the f tiques of the voyage, and wiü then go to Canada, to be present at the cereiaony oí opening the Victoria Bridge.