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Legacies Project Oral History: Nancy Taylor

Thu, 01/16/2020 - 9:12am

Nancy Emmons Taylor was born in 1941 and grew up in Luxmanor, Maryland. She attended Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. She married Thomas Taylor soon after graduating, and they had two children. She received her Masters from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. When their children had graduated from high school, the Tayors moved to London for 12 years. Thomas was the administrator of an international Quaker program and Nancy was the warden of the Quaker meeting house and ran a program for international diplomats.

Nancy Taylor was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2014 as part of the Legacies Project.

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Legacies Project Oral History: Ruth Zweifler

Tue, 12/10/2019 - 11:00am

Ruth Zweifler was born 1929 in Palisades, New Jersey. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College, and converted from Judaism to Quakerism. Since the 1960s, she has been active in Civil Rights, anti-war, and anti-Zionist protests, including a sit-in at Ann Arbor City Hall protesting residential segregation. In 1975, Zweifler co-founded the Student Advocacy Center of Michigan, and she was Executive Director for nearly 30 years.

Ruth Zweifler was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2018 as part of the Legacies Project.

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Becoming American | "Muslim Cool: Race Religion and Hip Hop in the United States" with Dr. Su'ad Abdul Khabeer

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 2:56pm

Su'ad Abdul Khabeer is a scholar-artist-activist who uses anthropology and performance to explore the intersections of race and popular culture.  

Su'ad is currently an associate professor of American Culture and Arab and Muslim American Studies at the University of Michigan. She received her PhD in cultural anthropology from Princeton University and is a graduate from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and completed the Islamic Studies diploma program of the Institute at Abu Nour University (Damascus).

Her latest work, Muslim Cool: Race, Religion, and Hip Hop in the United States (NYU Press 2016), is an ethnography on Islam and hip hop that examines how intersecting ideas of Muslimness and Blackness challenge and reproduce the meanings of race in the US. 

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Michigan Notable Book Author and U-M Professor Sally Howell Discusses Her Book “Old Islam in Detroit: Rediscovering the Muslim American Past”

Fri, 11/06/2015 - 3:50pm

Michigan Notable Books Award winning author Sally Howell speaks about the history of Islam in Detroit, a city that is home to several of the nation’s oldest and most diverse Muslim communities.

In the early 1900s, there were thousands of Muslims in Detroit. Most came from Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and British India. In 1921, they built the nation’s first mosque in Highland Park. By the 1930s, new Islam-oriented social movements were taking root among African Americans in Detroit. By the 1950s, Albanians, Arabs, African Americans, and South Asians all had mosques and religious associations in the city, and they were confident that Islam could be, and had already become, an American religion. When immigration laws were liberalized in 1965, new immigrants and new African American converts rapidly became the majority of U.S. Muslims. For them, Detroit’s old Muslims and their mosques seemed oddly Americanized, even unorthodox.

Old Islam in Detroit: Rediscovering the Muslim American Past explores the rise of Detroit’s earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, it provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life and shows how Islam has become American in the past and how the anxieties many new Muslim Americans and non-Muslims feel about the place of Islam in American society today are not inevitable, but are part of a dynamic process of political and religious change that is still unfolding.

Sally Howell is Assistant Professor of History and Arab American Studies at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

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How Faith Communities Can Change the World One Meal at a Time

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 12:08pm

In this event, part of a year-long Interfaith Council for Peace & Justice program entitled Food & Justice: An Interfaith Exploration of How Our Food Choices Impact Our Environment, Our Economy and Our Neighbors, a panel of interfaith leaders explores how their faith traditions take on issues of food justice and how their communities are making a meaningful impact in all areas of the food system addressing issues like hunger, worker's rights and climate change.

Hosted by Interfaith Council for Peace & Justice and Interfaith Round Table, the panelists include: Reverend Ryan Boes, Ann Arbor Christian Reformed Church; Yusuf Salloum, Islamic Center of Ann Arbor; Julie Ritter, Jewel Heart Ann Arbor; Reverend Kristin Reigel, First Presbyterian Church of Ann Arbor; and Rabbi Rob Dobrusin, Beth Israel Congregation.

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ICPJ Podcast: Ruth Kraut and Joe Summers

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 1:21pm

Ruth Kraut and Joe Summers talk about their motivation for first getting involved with ICPJ - Middle East, women's, and racial and ethnic issues for Ruth, and Latin American human rights issues for Joe. Both discuss the changes to ICPJ over the years, from its birth during the Vietnam era and its relative successes and failures in finding common ground on different topics, such as LGBT issues, as it evolved over the years.

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ICPJ Podcast: Rebecca Kanner, Gregory Fox, Tobi Hanna-Davies, Mary Anne Perrone and Richard Stahler-Shulk

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 1:21pm

In this episode, Rebecca Kanner, Gregory Fox, Tobi Hanna-Davies, Mary Anne Perrone, and Richard Stahler-Shulk discuss their involvement in various ICPJ projects and activities relating to central American issues over the years.

Tobi Hanna-Davies talks about her leadership and involvement in the Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament during 1980s

Gregory Fox discusses his involvement with the Latin American Solidarity Committee and in establishing a Sister City program in Nicaragua

Rebecca Kanner talks about her involvement with the Latin American Task Force and some of the activities she's helped with over the years, from clothing drives to demonstrations and lobbying.

Mary Anne Perrone talks about hunger and describes their successful 1991 protest over Tom Monaghan's efforts to raise money to build a cathedral in Nicaragua with a $500-a-plate dinner by staging a 5-cent-a-plate dinner of rice and beans.

Richard Stahler-Shulk. a Latin American scholar and Eastern Michigan University professor, talks about his dual role as an academic and activist

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ICPJ Podcast: Peter Boeve

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 1:20pm

Peter Boeve, former pastor of Ann Arbor's Northside Presbyterian Church, was able to explore areas of his interest, including medicine and agriculture, through involvement with ICPJ. He recounts his work attempting to integrate faith with dialogue about social issues and change and how ICPJ has helped to expand his world.

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ICPJ Podcast: James Varani and Sister Dori

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 1:19pm

Sister Dori originally connected with the organization in the 1960s, through her work to oppose the Vietnam War, and speaks about the importance of the organization's focus on faith. James Varani talks about finding likeminded people at ICPJ who shared his interest in nuclear disarmament and indiscriminate warfare. The pair also talk about their attempts to mobilize congregations to promote religious opposition to nuclear disarmament.

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ICPJ Podcast: Jan Wright

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 1:15pm

ICPJ member Jan Wright discusses her initial involvement volunteering with the organization to becoming an active member, involved with initiatives regarding climate change, local food, and trade agreements.