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Blog Post

Fantastic Children's Non-Fiction

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When Planet Earth Was New - by James Gladstone & Katherine Diemert -
This starkly beautiful picture book introduces very young readers to the geological history of planet Earth. Beginning with the very early development of the solar system, billions and billions of years ago, 'When Planet Earth Was New' shows the earth as it passes through various geological epochs, through the beginnings and the evolution of organic life, and into the human-dominated present. You'll find a great appendix at the end, giving a wealth of additional details. This little gem is a great way to show your child the basics of geological and biological history, years before they will first learn it in the classroom.

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Pocket Full of Colors: the magical world of Mary Blair, Disney artist extraordinaire -by Amy Guglielmo & Jacqueline Tourville-
The authors chart the course of the life of Mary Blair, the creative talent behind Disney classics like Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland. Mary's creative instincts and professional ambitions collide with gender discrimination in the highly male-dominated work-spaces of mid-century America. Mary perseveres though, and single-handedly drags the Disney Studios from it's black and white past, and into the lush colors of it's storied golden age.

While there is much to love in this slender book, as and adult, my favorite part of 'A Pocket Full of Colors' is how carefully the illustrator captured the various incarnations of Mary's personal style, from Betty Page bangs, to late 50's June Cleaver pearls, and finally into ultra-trendy 60's Mod. This beautifully illustrated, audaciously colorful picture book is a great way to introduce your little one to biographies.

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Yum! MmMm! Qué rico! : Americas' sproutings - by Pat Mora -
Featuring vibrant, warm colors and a playful style, Pat Mora manages to pack an enormous amount of quality content into a tiny little picture book. 'Written as a series of haiku, Yum! MmMm! Qué rico!' teaches kids about the history of many of the great foods that originated in the Americas (chocolate, corn, peanuts, potatoes, and many more). Be sure to check out the fun and informative histories of each food item, always in small print on the left-hand side of every page. Your child will be both educated and entertained.

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Poison : deadly deeds, perilous professions, and murderous medicines - by Sarah Albee -
Written for more advanced readers, this book is sure to satisfy kids with a passion for chemistry, history, spy-craft, or maybe just anything morbid. While the author is careful to state that 'Poison' is not an exhaustive index of poisonous materials, at nearly 200 pages, Sarah Albee manages to cover an enormous amount of ground. Your child will learn about how humans have wrangled with chemistry throughout history, focusing on the where, when, and why of how people have come into contact with dangerous chemical compounds. Be sure to check it out!

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Public Event

Sensation Stations

Monday February 12, 2018: 10:30am to 11:15am
Traverwood Branch: Program Room
Age 10 Months–2 Years

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Public Event

Sensation Stations

Friday January 12, 2018: 10:30am to 11:15am
Downtown Library: Secret Lab
Age 10 Months–2 Years

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Public Event

Sensation Stations

Tuesday December 12, 2017: 10:30am to 11:15am
Westgate Branch: West Side Room
Age 10 Months–2 Years

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Blog Post

Feeling Anxious?

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The following memoirs are all unflinchingly honest and personal accounts of those grappling with anxiety and panic disorders.

In [b:1444790|My Age of Anxiety : Fear, Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind], [a:Stossel, Scott|Scott Stossel] reports with candor on his constant and continued battles with severe anxiety in many forms. Accessible, readable, funny, forthright and extremely well researched, Stossel’s book offers alternating personal accounts with examinations of anxiety as seen in past and present science and philosophy. [a:Smith, Daniel B.|Daniel Smith] also looks at how writers, scientists and other thinkers have considered anxiety while delving deeply into his own in [b:1410679|Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety]. Like Stossel, Smith allows readers a very close look at his daily fears, and like Stossel bravely tackles the subject with much humor.

[a:Petersen, Andrea|Andrea Petersen] was a student at the University of Michigan when she suffered her first panic attack. In [b:1510992|On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety], she recalls how she went from doctor to doctor, one misdiagnosis after another to realize that her physical pain was caused by debilitating anxiety. She was eventually diagnosed with several different anxiety disorders.

Petersen chronicles her anxiety on a very personal level, but also takes us through myriad treatments, both past and present, as well as the physiology and genetics of anxiety disorders.

These accounts of crippling anxiety mixed with studies of this common and misunderstood mental illness have the potential to offer considerable help to anyone suffering from anxiety or close to someone who is.

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Public Event

Science Fun with FEMMES

Saturday January 27, 2018: 11:00am to 12:30pm
Westgate Branch: West Side Room
Grade 2 - 6

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Blog Post

Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World

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Mitch Prinstein, the Director of Clinical Pyschology at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, explains the science behind popularity—and why it can be so elusive for many—in his new book. [:http://www.aadl.org/catalog/record/1513157|Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World] explains why whether or not we are “popular” as children plays such a huge role in our development. Whether or not we were popular in elementary school and high school has surprising effects on our careers, family life and friendships later on and, interestingly, it's difficult to change our “popularity level.” Prinstein explains that, although we can control to a certain extent whether we are popular or not, craving popularity and striving for it is part of our biology—it’s the way humans are wired.

Prinstein also delves into the difference between being popular because one is likable and being popular because one has high status. Both types of people are socially powerful, but the way others feel about them is vastly different. It’s interesting to read about the details and the science behind popularity, because it’s an issue that even the happiest among us struggle with from time to time. We can all relate to wanting to be well-liked and well-received, and Prinstein’s book offers useful advice for using and controlling those impulses.

Popular is a particularly interesting read today, as social media becomes ever more prevalent in our lives.

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Crafts

Erupting Sensory Snow

Thursday January 4, 2018: 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Downtown Library: Secret Lab
Grade K-5

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Crafts

Dinosaur Camp!

Friday February 16, 2018: 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Downtown Library: Youth Story Corner
Grade K-5