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Nuclear Reactor Put To Many Uses At 'U'

Nuclear Reactor Put To Many Uses At 'U' image
Parent Issue
Day
21
Month
July
Year
1964
Copyright
Copyright Protected

'U' Experiments To Probe Atoms' Secrets

'U' Experiments To Probe Atoms' Secrets image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
September
Year
1962
Copyright
Copyright Protected

GM Pledges $500,000 To university

GM Pledges $500,000 To university image
Parent Issue
Day
9
Month
December
Year
1959
Copyright
Copyright Protected

U-M Nuclear Program Now Biggest In U.S.

U-M Nuclear Program Now Biggest In U.S. image
Parent Issue
Day
12
Month
August
Year
1959
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Four-ton box containing radioactive cobalt arrives at the U-M Phoenix Memorial Laboratory on North Campus, July 1955

Four-ton box containing radioactive cobalt arrives at the U-M Phoenix Memorial Laboratory on North Campus, July 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, July 11, 1955
Caption
RADIOACTIVE COBALT ARRIVES AT U-M: This four-ton cylindrical lead box contains the first shipment of radioactive cobalt to arrive at the University's Phoenix Memorial Laboratory on North Campus, where research on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will be carried out. Handling the material here is Ardath H. Emmons (left), U-M associate radiological safety officer, and Charles Hopp, operator of the power lift. (Story on page 13.)

Lee A. Feldkamp, graduate student working in the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968

Lee A. Feldkamp, graduate student working in the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 8, 1968
Caption
Computer Is Handy Lee A. Feldkamp, a graduate student from Ann Arbor, reads out data from computer at the base of the U-M's Ford Nuclear Reactor in research on the structure of Polyethylene. Neutrons from the reactor prove to be better for analysis of structure of light materials than X-rays which have advantages in examining heavy materials. The computer is the kind being used more and more by industry for operating machine tools. Feldkamp is shielded from radiation coming from the reactor core by concrete.

Professor William Kerr, in the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968

Professor William Kerr, in the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 8, 1968
Caption
Scientists At Work At left, Prof. William Kerry, chairman of the U-M nuclear engineering department and director of the Phoenix (atoms-for-peace) Project, operates neutron scattering equipment at base of the Ford Nuclear Reactor in the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory on the North Campus. Neutrons, provided by the reactor, scatter in various directions when passing through the target material and may gain or lose energy.

David Rawling works with the Ford Nuclear Reactor in the Phoenix Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968

David Rawling works with the Ford Nuclear Reactor in the Phoenix Laboratory, North Campus, August 1968 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 8, 1968
Caption
Work Goes On In the picture above, David Rawling, nuclear chemist, manipulates mechanical hands inside one of the "caves" near the base of the U-M's Ford Nuclear Reactor to put radioactive material into jar. Protected by the three-foot thick windows of the cave, he is able to handle by remote mechanical means materials which otherwise would be too dangerous to manipulate. The work he is doing involves making up radioactive bromine for General Motors Corp. to use in measuring oild consumption in car motors.