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AADL Board of Trustees Meeting - October 15th, 2018

Fri, 09/28/2018 - 12:40am

When: October 15, 2018 at the Downtown Library

Watch the October 2018 Meeting of the AADL Board of Trustees. Select an agenda item below to jump to that point in the transcript. 

For more information, please see the Board Packet for this meeting

18-142 I. CALL TO ORDER

18-143 II. ATTENDANCE

18-144 III. APPROVAL OF AGENDA (Item of action)

18-145 IV. CONSENT AGENDA (Item of action)

CA-1 Approval of Minutes of September 17, 2018

CA-2 Approval of September 2018 Disbursements 

18-146 V. CITIZENS' COMMENTS

18-147 VI. FINANCIAL REPORTS Bill Cooper, Finance Manager

18-148 VII. COMMITTEE REPORTS

18-149 A. BUDGET & FINANCE COMMITTEE

18-150 VIII. DIRECTOR'S REPORT Josie B. Parker, Director

18-151 IX. OLD BUSINESS

18-049 A. UPDATE ON THE PUBLIC MEETING SPACES IN AADL BRANCHES PROJECT Len Lemorie, Facilities Manager

18-152 X. NEW BUSINESS

18-153 A. RESOLUTION TO OPPOSE CITY OF ANN ARBOR PROPOSAL A TO DESIGNATE THE LIBRARY LOT AS AN URBAN PARK

18-154 A. REVIEW OF THREE YEAR SNOW REMOVAL CONTRACT (Item of discussion) Len Lemorie, Facilities Manager

