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Public Event

ArborWiki Blogwarts

Wednesday June 24, 2015: 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Downtown Library: Training Center

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Lectures & Panel Discussions

Our Visit to Tubingen

Friday August 21, 2015: 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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Exhibits

Celebrating 50 Years of Sister City Friendships

Sunday June 14, 2015: 12:00pm to 9:00pm
Downtown Library: Lower Level Display Cases

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Blog Post

70 years ago this week...

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70 years ago, on April 14, 1945, Ann Arbor News photographer Eck Stanger took this photograph of a service parade in the U-M Law Quadrangle held in honor of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had died two days earlier.

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Blog Post

The 60th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine in Ann Arbor

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60 years ago, [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19550412-vaccine_will_end_polio_pg1|the announcement of the success of the Salk polio vaccine] took place right here in Ann Arbor. This momentous announcement followed one of the largest peacetime mobilization of volunteers in American history to undertake the 20th century's greatest public health experiment. Like many other community newspapers, the Ann Arbor News documented the determination of its citizens to fight [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/33324|polio], with feature stories on the afflicted and the swirl of local fundraising efforts to raise awareness, find a cure, and vaccinate area children. Local historian Grace Shackman has written [http://oldnews.aadl.org/features/polio|a feature story on Polio in Ann Arbor] for our Oldnews site, pulling together dozens of articles and photographs on the history of polio in our community and the announcement of the polio vaccine on April 12, 1955.

Join us on the 60th anniversary, Sunday, April 12, for [http://www.aadl.org/node/265968|a special discussion] at the Downtown Library with Dr. David Oshinsky, Director of the Division of Medical Humanities, NYU School of Medicine, Professor of History, and author of the Pulitzer prize-winning [http://www.aadl.org/catalog/record/1223012|Polio: An American Story].

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Lectures & Panel Discussions

Researching Your Home's History

Saturday June 13, 2015: 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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Public Event

Show & Tell for Grown-Ups

Tuesday May 5, 2015: 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room

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Blog Post

February is Black History Month

[img_assist|nid=311589|title=Signal of Liberty|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=133]The best way to celebrate and honor Black History Month is to delve into history. What better place to do that than the Library?

This February, AADL has several events and resources to help you mark Black History Month by honoring those who came before, their traditions, and our hopes for the future.
EVENTS:
April Ryan, a 30-year journalism veteran, the White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, and the only black female reporter covering urban issues from the White House has just released a new book, [http://www.aadl.org/catalog/record/1466530|The Presidency in Black and White: My Up-Close View of Three Presidents and Race in America], a behind-the-scenes look at the inner workings of race relations as it relates to the White House. [http://www.aadl.org/node/270426|She will be at the Downtown Library] on Monday, February 16 at 7 pm to discuss the book, her career, the three presidents she’s covered, and her experiences.

The Sankofa Ensemble takes their name from a word that means “to retrieve the goodness from the past”. They will teach us about the traditions of Ghanaian and West African music and play authentic instruments from Ghana. Families will especially enjoy being able to get up and dance to the music, and learning more about traditional African dancing. [http://www.aadl.org/node/266347|The Sankofa Ensemble will perform] on Saturday, February 21 at 2 pm in the Downtown Library’s Multi-Purpose Room.

The last very special Black History Month event features the relatives of a prominent Civil Rights figure: Rosa Parks. Sheila McCauley Keys is Rosa Parks’ niece, and she and her siblings grew up very closely with their aunt when she moved to Detroit. They have recently released a new book of memories of their aunt, [http://www.aadl.org/catalog/record/1466196|Our Auntie Rosa: the Family of Rosa Parks Remembers Her Life and Lessons], and [http://www.aadl.org/node/270751|Sheila will visit the Downtown Library] on Tuesday, February 24 at 7 pm. She will talk about her new book and her Auntie Rosa, and she will take questions from the audience.

PRIMARY SOURCES:
Of course, libraries are fantastic resources for more than just events. Here at AADL, we have the African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw County’s [http://www.aadl.org/aachmvideos|Living Oral History Videos]. These are recorded interviews with local African-Americans discussing what they witnessed and experienced and their perspectives relating to race, gender, education, equality, faith, housing, employment, community building activities, and social infrastructure in our area. These amazing videos show what a historical resource our own people are, and make learning about history as easy as a conversation with your grandparents.

Newspapers are also great historical resources. AADL has digitized copies of local abolitionist newspaper [http://signalofliberty.aadl.org/|Signal of Liberty] which was started in April 1841 and published almost every week from an office on Broadway Street in Ann Arbor. Issues featured local and national news, anti-slavery poems, interviews with emancipated slaves, minutes from anti-slavery meetings, and stories by abolitionists about helping people escape from slavery. Reading these articles helps us to understand issues surrounding slavery, why people opposed this dark part of our past, and how ordinary people participated in the fight for freedom.

Whatever part of history you are interested in, your library is a resource for research, learning, and commemorating.

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Blog Post

Celebrating African-American History In Ann Arbor

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Dating back to the Underground Railroad, Ann Arbor boasts a rich and vibrant history for African-Americans. A wonderful piece about this time in Ann Arbor’s history is written by Grace Shackman and can be found [http://aaobserver.aadl.org/aaobserver/15566|here].

There are many [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/27735|African-Americans] that created their own piece of history in Ann Arbor. For instance, you can read about Ann Arbor’s first African-American mayor, [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/3779|Albert H. Wheeler], first African-American teacher and later principal at [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/3790|Northside Elementary], [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/2326|Harry Mial] and his wife, [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/3480|Joetta Mial], [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/1500|Huron High School's] first female African-American principal.

[http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/4133|O.Herbert Ellis], who [http://www.niefuneralhomes.com/obituaries/Ora-Ellis/#!/Obituary|passed away last year] is notable for being the first African-American to serve on and to chair the [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/2471|Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners]. You can read more history and the individuals that created it [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/54427|here].

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Blog Post

Ann Arbor responds to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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In the days following the assassination, Ann Arbor held a [http://oldnews.aadl.org/N002_0442_028|memorial at Hill Auditorium] and Ann Arbor News photographers snapped dozens of photos of townies and students participating in [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/55876|marches and peaceful demonstrations]. Here they are, for the first time, from the [http://oldnews.aadl.org|Oldnews archive].