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Body of Work: David Chang

Mon, 11/04/2019 - 10:02am

We talked all about our own food journeys, and even adventures as we dove into David Chang's body of work. We may have all left the room hungry....

 

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Kick the Sugar Craving

Fri, 08/09/2019 - 12:30pm

Join health coach Jennifer Sprague to learn about sugar cravings, what sugar does to the body, and why it's so hard to cut sugar out of your diet. She provides tips for getting unstuck when it comes to sugar.

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Butter Extravaganza

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 1:13pm

The delicious topic of butter is the theme of Margaret Carney’s presentation “Butter Extravaganza.” Is there ever too much butter in our lives, recipes, and artwork? Of course there isn’t, so stories about butter, a celebration of butter, butter sculpture, butter dishes and related butter paraphernalia used in dining, and the International Museum of Dinnerware Design’s pop-up exhibition, Butter, was “on the table” for everyone’s enjoyment. Margaret Carney is the founder and director of the International Museum of Dinnerware Design, located in Ann Arbor.

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Of Chinese Cheese and Curds

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 11:55am

Nowadays, the Chinese are famous for their food — but not for their cheeses or for their dairy products. Scholarly and popular accounts explain this through biological and cultural factors — the prevalence of lactose intolerance and xenophobia, for example. Miranda Brown, Professor of Chinese Studies, U-M Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, challenges the popular and scholarly view through a mouthwatering tour of dishes composed of curds. Dr. Brown traces the long history of curds in China, demonstrating that such foods were regarded as delicacies by the elite, and accounts for their sudden and belated disappearance from the modern Chinese diet. The talk concludes by exploring the modern legacies of the Chinese fascination with curds.

A native of San Francisco, Miranda Brown is Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan, where she has taught since finishing her degree in History at UC Berkeley in 2002. She recently worked on the premodern history of dairy in China, a topic that has received little scholarly or popular attention. Her article, on the history of cheese in South China, appeared in Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies (2019). Having been raised by a Southern Chinese mother, Brown is fascinated with all Chinese food and considers herself a serious amateur cook. 

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Author Event | Barbara Barton and "Manoomin : the Story of Wild Rice in Michigan"

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 2:07pm

Manoomin: The Story of Wild Rice in Michigan is the first book of its kind to bring forward the rich tradition of wild rice in Michigan, and its importance to the Anishinaabek people who live here. The book received the 2018 Michigan History Award and 2019 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Join author Barbara Barton as she follows the threads that connect the history, culture, biology, economics, and spirituality of this sacred plant. Learn about the vast wild rice beds that once existed in Michigan, why many disappeared, and the efforts of tribal and nontribal people working to return and protect Manoomin across the landscape. 

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Familiar and Exotic: The Long History of Arab Restaurants in the United States

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 10:28am

Beginning with the earliest Arab immigrants to the U.S. in the 1880s, restaurants have been a staple of Arab immigrant communities. Originally meant to serve the Arab American population, the restaurants quickly became favorite spots for adventurous eaters. As Arab restaurants began serving more and more non-Arab diners, they transitioned from holes-in-the-wall to elaborately decorated and exotically named dining experiences. Today, there is likely to be at least one Arab restaurant in every small and large city in the U.S., despite the relatively small population of Arab Americans nationally. Matthew Jaber Stiffler, PhD, Research and Content Manager, and Ryah Aqel, Curator of Education & Public Programs, both of the Arab American National Museumwill trace the development of the Arab restaurant over the last 125+ years, with a focus on New York City and metro Detroit.

Ryah Aqel serves as the Curator of Education & Public Programming. She received her B.A. in Political Science & Arab, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies from the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor. Her M.A. in Near East Studies was received from New York University. Ryah organizes and implements statewide educational activities, as well as developing programs that educate the public on Arab Americans and the Arab world.