18-155 XI. CITIZEN'S COMMENTS

18-156 XII. ADJOURNMENT 

Transcript

  • [00:00:03.90] NARRATOR: Ann Arbor District Library board of trustees meeting.
  • [00:00:07.55] [GAVEL POUNDING]
  • [00:00:08.40] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Sorry. Good? OK. Sometimes I don't bang it loudly enough. Then they don't know to start the recording.
  • [00:00:13.57] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Are you hitting the wooden thing?
  • [00:00:14.85] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yes.
  • [00:00:15.29] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Hit it. [INAUDIBLE].
  • [00:00:16.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I feel like I hit it hard last time. In the next meeting I'll do it, at the end of this video of course. So Karen, we're good on attendance?
  • [00:00:27.04] KAREN WILSON: Yes.
  • [00:00:27.67] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. So the next item is to approve the agenda.
  • [00:00:33.68] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: I'll move.
  • [00:00:34.98] JIM LEIJA: Second.
  • [00:00:36.27] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: So as we are-- yeah. There's some discussion I wanted to have about the agenda. So you might see on the table in front of you a resolution that's not in the agenda. That's something that we talked about in Executive Committee. And we decided--
  • [00:00:53.05] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: When do you have the Executive Committee?
  • [00:00:54.33] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: We had it tonight. So we decided--
  • [00:00:56.30] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: It's usually right before the meeting.
  • [00:00:57.56] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Right before this meeting. So we decided that we would like to add another item to discuss and a resolution to the agenda tonight. So that's on the table in front of you. And so that's something that I would like to add to the agenda and new business, probably the first thing.
  • [00:01:16.71] JIM LEIJA: So that it can be entered into the minutes, the-- you're moving to add resolution regarding proposal A.
  • [00:01:26.72] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Correct, yes.
  • [00:01:28.42] VICTORIA GREEN: To the agenda?
  • [00:01:29.63] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yes. Is there a second?
  • [00:01:32.66] JIM LEIJA: I'll second that.
  • [00:01:33.74] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. Any discussion? And we can talk about the resolution during the time too, just to clarify.
  • [00:01:39.95] VICTORIA GREEN: I think the only comment I'd make is it's unusual for us to add something to the agenda. And I'm glad it's unusual for us to do this. I mean, I understand why it happened in this case, because it's so timely. But I think this is the first time in my service on the board that we've had to add something at the last minute.
  • [00:01:53.54] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Point taken. OK, so that brings us to voting on this addition to start, yes.
  • [00:02:00.62] JIM LEIJA: So I move to approve the agenda with the addition of the discussion of this resolution.
  • [00:02:05.59] VICTORIA GREEN: And I second.
  • [00:02:06.88] JIM LEIJA: Thank you.
  • [00:02:07.51] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: All those in favor?
  • [00:02:08.53] VICTORIA GREEN: Aye.
  • [00:02:08.92] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Aye.
  • [00:02:09.57] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Aye.
  • [00:02:10.34] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Opposed? OK! Consent agenda. Karen, point of order.
  • [00:02:18.94] KAREN: [INAUDIBLE].
  • [00:02:23.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I think it-- like, it-- we kind of have to vote another time.
  • [00:02:28.73] COLLEEN SHERMAN: So I motion that we approve the agenda with its changes in the format of a consent agenda.
  • [00:02:39.83] JIM LEIJA: Second.
  • [00:02:40.41] JOSIE PARKER: No.
  • [00:02:41.01] JIM LEIJA: Yes. I think we're coming up on the Robert's Rules.
  • [00:02:44.70] JOSIE PARKER: You're going to back to the main agenda.
  • [00:02:45.81] JIM LEIJA: Yeah, we're going back to the main agenda.
  • [00:02:46.85] JOSIE PARKER: You voted on a change the agenda.
  • [00:02:49.05] JIM LEIJA: Correct.
  • [00:02:49.47] JOSIE PARKER: And now you have to vote to approve the agenda as it was changed. That's simple. Just somebody move it, somebody second it, and then--
  • [00:02:56.73] JIM LEIJA: I approve a move to approve the agenda as it was changed.
  • [00:03:01.33] LINH SONG: I'll second it.
  • [00:03:02.37] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. All those in favor?
  • [00:03:04.42] BOARD MEMBERS: Aye. Aye. Aye.
  • [00:03:05.92] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Opposed? OK. Now we can move on.
  • [00:03:09.39] JOSIE PARKER: Right.
  • [00:03:10.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. Consent agenda, is there a motion to approve the consent agenda?
  • [00:03:16.38] VICTORIA GREEN: So moved.
  • [00:03:17.79] JIM LEIJA: Second.
  • [00:03:19.12] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Any discussion? All those in favor?
  • [00:03:22.47] ALL: Aye.
  • [00:03:23.72] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Opposed? Citizens' comments. Anyone signed up? Oh. Hi.
  • [00:03:37.58] DAVID DEPICE: I wasn't planning to speak. But I heard that you're adding something to the agenda. And this is a comment I've made a lot of public meetings.
  • [00:03:44.35] I think it's anathema to public transparency when resolutions are added at the last minute so that the public doesn't know what you are doing to come here and make a comment about a resolution or an ordinance, whatever it happens to be you're going to do. I understand the timely situation sometimes gets in the way of this. But I just don't think it's right. So thank you.
  • [00:04:11.09] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yeah. Thank you for speaking. Yeah, I mean, point taken.
  • [00:04:14.54] ED SUROVELL: Could we have the name of the speaker please? Oh yes. I'm sorry. David, yes?
  • [00:04:18.27] JIM LEIJA: David Depice.
  • [00:04:19.90] DAVID DEPICE: Yeah, sorry. David Depice.
  • [00:04:22.87] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Where do you live?
  • [00:04:24.85] [LAUGHTER]
  • [00:04:26.57] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: We'll just keep asking you questions when you're almost seated.
  • [00:04:29.00] DAVID DEPICE: Yeah, South State Street, Ann Arbor.
  • [00:04:30.95] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Thank you.
  • [00:04:31.77] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Thank you. Anyone else? Thank you everyone.
  • [00:04:42.15] Your feedback is received. Although, soon you'll have another president so you'll have to make the feedback or the comments to them. OK. So moving on to financial reports.
  • [00:05:00.48] BILL COOPER: Good evening, everyone. You have my report for September. As a reminder, the amount that we are reporting now in the financial report are actuals. There are no accruals in the report. So it's actual cash received and actual cash dispersed out.
  • [00:05:19.96] So as of September 30, 2018, we have collected nearly 91% of our estimated tax revenue. And year to date revenue over expenditures is $11,378,828. And there were no line items that were over budget. Any questions for me?
  • [00:05:42.18] VICTORIA GREEN: It's not a question, but just to clarify, Bill, and the reason we're $11 million over is because we've gotten so much of our receipts and not very much of our expenditures.
  • [00:05:48.51] BILL COOPER: Yes, that's correct.
  • [00:05:50.26] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: And do we ever not get 100%?
  • [00:05:53.81] BILL COOPER: No, we have not ever not got 100%, since I've been here anyway.
  • [00:05:58.65] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Must be you.
  • [00:06:01.47] JOSIE PARKER: I think we've always gotten 100%, except in a year where it was beginning in the down economy where there might have been a year that ended short. But that would be more about the tax abatements that were asked for, that were far more than we expected. But as far as taxes coming in, we've always gotten 100% of what we expected.
  • [00:06:26.06] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Thank you.
  • [00:06:27.25] BILL COOPER: Anything else for me?
  • [00:06:28.55] JIM LEIJA: Bill, I just want to comment that I appreciate the new format where we're working with a more considered set of budget figures against which we can place the actuals. Because there are no line items over budget. So it makes the reporting a lot clearer, and also really does give us a sense of just how expenses move across the fiscal year.
  • [00:06:56.81] BILL COOPER: Right, thank you.
  • [00:06:57.89] JIM LEIJA: Thank you.
  • [00:06:58.46] LINH SONG: I have one question. So when under Grants and Memorials Balances, so Friends of the Ann Arbor District Library, the $40,000, so that's the balance--
  • [00:07:06.97] BILL COOPER: Yes. That's from money that was carried over into this year. We haven't received grant money yet this year from them. So we usually get that around May or June.
  • [00:07:16.58] LINH SONG: OK. It's not quarterly? It's just once--
  • [00:07:19.54] BILL COOPER: No. It's usually just one-- one payment once a year.
  • [00:07:22.49] LINH SONG: OK. And that's what's remaining after Summer Games?
  • [00:07:25.43] BILL COOPER: Yes.
  • [00:07:26.11] LINH SONG: OK. Thank you.
  • [00:07:27.71] BILL COOPER: Yes. Anything else for me?
  • [00:07:35.82] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Would you like more questions?
  • [00:07:38.46] BILL COOPER: If you have them.
  • [00:07:42.23] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: I can't-- I'll disappoint you if you [INAUDIBLE].
  • [00:07:45.57] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Thank you.
  • [00:07:46.43] BILL: You're welcome.
  • [00:07:50.06] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK, moving on to Budget and Finance.
  • [00:07:53.40] JIM LEIJA: The Budget and Finance committee met-- Josie, was that last week or--
  • [00:07:58.27] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Six days ago.
  • [00:07:58.84] JIM LEIJA: Six days ago. Thank you. Thank you fellow committee member. We spent the bulk of the meeting discussing the audit process, which is now underway and moving on-- moving on schedule. There's nothing to report thus far.
  • [00:08:17.89] And the committee will meet again in, I believe, in early November? And then we're going forward with the idea that a draft audit comes to the full board in the November board meeting, I believe. Right?
  • [00:08:32.35] JOSIE PARKER: No, it's the audit.
  • [00:08:33.27] JIM LEIJA: Oh, it's the audit. I'm sorry. Yes, thank you. Budget audit. My brain's a little fried this Monday.
  • [00:08:39.10] Yes, the audit would come to-- draft audit would come to us in November. We also spent a little bit of time discussing the new financial reporting, as I just commented on. And then were there any other items coming?
  • [00:08:53.77] JOSIE PARKER: Yes. I'll tell you know. I can help you. It's about the audit RFP.
  • [00:08:59.35] JIM LEIJA: Oh right. That's correct. So we have reached the end of our contract with our current firm, and therefore, we will go out into the marketplace with a new R-- or with a renewed RFP, for which I would suspect that our current firm would submit a proposal. And we would consider others as well. And that is obviously a gesture towards an open and transparent process in terms of finding the auditing firm that will do the best job for us.
  • [00:09:35.30] COLLEEN SHERMAN: And we're going to be going into that after the first of the year, the RFP process, correct?
  • [00:09:39.28] JOSIE PARKER: Yes, that's correct.
  • [00:09:40.70] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Do you feel that it's necessary to change auditors?
  • [00:09:45.96] JIM LEIJA: At this time I don't really have an opinion. I want to understand how this audit finishes. I mean, I guess my only opinion would be that it's probably prudent for us to consider changing firms on some regular basis to ensure that we're getting an accurate and--
  • [00:10:05.42] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: How long we've been with this firm?
  • [00:10:09.28] JOSIE PARKER: 15 years at least. But there have been RFPs.
  • [00:10:13.72] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: We've compared other--
  • [00:10:15.78] JOSIE PARKER: Is it longer than 15 years, Ed?
  • [00:10:17.78] ED SUROVELL: No. I think it's not that long?
  • [00:10:19.47] JOSIE PARKER: With Raymond? I'm-- I'm comfortable saying--
  • [00:10:28.58] ED SUROVELL: There was-- it may be 15 years, I'd be frank. I'd have to work hard to remember who the previous one was. But we had had an initial thought that they should be changed every three years. And that's primarily to avoid-- it was the year after Don left his employment here.
