Press enter after choosing selection

Three brilliant wordsmiths

Tue, 10/10/2017 - 4:27pm

[cover_image]|1460390[/cover_image]

As presented in delightfully rendered, craftily composed biographies of wordsmiths for children (of all ages).

Edward Estlin Cummings was born on October 14, 1894 and was raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts by two supportive and creative parents, who introduced Estlin to the wonderful world of words and provided him with the space to use them magically. Estlin’s love of words was illuminated by his passion for drawing and painting, so that the poems he created used words for language and illustration. This very unique style of poetry is well known to any who are familiar with the works of [a:cummings, e.e.|e.e. cummings]. In [b:1469730|enormous smallness : a story of e.e. cummings], [a:Burgess, Matthew|Matthew Burgess] details [a:cummings, e.e.|cummings’] childhood and his journey to becoming a poetry pioneer. [a:Di Giamomo, Kris|Kris Di Giamomo’s] illustrations are the perfect match to both Burgess’s and cummings’ words. Words appear as pictorial representations of leaves on trees, clouds, the night sky.

[a:cummings, e.e.|cummings] was greatly inspired by the outside world that he noticed as a child. So was [a:Williams, William Carlos|William Carlos Williams], born in 1883 in Rutherford, New Jersey. [a:Bryant, Jen|Jen Bryant] gives us Williams’ story in [b:1323360|A river of words: the story of William Carlos Williams]. As Williams grew older and had less time for outdoor pursuits, he realized that poetry instilled in him the same feeling as the sounds of the natural world. Unlike cummings, Williams did not find the poetry bursting out of him. He first tried his hand at writing like the famous English poets he had read in school, but found that this style could not convey the images he was seeing in his mind. He put aside rhyme and rhythm and “let each poem find its own special shape on the page.” Williams became a doctor to pay the bills, but often used his prescription pads for jotting down the lines in his head. After each day of work, he wrote to create the poems that are so well known and well loved today, poems about plums and wheelbarrows. Like Di Giamomo, illustrator [a:Sweet, Melissa|Melissa Sweet] demonstrates that pictures can be made with words.

Bryant and Sweet team up again in [b:1460390|The right word : Roget and his thesaurus] to give us the story of another great wordsmith. Born in London in 1779, [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Mark_Roget|Peter Mark Roget] was a collector of words, and because of his accumulation, we have one of the most amazing, breathtaking books there is. The Greek translation of thesaurus is “treasure house,” and there is not a better word within it to describe it. As a child, Roget didn’t have many friends, but he had books, and reading them inspired him to make his own. He organized his words differently from cummings and Williams: he created lists. As he grew older he realized that there was always an ideal word to describe anything and that if those perfect words could all be found in one place, a book sure to provide the best word, than the world would be improved for it. Like Williams, Roget also became a doctor, but it was ultimately his wondrous compendium of words, the “Collections of English Synonyms Classified and Arranged,” that created his legacy. Bryant tells Roget's story in way that exhibits her own admiration for the thesaurus, and Sweet has once again used words as active, cheerful illustrations to show how letters can convey meaning on many levels.

The stories of these three scribes will appeal to word-lovers of any age, even help to create some new ones. And yes, I used a thesaurus to write this. I always do, regularly, repeatedly, and evermore.

Comments

LOL