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Grace Haynes & May Brown Discuss Flower Show Trophies, June 1939

Grace Haynes & May Brown Discuss Flower Show Trophies, June 1939 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, June 2, 1939
Caption
THE FLOWER SHOW TROPHIES ARE READY FOR NEW WINNERS: Mrs. Harley A. Haynes (at the left), chairman of hostesses for the Ann Arbor Citizens' Flower show at Yost Field house this week-end, and Mrs. Everett S. Brown, chairman of judges, discussed the trophies to be awarded tomorrow morning at the show. The cups, from left to right, are: The Kiwanis trophy for school exhibits; the new trophy given by Mrs. Alex Dow for miniature flower arrangements; the Rotary Club cup, for a home garden product; the cup of The Ann Arbor News for the choicest variety of blooms produced by a gardening family; and the Yost cup, for six most perfect blooms. A silver vase has been added as an award by Mrs. R. Bishop Canfield, for the best larger flower arrangement.

Pine Ridge Residents Hold Garden Party

Pine Ridge Residents Hold Garden Party image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
July
Year
1946
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Charles Palmer In His Iris Garden, May 1949

Charles Palmer In His Iris Garden, May 1949 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, June 4, 1949
Caption
Charles Palmer, of 2744 Kimberly Rd., who specializes in growing iris, is pictured with one of the 350 plants which are now in full bloom in his garden. The variety he is inspecting is known as Snow Flurry. His garden is open for inspection this week-end.

"Carrie Beal Earhart" Narcissus, Earhart Greenhouse, April 1944

"Carrie Beal Earhart" Narcissus,  Earhart Greenhouse, April 1944 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 6, 1944
Caption
NARCISSUS NAMED FOR MRS. EARHART: The Carrie Beal Earhart narcissus, named for the late Mrs. Harry B. Earhart of Ann Arbor because of her love and knowledge of horticulture, is a new example of growth in the narcissus species. Its perianth is of ivory-white and its trumpet is finely proportioned of clear, pale primrose passing into pure white, as opposed to the yellow trumpet of the usual daffodil in the narcissus family. James Fisher, a representative of the Lohrman Seed Co., asked Mr. Earhart for permission to name the flower after his late wife, whose love for flowers was widely known.

Cynthia Cross & Ann Joiner Admire Flowers Outside The Joiner Home, May 1971

Cynthia Cross & Ann Joiner Admire Flowers Outside The Joiner Home, May 1971 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 7, 1971
Caption
Cynthia S. Cross, left, and Mrs. Charles W. Joiner inspect the flowers growing around Mrs. Joiner's home while discussing the duties of the League of Women Voters' presidency. Mrs. Joiner is the retiring president of the group, and Mrs. Cross will be taking her place.

Don & Jack Beck With Giant Squash From Their Yard, October 1954

Don & Jack Beck With Giant Squash From Their Yard, October 1954 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 27, 1957
Caption
HOLDING HIS OWN IN SQUASH: Six-year-old Jack Beck (right) appears to be having a hard time holding one of eight giant squashes which grew up mysteriously from an old compost pile in his yard. Jack's older brother, Don (left), who claimed ownership of the garden's rarities, holds one of two squashes which the Jay K. Beck family of 715 Virginia Ave., Ypsilanti, planted. Jack and the squash he holds both weigh exactly the same - 42 pounds. The eight "wild" squash together weigh some 200 pounds.

J. H. Seitz Sr. and Granddaughter Susan Reid with Giant Cabbage, November 1958

J. H. Seitz Sr. and Granddaughter Susan Reid with Giant Cabbage, November 1958 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 15, 1958
Caption
GIANT CABBAGE: J. H. Seitz, sr. (left) of 1215 Washington St., holds an exceptionally large, 12-pound, German cabbage he raised this year in a vegetable garden in the backyard at his home. His granddaughter Susan Reid, 2, holds an average size head.