  • [00:10:56.88] And the theory is that you change auditors to keep from developing an uncomfortable familiarity bewteen employees and auditors that opens the possibility for either careless work or potential oversight. At the time when that was first approached, everybody had been satisfied with Raymond, and have remained satisfied ever since. I have to say I'm satisfied.
  • [00:11:35.19] Getting auditors is not easy. Not many firms are in the municipal auditing business. And they're mostly very small. And I think that-- I'm just speaking-- they were what we've got. They've done a good job
  • [00:11:51.88] JIM LEIJA: Thanks Ed.
  • [00:11:53.88] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: But even after an investigation, we could still decide to use the same firm?
  • [00:11:59.70] JOSIE PARKER: Correct.
  • [00:12:01.54] JIM LEIJA: Simply an open process given that their contract has ended or will end.
  • [00:12:08.77] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Great. Thanks, Jim. Director's report?
  • [00:12:13.20] JOSIE PARKER: Director's report, thank you. In addition to the-- what's written, and I'll look here and do this this way. Upcoming events and issues of interest, I wanted you to know, this was last year's Halloween party and puppet show. And this year it's at 10:00 and 11:00 in the downtown library on Halloween.
  • [00:12:37.41] This is a preschool through early-- early elementary grade targeted audience. It packs the room. It's a ton of fun. And if you're available on Halloween morning, this is the place to be. And so we're very happy about that.
  • [00:12:54.26] MeLCat returned along with the bags full of apples that said I Survived a Year Without MeLCat. So that has been well received. We haven't had a single-- I'll say this out loud tonight. I haven't had a single comment from anyone negative about the return of MelCat. So I'm very happy about that.
  • [00:13:14.15] On Staff Day this year, we took tours out into the community to visit partner institutions who-- institutions that have long been partners of library and some are newer partners to the library. We received an invitation by Ray Detter to take a group of people out into the community to-- along the street exhibits, the history exhibits. And that is a photograph of Ray and Sherlonya discussing that. We support their work with an online version of the street exhibit, and have for a very long time.
  • [00:13:47.03] This is my message to you about the change in the service for the Library for the Blind from a sub regional library to a advocacy an outreach library. This is what we will no longer have in the downtown library in shelves. And we will no longer mail them from here. They'll all be mail from Lansing.
  • [00:14:06.88] Lansing is moving to an ILS program that does not support sub regional circulation services. So this is a change. We're the last sub regional library in the state of Michigan. So essentially, our services remain the same, except for the housing of the cassettes and the players themselves.
  • [00:14:23.71] ED SUROVELL: Can you explain--
  • [00:14:24.67] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: How do you mean that?
  • [00:14:27.21] JOSIE PARKER: OK. I'll answer Jan's question. Do you have a question? Go ahead and ask me the question.
  • [00:14:32.13] ED SUROVELL: Explain what happened and why.
  • [00:14:34.57] JOSIE PARKER: Yes. The Library of Michigan is changing its circulation systems in the same way we just changed ours. They are migrating to a new system. It's a system that's being used in several consortiums around the country that serve the blind throughout state libraries. The one that we use is ancient and clunky and despised by all.
  • [00:15:01.44] We are very glad that the Library of Michigan has decided to migrate to a new ILS system, and one that's being used very well by others around the country. But the ILS system does not support two services where physical items can be held and sent out from two remotely separate institutions. So the sub regional library is no longer a circulation point within this ILS process. So we give up that.
  • [00:15:39.39] We no longer have the physical cartridges mailed from here. They will be mailed from Lansing. We'll still do everything else. We'll take the calls. We'll make the holds.
  • [00:15:49.05] We'll talk to people about what they would like to have on their lists of things they want sent to them or what they don't want sent to them. We will still have the Visions Conference. We will still do outreach to the neighborhood, community centers, and to the-- with ophthalmologists and optometrists in the community, helping make sure people know this service is available to them.
  • [00:16:10.99] And we will also still mail our large print material as free matter to those persons throughout the county who are approved into the Library for the Blind service. And being approved as simple. There's an application form, and I sign it. It's that simple. If a person has a vision problem--
  • [00:16:30.82] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Will they feel less committed to this library and more to the State Library? I don't understand.
  • [00:16:37.39] JOSIE PARKER: The patrons shouldn't see the difference. The patrons should know the difference.
  • [00:16:41.61] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: They will still deal with us.
  • [00:16:43.32] JOSIE PARKER: They will still deal with us, yes. Right.
  • [00:16:45.33] ED SUROVELL: Is that ancient and clunky referring to certain trustees?
  • [00:16:49.63] JOSIE PARKER: No sir. Not at all.
  • [00:16:52.01] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: My understanding is that we'll just have to deal with fewer physical materials.
  • [00:16:55.70] JOSIE PARKER: We will-- and this is something I wanted to make sure everybody understood. It will mean a large space in the basement will be open. And the Friends of the Library will-- their storage space will move to the east. And it will open up the storage space adjacent to secret lab, which we really need. So while this was not something that we would have done preemptively, having this come to us in the letter came to me just a few weeks ago, it allows us to plan for this and allows the Friends to plan for this.
  • [00:17:26.32] This change will take place on January 1st. We will begin sending back cartridges from here to Lansing at that point in time. It will take awhile, because they want them to come in batches, not as one, in one fell swoop.
  • [00:17:41.83] So it will be several months of this. And then it will-- then we'll do the moving. We'll help move everything over.
  • [00:17:46.78] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Will the Friends subsequently have more space?
  • [00:17:49.18] JOSIE PARKER: They won't have more space, Jan. I don't have more space to give away. They will have what they have. It will just be further to the east in the basement.
  • [00:18:00.13] COLLEEN SHERMAN: So one pro is more space. Is there a reduction in cost for the library as a result?
  • [00:18:05.52] JOSIE PARKER: There is. It will cost us less to handle to manage the service, because now we have circulation staff who go down and pull for the requests and box and prepare and send them out. So the library will not have as much invested in the service. But then in time and people and in space. Yes.
  • [00:18:27.86] COLLEEN SHERMAN: The community still gets the same service. It's delivered from another entity.
  • [00:18:32.15] JOSIE PARKER: Correct.
  • [00:18:32.87] COLLEEN SHERMAN: OK, great.
  • [00:18:33.39] JOSIE PARKER: Yes.
  • [00:18:34.43] LINH SONG: Can you say again how it impacts the Secret Lab ?
  • [00:18:38.69] JOSIE PARKER: If you were in this basement, you would see the Friends of the Library space is next to the Secret Lab. And the WLBPD collection is further to the elevators. That will all be emptied, and the Friends will move over into that space. We will then be able to pull all of the equipment and supplies that we used for Secret Lab into the space adjacent to the Secret Lab that's in the staff side, so that the staff can go through staff doors and pull what they need into that space in preparation for programs.
  • [00:19:11.33] Right now it's stored in several different places in the building. This will bring it all into one space next to the Secret Lab. Any more, any further questions?
  • [00:19:28.33] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: What was that device that we saw on the screen that has to do with this, the two boxes?
  • [00:19:34.88] JOSIE PARKER: Those are the items that we currently have. And the blue box is what we send out. It has the content, books, magazines on that. And people request it. So we box them in boxes and it's mailed free. The federal mail is free and for this service.
  • [00:19:54.26] It goes out to the patron. It has a card on it. They flip that card over when they're done with it, and put it in their mailbox. And it comes right back to here. After January, these things will go to-- well, before January, these things will go to Lansing, not to here. We will still--
  • [00:20:10.80] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: This is not a decision we made on our own?
  • [00:20:13.30] JOSIE PARKER: No. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't make it. I waited for them to make it. I wanted them to make it. And so they had-- and they did.
  • [00:20:22.21] When the state budget allows them to put money in to make this migration to this new ILS system this year, so they need to do it this year, because their budget next year doesn't include it. So they're getting it done this year.
  • [00:20:35.38] ED SUROVELL: Do we know whether that's state or federal money?
  • [00:20:38.83] JOSIE PARKER: It's state money that pays for the migration. This is our Lobbitorium Series. Beginning on the 27th through the 12th of November there will be 12 different events in the lobby. It includes Ignite Ann Arbor, which started in Seattle in 2006. Is that what that-- I think that's right.
  • [00:21:01.90] And then also several different events-- and I had-- I think I had written down the Taiwanese Puppet Theater has proven to be extremely popular event. And it will be back, but it's the night of the November board meeting. So I'm sorry to tell you that you won't be able to see the beginning of it. The Halloween puppet show-- Susan Orleans-- who's written a book that you may be reading about a lot-- then the New York Times.
  • [00:21:26.92] There was an article today in the Wall Street Journal about it too. She is writing about the fire in LA, on the LA Public Library. And the book is called The Library Book.
  • [00:21:37.39] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: And it was also in The New Yorker.
  • [00:21:39.01] JOSIE PARKER: In The New Yorker. So she is coming to speak. And it will be in the lobby.
  • [00:21:45.32] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: And when is that? What's the date?
  • [00:21:47.51] JOSIE PARKER: Susan Orleans-- I can't tell you off the top of my head, Jan. Oh, yes I can.
  • [00:21:52.72] ED SUROVELL: She was interviewed-- she was interviewed in on NPR a couple days ago.
  • [00:21:58.09] JOSIE PARKER: November 8. November 8th, correct.
  • [00:22:00.76] ED SUROVELL: She was interviewed by NPR in an extremely important moving interview, if anybody has heard it. All right. Move up here a second, right?
  • [00:22:14.09] A very good interview, if you can dig it up, or if we could even transcribe it. Because it was really a epitome the public library's role in the community. And I think it left us some things to think about as well, which I can talk about later. Not this meeting.
  • [00:22:36.18] JOSIE PARKER: OK. We were also asked to host a panel presentation called In Our Own Words, which is a presentation of a panel of victims who spoke out against Larry Nassar. And it's the Heartland Independent Film Forum and the Michigan Daily are launching a new website that archives the court statements unabridged, the victim impact statements of a number of these young women. That will be here also on November 8th at 7:00 PM, but it will be upstairs in the Fourth Floor auditorium. So it will be a very busy library that evening. We were honored to be asked, and very pleased to provide the opportunity here.
  • [00:23:17.85] In addition to those, I want to say that on October 25, Thursday evening at 7 o'clock, here in this room, the League of Women Voters will be having a panel discussion on proposal A about regarding the library lot. And representatives from groups that support and oppose proposal A will present their views and answer questions. Also on Thursday, November 1st we will begin a series here that's been-- and that has been received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. And the groups are working on this are the Ethnic History Society International Coalition of the Sites and Conscience and the-- it's an-- it's an immigration problem-- program that's being put on by City Lore in collaboration with those others. It's called Becoming American.
