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Sometimes Amazing Things Happen

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“And when an incarcerated person with a mental illness is too ill to be cared for at Rikers they go, the men that is, to the "prison ward" on the 19th floor of New York's storied Bellevue Hospital, where they remain in custody while doctors, nurses, social workers and counselors treat them, under the watchful eyes of correctional officers, until they are well enough to return to jail.”
From [https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/therapy-it-s-more-just-talk/201706/sometimes-amazing-things-happen|Psychology Today]

In her author’s note, [a:Ford, Elizabeth|Elizabeth Ford] tells us that she measures her “success as a doctor not by how well I treat mental illness but how well I respect and honor my patients’ humanity, no matter where they are or what they have done.” Her book, [b:1508643|Sometimes amazing things happen : heartbreak and hope on the Bellevue Hospital psychiatric prison ward], chronicles the ways in which she does exactly that, sometimes with a personal struggle, though most often intuitively. [a:Ford, Elizabeth|Dr. Ford] begins her story at the outset of her career at Bellevue Hospital in New York. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NYC_Health_%2B_Hospitals/Bellevue|Bellevue], the oldest public hospital in the country, houses, on its top floors, “one of the most famous psychiatric wards in the world,” including the Bellevue Hospital Psychiatric Prison Ward. The patients here are inmates of the New York City jail system, headquartered on Rikers Island. This is where [a:Ford, Elizabeth|Dr. Ford] works for most of this memoir, and these inmates people her stories from that time. [a:Ford, Elizabeth|Dr. Ford] details her interactions with her patients, providing them with humanity and respect. She is skilled at turning even her most extreme outrage to empathy, aided by her capacity to listen well. “If you listen to the story long enough, you can figure out why these patients behave so badly. Then you can try to fix it.”

Ford has two young children, and like many parents, she struggles with a work-life balance, and at times finds herself unable to leave her patients’ suffering behind. Her own unraveling during her second pregnancy causes her to scale back on her work and leave Bellevue for a period of time. When she returns in 2009, it is to become the first female Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Service at Bellevue. She is continually challenged by the caring of her patients, by episodes of violence, by her frustration with the criminal justice system, but she faces these crises with boundless compassion and determination. Today, [a:Ford, Elizabeth|Dr. Ford] is the Chief of Psychiatry for Correctional Health Services for New York City’s Health and Hospitals.

Similar medical memoirs include, [b:1512129|No apparent distress : a doctor's coming-of-age on the front lines of American medicine] by [a:Pearson, Rachel|Rachel Pearson], and [b:1517189|Admissions: life as a brain surgeon] by [a:Marsh, Henry|Henry Marsh].