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Planting Fish at Pleasant Lake, October 1938

Planting Fish at Pleasant Lake, October 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 15, 1938
Caption
BASS PLANTED IN WASHTENAW LAKES: Twenty-six Washtenaw county lakes and streams were stocked with 15,000 large mouth black bass fingerlings by a State Conservation Department crew Thursday and yesterday: In the picture at the left, William Corson, Washtenaw county conservation officer, is standing between J. R. Meadows (left), and Nick O'Day, in front of the truck used to carry the fish. The picture was taken at Pleasant lake, and at the right is an interested spectator, Junior Sodt of Pleasant lake. Note that the conservation officer is equipped with a gun, following out the department's recent order to equip all its men with side-arms. In the picture at the right, Mr. Meadows is shown dumping some of the small fry into Pleasant lake.

J. R. Meadows Plants Largemouth Bass In Pleasant Lake, October 1938

J. R. Meadows Plants Largemouth Bass In Pleasant Lake, October 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 15, 1938
Caption
BASS PLANTED IN WASHTENAW LAKES: Twenty-six Washtenaw county lakes and streams were stocked with 15,000 large mouth black bass fingerlings by a State Conservation Department crew Thursday and yesterday: In the picture at the left, William Corson, Washtenaw county conservation officer, is standing between J. R. Meadows (left), and Nick O'Day, in front of the truck used to carry the fish. The picture was taken at Pleasant lake, and at the right is an interested spectator, Junior Sodt of Pleasant lake. Note that the conservation officer is equipped with a gun, following out the department's recent order to equip all its men with side-arms. In the picture at the right, Mr. Meadows is shown dumping some of the small fry into Pleasant lake.

Wildcat At The University Of Michigan Zoo, August 1952

Wildcat At The University Of Michigan Zoo, August 1952 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 9, 1952
Caption
This is no house cat. It's a genuine wildcat, about three months old, captured by a Berrien county farmer and shipped by the State Conservation Department to the University. The capture caused quite a buzz in conservation circles at first, because wildcats are unknown as far south as Berrien county. But the mystery was cleared up when another Berrien resident reported his "pet" wildcat, brought back from a western trip, was lost. He had neglected to take out a permit to keep the animal in captivity, however, so it looks as if the wildcat will find a permanent home in the University's zoo. He looks happy enough here with a mouse for lunch.