  • [00:24:11.10] It's a film and discussion event. And there will be several over the year. But they begin in November. And the Michigan World War II Legacy Memorial Project, it's a year round multipurpose destination that will encourage visitors to commemorate those who served and celebrate our freedoms. It will launch on Saturday, November 10th at 11:00 here at this library.
  • [00:24:37.62] And it will be launched at the same time, and our historic library will unveil a new online collection of over 400 photographs of World War II military personnel, many previously unpublished from the Ann Arbor News photographic archive. There are any number of other events. And you have those in front of you.
  • [00:24:57.72] ED SUROVELL: Do we have that photo-- we don't have a photographic collection, or do we.
  • [00:25:02.25] JOSIE PARKER: Yes, we do. We are the ones who--
  • [00:25:03.75] ED SUROVELL: The research was done here?
  • [00:25:04.92] JOSIE PARKER: Yes, the research was done here and we've digitized and put it together. Yes, we-- the title-- the Japanese Shiga prefecture calligraphy exhibit came down this week. I think it's important to note how important that was in the community as a bridge between the Japanese people and Michigan, Michiganders, that will continue through this year, because next year is the 50th anniversary of the Ann Arbor Hikone partnership.
  • [00:25:36.45] So we will be involved in the planning and whatever events happen next year for that celebration. But we were honored to be asked to house that exhibit. It was quite a challenge, but it was worth it. And we have many, many people come here from all around Michigan to see it. So we're the only location where that exhibit was in Michigan.
  • [00:26:01.31] OK. Projects and Issues Underway, Len is going to talk to you a little bit later about the meeting room construction work. You know we have a contract with HBM Architects from Cleveland to develop a building program for a new downtown library building. And they have met with all of the board members and the staff, the whole staff on Staff Day.
  • [00:26:22.62] We did a program-- project around this with them. And we will be getting reports back from working with them, tweaking and answering questions. And they will make a presentation, a final presentation to the board and a board meeting in January.
  • [00:26:37.18] Also, we had to postpone that we didn't-- Cook Ross had to postpone our have training for managers and supervisors on eliminating unconscious bias and hiring. That's been rescheduled for early December. And before I move on to the Summary of Public and Staff Comments, I'd also like to acknowledge Melanie Baldwin as the Outgoing Director of the Friends Bookshop. Melanie has done an outstanding job in that position.
  • [00:27:06.53] Everyone on the library staff has felt Melanie's presence is a very upbeat and positive and cheerful person. The sales have definitely increased. The awareness on social media that the Friends exist, and that there is a sale and how you can donate books has increased.
  • [00:27:25.71] We are gratified to be able to acknowledge her work at the library board meeting. And I want to be personally wanted to say thank you very much Melanie. It's been a pleasure, absolute pleasure. And she's here.
  • [00:27:37.70] [APPLAUSE]
  • [00:27:44.34] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Where is Melanie going?
  • [00:27:45.83] JOSIE PARKER: Melanie is staying. Melanie is working for-- is continuing with the library as a Public Library Association-- Associate. And the Friends have selected a new director for their bookshop. And she will begin in December. So we have not lost Melanie.
  • [00:28:03.55] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: That's good news.
  • [00:28:04.98] [INTERPOSING VOICES]
  • [00:28:05.31] [APPLAUSE]
  • [00:28:11.10] Summary of Public and Staff Comments, I'm going to use my page here. This is the beautiful Mouse Creek. And this med school student shared her Friday work set up with us, complete with laptop, textbook, and her gorgeous view. The veiw is Malletts. The summer game has been over since August, but our patrons are still enjoying their swag and letting everybody know about it.
  • [00:28:36.06] Members of the Junior League of Ann Arbor met downtown for their fall book club meeting reading The Firebrand and the First Lady by Patricia Bell Scott. They meet here in the downtown library. Their book club meets here. And they've been doing that for a while. So we're happy about that.
  • [00:28:52.86] Parents love downtown, including this dad, who is known as Papa Bear Down, who came to the library on one day to enjoy the fish with his little guy, and attended a Kindler concert on another. And he's writing about it. Study rooms at West continue to draw rave reviews, helping individuals like Brooke Boyle of A2 Engage get some of her best work done, in her words.
  • [00:29:20.91] Westgate got a new addition, a few weeks ago that's fun for all ages. And here's a little video of our new Everbright.
  • [00:29:29.14] [VIDEO PLAYBACK]
  • [00:29:36.12] [MUSIC PLAYING]
  • [00:29:57.08] [END PLAYBACK]
  • [00:30:02.08] The Secret Lab has been home to a number of amazing programs, one of which is a weekly Friday afternoon creative break. Here, attendees show off some of their incredible creations. And the Secret Lab continues to host weekly Letter Press labs, which our patrons are always thankful for. So someone letter pressed us their thanks.
  • [00:30:28.04] Gearing up for the Lobbitorium series, we decided to invite our friend Ninja Brian to the library. And 352 of his friends came yesterday afternoon. And he was in the fourth floor auditorium. When the line formed for his book signing, the line went from the fourth floor atrium all the way down the stairs to the first floor.
  • [00:30:52.55] And so we had to split his audience. And some people had to sit out in the atrium and watch this on a screen. They were first in line for book signing. So we're very, very happy to-- and people were very gracious about it, right?
  • [00:31:06.97] And finally, I remember talking to you about our friend Daniel, who made the guitar in the Secret Lab, and made a one string guitar. Well, he was so inspired by his new instrument, that he shot edited, and produced a whole music video using it. And we're going to listen to.
  • [00:31:25.72] [VIDEO PLAYBACK]
  • [00:31:39.16] [ROCKABILLY SURFER MUSIC PLAYING]
  • [00:33:28.16] [APPLAUSE]
  • [00:33:29.09] [END PLAYBACK]
  • [00:33:31.90] And that is my Director's Report unless you have questions.
  • [00:33:36.75] LINH SONG: Josie, is there for the Larry Nassar event, that would be upstairs instead of the auditorium?
  • [00:33:43.95] JOSIE PARKER: That will be upstairs.
  • [00:33:46.38] LINH SONG: So how many can we accommodate upstairs versus in the lobby?
  • [00:33:50.40] JOSIE PARKER: There is something going on in the lobby that evening. That's the Susan Orleans evening.
  • [00:33:54.54] LINH SONG: Oh, gosh.
  • [00:33:55.45] JOSIE PARKER: So it will be it will be upstairs. And it's about 200 or so people, standing room only. So we'll have to stop close the door when we reach maximum. They understand that.
  • [00:34:07.20] They wanted to be in Ann Arbor. And they ask us. That's what we were able to give them. And that's what we did.
  • [00:34:12.64] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Woo, talk about capacity.
  • [00:34:14.82] JOSIE PARKER: Yes, capacity. We talked about capacity today in our administration meeting.
  • [00:34:20.07] LINH SONG: I am crossing my fingers on the bathroom situation.
  • [00:34:22.63] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yeah.
  • [00:34:23.18] JOSIE PARKER: Well, we-- so is Len.
  • [00:34:26.94] [LAUGHTER]
  • [00:34:28.71] JIM LEIJA: It's been so long since anyone's said crock at this meeting.
  • [00:34:31.95] JOSIE PARKER: Actually, you know, we've had some major, major events here since the bathrooms were redone. And so I think we're pretty-- we're pretty OK with-- it will be all right.
  • [00:34:44.33] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yeah, probably the bigger issue is--
  • [00:34:46.90] JOSIE PARKER: Space.
  • [00:34:47.61] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Scale and space.
  • [00:34:51.18] JOSIE PARKER: I would like to tell you all that in the month of September, the top events-- event in the library was Paint Along with Bob Ross.
  • [00:34:59.66] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: That does not surprise me.
  • [00:35:01.20] JOSIE PARKER: And so we are having another one. And that will be a Lobbitorium event.
  • [00:35:04.21] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Oh, you are having another one? Do you know what day it is? I can also just look it up.
  • [00:35:08.46] JOSIE PARKER: It's on this list somewhere. I can find it.
  • [00:35:11.79] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: No. I'll look it up. I have a friend who's-- November 1?
  • [00:35:16.62] JOSIE PARKER: November 1st.
  • [00:35:17.74] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: My friend's kindergartner is like a really anxious little dude. And he watches Bob Ross before he goes to bed to like, calm down. It's like you need to take him to the library.
  • [00:35:28.94] JOSIE PARKER: November 1st. And it will be in the lobby. So she can stay with him as long or as little as she would like.
  • [00:35:34.27] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK, cool.
  • [00:35:37.02] JIM LEIJA: I was just going to say I would just register my mild discomfort around the Lobbitorium now becoming branding too, which you know, as I said before, we don't have a Lobbitorium. We have a lobby. And I just want to think about that, and continue to bring that up as a-- because we're also talking about capacity in the same breath here that the reason that phrase exists is because we are bending the limits of what this building can do.
  • [00:36:13.05] JOSIE PARKER: --can do every time.
  • [00:36:14.14] JIM LEIJA: And I don't want the like, the nice stamp of the Lobbitorium series to like, cover up the fact that we have to go to pretty extreme measures in terms of staff, staffing and capacity to be able to clear that space out and do these events there. And it's a space that was not designed for a purpose built for this kind of thing.
  • [00:36:40.76] JOSIE PARKER: Thank you Jim. That's right.
  • [00:36:44.86] LINH SONG: I was watching the Halloween video from last year. And I really appreciated how in the beginning of it, you can see staff move all the items in the first floor, and the time that takes to set up the stage. All the setup work behind an event and then to take it down, I don't think a lot of patrons or even we really fully appreciate the creativity that goes into making the library into a community space.
  • [00:37:17.53] JOSIE PARKER: I think one of the criticisms that we still receive is when a person enters the library, the lobby area, it's not ranges of books. And the reason that so is because of what's down there is on wheels, and it allows us to move things out so that we can use that space for these big programs. Because there is no other space in the library big enough to do that. And the only other choice is to just decline those opportunities, which we have chosen not to do.
  • [00:37:43.77] So we have moved the books to the second floor. Most of what was on the first floor is now on the second floor. But there actually was more room and there are more ranges and more space for material. And use that area down there as a space that's easily cleared in terms of moving something. It takes a lot of work to clear it out and put it back but it's not ranges of books.
  • [00:38:08.18] I will say, when I first began to work here, the Loving branch library had ranges, children's book ranges on wheels. They had to be rolled out of the way every time there was story time, and then rolled back. And it was not a small thing to move ranges of books for a story time. So this is the same thing, just different material. I appreciate you bringing it up.
  • [00:38:36.52] JIM LEIJA: I just-- you know, I love being transparent about how-- about the capacity that it takes to do that. And I also I don't think we actually discuss it in the full board meeting, but it may be in the Budget and Finance committee. And it was in the minutia, which is that we actually-- we own a stage now.
  • [00:38:54.83] JOSIE PARKER: We purchased a space-- stage in the last month, we did.
  • [00:38:58.04] JIM LEIJA: Which I find to be kind of interesting minutia because it says that we really have a demand for events like this. And it behooves us to make the investment in a piece of equipment like that, rather than continuing to rent it on an as needed basis. A good decision.
