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Great Migration Interview - Betty Thomas

Mon, 08/08/2022 - 3:23pm

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Great Migration Interview - Janet Haynes

Mon, 08/08/2022 - 3:15pm

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Great Migration Interview - Roger Doster

Mon, 08/08/2022 - 3:11pm

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The Gayest Generation Ep. 8 - Stephanie Byers

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 3:48pm

Welcome to The Gayest Generation, where we hear LGBTQ older adults speak for themselves. Every episode, we sit down with a different member of the LGBTQ community who laid the foundation for the freedoms we have today. Their stories make noise where there is silence and that silence has lived for far too long. It is time we let their voices fill the room.

In this episode, we speak with Kansas State Congresswoman Stephanie Byers. We learn about what it’s like to be one of first openly transgender people elected to a State Legislature, growing up as a member of the Chickasaw Nation, and what it means to live life authentically.

AADL is excited to announce that you can listen to this episode, or any episode of The Gayest Generation, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or YouTube!

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Martin Bandyke Under Covers for March 2021: Martin interviews Reuben Jonathan Miller, author of Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration.

Mon, 03/08/2021 - 3:49pm

Each year, more than half a million Americans are released from prison and join a population of twenty million people who live with a felony record.

Reuben Miller, a chaplain at the Cook County Jail in Chicago and now a sociologist studying mass incarceration, spent years alongside prisoners, ex-prisoners, their friends, and their families to understand the lifelong burden that even a single arrest can entail. What his work revealed is a simple, if overlooked truth: life after incarceration is its own form of prison. The idea that one can serve their debt and return to life as a full-fledge member of society is one of America’s most nefarious myths. Recently released individuals are faced with jobs that are off-limits, apartments that cannot be occupied and votes that cannot be cast.

Halfway Home shows that the American justice system was not created to rehabilitate, and that parole is structured to keep classes of Americans impoverished, unstable, and disenfranchised long after they’ve paid their debt to society.