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'U' Museum Opens New Display

'U' Museum Opens New Display image
Parent Issue
Day
4
Month
October
Year
1968
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Chairs Designed By Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987

Chairs Designed By Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 3, 1987
Caption
Wright chairs are more comfortable than they appear at first glance, like the side chair, 1902, from the Heurtley house, Oak Park, Ill. The cushioned leather arm chair from the Evans house, Chicago, looks eminently comfortable. At, right leaded glass window from the Martin estate, Buffalo, N.Y., 1904.

'Origami' Chair Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987

'Origami' Chair Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 3, 1987
Caption
Above [this photo] is the 1937 'Origami' chair from Frank Lloyd Wright's studio, Taliesan West in Scottsdale, Arizona, flanked by a pair of windows from the Bradley house, Kankakee, Ill., 1900. Below is one of two Frank Lloyd Wright copper urns in the Prairie House collection, designed in 1902 for the Susan Lawrence Dana house in Springfield, Illinois.

Copper Urn Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987

Copper Urn Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, May 1987 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 3, 1987
Caption
Above is the 1937 'Origami' chair from Frank Lloyd Wright's studio, Taliesan West in Scottsdale, Arizona, flanked by a pair of windows from the Bradley house, Kankakee, Ill., 1900. Below [this photo] is one of two Frank Lloyd Wright copper urns in the Prairie House collection, designed in 1902 for the Susan Lawrence Dana house in Springfield, Illinois.

Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Home, April 1980

Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Home, April 1980 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 10, 1980
Caption
Frank Lloyd Wright, when he created the design for this house in the late 30s, specified that it be built of cypress wood, a building material that is no longer available. Redwood, however, is equally effective in creating a natural look that contributes to the organic integration of house and surroundings that Wright desired, as is the Western red cedar used on the roof and sloping north wall of the structure. Landscaping will complete the blending of house and hill.