  • [00:39:16.91] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Yeah, I think-- I'm so glad you said something Jim. Because when I saw the logo, I thought oh, that's cute. And like, I think that you all are just determined to deliver the best possible library service with the physical plant that you have. And I think that you're just not going to let it get in your way.
  • [00:39:38.07] You're like, very determined to be like, sort of spectacular, right? But I think that then it's easy to just like, talk about how many people are coming, and how great the programs are. And then it's harder for us to talk about oh, like, that we don't have the space to offer the programming that you really want to do, or that you're in this difficult position of having two big programs on one night.
  • [00:40:01.23] JOSIE PARKER: Well, I'll just say it for you. I think it's a shame if you have a program like Ninja Brian. And the line for people to sign his books strings down four flights of stairs and out into a lobby, because you have nowhere else for all these people to stand.
  • [00:40:16.38] It is absolutely a shame in a town like this with the people who come here, and the programming people appreciate it and then now asking for. It needs a place. It need a place that will house it. It needs a place that can serve it. And it's not this place.
  • [00:40:30.99] LINH SONG: And it's not the same experience from sitting in an audience with the author, than watching it on the screen right next to.
  • [00:40:40.07] JOSIE PARKER: People very gracious about that.
  • [00:40:41.68] LINH SONG: But it's a continuous problem though. Because I know that you--
  • [00:40:46.43] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: A person signing a book can only sign one person at a time. How would you make-- the line would still be the line.
  • [00:40:55.42] JOSIE PARKER: The point is Jan, you have an event on the fourth floor and there's nowhere for the line to go except winding around down the stairs four floors.
  • [00:41:03.07] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: If you had the event on the first floor, it would wind up to the stairs.
  • [00:41:05.51] JOSIE PARKER: Not necessarily. You've got more space in the first floor for people to move around. And you've got a lot more space for people to circle around. And it was on the fourth floor because there was another event on the first floor.
  • [00:41:15.50] LINH SONG: But you were saying you had to actually project the talk, the authors talk on a screen in a different room.
  • [00:41:20.94] JOSIE PARKER: In the atrium, right. So people could-- because the room was full. We couldn't bring more people in the room.
  • [00:41:25.56] LINH SONG: And I know that when I've come to events before with a children's author, a very popular children's author, we had the same experience where we had to sit in this room and watch via a screen. And it was disappointing for kids.
  • [00:41:37.70] VICTORIA GREEN: And let alone, I don't think any of us like the idea of say, a wheelchair user having to wait on the stairs for an event.
  • [00:41:44.30] JOSIE PARKER: Well, the wheelchair user was not going to wait on the stairs.
  • [00:41:46.88] VICTORIA GREEN: But still, we'd like them to have a spot that would work for all people.
  • [00:41:50.80] JOSIE PARKER: But you've got a stairway that's blocked by people standing in a line. So you have a lot of people affected one way or the other, by the limitations of your space for an event that you should easily be able to accommodate without a lot of difference in what you're trying to accomplish. And you know, you might as well say it.
  • [00:42:12.96] On the fourth floor there's one public women's room. There's one public men's room. There are two stools each, and that is all. And when you have a room that will handle 200 something people, that's deficient.
  • [00:42:26.09] LINH SONG: Do you get a sense of where folks are coming from for that event?
  • [00:42:30.13] JOSIE PARKER: They travel from all around Michigan and outside of Michigan and other states nearby. He has a very popular online presence.
  • [00:42:43.07] LINH SONG: Josie, do we have anything planned for Election Day at our downtown branch? We're not a--
  • [00:42:49.50] JOSIE PARKER: We are a voting precinct for Ann Arbor. Yes. So this room is where people vote. So we open early and we close late.
  • [00:42:57.11] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: What group votes here? What precinct?
  • [00:43:00.96] JOSIE PARKER: One.
  • [00:43:03.07] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Ward one, precinct one.
  • [00:43:04.76] JOSIE PARKER: Ward one, precinct five. Is it-- Ward five, precinct one. Yes.
  • [00:43:11.16] LINH SONG: That's a good reminder. That's coming up quick. Thank you.
  • [00:43:17.64] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Thank you Josie. All right. That brings us to Len. An update on the meeting spaces and the AADL branches project.
  • [00:43:25.79] LEN LEMORIE. Good evening. So we've received all of our documents. We're ready to go to bid. We've received the structural documents last week. So we think we have everything in place.
  • [00:43:37.66] It's going to be on the street for about three weeks. And so by the November board meeting, we will have the bid results for you guys to go over and select the contractors. Do you have any questions so far, because it's been a few months since we talked about this one.
  • [00:43:52.69] VICTORIA GREEN: Len, can you remind us what we're building and what we expect costs to be? Oh, I could just look.
  • [00:43:59.28] LEN LEMORIE: So that's Pittsfield branch. So you have a 35-seat bookable meeting space, and then two 5-seat bookable meeting spaces over in the corner. The construction estimates were-- well, here, we'll keep going. So Mallett's Creek in the lower left, you have a 7-seat room.
  • [00:44:15.94] And then in the top, we're going to shift some shelving some tables, and there's a 10-seat bookable space there. And then Traverwood, outside the computer lab we're eliminating I think, it's four computers and moving one range. And that's an eight-seat bookable space.
  • [00:44:34.59] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Oh, so there's a significant difference in capacity across the branches?
  • [00:44:39.65] LEN LEMORIE: Yes.
  • [00:44:40.48] JOSIE PARKER: Yes. It's about their design.
  • [00:44:41.65] LEN LEMORIE; Yeah, what the building would allow and also one of the reasons it took so long was because of some of the structural elements that where can we put it, and is it going to look like it was always there? That was important. So the budget, I think it was July when we talked about it. The construction estimate was $290,000 for all locations.
  • [00:45:07.27] And the resolution to transfer the remaining funds from the MSE project would go towards this. I think that amount was-- I'm going off memory. I think it was $358,000. So we had our contingency in there.
  • [00:45:23.72] LINH SONG: So the Pittsfield branch, that's a pretty that's a 35-seat meeting space. And that's--
  • [00:45:31.95] JOSIE PARKER: It's equivalent to the free space down here. What that is the computer lab. And what we've found is at Pittsfield, that space has never been utilized well.
  • [00:45:41.68] So there's computers outside of that on the back wall that are utilized a lot. And then people there bring their own laptops to that space. So we're going to be able to take that computer lab and make it a larger bookable meeting room the way we have free space down here.
  • [00:46:02.87] COLLEEN SHERMAN: This is great. Excellent service. It's going to be fantastic.
  • [00:46:08.32] LINH SONG: Is the Bernouli-- or what is it?
  • [00:46:10.57] JOSIE PARKER: It's right there.
  • [00:46:12.55] LINH SONG: So that's right there on the corner of the 35-seater.
  • [00:46:15.12] JOSIE PARKER: So you want to talk about noise, what we're doing about that?
  • [00:46:17.57] LEN LEMORIE: Yeah. We're going to-- we've bounce some ideas back and forth about an acoustical ceiling. And it'll have acoustic panels over the room.
  • [00:46:27.92] And it looks like where we're looking at options for lights in the panels, so we don't have to change lighting or HVAC. So it'll be pretty cool looking. I've seen the pictures. I'm really happy so far.
  • [00:46:41.04] LINH SONG: My son learned how to walk in this branch. In the front section, where there's stuff climbings-- I love this branch.
  • [00:46:53.84] LEN LEMORIE: Any other questions? All right. Well, we'll bring the bid results to the November meeting.
  • [00:47:00.66] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Great. Thank you. OK. So that brings us to the resolution that you all have in front of you. I'm sorry for springing this all on you all.
  • [00:47:15.47] I think this is sort of something that comes with having a younger board. It didn't occur to me that the community would feel frustrated to not know about this in advance, and that you might feel similarly. But when we were talking about in Executive Committee, we don't meet again until after the next election. And I felt like it was important for us to talk about this together tonight. So it would have been nice if someone would read the resolution so that we can--
  • [00:47:43.87] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: It's up to Jim.
  • [00:47:45.71] [INTERPOSING VOICES]
  • [00:47:46.29] JIM LEIJA: Oh, I do. Thank you. But I don't have to be the only one.
  • [00:47:52.77] The resolution to oppose City of Ann Arbor proposal A to designate the library a lot as an urban park. The board resolves as follows, the Ann Arbor District Library opposes the City of Ann Arbor proposal A for the city owned public land bounded by 5th Avenue and William, Division and Liberty Streets to be designated in perpetuity as an urban park and civic center commons to be known as the quote, "Center of the City" by amending the Ann Arbor City Charter. That all resolutions and parts of resolutions that conflict with the provisions of this resolution are rescinded.
  • [00:48:35.07] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. So is there second?
  • [00:48:39.57] LINH SONG: I'll second.
  • [00:48:42.45] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. So time for discussion. I'm very curious what you all think about this.
  • [00:48:49.83] VICTORIA GREEN: Well, why don't I start? I think the first thing as a board we should talk about is its-- this is first time in my time on the board were we've considered supporting or not supporting something that's on our ballot in November. And when I was thinking about this, the first thing I thought as well, OK, so should we be expressing as a board an opinion about this? And I think we should.
  • [00:49:14.07] And the reason is because it's our next door neighbor. And your next door neighbor matters of the health of any enterprise. I also, when I read about this, what other folks are saying-- other people are quick to say what's good or isn't good for the library. So we're hearing various opinions about what's good for the library.
  • [00:49:33.27] We've heard from Josie, I know has expressed before on behalf of the library the need for an active and engaged space next door. But I'm hearing a lot of people say well, we need this for the library, who are not speaking on behalf of the library. And I've heard that enough that it makes me think as a board we should say what we think about proposal A as it relates to our neighbors.
  • [00:49:58.56] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Do we have the language for a proposal A? Can someone pull up the language for proposal A?
  • [00:50:05.83] VICTORIA GREEN: Oddly, I have it.
  • [00:50:06.94] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Oh!
  • [00:50:07.46] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Would you be willing to read it?
  • [00:50:09.74] VICTORIA GREEN: Sure. Well, I have it. I pulled it off of what off of Civ City. But I'm sure that Mary Morgan got it right.
  • [00:50:17.69] The proposal is proposal A charter amendment for the city owned public land, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And the question is, shall the city owned public land bounded by 5th Avenue and William, Division and Liberty Streets be retained in public ownership in perpetuity and developed as an urban park and civic center commons, known as the quote, "Center of the City" by adding a new section for the purpose as explained above? Question, yes or no?
  • [00:50:50.12] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: I will just give you-- I've spoken against this proposal among a number of groups of people. And I hear mostly from people who are ignoring the in perpetuity. They don't realize they-- what they're doing is voting against the building that they see is going to be put there by the city. And they think if they vote yes on this proposal, they are merely postponing the development of a building until it's a building they like. They don't know, they don't realize that this in perpetuity is forever.
