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Author Event | William D. Lopez: Separated: Family and Community in the Aftermath of an Immigration Raid

Mon, 03/02/2020 - 12:26pm

In Separated: Family and Community in the Aftermath of an Immigration Raid, local author William D. Lopez examines the lasting damage done by this daylong act of collaborative immigration enforcement in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Exploring the chaos of enforcement through the lens of community health, Lopez discusses deportation's rippling negative effects on families, communities, and individuals. Focusing on those left behind, Lopez reveals their efforts to cope with trauma, avoid homelessness, handle worsening health, and keep their families together as they attempt to deal with a deportation machine that is militarized, traumatic and implicitly racist. 

This event was part of the 2020 Washtenaw Reads. For more information about Washtenaw Reads and previous years' reads, visit wread.org.

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 35 - Kiarostami Retrospective

Thu, 02/27/2020 - 1:00pm

Nick is joined by Ashkan Kazemi of the Iranian Graduate Student Association at the University of Michigan to discuss the upcoming Abbas Kiarostami retrospective beginning in March at the Michigan Theater. They discuss the impact of Kiarostami on each other's lives, the role of the artist in Iran, Iranian humor, and more. And as always, they conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the Week.

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 34 - Barton Organ Restoration

Mon, 01/13/2020 - 3:47pm

Nick is joined by Michigan Theater house organist David Hufford to discuss his work to restore the historic Barton Organ, what makes it unique, a bit of its history, and what it’s like to accompany a silent film or sing-along.

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 33 - 2019 and a Decade in Review

Mon, 12/09/2019 - 3:39pm

Nick, Makenzie, Ariel and Jay recap 2019, discuss their favorite films of the last decade, what they’re most looking forward to in 2020, what trends they hope to continue in the next decade, and conclude with their “Movie Gifts”.

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 32 - Journalism on Screen

Mon, 11/04/2019 - 1:30pm

Nick is joined by Zoe Clark (Program Director of Michigan Radio and Co-Host of ‘It’s Just Politics’) and Robert Yoon (Visiting Professor of Journalism at U of M and former CNN Director of Political Research) to talk about the upcoming Journalism on Screen film series at the State Theatre! Discussion includes journalism’s depiction in the movies, its impact on our daily lives, takeaways from each film in the series, and as always, they conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the Week.

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Book Discussion | What the Eyes Don't See

Tue, 09/17/2019 - 9:36pm

Stephen Henderson of WDET's Detroit Today leads a discussion of Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha’s What The Eyes Don’t See: The Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City.

The book dives into Dr. Hanna-Attisha's story in contributing to the discovery of elevated lead levels in Flint’s public water infrastructure.  Henderson is in conversation with Michigan Radio Investigative Reporter Lindsey Smith ​and State Senator Jeff Irwin.

This event is part of a community-wide discussion on the story of Flint and how it’s affected the country’s views on infrastructure, justice and the relationship between state and local government.

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Martin Bandyke Under Covers for August 2019: Martin talks to David Maraniss about A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.

Fri, 08/09/2019 - 2:05pm

In a riveting book with powerful resonance today, Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Maraniss captures the pervasive fear and paranoia that gripped America during the Red Scare of the 1950s through the chilling yet affirming story of his family’s ordeal, from blacklisting to vindication.

Elliott Maraniss, David’s father, a WWII veteran who had commanded an all-black company in the Pacific, was spied on by the FBI, named as a communist by an informant, called before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952, fired from his newspaper job, and blacklisted for five years. Yet he never lost faith in America and emerged on the other side with his family and optimism intact.

In a sweeping drama that moves from the Depression and Spanish Civil War to the HUAC hearings and end of the McCarthy era, Maraniss weaves his father’s story through the lives of his inquisitors and defenders as they struggle with the vital twentieth-century issues of race, fascism, communism, and first amendment freedoms. A Good American Family powerfully evokes the political dysfunctions of the 1950s while underscoring what it really means to be an American. It is an unsparing yet moving tribute from a brilliant writer to his father and the family he protected in dangerous times.

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Michigan in the Trade War: International Trade and Our Vulnerability to Recent Trade Policies

Tue, 08/06/2019 - 8:38am

As U.S. states go, Michigan is relatively more involved with international trade than are most states.  This talk discusses Michigan’s role in U.S. trade, with a focus on President Trump’s trade initiatives, particularly trade with China, Korea, and North America. 

The presentation informs, in particular, the role of recent trade policies in shaping Michigan’s international trade flows in specific industries, including the steel, aluminum, and automotive sectors.  Learn about Michigan’s role in US international trade, the efficacy of recent international trade initiatives, and how they affect important sectors of the Michigan economy.

 

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Shockwaves from Stonewall: Gay Liberation in Michigan

Mon, 07/29/2019 - 12:42pm

In the first few years following the Stonewall Uprising in New York, Michigan experienced a surge in gay liberation activism, what today might fall under the umbrella of the LGBT movement.  Historian Tim Retzloff explores the multiple queer organizations that sprang up in Metro Detroit and elsewhere in the early 1970s and key events from that time that sent political and social shockwaves through the state still felt today.

Tim Retzloff teaches history and LGBTQ studies at Michigan State University.  He earned a B.A. in history from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in history in from Yale University.  His scholarship has appeared in the anthology Creating a Place for Ourselves, the journal GLQ, and the collection Making Suburbia.  He is finishing his first book, Metro Gay, about gay and lesbian life and politics in Metro Detroit from 1945 to 1985.

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World Press Freedom Day | Rami Khouri

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 12:44pm

In honor of World Press Freedom Day, internationally acclaimed journalist Rami Khouri came to AADL to share his latest research on politics and economics in the Middle East. In this talk, Khouri focuses on the Middle East and the links between press freedoms and other destructive trends, such as growing poverty and declining political engagement. He also links Middle Eastern trends with global ones, showing that these are global problems and not specific to one area or culture. 

In dialogue with Rami Khouri is Juan Cole, journalist and Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan.

Rami Khouri is a Palestinian-Jordanian and U.S. citizen whose family resides in Beirut, Amman, and Nazareth. He is a senior fellow and journalism professor at American University of Beirut and a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School.