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Local Brevities

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Parent Issue
Day
13
Month
February
Year
1891
Copyright
Public Domain
Obituary
OCR Text

Valentine's day, to-morrow. Professor Alexander Winchell is very seriously ill. A butter and cheese factory is the latest venture for this city. W. F. Bradley is now master méchame on the Ann Arbor road. Miss Carrie Fassett, of Salem, is stenographer for attorney general Ellis. The Michigan schoolmasters' club meets in University hall a week from to-morrow. Four more patients have been inoculated with Koch's lymph at the University hospital. The city treasurer's office will be open Saturday evenings to receive taxes until eight o'clock. The Ann Arbor road, it is again said, will shortly build an iron bridge over the Huron river. Three hundred and twenty-five bodies had been removed from the old cemetery Wednesday night. The Sons of Veterans are talking of presenting the Confedérate Spy in the opera house in three weeks. The republican ward caucuses will be held next Tuesday evening, and the county convention on Tuesday. Mary Francis Twitchell, of the fourth ward, died on Friday of last week, of consumption, aged only sixteen. There were seventy-six couples at the Sons of Veterans' dance last Thursday night. They will give another after Lent. Thomas Corbett and Richard Barley were given one day each by Justice Pond, Monday, for being drunk on the streets. The funeral services of Deacon Lorrin Mills, will be held in the Congregational church to-morrow morning at ten o'clock. There is, at least, one model large dog on Washington street. He is never known to bark, but gives a whine like the cry of a child. The editors of the U. of M. Daily for next semester, will be elected at a meeting of its subscribers in Room A, at two o'clock, to-morrow. Past Master N. J. Kyer, of Golden Rule Lodge, F. and A. M., was presented with a beautiful ring by the lodge last Thursday evening. A team of horses and an ice plow belonging to Charles Rains, broke through the ice at Whitmore Lake, Tuesday and went to the bottom. Mrs. Eli Benton died in Lodi, Monday last, at the residence of her son-in-law, Comstock F. Hill, of old age and heart disease, aged eighty years. At the Unity Club, next Monday evening, Feb. 16, Dr. S. A. Jones, of this city, will read a paper on "A Visit to the Home and Haunts of Thoreau." The daughter of George Sneering, of Freedom, died Tuesday, of lung trouble. This is the second daughter he has lost in a year, both from the same disease. The trustees of the Congregational church have elected Thomas J. Keech, chairman; Charles W. Wagner, secretary, and Miss P. A. Noble, treasurer. A lady gave one of the motor men a #20 gold piece the other day and asked for a dollar change. She could hardly believe it, when the motor man called her attention to it. Richard Brown, of Webster, died Wednesday, aged sixty years and five months. The funeral services will be held at half past ten to-morrow in St. Patrick's church, Northfield. During Lent, week day services will be held in St. Andrews church as follows : Monday and day evenings, 7:30 p. m. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, at 4.00 p. m. The democratie ward caucuses to elect delegates to the county convention will be held at the usual places next Wednesday evening. The convention will be held on Thursday. Every one who has received a target and gun for obtaining a new subscriber to the Argus has been highly delighted with it. It is worth many times the effort it willcost you to get a new subscriber. The Courier this week published a ligt of forty professors in medical who are graduates of the medical department of the University. The University graduates are doing well in the world. The books of Nelson Sutherland, treasurer of the Ann Arborand Lodi Plank road Co., have been examined by a committee consisting of Geo. E. Sperry and Frank E. Mills and have been found correct. Mrs. Margaret Sutton, wife of Thomas Sutton, of Ann Arbor township, died Monday of blood poisoning, aged eighty-three years. The funeral services were held Wednes day afternoon at the house. The third of the series of lectures in the C. M. B. A. course at Dexter will be given next Thursday evening by Bishop Foley on Church Unity. The music will be furnished by the business men's quartette of this city. Mrs. Mary E. Smith, wife of John Smith, of Ann Arbor township, died of heart disease and la grippe, on Saturday of last week. She was forty-nine years and nine months oíd. The funeral services were held on Monday at nine o'clock. Rev. Rush R. Shippen, of Washington, D. C, will preach at the Unitarian church, in this city, next Sunday morning and evening, in exchange with Mr. Sunderland. Mr. Shippen is one of the ablest and best known Unitarian clergymen in this country. The social given last Friday evening by the Algonquin club was a great success, due mostly to the efficiënt work of the managing committee, Robert Gwinner, John Fischer, Jacob Gwinner and Adolph Diehl. It is in contemplation to give another social in the near future. Three men were at work in the stone yard Tuesday, and only one Wednesday. Tramps are giving Ann Arbor a wider birth. Ypsilanti, Chelsea, Dexter, Saline, Milan and Manchester ought to give their tramps a dose of the stone yard, so that they will avoid the county. The Jeffersonian literary society of the University has elected the following officers: President, C. O. Knudson; vice-pres., A. J. Davis; recording secretary, C. W. Wells; corresponding secretary, H. A. Piersol; critic, Samuel Dewel; treasurer, B. B. Hamilton; marshal, Jeremiah Donovan. Rev. Russell H. Conwell, president of Temple College, lectures before the Student's Lecture Association, Saturday evening, February 21. Of him, the New York Evening Post says, "Unexcelled by any orator in America and perhaps the equal oí any in the world in those marvellous descriptive powers." Albert Mann, of Mann Bros., druggists, and Miss Ida K. Bindei were married Wednesday evening, by Rev. Max Hein, at the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Binder. They will be at home after February 16, at 20 East Madison street. Mr. and Mrs. Mann have the warm congratulations of many friends. M. Staebler will sell at auction on his farm in Lodi and Scio, eight miles west of Ann Arbor, six miles south of Dexter and three-quarters of a mile west of Scio church, on Wednesday, February 18, at ten o'clock, five work horses, two colts, seven cows and four heifers, 140 sheep, 80 chickens, binders, plows, 20 tons of hay and very many farming implements and other articles. División Lieutenant Edwin E. Hallett received word from Gen. Marvin E. Hall, of Hillsdale; Mich., to the effect that Mich. División, Sons of Veterans, will hold their state encampment at Detroit, the same time of the G. A. R. encampment. Prizes to the amount of $500 for the best drilled Camp in full uniform. There will be quite a number of other prizes which will be mentioned in general orders. Sheriff Dwyer went down to Detroit yesterday and brought back with him William Butler, colored, who stole a suit of clothes from Henry Laflin, of Ypsilanti town, in the fall of 1889. Butler does not seem to have the best of reputations. He broke ;il in Sandwich, Ontario, and Í50 reward was offered for his capture. It was after this that he ïired out to Laflin and stole the suit of clothes. By invitation of Rev. Mr. Carman, the gospel temperance meeting next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, will be held in the Baptist church instead of in Cropsey's hall, and the service by the Good Templars intended for that day is deferred. Meetings planned in Cropsey's hall are: Sunday, Feb. 22, Who favor high iicense, and why. An address in its defense; March 1, meeting by the W. C. T. U., March 8, meeting by the Good Templars. A conference of the clergy and friends interested in the temperance work was held in lecture room of the M. E. church, last Monday morning, with Prof. J. B. Steere in the chair. After remarks by Revs. Rust, Carman, Bradshaw, Sunderland and Day, Mesdames Dick, Sunderland and others, it was voted to hold a unión mass meeting the first Sunday evening in March. A committee was appointed to make further plans for temperance work. The Students' Christian Association wal requested to secure University Hall for the mass meeting.