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Wouldn't Bet On A Sure Thing

Wouldn't Bet On A Sure Thing image
Parent Issue
Day
9
Month
January
Year
1880
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

At an early hour yesterday morning a Randolph-street saloon-keeper was called to wait upon a oustomer vvho liad ost an eye, suffered a broken nose, and vas otherwise s]oiled to take the part of Apollo on life's stage. He was a stranger, but he was very easy to get acquainted with. ■ What kind of folks have yon got in his town?" he suddenly inquired, as ie sipped his beer. " Well, a purty good lot, I guess," was the reply. "Kather soft, I guess," continued he stranger. " I might have made ten lollars iust now if it wasn't for my conounded conscientions scruples. Hang t! I wish I could be a little off, like most other men, but I can't. It wasn't )orn in me to be tricky." "How's that?" said the saloonist. "Why, there's a chap in a saloon ust above here who thinks he's smart, ie wanted to bet me that the windows n tlie back end of tho Board of Trade juiküng eontained six panes of glass to i wimlow. He bluffed me all around he room and shook a ten right under my nose, but my conscience wouldn't et me bet on a sure thing. If I hadn't )een strictly honest I could have taken lis money as slick as grease." "How?" " Why, my partner puttied in all that ;lass, and there's eight panes to a win[ow. I knew it all the time, and I ould have bet on a sure thing, you see. sometimos wish 1 hadn't beun brought 1 1 so slrict, but perhaps it was the best way." Just then a second stranger dropped n. Seeing No. 1 he hauled out a tenollar bilí, shook it at him and sneerngly said: "ïou must be a taffy sort of a chap! Vhen I say any thing I'm willing to jack it, but you sneak around the voods !" "I never bet on a sure thing," ealmy replied tho other. " If I took your iet I should shnply rob you of ten dolars, and my conscience would never et me rest." " I'll teil you what I'll do," said the aloon-keeper, carolessly- " I'll make a little bet with you. I think there are ight panes to a window; I'm wllling -o bet ten dollars there are." "After considerable " clawing off" the money was put up and the tvvo walked down to the buildino" to count the panes. There were only four to a window, and yet it took the saloonisL an hour and a half to get the trick mtangled so that he coiüd compreheud.

Article

Subjects
Old News
Ann Arbor Argus