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Moorish Meals

Moorish Meals image
Parent Issue
Day
6
Month
January
Year
1881
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

A Moorish breakfast consists of cascus-su-a cake of baked granules, deftly madH of floor, which eats crisp anil swei-t milk, butter, omleta, pigeons cooked in oil, sweet potatoes.forcemeat, and svveet tarta of honey butter and egijs. ÏVa, which is quite a "coursti" meal, is taken cross-Iegged on soft carpets spread on the floor around a handsonie and costly tray with dwarf feet raiáing it a lew inches from the floor, furnished with drinking glasses in place of china cups. The formidable meal, which is served by an upper man servant, excite the European visitors' wonder and dismay. First the teapot - or kettle, if named after its shape - is ülled with green tea, sugar and water in such proportions as to make a thick sweet syrup, which is drunk without milk or cream, ïhen follows an infusión of tea and spearmint, yet another of tea and wormwood; yet another of tea and lemon verbena; and yet amiiher of tea and citrón. On goud occasions a sixtli is addfd of tea and nrnbereris. Nothinsr is eaten. The "weed" usuitlly follóos, but the Moor tbough a sinoker, is iiot an "invetérate.' Dinner consista of vaiious dishes of mutton, lish, and fowl, ingeniously and irtistically served in mixtures of pomades, s ups, spices, md cosmetios ; sp at least, Englishinen declare who liave had in coúrtesy toswallowt.be preparatious. Knives, íorks, md spoons are dispensed with, perliaps despised. Around a neutral dishe thers thecoiupany, as uaual leggedon thetloor. Af'In the name of God," which is the brief grace pronounced by the master of the liouse, the slave removes the cover front the bowl; lifted hands are thrust into the smoking dish, and morsels of its eontents, dettly rolled iuto convenient forms, are tossed dripping into the mouth with a neatness and precisión trulv wonderful. Exact ixirtions are picked from fowl and tisli and mutton-cliopbone without delay or effoi t. Sharp nails are said to act as knives. After the ceurse water uiul napkins are brought around. The mtafa over, auotber piunging of the paws into the savory mess. Incensé is often burned duringdinner, which tills he apartment with delicate aroma. When a mea] is served in the open court the ladies of the house are peruiii ted o gaze on their lords from the opeu balcouy which usually surrounds it. . .

Article

Subjects
Old News
Ann Arbor Democrat