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Jean Nimke, 4-H Member Honored For Flower Garden Project, November 1938

Jean Nimke, 4-H Member Honored For Flower Garden Project, November 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 2, 1938
Caption
PIONEER IN 4-H PROJECT: Miss Jean Nimke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Nimke of Plymouth Rd., is the first Washtenaw county 4-H club member named a delegate to club week at Michigan State College for achievement in a flower garden project.

Barbara Alexa's Prickly Pear Cacti, June 1984

Barbara Alexa's Prickly Pear Cacti, June 1984 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, July 12, 1984
Caption
The prickly pear cacti, which have yellow flowers with red centers, usually bloom the first part of July, she says, and recently the early blooms attracted a hummingbird to the area.

Charles Palmer In His Iris Garden, May 1949

Charles Palmer In His Iris Garden, May 1949 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, June 4, 1949
Caption
Charles Palmer, of 2744 Kimberly Rd., who specializes in growing iris, is pictured with one of the 350 plants which are now in full bloom in his garden. The variety he is inspecting is known as Snow Flurry. His garden is open for inspection this week-end.

Valentines Day Orders Are Prepared At Chelsea Flower Shop, February 1994

Valentines Day Orders Are Prepared At Chelsea Flower Shop, February 1994 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 14, 1994
Caption
Karen Berwald of the Chelsea Flower Shop, 203 E. Liberty St., is surrounded by Valentine Day's orders as she works on a bouquet. The store was a flurry of activity over the weekend as workers hurried to prepare the Valentine Day orders that numbered "in the hundreds," according to owner Claire Harding.

"Carrie Beal Earhart" Narcissus, Earhart Greenhouse, April 1944

"Carrie Beal Earhart" Narcissus,  Earhart Greenhouse, April 1944 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 6, 1944
Caption
NARCISSUS NAMED FOR MRS. EARHART: The Carrie Beal Earhart narcissus, named for the late Mrs. Harry B. Earhart of Ann Arbor because of her love and knowledge of horticulture, is a new example of growth in the narcissus species. Its perianth is of ivory-white and its trumpet is finely proportioned of clear, pale primrose passing into pure white, as opposed to the yellow trumpet of the usual daffodil in the narcissus family. James Fisher, a representative of the Lohrman Seed Co., asked Mr. Earhart for permission to name the flower after his late wife, whose love for flowers was widely known.