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President's Birthday Ball Committee, January 1936

President's Birthday Ball Committee, January 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 29, 1936
Caption
President's Birthday Ball Committee Meets -- The group supervising arrangements for the celebration of the President's Birthday Ball in the Intramural Sports building tomorrow night met in Mayor Robert A. Campbell's office in the City Hall last night to complete plans for the big charity ball. Seated Is Mrs. Earl H. Cress. Standing, left to right, are D. B. Conley, Dean Walter B. Rea, Frank B. DeVine, Dr. Harley A. Haynes, E. C. Pardon, Herbert G. Watkins, general chairman, Arthur W. Stace, Mayor Robert A. Campbell and Dr. Max M. Peet.
Day
28
Month
January
Year
1936
Description

In 1934 a group launched the National Committee for Birthday Balls that sponsored a dance in every town across the nation, both to celebrate President Franklin D. Roosevelt's birthday and to raise money for the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation for research and treatment of Infantile Paralysis. The Birthday Balls raised about a million dollars per year, with contributions split between the Warm Springs Foundation and the local communities where the balls were held.

Second from right is Ann Arbor Mayor Robert Campbell. Third from right is Arthur Stace, Editor of the Ann Arbor Daily News. Second from left is Walter B. Rea who later became the University of Michigan Dean of Men - Wystan Stevens

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Donated by the Ann Arbor News. © The Ann Arbor News.
Related

Minnie Gillett, Fred Duffield, Jr. and Ida Clements Wheat, May 1941

Minnie Gillett, Fred Duffield, Jr. and Ida Clements Wheat, May 1941 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 10, 1941
Caption
COMPOSER OF SONGS IS ENTERTAINED: Mrs. H. M. Gillett of Bay City (at the left above), was the guest of honor at a tea given yesterday by Mrs. Ida Clements Wheat (at the right) at her home on Oxford Rd. with Mrs. Richard H. Morgan as co-hostess. In the center is Mrs. GIllett's great-grandson, Frederick H. Duffield, jr. of Grosse Pointe Farms. The guest of honor is the writer and composer of the trio of song children's songs given yesterday afternoon at the May Festival concert. She wrote the words and music many years ago for the entertainment of little Frederick's mother, Mrs. Duffield, and her sister and brother, now Mrs. Edward S. Evans, jr., and Derby Allington, all of Grosse Pointe.
Month
May
Year
1941
Description

The woman at right is Mrs. Ida Clements Wheat, who was born in Ann Arbor. She was a sister of William L. Clements, who donated the Clements Library to the University. Her son, the late Renville Wheat, was a longtime member of the Clements Library board of directors. - Wystan Stevens

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Donated by the Ann Arbor News. © The Ann Arbor News.

Dunbar Center Girls, August 1936

Dunbar Center Girls, August 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 15, 1936
Caption
CHILDHOOD SINGS--Childhood is childhood regardless of race or color and these youngsters raise their voices in joyful harmony at Dunbar Community center.
Month
August
Year
1936
Description

In 1923, the Reverend R.M. Gilbert, pastor of the Second Baptist Church of Ann Arbor, Michigan, spearheaded the effort that led to the establishment of the Dunbar Community Center. The original intent of the Center was to provide housing for Black laborers working on area roads and University of Michigan building projects. The Center's first building, located at 209-11 North Fourth Avenue, was used primarily for sleeping quarters, but there were also a few areas set aside for club meetings and social events. Gradually the purpose of the Center changed from one of providing temporary housing to that of being a place where Ann Arbor's Black population could gather for social, recreational, and civic activities. In 1926, a new administrator, Mrs. Savonia L. Carson, was appointed Executive Secretary and the Center moved to 1009 East Catherine where it remained until 1937. - Ann Arbor Community Center Records, Bentley Historical Library

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Donated by the Ann Arbor News. © The Ann Arbor News.

Kendell Stuber & Harry Boyd Receive Heroism Medals For Bringing Auto Accident Victims To A Hospital, January 1936

Kendell Stuber & Harry Boyd Receive Heroism Medals For Bringing Auto Accident Victims To A Hospital, January 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 29, 1936
Caption
CITED FOR HEROISM: Kendell Stuber, 19 years old, and Harry Boyd, 20, Ann Arbor youths, are shown receiving medals from Prof. Walter C. Sadler, Americanization chairman of the local American Legion post, and Frederick Thompson, Americanization officer of the Detroit post. Left to right, they are Prof. Sadler, Stuber, Boyd and Thompson.
Day
28
Month
January
Year
1936
Rights Held By
Donated by the Ann Arbor News. © The Ann Arbor News.

4-H Prize Winners

4-H Prize Winners image
Year
1939
Description

4-H Prize Winners.
Head, Heart, Hands, and Health are the four Hs in 4-H, and they are the four values members work on through fun and engaging programs. 4-H empowers youth to reach their full potential, working and learning in partnership with caring adults. The 4-H movement began around the start of the 20th Century and revolutionized how science was taught outside the classroom -- through practical, hands-on programs and experiences. 4-H was also one of the first organizations in America that taught young people leadership skills and how to positively impact their communities.

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Donated by the Ann Arbor News. © The Ann Arbor News.