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Good Bread

Good Bread image
Parent Issue
Day
19
Month
July
Year
1872
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

" ïho unpardonable sin in man is from good grain to make poor whisky ; and in woman, froto good tlour to make poor bread.'' ïho latter is a erimo ol' frequent oecurrence, aad has uothiug to excuso ifc, for it is just as easy to always havq liht, swoet, wholesomo bread ns to ruin on 's digestive organs with hot saleratus ln'souit, oi' to disgust ono's olfactoriea with " salt riaingS." After several years of trying bread recipes, taking advioo from othei hout .".ml experimenting myself in the nuittur of bread making, I havo finally i reoipo tbat never faite. It i:iiiy not be now to many readors, but I have nevor seon it pubiished. To commenco witb, good yeast and tlour are, of course, ossontial. If yon use dry yoast cakes, have ihcm thoroughly soaked in topid water. At night boil half a dozen potatoes and put them through a ooiander with tho water Hl which they wcr boiled. Pour in cold waterun til tho potato water is luke warm, add tho yoast, cover and put in a warm place over night. You observe thut no ilour is put in at night. Tuis is the peculiarity of this recipe. In the moruing heat the potato water, stirring constantly and being caroful not to scald it. Htir in floui till it is a thick battcr, and let it rige. When sulnciontly light, knead in all the floor you can. J is ut this stage tiiat kueading is most eifective ; so knead it just one honr. Don t gay you haven't the time to spare ; you had butter on that "baking day" make only three kinds of cake, iustead of the usual six, or oven omit tho inevitable "pies" altogether, rather tban have the "staff of life" anything short of perfecï. After it has again ïisen, mold into loaves, and wlion ligbt, bake. The result will bo bread th.it is white, with the puro wheaton tiste, that can be presaed into one-half ita bulk, and will immediately (xpand to its original ■ui whcn breken apart eun be peel ed oiT in flakes or layers. This is one of the resulta of long kueading, and is prooi that the' bread has "attained unto porfectiou."' It is Burprising how few people know wliat reuil y good. bread is. So loup: as thoir bread is not positively sour or lieay tii. y eat it, blissfully ignorant that it can be made better. A few daya since a young housekeper showod me, with evident pride, a loa!' of bread of her niaking, remarking that the ability to make bread was hor ono aocomplishment, of which sho was j itly proud. Said bread wis hard, dark and ooarse-grained. .!;■. Rural, whatoouldl To the class of housekeepers which she representa, wlio oonsider tlieir method of doing anything r.ght, simply bu it is " tlieir wny," it is nseless to try tó toach anything ; buttothose who are trying to learn, ihe ui m:ty

Article

Subjects
Old News
Michigan Argus