Press enter after choosing selection

Jones School

Jones School was an anchor of Ann Arbor’s historically Black neighborhood (what is now Kerrytown) from the early twentieth century until 1965. Many living Ann Arbor residents remember attending Jones School during the Civil Rights Era. In 1964 the Ann Arbor Board of Education acknowledged that, with over 75% Black students, Jones was a “de facto” segregated school. Jones School closed in 1965, and several years later the building reopened as Community High School.

Scrap Drive: Removal of Rails from Catherine St. for Steel, May 1942

Scrap Drive: Removal of Rails from Catherine St. for Steel, May 1942 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, May 26, 1942
Caption
SCRAP FOR GUNS, BATTLESHIPS, TANKS: Long unused street car rails in Ann Arbor are going into the nation's war effort as scrap iron. A group of WPA workers is shown tearing up the rails on Catherine St., starting the job of salvaging between five and six hundred tons of the rails from Ann Arbor streets. The labor cost will be met by theWPA--the city contributing the value of the scrap iron as its share--and the WPA will repair the pvaement damaged int eh process.

Park Road kids pose with their scrap pile, October 1942

Park Road kids pose with their scrap pile, October 1942 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 12, 1942
Caption
Two days of scouting in backyards in rural areas of the county resulted in the collection of the car body, bed frames, old boilers and miscellaneous scrap metal shown above. The five salvage scouts, shown with their "band," say they know where "there's a whole lot more." Left to right the youthful junk collectors are: Waldo Steinaway, jr., 12 years old, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Steinaway of 27 Burton Rd; Jean McAllister, 13, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold McAllister of 5010 Park Rd; Robert Hodge, jr., 10, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hodge of 44 Luella Rd; Donald McAllister, six, brother of Jean; and Arthur Steinaway, brother of Waldo. Just as the picture was taken, Ranger, their canine moral support, strolled in to post also.

Tin Can Salvage demonstrated by Sally Rezny, April 1942

Tin Can Salvage demonstrated by Sally Rezny, April 1942 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 6, 1962
Caption
Here's how to do it. The scrap tin can drive is on tomorrow. Save 'em, have Mrs. Arthur Resny (see photo) of 506 Maple Ridge, show you how to collapse them easily and safely, and then place them in containers on your lawn extension.

Henry Backhaus With License Plate Collection For Scrap Drive, September 1942

Henry Backhaus With License Plate Collection For Scrap Drive, September 1942 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 30, 1942
Caption
CAN YOU BEAT THIS RECORD? Henry W. Backhaus, 558 S. Ashley St., has contributed a souvenir collection to the scrap drive his automobile license plates dating back to 1928. Mr. Backhaus decided he would rather have the license plates dropped on Japan or Germany in the form of bombs than merely nailed to a garage wall. A lot of people have saved their old tags. That was all right during peace times, but war needs scrap. How many old plates have you to give?