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AACHM Oral History: Patricia Manley

Wed, 08/24/2022 - 8:47am

Pat ManleyPatricia Ashford Manley was born in 1945 in Ann Arbor, and she was raised by her mother. She remembers attending Jones Elementary School and trying out for cheerleading at Ann Arbor High School. Manley graduated from Western Michigan University in 1970 and later earned her master’s in counseling from Eastern Michigan University. She worked as a teacher, cheerleading coach, and guidance counselor at Huron High School for thirty-one years, and was principal of Thurston Elementary School for ten years. She and her husband Lamont Manley enjoy traveling and going to concerts together. They have been married for 43 years.

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D. J. Malloy Harness Shop on East Ann Street, July 1958 Photographer: Duane Scheel

D. J. Malloy Harness Shop on East Ann Street, July 1958 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, July 3, 1958
Caption
STILL IN BUSINESS: The D. J. Malloy harness shop was first established at 123 E. Ann St. in the year 1891. The store, last reminder of the city's horse and buggy days, still bears its original shingle - "D. J. Malloy Harness" - suspended over the doorway.
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AACHM Oral History: Sharon Gillespie

Wed, 09/22/2021 - 10:53am

Sharon Gillespie

Sharon Gillespie was born in 1945 and raised by her grandmother in Oklahoma before moving to Ann Arbor with her mother at age nine. She remembers redlining in Ann Arbor and the breakup of the historically Black neighborhood she grew up in. She helped raise two younger sisters while her mother attended ophthalmology school at the University of Michigan. Gillespie excelled in her career as a typesetter at local businesses. After retiring, she has been active in volunteering at homeless shelters and hospice programs. She was married to Raymond Gillespie for 21 years. 

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AACHM Living Oral History Project Walking Tour

Presented in Partnership between the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County and the Ann Arbor District Library

Colored Welfare League Building Up For Sale, September 1964 Photographer: Eck Stanger

Colored Welfare League Building Up For Sale, September 1964 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 9, 1964
Caption
The city is considering buying this building at 209-211 N. Fourth Ave.
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AACHM Oral History: Thekla Mitchell

Sun, 11/08/2020 - 9:27am

Thekla Mitchell

Thekla Mitchell: Thekla White was born in 1921 in Newport, Arkansas, the youngest of nine siblings. At age 22, she traveled to Ann Arbor to visit her sister. After getting a job at Cunningham’s Drug Store, she decided to stay. She worked at the University of Michigan Hospital as a nurses’ aid and laboratory assistant in the Pathology Department for 24 years. Known as “Dimples” to friends and family, Mrs. Mitchell was active in community organizations including the Ann Arbor Civic Club and the Order of the Eastern Stars.

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Ann Street Black Business District

For most of the twentieth century, the 100 block of East Ann Street was a hub for Black-owned businesses in downtown Ann Arbor. A rotating set of barber shops, shoe shine parlors, dry cleaners, restaurants, blues bars, and pool rooms formed the backbone of Black social life, especially for men. The district stretched around the corner onto North Fourth Avenue where the Colored Welfare League housed Black-owned businesses and community organizations such as the early Dunbar Center.

Johnnie Rush in Barber Shop, November 1960

Johnnie Rush in Barber Shop, November 1960 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 4, 1960
Caption
John Rush: "Some say they don't see why the County Building and the city hall couldn't have been combined."
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AACHM Oral History: Henrietta Edwards

Sun, 07/21/2019 - 3:27pm

Henrietta Edwards was born in 1919 and grew up in Muskogee, Oklahoma before moving to Ann Arbor in 1941. She and her husband worked at the Willow Run Bomber Plant during World War II, and owned two filling stations—one downtown at N Fourth Avenue and E Ann Street, and one on Highway 23. She celebrated her hundredth birthday with family, friends, and former coworkers and patients from St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, where she worked as a pediatric nurse for 32 years.