Press enter after choosing selection

Public School Reports

Public School Reports image
Parent Issue
Day
5
Month
September
Year
1889
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

According to annual custom, the reports of the board of education and ot the superintendent of schools have been given out this week acd both reports make a creditable showing ior our school work. SUPT. PERRYS REPORT. Extracts from the superintendente report are of considerable interest, this being the 19 ;h annual report that Prof. Perry has made. The statistics of attendance and kindred items in the three departments are placed in tabular form for easy inspection and comparison, if desired, with those of last year, or with eimiliar pointe in other schools. Items. H 8 g 5 ! I Fnroliment ( Boys 337 302 431 1070 fereScluded Gids 267 278 354, 899 Total 604 680 7851 1969 Average n'ümber belonging 474; 472 6131 1590 Average daily attendance 459 458 617 1 1533 Per cent. of attendance 90.74 97.18 95.58 06 47 Kumber of non-resident 298 50 51 399 Number of men teachers 8 8 Number of women teach ers 6 15 16 87 Number of Special teachers - 3 Average number of days attendance of each pu pil 147 170 152 150 Number of pupils to each teacher... 86 a sy .o Cost per capita for tuition 26 65 12 84 11 84 16 55 CralsPerCTílí.r-i": 3 90 3 90 3 90 3 90 Totai cost per capita 80 55 16 74 15 74 20 45 SUMMARY BY AGES. Under 6 years of age upon entering school ? Between 6 aud 16 years of age Il) Over 16 years of age 42 Total 1.969 The"per cent. of attendance"' shown in tables indícales that our school popuhtion makes the improvement of the school privileges a matter oL thoughtful attention. An invasión of epidemics considerably lessened the promotions and other stated products of the year. Probably no other enterprise or general interest of a community is so susceptible to attack and damage by epidemics as school. Still, out of 950 examined in the Grammar and Primary department, 864 were promoted. An excellent class of G7 pupila were passed from the eighth grade to the High School. Duricg the year, 74 pupils were placed in the several grades "on trial," of whom 52 gucceeded and 22 tailed. One of the items of the year that I record with special satisfaction is a system of iacreaeing the salaries of those grade teachers that have remained a certain num - ber of years in the service of the Board. To some of our experienoe and ekillful teachers, this is an act of signal justice, which will be gratetully appreciated, and I think will be heartily endorsed by the patrons of the schools. Ah enrollment of 6Ü0, and a graduating ciass of 80, are sufficient evidence that the High Scnool is more than retaining its wonied prosperity. This continued expansión is largely due to the wide reputation the school has attained in its special field of fitting etudents for college. The following table of branches taught, and the numbersin each, willafford a concise view of the annusl work accomplished by the schooi: Studies. Boys. Girls. Total. Latin 176 IOS 279 Greek 37 H 61 Germán - 72 52 124 French 10 32 42 Algebra 172 140 312 Geometry _.. 57 55 112 Arithmeüc 98 89 182 Chemistry 18 10 28 PhysIC8 69 85 104 Astronomy 18 8 21 l'hysiology 33 41 74 Botany 98 80 173 Physical Geography 40 54 94 Etymology 10 18 28 Composition 93 77 170 Grammar 99 85 184 TJnited States History 80 80 160 General History 48 44 92 English History 21 17 88 Roman History 89 32 71 Greek History 18 11 24 Book-Keeping 60 37 7 Political Économy 15 12 27 Commercial Law 12 7 19 Civil Government 25 27 52 Writing 12 6 18 English Literature „ 26 29 55 Rhetorlc 21 23 44 American Literature 11 15 26 : The new requirements for admission to the University will hereafter increase the numbers in the Sciences aDd History, and have necessitated a re-arrangement of all the preparatory courses. REPORT Of TUE TRUSTEES. The 33d annual report of the board of education places the total reaeipts (or the year at $00,389.98, the expeuditures being as fullows: Patd salaries " bonds and Interest .j' f insurance 4.' " ianitors L1?? " librarybooks L j I oVerneüte:::::.:::::::::::::::::::::... wwf6 new'büiïding"".'".! 22,481 78 " repairs and incidentals 2,116 01 Cash on hand So1 ói The estimated ordinary expenses for the current school year are as tollows: Bonds tlue February 1. 1890 ■■ 8 4.000 Interest" " 1, " 5 Per „„ old Z75 Interest due February 1, 1890, 4 per cent., new o-n Salaries f,0. Insurance . ffi Janitors J'" Incidentals í'VVX pfirs ::r:::::::::: 2$ ÍS8.6E0 The estimated receipts for.the carrent school year are as folio wt: Prlmary School Money 3.500 00 MillTax $ Tuitlon Receipts Cash on hand Dl 8 814,351 33 It will be necessary to rsise bv taxation the sum of $'24,500, and the Board also recommends thalitbeautherized, iL necessary, to raise by temporary loan notexceeding $5,000 for the furnishing and improving of the high school building?, stone walks, etc. Of the sum necessary to raise by tax tbis year, $5,125 is to pay bonds and interest dne February 1, 1890. After the first of February next tbe total ïndebtednes of the district (new and oíd) will be $24,000 bearing interest at 6ve and tour per ' cent., the principal sum to become due as folio we: 1891, February lst W.000 189Í " " """ 1893 " " .0 íqí .. 'i 4,000 íie - ■::::::::::::::::::::: 4,000

Article

Subjects
Old News
Ann Arbor Register