  • [00:51:37.00] And it's taking the land, our most marketable, our most important land in this town and turning it into a park, which we cannot even afford to maintain the parks we already have, which I've heard in the past, I hope it's still true. It may not it's still true. But I've heard it and I've said that the city owns already more park land than the university owns. That used to be true. I don't know if it's still true.
  • [00:52:06.62] But we can't afford-- and there's also on the ballot to raise money for supporting the parks, if you notice. Because we even can't support the parks we already have. So it makes no sense, unless we want to raise our taxes, to provide for these things that are in this proposal. It makes no sense at all that people don't get that. So if our proposal helps people understand, but it's our proposal as it's written, does not take on these issues.
  • [00:52:39.96] We have to be prepared to, if we could get the city to publish letters to the editor, which-- or something. But it's a real concern for me. I think it's a ill advised movement for the city. But the people who argue it think they're just postponing development.
  • [00:52:59.52] And they see the development that's been done. And they blame our current administration. These buildings were authorized by a previous administration, and by an administration we had to compensate for $600,000 a year loss in income when the what's
  • [00:53:22.18] JIM LEIJA AND LINH SONG: Pfizer.
  • [00:53:23.26] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Pfizer, thank you. And so all these things have a history. And it's a movement that makes them happen. But I wish we had voiced our opinions and our reservations all along. We've only said what we want is more activity downtown.
  • [00:53:42.27] And people who putting a park up in front of us said OK, we'll be active. And they don't-- and we have to count on city planners. We heard enormous possibilities from the people who came at our last meeting.
  • [00:53:58.02] And I'm not sure how many people care what we think, but it is important to say what you do think. I hope we make some difference with this. I'm not sure we will. But it has my approval, I guess. But I--
  • [00:54:16.71] JIM LEIJA: It sounds like it.
  • [00:54:18.00] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: I wish-- well, I'm not sure that we're getting all that we think we are due just by this action. So that's where I.
  • [00:54:29.84] JIM LEIJA: I really appreciate you speaking on the word perpetuity.
  • [00:54:34.45] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: That's the important part of this!
  • [00:54:38.50] JIM LEIJA: It's not even something I have really processed. And this is not-- and by some, it's a sort of temporary decision. I mean, I haven't really thought about that.
  • [00:54:46.93] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: And you see, the postcard that they're sending out shows a rather odd looking green space that we know is going to be on top of a concrete base. And then that-- and then a funny looking fountain. That's one choice.
  • [00:55:02.88] And the other choice is a very elaborate, very complicated building. And so that's what people think they're voting on. Oh, well, I'd much rather have a place to walk my dog.
  • [00:55:13.55] In that park are like, two people and two dogs. And can we afford it? You know, it-- it it's just an interesting public presentation that maybe will get people to look at differently, but I'm not sure.
  • [00:55:30.53] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Jan, I'm glad you brought up this sort of like, the permanence aspect, I think. Because the last meeting that we had, we heard all these exciting propositions
  • [00:55:41.02] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Possibilities.
  • [00:55:41.64] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Right! For the future of our town. And all of them involve like many different moving parts and different things sort of coming together.
  • [00:55:51.86] And to think about the future that we have as an organization when we're making decisions to have one of those pieces of the puzzle locked in a particular position permanently, just really reduces our ability to think about our future as an organization. So I think that's why I feel strongly about it. And I think that I also like that you said that like, you're not sure who's listening, but--
  • [00:56:16.50] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: I don't think that people care what we think.
  • [00:56:19.36] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Right. But it is OK to say what we think I think. It's OK for us to have opinions. Look, everyone can have an opinion.
  • [00:56:26.02] And it's OK for us to say ours. I think that we are very respectful that this is a representative board that comes from a community that has lots of different opinions, and we don't all share the same opinions, even as a group. But I think it's OK to say what we think and to talk about it together at this meeting.
  • [00:56:47.79] VICTORIA GREEN: And I also think it's good for us to focus our conversation on what we think the impact of this proposal is on the library. We all have our own opinions. We all get a vote. I think we can all vote in this election, but that our focus should be on what do we think the proposal will do for the libraries, good or bad for?
  • [00:57:11.61] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Well we've talked about, and Josie has spoken publicly about the negatives of a non-supervised non-controlled space right in our front yard. And that's been registered.
  • [00:57:28.83] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I mean, I do think like, I've also heard Josie say that the library is obviously very-- I don't want to speak for you, but the library is it's very good at making the best of any situation and working with every member of this community. So I think you know, regardless of the way this goes, I do think the library is well suited to partner with anyone to make anything I think a success. But I just think that you know, like Victoria said, like, this proposal directly impacts our future options as a board. And to not say anything about it, I think would be irresponsible.
  • [00:58:02.55] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: It sort of pushes us out of downtown, or it could. And we-- we're important to this town. And we don't want to be-- our branches do what they do for the outlying regions.
  • [00:58:24.41] It's also-- it's so short-sighted. I am not saying any more. The other people have opinions.
  • [00:58:31.25] COLLEEN SHERMAN: I'd like to say something when it's my turn.
  • [00:58:33.44] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: It's your turn.
  • [00:58:34.51] COLLEEN SHERMAN: OK. There are two issues I'd like to address as part of this conversation. The first is process. As Josie knows, I am very interested in process. I think is important.
  • [00:58:44.59] And what I'm going to say is I appreciate your apology. But I think in order for the apology to really hold weight, we need to think about what we're going to do next time this happens, so this does not happen again. I think when we made a change away from the committee structure, communication structure of the board is very wrapped up into making sure we honor the public Meetings Act, which is very good.
  • [00:59:09.09] But the problem is when you have four trustees walking into a room that need to be able to discuss something without enough information or background that they can prepare themselves, that's a problem. And more than an apology, I would say we need a process to address how we process these kind of things so they get on the agenda for months in advance, so we see it in advance, so we wouldn't know what we're doing. I heard about this a bit through conversations that this might be on the docks today, so I did my homework. I really thought about it. So I would be prepared to discuss it, but it doesn't sound like everyone had that opportunity.
  • [00:59:51.23] If I walked in here and I had not been able to do my homework, I would have been very angry. And I think rightly so. Don't do that please. And I hope you'll understand that the communications thing, as much as you were saying it is wrong for us to not have a voice or make a statement, it is equally wrong for us to do what Dave is saying, which is not give public notice on these kind of very public issues. So enough of that.
  • [01:00:17.36] I would ask the Executive Committee to consider having this is a discussion topic on the agenda in November or December for your consideration. OK. So onto the issue at hand. I joined the board in part because I'm interested in representing the single moms who make under six figures in Ann Arbor. The Core Spaces development may not make it more affordable in the short run, meaning I might not be able to live in the Core Spaces apartment building.
  • [01:00:52.20] But on the other hand, it diversifies the tax base. It also makes the space on this block more active. I think both of those things are good for both Ann Arbor, I can say that as a citizen, and for the library. I think it will stabilize us and we will see an increase in tax revenue. So I think the idea of a park is Utopian at best. I have great respect for the people who did this work, but I think they don't understand the perspective I have of trying to live on this community-- live in this community and be able to afford to stay here. A park doesn't serve that.
  • [01:01:30.32] There are plenty of places and open spaces for us to go. We need tax revenue. We work in a university town.
  • [01:01:37.91] The university doesn't pay taxes. That chips away at the tax base. Ann Arbor has historically been a very expensive city. I don't want it to become more so.
  • [01:01:48.60] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Here, here.
  • [01:01:54.43] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Ed, you haven't said anything.
  • [01:01:57.31] ED SUROVELL: I kind of like what I heard. It's touched a number of items, not all directly related to one another. We've talked about our process. We've talked about our structure. We've talked about city finances.
  • [01:02:23.44] We've talked about-- I like Colleen's last comment about you have plenty of place to play that already exists without taking a place that was designed to have a rateable on top of it. In my past commitment to the city, I have been a planning commissioner. I have been chairman of the planning commission twice. The process of zoning in perpetuity by public referendum is horrible. I know that issues of parks are emotional. Someone here mentioned that they tend to be anti-development, which I think certainly is the case here.
  • [01:03:21.56] My experience has been that as a commissioner, all parks tended to be good and no one wants a development next to them. There is no next to anybody here except the library. And in fact, the library does want the development next to us. We have been sitting here in the 22 years that I've been a trustee of the library, there has been no construction on 5th Avenue, with the exception of the bus station.
  • [01:04:01.21] And irrespective of one's point of view about whether that's the right place for the bus station, there is not any commercial activity whatsoever in the center of downtown, with the exception of two little restaurants, one of which I eat in occasionally and like very much. But it is not enough for the central block and the large block in the city in downtown Ann Arbor. This is a Utopian vision. It has not gone through the planning process. It has not gone through public review. It has not gone through any of the processes that normal development go through.
  • [01:04:47.51] And indeed, for that reason, if for no other reason alone, I would cast a no vote. And as a library trustee, I will cast a no vote. I think I could go on forever, and perhaps I've simply said enough. I do want to make one comment that this is the first time that I can recall in my 22 years that the library has taken a public position on a city issue. In retrospect, I think it was a mistake.
  • [01:05:31.75] We are an active part of the city. And our 22 years of saying nothing has produced a wasteland on South 5th Avenue that has not gotten better, frankly with the remarkable activity or lack of activity on the empty lot across the street from us, on the empty lot to the north of us, or any of the other impermeable surfaces that exist without particular purpose from the parking lot for postal git knees in the middle of a commercial district fool me. And I hope in the future that future library boards and future library administration become far more active in determining what happens to our own future.
  • [01:06:35.98] I think that our view of independence has a history to it, but I think it's lost its utility. And for those of you who remain, I hope you become more participatory and vocal. Pretty good group for that. In the future, good luck.
  • [01:06:57.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Wow, Ed. I'm going to cry. That's really nice. Thank you.