Matthew Jaber Stiffler is the Research and Content Manager at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, MI, where he works with museum staff to accurately represent the diverse Arab American community through the museum’s collections, exhibits, and educational programming. Matthew has also helped to develop the museum’s food-based programming, particularly the Yalla Eat! Culinary Walking Tours. Matthew also leads a national research initiative through ACCESS, the largest Arab American non-profit in the country, in an effort to secure better data about the Arab American community. Matthew received his Ph.D. in American Culture from the University of Michigan in 2010, where he serves as a lecturer in Arab and Muslim American Studies. Matthew’s research focuses on the confluence between religious and cultural identities of Arab Americans, particularly through community memory, celebrations, and foodways. He is currently a board member and treasurer of the Arab American Studies Association.

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A Conversation With Chef and Writer Tunde Wey

Wed, 07/11/2018 - 8:56am

Nigerian-born chef and writer Tunde Wey opened a restaurant in Detroit in 2013. A year later, realizing that the influx of capital to the city was not contributing to an inclusive revival but to the profit of those already "fluent in the language of privilege," Tunde left the restaurant and moved to New Orleans. 

He now travels around the country holding dinners, using food as a medium to have conversations about race, equity, and cultural values. Recently, the has received national press for Saarti, his lunch counter in New Orleans where white patrons were asked to pay $30 per plate and people of color were charged $12 per plate as a way to call attention to racial wealth disparity. Participants of color could “opt-in” to receive the profit redistribution. 

In this video, artist and Stamps School Professor Rebekah Modrak (whose works, such as Rethink Shinola, critically intervene in consumption) moderates a conversation with Tunde about his work as a chef, his decision to use food as provocation, the possibility of transforming consumptive acts through dinners and pop-up restaurants, discriminatory development, racial wealth disparity, and the importance of self-determination in affecting the outcomes of your life and community.  While in Ann Arbor, Wey also hosted two private dinners for local residents and advocates concerned with equity and race and offered food truck conversations for four nights.

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Farm Meals Mentioned in Ypsilanti Farm Diaries

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 5:13pm

The stories and recollections of Washtenaw County farm women held by the Ypsilanti Historical Society provide a record of daily life in the 19th and 20th centuries. Local author and historian Laura Bien presents research on handwritten diaries that reflect, in their own words, the everyday work farm women performed: gardening, harvesting, butchering, processing, preserving and cooking food for their families, supplementing the family income through the sale of eggs and produce, adapting to technological changes, and organizing work at the homestead.

This event is in partnership with the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor (CHAA), an organization of scholars, cooks, food writers, nutritionists, collectors, students, and others interested in the study of culinary history and gastronomy. Their mission is to promote the study of culinary history through regular programs open to members and guests, through the quarterly newsletter Repast, and through exchanges of information with other such organizations.

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Socially Responsible Businesses – How Tea, Ice Cream, and Vegetables Do Good

Tue, 03/06/2018 - 4:05pm

Local business owners talk about how socially conscious business practices – from environmental sustainability to hiring practices to community partnerships – are part of their business identity and their bottom line.

The panel includes Rob Hess from Go! Ice Cream, Phillis Engelbert from The Lunch Room and Detroit Street Filling Station, and Aubrey Lopatin from Arbor Teas. This discussion is be moderated by Rishi Moudgil, Executive Director of GreenLight Fund Detroit and Founder of the Center for Social Impact at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business. 

More about the panelists:

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Hot from the Oven: Zingerman’s Bakehouse Cookbook!

Mon, 01/29/2018 - 8:58am

Amy Emberling and Frank Carollo, Managing Partners of Zingerman’s Bakehouse, discuss the Zingerman's Bakehouse cookbook, their first-ever cookbook, which features all the recipes of the Bakehouse’s most popular items. Also included are recipes that are unique to Michigan, along with Frank and Amy’s personal favorites. They’ve also added essays and brief stories for context, to give readers a sense of how the Zingerman’s community works together to produce great food. 

This event is in partnership with the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor (CHAA), an organization of scholars, cooks, food writers, nutritionists, collectors, students, and others interested in the study of culinary history and gastronomy. Their mission is to promote the study of culinary history through regular programs open to members and guests, through the quarterly newsletter Repast, and through exchanges of information with other such organizations.