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Riding Camels

Riding Camels image
Parent Issue
Day
26
Month
May
Year
1876
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Mounting the camel is not difncult, jut it has soine sweet surprises for the novice. The camel lies upon the ground with all his legs shut up under him like a jackknife. You seat yourself in the oroad saddle, and cross your legs in front of the pommel. Before you are ready, something like a private earthquake begins under you. The camel raises his lind quarLers suddenly, and throws you over upon his neck ; and, before' you recover from that ho straightens up his knees and gives you a jerk over his tail ; and, while you are not at all certain what aas happened, he begins to move off with that dislocated walk whïch sets you into a see-saw motion, a weaving backward and forward in the capacious saddle. Not ha ving a hinged back flt for this movement, you lash the beast with your koorbash to make him change his gait. He is nothing loth to do it, and at once starts into a high trot, which sencls you a foot into the air at every step, bobs you from side to side, drives your backbone into your brain, and niakes castinets of your teeth. Capital exercise. When you have enoug:i of it yovi pull up, aod humbly inquire what is the heathen method of riding a dromedary. It is simple enough. Shako the loose halter rope (he has neither bridle nor bit) against his neck as you swing a whip, and the animal at onco swings into an easy pace ; that is, a pretty easy pace, like that of a rocking-horse. But everything dependa upon the camel, - Warner 's Book on Egypt.

Article

Subjects
Old News
Michigan Argus