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Dr. William L. Williams and Larry D. Petro, of the U-M Astronomy and Physics departments, work together at Stinchfield Woods Observatory, May 1972

Dr. William L. Williams and Larry D. Petro, of the U-M Astronomy and Physics departments, work together at Stinchfield Woods Observatory, May 1972 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 14, 1972
Caption
Working Together Dr. William L. Williams (left), professor of physics, and Larry D. Petro, research assistant in astronomy, work together in the University's Stinchfield Woods Observatory near Dexter. The two departments are working together more and more on research and instructional programs designed to benefit mankind.

U-M Astronomy Department professors Leo Goldberg, William Liller, and Fred T. Haddock inspect a vacuum tank for a satellite observatory, December 1959

U-M Astronomy Department professors Leo Goldberg, William Liller, and Fred T. Haddock inspect a vacuum tank for a satellite observatory, December 1959 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, December 8, 1959
Caption
WORK ON SATELLITE: Professors in the University's astronomy department inspect a vacuum tank they are building to aid in the design of instruments for a satellite observatory that will circle the earth 300 to 400 miles out in space. The professors are (left), Prof. Leo Goldberg, department chairman, standing; and Prof. William Liller; and (right) Prof. Fred T. Haddock. The project is being financed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Dome for Observatory being lifted into place, Stinchfield Woods, February 1969

Dome for Observatory being lifted into place, Stinchfield Woods, February 1969 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 25, 1969
Caption
Up Goes Dome For Observatory: Workmen use a crane to lift dome of the University's new half-million-dollar astronomical observatory in Stinchfield Woods northwest of Dexter. The dome was placed on top of the observatory building yesterday. the building was constructed with National Science Foundation and U-M funds by the Butcher and Willits construction firm of Ann Arbor. It is located about a half mile east of the U-M's Peach Mountain Radio Astronomy Observatory in the vicinity of an older U-M optical observatory. The 50-inch telescope for the new observatory is expected to be delivered sometime in May, according to Prof. Orren C. Mohler, chairman of the U-M astronomy department.

Peach Mountain telescope being sent to South America, October 1966

Peach Mountain telescope being sent to South America, October 1966 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 28, 1966
Caption
Telescope To Travel: Workmen remove tube of the University's 24-inch Schmidt telescope at the Portage Lake Observatory near Dexter yesterday prior to shipping the instrument to Chile where a U.S. astronomy observatory is being built in the Andes Mountains. The U.S., a European group, and the Soviet Union are all building observatories in the Andes in a race to make the first detailed exploration of the southern hemisphere sky. The U-M telescope will be returned to Ann Arbor after five years of observations. The removal of the instrument is being supervised and paid for by the National Science Foundation.