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How To Sustain Your Local Paper

How To Sustain Your Local Paper image
Parent Issue
Day
5
Month
April
Year
1861
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

1. Lay aside your feara that tho editor will get rich fustor than his ceighbors. We have never heard of a man making more than a decent living by the publioation of country newspaper, even if he had ever so good a busi ness. A oase n point is an acquaintance of oura who has been publishing sorao six or seven years, and has had all the business of his town and county, and a largo portiou of that of tho surroundicg country; but with all that he gets into as tight piaches for niouey to buy his white paper with as other publishera with whom we are aequainted. 2. Il the paper agrees with your way of thinking, subscribo aod pay for it, and persuade your neighbors of the same miad to go and do likewice. Do not teil the editor to send your paper without paying, and when you get to owe two or three dollars teil your friends that the paper is of no account, and that it vvill burst one of these days. The way, under sucb. a state of the case, to keep a paper from bursting up, is for each subscriber to keep the editor's booka free from charges himself. Once we had to close, and on postiog up, found we had booked and outstanding some $1,300. The tiaing of applying the credit system to tho newspaper business may be likened to a farmer Belling out his erop a bushei to the man. The sum does not saem of any account to the debtor, but the aggregate oí these bushels may make or break the poor delver of the soil. 3. If you have a father, mother, sister, brother or friend of any kind, residing at a distance, and are able, subscribe, pay for and send thom a copy. 4. Il you have any printing you wish done, do not 'jew" the editor down to a starvution price, and when he comes to made a purchase of you "spike on the tarifif." 5. If you have any advertising or job-work to be done, take it to vour village paper, except perhaps you may wish to advertise in more than one Bader. 6. Do not run off to the city to get your hand-bills, labels, cards, &c, printed, becausa, forsooth, you can get a reduction. Support your own as you wish to be supported. A man who is always running away frota home with bis business, little deserves the patronage of the community ia which be lives, and as far as we aro concernad, euch will receive the "ccld shoulder." 7. If you havo tbe control of any legal advertising eend it to your iriend. Tliis kind of business pays better than any other, and the more you can send to the editor of your paper, the better for hini and it. In proportion to the amount of receipts of a paper is the editor able to rnake it usot'ul, amusing and entertaining to the community iu which it is published. 8. Do not expect much of a paper when an editor is drivon to be his own compositor, proof reader, pressman and davil, and has to run all over town every forenoon in the vain search for a "quarter" to buy eomething for his dunner. 9. Do not expect the editor to make honorable rnention of your business every few weeks for nothing. The space ia a paper, and a man's time, are worth something, and the notice comes back to the drawer of the recipiënt in dollars and cents. Aa editor ehould not be allowed to go hungry, barebacked and bare footed. They "eat, drink and swear" just like other people. 10. If the editor owes you a shilling, do not chaee hina "from rony morn to balmy eve" for it, and when you happen to get tbe balance on the other side, " cut the gentloinan'a acquaintance."

Article

Subjects
Old News
Michigan Argus