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How They Vote In France

How They Vote In France image
Parent Issue
Day
3
Month
July
Year
1863
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

correspondent oí the London Exatniner visited tha voting polls in Paria during Uie recent olections, and reporta that nothing can be more orderly and tranquil than the proceedings. He k'ivcs an interesling descriptioa of the mannerio which the details of a French eleotion are conducted: "A polioo oíScer is stationed at the entrance of the hall of voting, who merely inquires whether you are an elector. As a stranger, I was invited by the Mayor, with my companion, to witness what was going on. ïhe Mayor presided over the table, on which was placed the ballot-box. Every ejtor had at the door separate tickets given him, on which were printed the naraes of the candidates. Each ticket resembled the others, so that when folded it was utterly impoasible to distinguís!) the name of the person veted for. The elector presented a document printod on green paper, containing his name, quality, place oí nbode, and certiñeate oí registration. - Ihe name having been called out, the serutinuers, of whom there wero fóur, exatnined the electoral lists; and on ascertaing thal the name was found there the elector, delivered his lolded ticket to the President, by whomit wasdropped into tho box. Voting aiwaya takes place on a Sunday, for the eonvenienee of the laboring classes, and on the following Monday. If any questioQ oí identity ariae, two known iuhabitants of the district are allowed to identifv tho individual vvho comes forward to vote. At four o'clock the ballüt-box is sealed; that oí yesterday was cou-rteously put intoour hands. We found that the great proportion of electora voto on the seomid day, as an additional security ngainst any tarnpering with tho ballot-box. There were at no time more than íour or fivo electora in the room, and no one was detained a minuto aftor his certifícate of registration was found to agreo with the electoral lists." ]féS_ Man's inhumanity to man, makes couutless thousauds mourn.

Article

Subjects
Old News
Michigan Argus