  • [01:07:02.23] LINH SONG: I think Ed touches upon how this is-- we've been neighbors to a parking lot or nothing, really for over 20 years. And for me, I feel like this is an opportunity where we can say we can't have this happen for another 20 years. We see how successful a grassroot efforts work in Ann Arbor. The skate park was an eight-year endeavor with a public school teacher, a nerd, raising money $100,000 for an endowment, bake sale by bake sale, cookies bake cookies, right? Through a partnership with a county with the city.
  • [01:07:44.09] And it was thoughtful. It was engaged. A partnership with Ann Arbor Community Foundation, partnership with the Tony Hawk Foundation. That was an eight year endeavor. We see the new Universal Access Park at Gallop Park, which is funded by the Rotary Club. So that was I think, nearly a half million donation to make that happen.
  • [01:08:05.39] And that was a multi-year effort. But again, in collaboration with the city. To do this by referendum is not the same as what we've seen happen in the city to support parks. I love parks. But I think my 8-year-old brought up a really interesting question.
  • [01:08:29.68] She said, well, if the neighbor next door to the library isn't going to be a park but will be a building, who will live in this building? And she asked will librarians be able to live in this building? Could the librarians live next door to where they might work? And I thought that was a great idea. And I asked.
  • [01:08:51.21] And it turns out we do have some staff who meet workforce housing requirements 60% to 80% AMI. So I hope when our committee members consider what the future of this lot is-- will be, what kind of neighbor we'd like to support to be in partnership with our programs, with our staff, you'll consider that there's so much more to think about than park versus building. It's people.
  • [01:09:25.70] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: But also for a long time-- I should be holding up my hand and asking to be recognized. May I speak? But the park people have been organized for a long time too. And they are also a grassroots effort.
  • [01:09:45.56] And as long as people understand what this says, and that they don't want anything to ever be on that space, and what it's going to cost our community, that's a negative way of approaching it instead of our positive way. But it's very frustrating to me when I talk to people who say they're voting yes and they give their reasons why. It's the case of miscommunication and it upsets me.
  • [01:10:22.38] VICTORIA GREEN: So I want to talk a little bit about what I think can help us in the library based on whether next door we have a park or we have something else. I do think our library can be successful and can be aided by an active and engaged park, a successful park. I also think our library can be helped by a busy commercial spot with lots of people living there and lots of activity. I think that either could succeed. But I think given, that's in theory.
  • [01:10:52.96] In actuality, I think that there is a middle ground, which is combining a commercial building with some public space for us. We've appreciated that under the current configuration, unlike the days when it was just a gravel lot-- I guess, it wasn't gravel. But you know what I mean. Back when they had your 10-minute free parking.
  • [01:11:13.63] That we can use this space now. And we've had events that bleed over into there. And the idea of having some public space, as opposed to all private commercial development, even housing, is appealing. I don't think--
  • [01:11:27.73] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Which we have in the past.
  • [01:11:28.69] VICTORIA GREEN: And I don't think anything about-- I don't think it has to be all park land for it to be space that can benefit the library directly.
  • [01:11:36.32] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: The Plaza.
  • [01:11:37.09] VICTORIA GREEN: Exactly. A 12,000 square foot Plaza I think would be a huge benefit for us. Now that's not what we're voting on tonight. I mean, the resolution itself is not do you like the plan that's being talked about. It's should we not have that plan as an option.
  • [01:11:53.92] When I think about this, one of the things I think about is the 5th Avenue library in New York in Bryant Park. Do you guys remember what Bryant Park used to be like what it was supported by public dollars before the private partnership started in the-- when was that? The mid '90s? When it was terrible.
  • [01:12:10.15] It kept people-- it was-- and I admit to having myself, I'm not crazy about walking down library lane at 8:30 at night on a winter night. It feels some of the same kind of empty vacant way that park land can feel. And when I look at Bryant Park today, which is similarly sort of a public private space, I think it supports the library well. Now we're never going to be Bryant Park, right? I mean, we don't have the acreage.
  • [01:12:39.31] We don't have the landscaping. We don't have the Rockefeller to fund that. I can't remember who it actually is. But I see many benefits to that kind of model for the library in New York. And I can see some of the same benefits for us, and we have a more direct connection in some ways, because it's not gated off with separate entrances.
  • [01:13:02.41] You bleet-- I mean, I almost always approach the library through Library Lane directly adjacent that way. So I think that having-- I think there's a lot of risk to an unfunded park next door for the library. I think there's a lot of risk of it being a concrete another 20 years where we are with throwing people to this block rather than there being more than one thing. I'm sorry, I went on a long time. Other people have other things to say.
  • [01:13:36.51] JIM LEIJA: I would-- I would just say it would actually really benefit from hearing Ed talk about the long view. Because when you put it in those terms Ed, it's like, it feels like this is the right thing to do to me. And now, and even as we were you know, in an Executive Committee today, considering bringing this resolution to the board for discussion, it wasn't even clear if that was the right thing to do, especially given what you've said, which is that this board has never taken this kind of public action before in terms of getting involved in city affairs.
  • [01:14:22.11] So that this is not a decision to be taken lightly. And I think what's very interesting about this conversation I think, is we all sort of seem to be coming at it from very different angles. And you know, I am of the personal opinion that I would like to see the lot next door developed in the way that the core developers have proposed, and have gone through a long process to deliver. Because it will be something for us that will create-- will start to create an idea about what the future of this park might be like.
  • [01:15:07.92] I'm also I think, pointedly aware that passing this resolution, which we have not done yet, it also creates a level of potential future discomfort should proposal A pass, and the library is then in the position of working with partners and collaborators that we have said you know, but this is not what we want to. But I really-- I do believe this library is a democratic institution, the will of the people will prevail. And as the library does with all of its collaborators and partners in this community, it will proceed in the best and most positive spirit with whomever is the future occupant of the space next door. I do think it is the right thing to do for us to have this conversation certainly, like we're doing right now and to make a decision as a board.
  • [01:16:23.93] ED SUROVELL: If I may make one more comments in relation to that. That ideally, this institution, this branch of it, belongs somewhere on the block that it's sitting right now, whether or not it remains here or go someplace else is yet to be determined. Flexibility is extremely small. But a perpetual park next door makes it much worse, dramatically reduces the ability to plan to move, and to provide alternatives for us.
  • [01:17:07.83] And I hope that we see it in that light. It is not good for the library. I don't think it's good for the city.
  • [01:17:17.54] The rest of the block isn't planned yet. It has existing zoning. Zoning can be changed. A perpetual park, or indeed a perpetual anything can be.
  • [01:17:30.14] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Building on that, I don't think we're drawing a line in the sand. So say it passes. By passing this resolution, we simply say that the seven of us had a long conversation. And we voted in such a direction that we feel that all the things that this resolution are true that we don't want there to be a park in perpetuity is our next door neighbor. To the lot in the place we own we have invested a lot of money.
  • [01:18:00.82] Like Victoria said, is our neighbor. You care about who your neighbors are. So even if it's yes, I don't think we're drawing a line in the sand and saying we won't work with you if that's what the voters decide.
  • [01:18:13.46] We are not saying that at all. We're simply saying right here and now before it's voted upon we have an opinion collectively. We've talked it out. This is the direction we think we should go.
  • [01:18:27.64] LINH SONG: I appreciate the sentiment behind prop A and that you know, that there is a demand for a common space, meeting space, a downtown common meeting space. And that's the library. I think if we push the conversation so that we're more imaginative about what's possible downtown-- like we've had with Peter Allen coming at the last meeting, and fulfilling the role as being a convener-- I hope voters will, well, take into consideration our worries.
  • [01:19:12.38] The impact that if this proposal passes, will make on our future planning, but also I hope they'll also take the opportunity to visualize the entire block. Right? I mean, there are things there are still being deliberated. There are other parcels.
  • [01:19:34.46] And the city is changing. We've talked about this in our board meetings and our retreat before. We talked about some cog data. We've looked at how the population will change. We know that we're going to see an increase in seniors in the city.
  • [01:19:52.32] And even though we're this separate body, even though we are not a planning commission, we know that these issues affect our patrons. So to talk about our neighbor and their neighbor's impact on affordability, all these issues ripple through our community. And I'm glad that the library has been able to have these conversations about our own building for the past two years, and try and imagine what our options are and what's possible down here. But I'm hoping that when we talk about all of our neighbors, we're consistent about that, and understanding that I think that our city is changing.
  • [01:20:37.52] The library is changing. So yeah. And then and we only have so many opportunities to start planning and start doing. So I'm really excited that we have this resolution in front of us. It's beyond what we've done before, but this is what happens when you have new leadership.
  • [01:21:03.59] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: You know-- I'm sorry. Am I interrupting? No? I went to the Core. I went to the Core presentation of what might be planned for them for the Plaza and what will be related.
  • [01:21:18.39] It was only attended by maybe 8 or 10 people. It was out at Weber's. I can't remember the date specifically. But it was sometime after our last meeting, between our last meeting and now. I think maybe the 3rd, 23rd.
  • [01:21:34.00] No, the 3rd of October perhaps. That can't be right. But anyway, I went and expected to see a lot of people there. The only people there who were interested wanted to see what might go on at the Plaza, how the public space would be handled.
  • [01:21:52.63] So I worried about that later. That what did that mean? There was so little interest.
  • [01:21:59.92] And I still don't know what it means. But there is a lot of possibility that we can see and help influence, I think. But I'm not sure.
  • [01:22:14.05] LINH SONG: So what's interesting about that particular Core Spaces meeting was that apparently the organizers had tried to book meeting space in the libraries, but there was nothing available.
  • [01:22:23.23] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Well there was criticism that why wasn't that why wasn't the meeting downtown?
  • [01:22:27.65] LINH SONG: Because we weren't available. And I think that--
  • [01:22:30.82] [INTERPOSING VOICES]
  • [01:22:31.56] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: This isn't the only downtown place to meet. There are places to meet. But that's where they met and nobody came.
  • [01:22:40.84] LINH SONG: Well, I think that says a lot about our role in being the downtown anchor.
  • [01:22:49.64] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Are we ready to vote?
