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Map of Model Cities Neighborhood Being Displayed, June 1970 Photographer: Jack Stubbs

Map of Model Cities Neighborhood Being Displayed, June 1970 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 17, 1970
Caption
The Neighborhood: This map shows the Model Cities Neighborhood with an estimated population in the 4,000 to 4,500 range. Millions of dollars could be poured into the area during the next few years to upgrade it physically and to help residents economically through employment projects. The program is expected to last about five years. A controversy now rages over the Packard-to-Beakes bypass route, with Model Cities representatives objecting to the northern end which would turn Kingsley and Beakes into major thoroughfares and divide the Model Neighborhood. An alternative suggested by Model Cities would be to follow the route of the Ann Arbor Railroad tracks to connect with Main St. near Depot.

Map of Proposed Packard-Beakes Bypass, February 1972 Photographer: Eck Stanger

Map of Proposed Packard-Beakes Bypass, February 1972 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 1, 1972
Caption
Packard-Beakes Route: This map focuses on the center of the controversial Packard-Beakes bypass, which was approved by City Council last night. It shows the northerly connection with Beakes and Kingsley as one-way pairs, Beakes handling inbound traffic and Kingsley the outbound motorists. Beakes and Kingsley would connect with Ashley and First (at left) which would then connect with Packard south of the Man St. business district. Arrows on the map indicate the traffic pattern which will result when--and if--the bypass is completed. The dotted-in diagram in the upper half of the map is the proposed alternative bypass route proposed by the Model Cities Policy Board, a routing termed too expensive by city officials. The route which was approved was first proposed six years ago. (Story on Page 1)

Ann Arbor Will Present an Application

Ann Arbor Will Present an Application image
Parent Issue
Day
15
Month
August
Year
1967
Copyright
Copyright Protected
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Media

AADL Productions Podcast: Lola Jones and Carol Gibson

Thu, 06/04/2020 - 1:03pm

Lola Jones and Carol Gibson are well-known to anyone familiar with Ann Arbor history. Over the past 30 years they have sought out and documented the history of the African American experience in Ann Arbor through a series of projects under the moniker Another Ann Arbor; it is largely through their work that the Ann Arbor African American story is a part of our shared community identity. Lola and Carol stopped by the library to talk with us one day about the work they have done over the years and where they are headed next. They shared with us some of the interesting people and events they have learned about and brought to the community in their television program, their documentaries, and their book. You can now watch one of their documentaries online at aadl.org in our video collection. A Woman's Town was produced in 1991 and tells the story of Ann Arbor through the voices of prominent African American women.

City Park Projects Stalled

City Park Projects Stalled image
Parent Issue
Day
28
Month
November
Year
1976
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Park Funds Borrowed For Other City Uses

Park Funds Borrowed For Other City Uses image
Parent Issue
Day
28
Month
February
Year
1974
Copyright
Copyright Protected
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Media

AACHM Oral History: Audrey Lucas

Thu, 12/01/2016 - 3:22pm

Please take a moment to take our Living Oral History Survey and let us know what you learned.

Audrey Lucas was born in 1934 and raised in Ann Arbor where she fondly recalls her school days Jones School. She talks about activities at the Dunbar Center where she had the pleasure of singing at various city events, and some of Ann Arbor's black neighborhoods and businesses. Ms. Lucas worked for the University of Michigan Health System for 47 years, the last 35 before her retirement as a human resources consultant.

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AACHM Oral History: Shirley Beckley

Sun, 09/11/2016 - 12:57pm

Please take a moment to take our Living Oral History Survey and let us know what you learned.

Shirley Beckley was born on July 30, 1942. She was raised by her mother on Wall St. and attended Jones School, Mack School, and Bach Schools in Ann Arbor. Shirley started as a housing manager for the Ann Arbor Housing Commission, later becoming housing director in Lansing and Muskegon. She reminisces about working at Jacobson’s, dances at the Dunbar Center, businesses on Fourth Avenue and Ann Streets, and tense racial incidents in the schools. Shirley continues to be deeply involved in social justice issues at the local level.