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Law Reform

Law Reform image
Parent Issue
Day
26
Month
March
Year
1897
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The lectureof Ex-President Harrison in the Students' Lecture ('ourse last Tuesday evening, was listened to by a large audience and was received with mueh favor. He was introduced in a very complimentary manner by President Angelí, which "compliment he returned in good shape by congratulating the students of the University of Micti igan on being privileged to"gain their . education under "one of the greutest of the college presidents of the world." i "Sorna Ilindranees to Legal Reform" was his formal subject, the chief of which he characterized as the inadequacy of legislatures in general to deal with a systematic revisión of the laws, even where they sit in unlim ted sessions. As a matter of fact they sit among social and political distractlons, I are unprepared by their previous training for the work, and in many cases their sessions are limited to (iO days, making adequate consideration impbssible. "Five-sixths of the voters of the country" said Mr. Harrisón fav'r a re visión oí corporation laws. limiting the purposes for which corporations may beorganized, supervising the issuing of stocks and bonds, and putting other restraints upon tliem. Au even larger proportion of our people would gíve meir empnatic support to the propo sition that tax burdens shonld fall equa W upon all property. JJut they do not, as everyone knows. Lands houses, live stock and iinpleinents of trade cannot be hidden. -Stocks and bonds can be, and the assessor has no way of checking the list But such questions as tax and corporatiou reforms are not to be solved by individual investigators. There must be a comparison of views, debatí'. aii'l the hearing of all interests to be afïected if crudity and confusión are to be escaped." Por thesfe reasons President Ilarrison favored the formation of commissions to be composed of the ablest men of the country, who should study these matters, and present bilis for iegislation. They should have time to thor oughly study the questions, and opportunitv should be giveu all aftected interests to be heard. There should be no attémpt to bring in the millennium on the morrow. It would betoo sudden. The ideal eannot be re iched at a step. but we should taco and move that way."

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Subjects
Old News
Ann Arbor Democrat