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Real Estate Transfers

Real Estate Transfers image
Parent Issue
Day
7
Month
November
Year
1879
Copyright
Public Domain

Memorial Garden Dedication Set

Memorial Garden Dedication Set image
Parent Issue
Day
28
Month
May
Year
1954
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Margaret Otto celebrates her 100th birthday with family, June 1945

Margaret Otto celebrates her 100th birthday with family, June 1945 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, July 5, 1945
Caption
Five generations are represented in this picture taken to mark Mrs. Henry Otto, sr.'s 100th birthday, which she will celebrate Saturday. Pictured (left to right) are Cpl. Robert J. Weinberg, now a patient at Fort Custer, a great-grandson; Mrs. Otto; David Weinberg, son of Corp. Weinberg and a great-great-grandson; Mrs. Mary K. Weinberg, Mrs. Otto's daughter; and Julius Weinberg, of Interlochen, son of Mrs. Weinberg and grandson of Mrs. Otto.

Julius Weinberg Teaches Children About Passover Seder, Beth Israel Community Center, April 1958

Julius Weinberg Teaches Children About Passover Seder, Beth Israel Community Center, April 1958 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 4, 1958
Caption
Passover Seder: Materials for the Passover Seder are shown to four beginning students in the Hebrew school of Beth Israel Community Center by Rabbi Julius Weinberg, spiritual leader of the center. Materials for the home observance are the candelabra, used for every holiday; a cup for Elijah, who is to herald the coming of the Messianic age and signifies future redemption; the matzah cover, which contains three matsoth (unleavened bread) for the meal; the Passover plate, which reposes before the head of the household and contains items used for the Seder, and the Haggadah, a collection of narratives, poems and blessings. During the ceremony, the door is thrown open in the symbolic hope that Elijah will appear. The children are (left to right) Gail Fine, Paul Berlin, Linda Gallatin and Jonathan Veniar, who will be among those to enjoy Passover games.

Rabbi Julius Weinberg Lighting Hanukkah Candle, November 1956

Rabbi Julius Weinberg Lighting Hanukkah Candle, November 1956 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 30, 1956
Caption
Jewish Chanukkah Begins First Candle For Chanukkah: Beginning of Chanukkah tonight is marked by the lighting of the first candle by Rabbi Julius Weinberg, spiritual leader of Beth Israel Community Center. Participating in the ceremony are four first grade students in the Center's Hebrew School, held twice weekly. They are (left to right) Michael Pear, Laurie Kroll, Larry Halman and Mark Mayerstein. Chanukkah, or dedication, commemorates the rescue of their faith by the Jewish people in 165 B.C., when they defeated a Syrian king who had ordered the worship of idols. Led by Judah the Maccabee, they drove the Syrians from the temple of Jerusalem, rededicating it with undefiled oil sufficient to burn one day. The oil burned for eight days, and to commemorate the miracle an additional candle is lit each evening during Chanukkah until eight are burning. The candle symbolize the miracle of the survival of the Jewish people.

Children Prepare To Take Part in Seder Meal, Beth Israel Center, March 1956

Children Prepare To Take Part in Seder Meal, Beth Israel Center, March 1956 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, March 24, 1956
Caption
Children Take Part In Seder Meal: Rabbi Julius Weinberg of the Beth Israel Center explains the ritual of the Seder (which means "order") meal to three of his young congregation members. Beth Israel Sunday school children will have their annual Seder meal at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow, and again on Monday and Tuesday evenings with their families. Rabbi Weinberg is showing the Haggadah, an ancient book which outlines the Passover celebration to (from left) Julian Cook, Jeffrey Ingber and Harvey Lansky.

Rabbi Julius Weinberg and Family Celebrate Jewish New Year, September 1955

Rabbi Julius Weinberg and Family Celebrate Jewish New Year, September 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 17, 1955
Caption
Eve Of The New Year: Rabbi Julius Weinberg of the Beth Israel Center and his family, like Jewish families all over the world, gathered last night for a ritual meal after synagogue services marking the beginning of the Jewish new year. Here, he feeds his 2 1/2-year-old daughter, Naimah, a piece of apple dipped in honey, while he repeats the traditional expression, "May it be God's will to grant us a good and sweet year." A piece of the rich white bread concealed by the cloth before him will also be dipped in honey as a symbol of hope that experiences of the coming year will be sweet. Mrs. Weinberg looks on.