  • [01:22:53.14] VICTORIA GREEN: I just want to make one more comment about-- the library-- I've been stressing that I think we should vote what we think is good in our positions as trustees. But I do want to talk a little bit about the-- a larger context in that one thing that's consistent in the conversations I've heard around the future of this downtown block is the importance of the library there, and the regard the library is held in as a community resource today, that the library is seen absolutely as a center for people around Ann Arbor, something that unites us, rather than divides us. And whatever happens in the November ballot initiative, I don't think that's going to change. No one in the library is going to stop working for the people of Ann Arbor or working to serve people, because that's-- I mean, we all are on this board because that's what we wanted to support the staff in doing, and to help with doing. And I think many of us, I don't speak for everyone individually, feel that providing those sorts of services downtown is the vision we want for the city overall and the library too.
  • [01:24:16.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. All right. All those in favor?
  • [01:24:21.64] BOARD MEMBERS: Aye.
  • [01:24:24.00] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Opposed? OK, motion passes.
  • [01:24:29.92] COLLEEN SHERMAN: Guys, we were unanimous! Man! And Jamie, I hope it didn't sound like I was busting your chops in that one part. I really didn't mean it to communicate that way. It was just a process point-- point of process is all.
  • [01:24:44.73] JIM LEIJA: Thank you, Colleen.
  • [01:24:46.00] VICTORIA GREEN: And I'll add that I have the utmost respect for the hard work that Jamie does as our president. I'm very proud to serve as a trustee under Jamie's presidency.
  • [01:24:55.58] COLLEEN SHERMAN: And also if you're not doing things and making things that might be questionable or might cause disagreement, then you're not doing anything. So good for you. And all the credit in the world. So it wasn't-- I wasn't trying to scold you, if it sounded like that.
  • [01:25:09.81] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I appreciate that. It was very hard to receive feedback like that in such a public way.
  • [01:25:15.74] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Well, that's why we decided to only speak publicly, so we have to expect that.
  • [01:25:20.84] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I know! I agree. I think-- I think like, two of the three people listening on YouTube, like, this is what it means to have a very public discussion.
  • [01:25:29.90] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: But I to tell you that at the Core meeting I attended, one of the nine people there said oh, I saw you when you appeared at the library board. So he--
  • [01:25:41.13] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I thought only Adalee watched. All right. Well, thanks everyone. But your feedback is not-- I mean, I receive it.
  • [01:25:53.49] So the last thing on our agenda besides citizen comments, and there are only a few I think attendees tonight who might decide to comment, but you should be feel very welcome to-- but the last thing before that is the review of the three-year snow removal contract item of discussion.
  • [01:26:11.07] LEN LEMORIE: OK. So last March, our three-year contract ended. So we've been receiving bids. And I'm one short tonight. I was expecting one more Friday.
  • [01:26:21.06] So I only have two out of three. So for the November meeting, we'll have three proposals for you guys to look at. And [INAUDIBLE] obviously a recommendation. So we can sign a new snow contract for three years. Any questions about that one?
  • [01:26:38.04] VICTORIA GREEN: I have a question.
  • [01:26:38.95] LEN LEMORIE: Yes.
  • [01:26:39.72] VICTORIA GREEN: So the snow removal contract is for all the branches?
  • [01:26:42.74] LEN LEMORIE: Yes.
  • [01:26:43.32] VICTORIA GREEN: It's not for any of--
  • [01:26:44.36] LEN LEMORIE: With the exception of the leased spots, Westgate and the Archives.
  • [01:26:47.76] VICTORIA GREEN: Yep, that makes sense.
  • [01:26:49.22] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: With the exception of what?
  • [01:26:50.23] LEN LEMORIE: The Archives and Westgate.
  • [01:26:51.81] VICTORIA GREEN: That's provided by the--
  • [01:26:53.92] LEN LEMORIE: It's part of our cam fees.
  • [01:26:55.45] VICTORIA GREEN: And can you-- are there any changes in the service that we're asking people to provide?
  • [01:27:01.29] LEN LEMORIE: The contractor we had was out of Toledo. So we've just been looking at people right here in our area, in Ann Arbor that we're a little bit closer. They-- It's a good company. But logistically, I think it kind of hurt us at times. Different storms-- if it snows here, doesn't snow in Toledo, that type of stuff.
  • [01:27:18.52] So that's the biggest difference. Reputable companies that have contracts close to all of our sites that our right here in Ann Arbor. So that's been the focus.
  • [01:27:27.65] VICTORIA GREEN: And I'm sorry. I think what I meant was does it include parking lots and pathways and stairs, and--
  • [01:27:33.33] LEN LEMORIE: Everything, yes. Everything that it would--
  • [01:27:35.20] VICTORIA GREEN: It's all one contract?
  • [01:27:36.00] LEN LEMORIE: Yes.
  • [01:27:36.59] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Was the Toledo company a low bid or something? Why did we end up--
  • [01:27:40.07] LEN LEMORIE: No, we had-- they actually did our lawn and snow. So it was a bundled service. I think it was about three years ago when we looked at the landscape package. We made a change there. And so we just had snow.
  • [01:27:53.23] And that was already under contract. So we lived with it. And not a bad company at all. We just-- you know, we'd like somebody closer.
  • [01:28:01.96] The scope of work is pretty much the same in Michigan. If anything, any service over an inch of accumulation, they're going to come scrape and plow. Any icing or freezing, they're going to come salt. It'll be all sidewalks all parking lot.
  • [01:28:14.50] LINH SONG: There is a snow plow at Traverwood that's in the parking-- parking garage.
  • [01:28:20.30] LEN LEMORIE: Yes, there is.
  • [01:28:21.43] LINH SONG: So is that--
  • [01:28:24.35] LEN LEMORIE: That's the library snow plow. And that's-- that's kind of up in our backup when our contractor didn't make it in from Toledo, or just clean up, if you know, if it's midday snow, and you don't get all the spots. Normally two spots someone needs to plow. So our maintenance guys would clean up the lots like that.
  • [01:28:41.03] ED SUROVELL: Can I ask? You have two bids right now?
  • [01:28:45.04] LEN LEMORIE: Yes.
  • [01:28:45.61] ED SUROVELL: I presume one of them is from Toledo?
  • [01:28:48.49] LEN LEMORIE: No.
  • [01:28:49.26] ED SUROVELL: No, neither of them.
  • [01:28:50.78] LEN LEMORIE: No. Both companies are here in Ann Arbor. I didn't extend an offer to the Toledo company this year.
  • [01:28:57.06] ED SUROVELL: Right. Are they precluded from bidding if they felt like it?
  • [01:29:01.95] LEN LEMORIE: No. I would think we'd accept a bid from anyone.
  • [01:29:05.28] ED SUROVELL: But it was made clear that that location-- proximity was going to be taken into account.
  • [01:29:13.53] LEN LEMORIE: Yes. The owner and I, over the last couple of years, had several conversations about their equipment and time to get here and get our sites opened up. And it's a challenge. I did snow removal for a lot of years before I came here. And you got to be ready to service no matter what.
  • [01:29:31.65] And I think if you're coming from a long ways away, and they had one crew coming out of Toledo, I think that not only hurt them, but hurt our service. They did a fine job once they got here. But there was a lot of days lots weren't serviced until after we opened. So I didn't extend the offer to them for that reason.
  • [01:29:48.26] ED SUROVELL: But it's publicly advertised?
  • [01:29:50.05] LEN LEMORIE: No. No. Just I did it through reputable contractors in our area. I didn't want to put it out to the public and have somebody in Grand Rapids or Lansing or someone bid it. So it wasn't posted.
  • [01:30:02.05] ED SUROVELL: Can we do that?
  • [01:30:03.14] JOSIE PARKER: Yes we can.
  • [01:30:04.30] LEN LEMORIE: Yes we can.
  • [01:30:04.89] JOSIE PARKER: The policies for RFPs, yes we can.
  • [01:30:11.27] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Not ours, but the--
  • [01:30:16.71] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Other further questions?
  • [01:30:19.74] LINH SONG: I hope it doesn't snow.
  • [01:30:20.83] COLLEEN SHERMAN: We need to read the resolution?
  • [01:30:21.88] JOSIE PARKER: The bid opening will be public.
  • [01:30:24.37] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: I think it's just an item of discussion though.
  • [01:30:26.02] LEN LEMORIE: It's an item of discussion for vote in November.
  • [01:30:29.33] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. Well, thank you. It sounds like you're really doing due diligence. And I mean, the bottom line is, snow has to be gone when the library opens. Like, it sounds like you worked really hard to try to make things work, but I understand why you wouldn't invite that to continue.
  • [01:30:46.22] LEN LEMORIE: Yes. Well, thank you.
  • [01:30:48.29] LINH SONG: Thank you.
  • [01:30:51.75] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: OK. Anyone want to address the board?
  • [01:30:55.54] KAREN WILSON: Yes. Dave.
  • [01:31:02.79] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Tonight's the night of Daves speaking to the board.
  • [01:31:08.79] DAVE ROLECK: Here's my cheat sheet. Thanks for listening. I'm Dave. I'm from the west side of Ann Arbor. I wanted to--
  • [01:31:16.79] ED SUROVELL: Can we have your full name please?
  • [01:31:18.64] DAVE ROLECK: Sure, Dave Roleck.
  • [01:31:20.77] ED SUROVELL: Thank You.
  • [01:31:22.19] DAVE ROLECK: Yeah, no problem. I wanted to-- as I understand, the mission of the library is to provide access to like, the "information agoura" to the public. I wanted to mention a project I recently heard of. It's called futel, that's f-u-t-e-l. And they say, it's in a one line, it's a cross between a social service and art project, providing radically accessible communication tools.
  • [01:31:52.84] It's a 501(c)3. It's funded by grants. And the project aims to provide public "no pay" phones for phone calls, for voice mail, and other telephone related services. They currently have six phones, five in Portland, one in Ypsi. And last year they served 14,000 calls.
  • [01:32:18.65] So me thinking, oh, library provides public resources to all. You know, things like internet. It's a natural place to have a "no pay phone" to supplement what the library currently provides. I think they only ask for a site for the phone and internet bandwidth. Because it's a voice over IP phone.
  • [01:32:42.66] So my understanding for this, why it might be useful for their library, is a lot of patrons may not even have access to phone service. The library currently provides access to internet via Wi-Fi. So if they have a phone, you know, no phone service but a phone, mobile device, they could use the internet. If they don't even have that, there's computing resources. This would supplement that.
  • [01:33:09.52] So I met with one of the co-founders. That's why I mentioned this just spontaneously. I'm happy to connect the library with him or really provide more info about the project. And I should note, that I don't have any affiliation with the project, just beyond like, observing that I think it would be good to serve the populace. So that's all.
  • [01:33:31.55] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Well, thank you. Thank for always bringing us new ideas. I saw another person approach. Yes?
  • [01:33:44.43] JESSICA LEETAW: And she noted on the card, it's Leetaw, because it rhymes with seesaw. Hi. My name is Jessica. I live on the west side of Ann Arbor on 5th Street.
  • [01:33:55.27] I wanted to thank all of you for the kind of leadership you're showing tonight, for the courage to make uncomfortable change, for the courage to make uncomfortable criticism, and for the courage to receive it publicly. I am a board member on the Ann Arbor's DDA, the Downtown Development Authority and relatively new to the position. I'm just going into month eight, I think.
  • [01:34:18.53] And I'm learning a lot about what public service and public leadership mean and what it looks like. So I just want to thank you for the examples that you're setting tonight. I'm very, very grateful.
  • [01:34:30.05] JAN BARNEY NEWMAN: Thank you.
  • [01:34:31.37] JAMIE VANDER BROEK: Thank you, Jess. Anyone else like to speak? All right. Thank you. I'll see you in November. Meeting adjourned.
  • [01:34:46.17] NARRATOR: This program was recorded on October 15th 2018 at the Ann Arbor District Library.
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October 15, 2018 at the Downtown Library

Length: 01:34:47

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

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AADL Board Meeting