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Ann Street Black Business District

For most of the twentieth century, the 100 block of East Ann Street was a hub for Black-owned businesses in downtown Ann Arbor. A rotating set of barber shops, shoe shine parlors, dry cleaners, restaurants, blues bars, and pool rooms formed the backbone of Black social life, especially for men. The district stretched around the corner onto North Fourth Avenue where the Colored Welfare League housed Black-owned businesses and community organizations such as the early Dunbar Center.

Welfare League Sale Offer Rejected

Welfare League Sale Offer Rejected image
Parent Issue
Day
8
Month
June
Year
1965
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Decision Expected On Buying Building

Decision Expected On Buying Building image
Parent Issue
Day
25
Month
May
Year
1965
Copyright
Copyright Protected

To Appraise Offered Building

To Appraise Offered Building image
Parent Issue
Day
20
Month
October
Year
1964
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Building Offered For Sale

Building Offered For Sale image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
September
Year
1964
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Building For The Future

Building For The Future image
Parent Issue
Day
30
Month
November
Year
1992
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Dunbar Center

The Dunbar Center--also known at various times at the Dunbar Civic Center and the Dunbar Community Center--was a social and social services organization for Ann Arbor's Black community in the mid-twentieth century.  It was the direct precursor to the Ann Arbor Community Center.  Along with the Bethel AME Church and the Second Baptist Church, the Dunbar Center was a major hub of social life for the Black community during this period.

Founding

Take A Tour Of African-American History

Take A Tour Of African-American History image
Parent Issue
Day
27
Month
February
Year
1996
Copyright
Copyright Protected