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Corn Shredding On The Aprill Farm, November 1936

Corn Shredding On The Aprill Farm, November 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 11, 1936
Caption
CORN SHREDDING TIME: Above is shown a group on the Manuel Aprill farm, Scio Church Rd., operating a corn shredder. Left to right they are: Mark Sweetland, Oscar Aprill, Manuel Aprill and Edward Aprill.

Symmetrical Beauty Of Growing Corn

Symmetrical Beauty Of Growing Corn image
Parent Issue
Day
6
Month
July
Year
1949
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Russian farm delegation lands at Willow Run Airport, August 1955

Russian farm delegation lands at Willow Run Airport, August 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 11, 1955
Caption
RUSSIANS LAND AT WILLOW RUN: Three members of the Russian farm delegation touring the United States landed at Willow Run Airport last night preparatory to making a tour of Ford Motor Co. plants in Detroit today. Pictured at the airport (left to right) are Vladimir Matshevich, chief of the delegation; Alexander Yezhevsky, a farm machinery specialist; Georgi Bolshakov, interpreter for the group; Nioklai Bogach, another farm machinery specialist; and John Strohm, American co-ordinator of the tour.

C. J. Wageman & Doc Jock, U. S. Army Remount Stallion - May 1943

C. J. Wageman & Doc Jock, U. S. Army Remount Stallion - May 1943 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 12, 1943
Caption
Doc Jock, the big bay stallion shown above, will stand the summer at C. J. Wageman's farm, 1080 Stein Rd., again this year and will be available for breeding purposes to farmers and horsemen in the Washtenaw area. Doc Jock, 16 hands plus high and weighing in the neighborhood of 1,200 pounds, was placed here by the Army remount service.

C. J. Wageman & Half-bred Horse - May 1943

C. J. Wageman & Half-bred Horse - May 1943 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 12, 1943
Caption
Farmers who breed a good type draft mare to Doc Jock, the Army remount stallion standing at 1080 Stein Rd., can expect a cross similar to the one shown above. Such an animal is generally tougher, more intelligent and a better worker than the average farm draft horse. In addition the half-bred is less expensive to feed.